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Roanoke Rapids herald. [volume] (Roanoke Rapids, N.C.) 1914-192?, March 31, 1922, Image 6

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ROANOKE RAPIDS HERALD, ROANOKE RAPIDS, N. C.
JET IN JOBS
Pearls Also Used to Add to Dec
orations for the Hair.
Sractlet Encircles Arm at Wrlit and
Above Elbow, Connected by
String of Beads.
Jet used singly or combined with
pearls makes up some of the most
striking combs und headdresses, either
seen In the simps or worn by smart
I'urlslennes, observes a faslilon writer.
A Jet comb noticed recently was set
with two rows of pearls, the upper row
two sizes larger than the lower. The
touch of chic, however, lay In the fact
thut the comb reached almost from ear
to ear, giving a wonderful effect
ugulnst the durk red hulr on which It
was worn.
A headdress made entirely from Jot
consists of u narrow bund worn low on
the forehead aud having three circular
ornaments overlapping each other at
the front. At either side ure Jet rlnss.
which are as large as bracelets ai'd
which give the effect of mammoth ear
rings. Accompanying this headdress Is
n pair of Jet bracelets, one enclrcllnc
the arm at the wrist und the other
above the elbow, and both connected by
a string of jet beads. The premature
ly white-haired woman who wore these
affected a one-! leoe dress of white vel
vet, the slight gathers across the front
lield In at either side with a Jet orna
ment. A new bracelet trade hiri-e enough
tt wear Just below the shoulder is of
pearls strung on silver and has a fringe
of pearl beads which falls over (he
arm. This fringe is sometimes of uni
form lengch and at other times lias
pointed scallops. This fringe Idea Is ,
carried out in bnt.-eiets of pearls com
bined with onyx, thus making a much
more striking and really smarter
bracelet than the pearls alone.
SUIT FOR BUSINESS WOMAN
! X
BOY
SCOUTS m.
I Wl
iComluetd by Nuuu.ij Council of tht Buy
tti'outu of America-
This diagsnal tweed suit of gray
promises to win favor with the busi.
ness woman who has no time for frills.
A becoming hat of wool and straw
with colored embroidery adds a touch
of refinement.
AFTERNOON GOWNS OF CREPE
THE STRIKING WHITE SERGE
Embroidered in Matching Sill;; Design
Recalls That Used for
Spanish Shawls.
III
Afternoon gowns are frequently of
crepe; almost entirely embroidered In
matching silk. In a design which re
calls that used for S ish shawls.
A delightful combination shown con
sists of a cape of blai k crepe marocaln,
with a great square let Into the buck,
of embroidered putty-colored criqie,
while the gown Is of the lighter crepe,
entirely embroidered. Many of these
gowns have long, tijit sleeves, but the
great square chllToii sleeve still per
sists. Models which might be worn for for
mal afternoon occasions, or for Infor-
; mal evening affairs, sometimes have
: the entire bodice made of a finely pnt
I tertied silk lace, rather bloused at the
waist, and cut with long, tight sleeves,
while the skirt is of matching crepe
de chine, often entirely embroidered.
Mauve and periwinkle blue are two
colors favored for these gowns.
RADIO GREETING TO SCOUTS
The Hoy Scouts of America cele
brated the twelfth anniversary Feb
ruary it to H on u iintlou-wldc scale,
Its entire membership of over 52,,00O
scouts and scout leaders rededlcntlng
themselves to the scout oath and luw,
Hundreds of rallies, father and son
banquets, parades, pageants and other
demonstrations were made a part of
the observance throughout the country,
und the "good turn" was emphasized
lu a number of practical aud Impres
sive ways.
The following message from l'resl
deiit Harding was broadcasted through
out the country, reaching prnctlcullv
half a million boys. The message was
as follows ;
"To the Hoy Scouts of America: Con
gratulations to the Hoy Scouts of Amer
ica on their twelfth anniversary, Feb
ruary s.
"This anniversary of nn organization
whoso Ideal is peace and friendship
quite strikingly coincides with Ike
birth of a new hope for world peace
and friendship ut tin- recent conference
of the nations here In Washington.
The responsibilities disclosed by that
conference must be met by the men
who come after us, and I look with
growing conililence to that steadily In
creasing number of boys who are ef
fectively trained to 'i, their duty to
!od and tlielt mitry' and to help oth
er people at all times, as are Hie Hoy
Scouts of America and throughout the
world.
"v.i:i:i:n c. iiakmnc."
Governor l(iihcrton ,,f Oklahoma Is
sued a message to p,,y scouts, which
was signaled by relay by four stations
over a distance of more than three
miles absolutely without error by '
scouts of Oklahoma I'ity. '
!v. 'ut M. XelT of Texas not only
took the scout oath, but made a 1
splendid address on "The Meaning of '.
an Obligation." :
IMPKOVFJ) IJNtfORM INTERNATIONAL
StmdaySehool
Lesson '
(By Rk.v. K b. MZ WATER. O. O..
Teacher of English Uilile In the Moodjr
Bible Institute of ChleaKO.)
Copyright, 1923, WUrn NVwipap'r UnluO.
Loneliest and Highest Railroad Station
LESSON FOR APRIL 2
ASA RELIES ON GOD
LESS), "J TKXT-ll Chronicles U:l-U.
Gulden tkxt-iii.io u. u l.ord our
3oii; for we nn on Thee. 11 c'hron. 14. 1L.
H. KHENCK MATEHIAU-11 Chron.
14:13-16; imi, 41:10-13.
I'KIMAHy Tui'lC-A Kin Who Trusted
3oJ.
JUNiult TOPIC-Odd Helping Asa.
INTKK.Y1EIJ1ATH AND SENIOR TOl'lC
-A Ruler Who Relied un i!ml.
YOUNU PEOl'l.K AXb AVVUT TOPIC
-Tile Hource of J'ersoiiul und National
Power.
Hats of Felt.
rints of felt, bound with a clre
ribbon and pressed Into ridges or folds
around the top of the crown, are par
ticularly smart. They come in alt
shades of tan and brown and In black
und dark blue. There are two ways
of trimming them. One Is to use
ostrich and one is to use a eocarde,
bow or bund of ribbon. The ribbon,
of course, presenes the tailored ef
fect of the liar. The ostrich makes
It Into a more elaborate hat for aft
ernoon dress wear.
This winsome costume of white
Raggedy Hem Line.
Some of the tew frocl;s show skirts
that are longer on one side than on
the other, some are long back and
BOY SCOUTS AT NAVAL ACADEMY
An analysis of the present regi
ment at AunupolU shows that bio
midshipmen have been boy scouts, of
this number OSti have gone as far as
second class and ?M to first class
rank. Thirty-three have been scout
masters, of the first class scouts.
73 have been putrol leaders, 22 Kagle
scouts, 0 Star scouts, and 7 Life
scouts.
In answer to a questionnaire the
following facts were developed:
of the total above mentioned, 400
were of the opinion that their boy
scout experience had helped them gen
erally In their present life, while U
state that this experience has do
finitely aided them in their academic
life. It Is the verdict of ".17 that
scouting had helped them pass thejr
ontramv requirements to the academy
and of MJ that Its training hail
helped them In adjusting themselves
to the discipline aud life of tin
academy.
serge is trimmed with black and white' front and short at sides, while more.
braid and black wool fringe. The
ever ready caps which reaches al
most to the hem of the skirt is popu
lar at Southern resorts. The vhite
hat completes the outfit
perhaps, are long nt the sides, with
shorter b:Kk and front widths, and
not n few, even of the separate skirts,
ure arranged In draped panels so that
a "raggedy" hem line Is In evidence.
SPORT TOGS; OTHER APPAREL
Vogue for Homespun and Tweed Mate
rial; Spring Hosiery, Shoes
and Gloves.
At present, there Is a great vogue
for Kport gnrmentg of homespun and
tweed. These materials fashion the
mostattructlve suits In uilurlng col
or periwinkle, apple blossom, ver
vain and adobe. Undoubtedly these
yults will make a strong appeal to the
" business woman next spring, as they
possess excellent wearing qualities and
are reasonable In price. Garments of
knit fabrics are also most popular,
little stri'.lghtllne dresses, capes which
full in graceful folds, sweuters aud
three-piece suits.
Flowing sleeves continue to be worn
but are now often attnehed to the
wrist by the use of ribbons, or of
Jeweled bracelets, or bunds of Jet or
onyx. In fact, Jewelry Is worn to a
marked degree Just at present; neck
laces, earrings, bracelets and fancy
girdles, all adding a barbaric note of
richness to many an otherwise undec
orated costume. The fan, too, con
tinues lo occupy a cromlnent place In
the affections of the debutante as
well as in the matron's, and even the
flat nosegay often accompanies frocks
which simulate the quaint modes of
the Thlrtlus.
Looking back In retrospect to a
year ago one realizes that skirts after
all are much longer, though whether
tboy will attain the ankle length of
those worn by our I'arlslan sisters
remains to be seen. With these long
skirts come the large thit-trlintued
hats.
In the new spring hosiery, colors
continue to rival black, and light tones
sucn as gray, beige, sand und taupe
are favored. It is expected that these
delicate shades will be worn with
black ns well as with matching shoes.
The white stocking also will be to the
fore if the vogue for the light-colored
cotton dress materializes, and they are
shown In funcy weaves as well as
with colored stripes.
The light shades In gloes. both kid
and suede, are also preferred to black
French gray, sand, mode and even
white being offered for street wear.
These spring gloves will be long, the
gauniiet and the 12 and lft-button
length being the choice.
SCOUTS AT BIG CONFERENCE
The boy scouts who were given tin
great honor of being the olliclal pages
at the limitation ( arms conference
acquitted themselves so admirably that
they won praise on all sides. Lord
Ulddel, spokesman for the British
delegation who, by the way, is the pub
lisher of the Hritlsh maguzlne. The
Hoy Scout, was particularly Interested
In these Washington lads und always
stopped to talk with them whenever
he got a chance. He Is a great be
liever In scouting und thinks it 1ms
u wonderful future, based as It is on
friendliness, helpfulness and inutuul
understanding. "I love our British
boys," he says, "but they are no hand
somer, no kinder, nor more courteous
than my splendid, manly, young friends
of the conference at Washington."
- FASHIONS IN BRIEF
Closely fitting hats of felt and beaver
are popular for sport wear.
The bateau necklines and other shal
low decolletes are preferred to the
. , extremes Just now.
Short rapes have stole collars of
fur, and are edged with narrow black
silk fringe.
An uneven line at the hem may be
very attractively developed by a sash
tied so that one end hungs well below
the skirt hem proper.
The new handbags for spring must
be tint and thin and ornamented with
onyx, karcnsUe or Jewels, whether they
be of silks, moires, velvets, faille or
' satin.
Clusters of chenille dots on the tight
veils will take one of the leading ranks
among the veilings In the spring, in
the cluster effects there will be several
contrasting colors.
A novelty apron, that has been es-.
pecinlly featured at a smart New
York shop Is mnde of suede rut In
stripes that are studded with steel
beads, forming a pattern. This novelty
Is being shown as the successor to
silk fringe, which has been so ex.
tenslveiy used as dress trimming.
It Is not generally known, but very
well worth remembwfng, that the
shine can be easily and quickly re
moved from the shoulders and elbows
of one's gowns by s gentle friction
with emery paper. Don't rub too hard,
Just enough to raise s little nap, and
then, In the case of cashmere and
other smooth goods, go over the place
a few times with a warmed silk band-kerchief.
An Economy In 8hoes.
When plunning the out-of-door ward
robe, a carefully thought-out color
scheme Is Just as necessary as It Is In
planning costumes for any other occa
slon. Shoes, stockings, hats and gloves
must be considered In relation to the
several costumes which they must ac
company. All-white shoes are a far
safer Investment than those with col
ored trimmings, unless one Is certain
that the color employed will harmon
ize with the hues of all the costumes
that they are to be worn with during
the season. Vogus.
SCOUT GOOD TURNS FROM OK LA.
A few of the many good turns of
the year reported by troops of Mc-
Alester, Okl.i., are as follows: Cut
down und burned 20O tent caterpillar
nests In Latimer county mountains.
repaired two miles of mountain trull
for farmers in same mountains, dis
tributed literature for Red Cross
Public Health Service, Ministerial Al
nance, etc.; cleaned up nearly a ton
of potential puncture causes from the
city streets, collected bundles for
poor In house-to-house campaign for
Chamber of Commerce and Associated
Charities, agitated state-wide demand
for cleaner motion pictures, helped
decorate Masonic temple for meeting
of State Women's clubs, donated
Christmas baskets for Salvation army
distribution among poor.
LOOK OUT FOR BIRO FRIENDS
Reading (Pa.) scouts are maintain
Ing feeding stations for birds through
out the country, particularly on Mt.
I'enn and Neverslnk mountain. They
have set up a number of feed houses
which they visit every Saturday or
Sunday to see that their feathered
friends have a sufficient larder. In sev
eral cases It was found that these
houses had been tampered with, prob
ably by careless or willful persons,
who do not realize what this provision
means to birds during the winter.
GOVERNOR HIKES WITH TROOP
Governor Tarker of Louisiana, hav
ing been officially Invested as a ten
derfoot scout by a group of Eagles of
Baton Rouge, went on a Lincoln's
birthday hike with the local scouts by
way of celebrating their anniversary.
ALL AMERICAN BOY 8COUTS
The Indian boys of the Chemana
school have recently been organized
Into scout troops under the auspice
of the Salem (Oregon) counclL -
I. Asa's Reformation (vv. l-o).
Asa was the grandson of Iteholioain,
Hoth his grandfather and father
Tuvored Idolatry, but in spite of tills
record of Ms ancestors, Asa bud a
will of his own, an though -oung
when lie came to the throne, Inagurat
ed a campaign of reform which
broiigh't great good, lie not only had
the handicap of the Idolatry and Im
mortality fostered bv the two former
kings, but he had lo contend against
the Inlluetice of his mother who lajd
neournged Immoral worship (1 Kings
15:1.1). In order to carry out Ills re
formatory measures I. had ro wrest
authority from her by deposing her.
Asa did that which win good ami right
In the eyes of the l.ord (v. 2).
1. Cleared the laud of Idolatrous
emblems and Images (vv. ll, o). (1)
Strange altars. These were the allars
devoted to other gods. a') High
places. These were places where un
lawful sacrifices were offered. (.'!)
Broke down the Images. These were
upright stones connected with Idola
tror worship. (I) Cut down the
groves. These were trees or poles
connected with tree worship. He hud
all these relics of Idolatry destroyed
In Jerusalem ami other cities turougli
ut his kingdom.
II. Comm. dod .ludali to seek the
Lord (v. -i). He knew that If the -vf-.
ormatlon was to lie effective It must
be by the positive seeking lifter and
worshiping of Cod, accompanied by
obedience to His commandments. )e
sfructlve work avails little unless fol
lowed by constructive.
II. Asa's Defensive Preparations
(vv. O S),
1. Built fortified cities (v. fi). The
cities are not named, but the meaning,
doubtless, is that It was a general sys
tem of defense which involved the
cities at strategic points.
2. He erected walls about the
cities (v. 7). These were usually of
stone. I'poti the walls were observa
tion towers from which the position
and movements of the enemy could be
seen, and from which defensive war
fare could be waged.
3. Made gates and barred them
(v. "). The reason h assigns for
these defensive preparations wns that
they had sought the Lord Cod. Those
who really trust Cod will make every
effort to provide defense.
4. Had an army of spearmen (v. 8).
These spearmen were also protected
with large shields. The army was
made up of 4SO.kh1 brave men. They
were prepared to wage an offensive
na well ns n defensive war.
III. Asa's Victory Over Zerah, the
Ethiopian (vv. 1112),
1. Asa set the battle In nrrny (v.
10). He went out to meet the enemy.
first made a disposition of his
means of defense. This was wisdom
on his part. Intelligent faith moves
the possessor to do first that which
Is within bis power.
2. Asa's prayer (vv. 11, 12). He
cried unto the Lord. He sought the
source of national power. In thl
prayer note (1) his conscious helpless
ness. As he faced the Kgyptlnn army
two to one against him. he wns clearly
conscious of bis Impotency. The first
requisite In obtaining help from Cod
is conscious weakness. The Christian
conquers not by self-reliance, but by
selt-dlstrust and faith In God. (2) Ap
peals to Cod for help. He knew that
though- they were helpless before the
mighty enemy, with God's help they
could win the victory. One ninn with
God s a, majority. (3) Reposes faith
In God. The wortf "rest" menus tc
lean upon to enst the entire weight
upon. In the mensure that we reallw
our need of support will we lent
hard upon God. (4) Advanced cou
rageously. ITe went forth depending
upon God to fight for him. Rep I fnltb
does not wnlt until It sees Its way
clear, but goes forth expecting God to
clear the way. (5) Hung himself
upon God's armr. "0 Lord, thou art
our God." Ills cause was God's muse.
If God has taken us for Ills people
and If we have taken Him for our God.
no enemy can prevail against us. Mnj
we experimentally sny, "Thou art my
God," and hear Him say, "I am thy
God !M
8. The Egyptians smitten (v. '12).
The enemy fled before IsreoJ and could
not recover themselves.
iJilfii i
l . V' WSi WSSSISVVISSI
Mam
Tf .w in . .1. -n . -... v utr a.m
Here is the railroad station iiiiml the mountains ut Trondhjem, In Norw.iy, which has Just bcn erected for thfc
Grand Trunk railroad which runs from tlie north to the sout.i of Norway. The station Is the highest in the world, being
at an altitude of more than 7.W0 feet.
One of These Peaks May Be Named Whittlesey
9 .. J
rmc ' :pn;w'. k-w-J ..ii.',,..L3X.llm,..' i. 1&.f . ;: ififr '
1 lie American Legion leccnll.v organized u "Col. Charles K, Whittlesey i'osl," at Sisters, Ore., and are seeking to
have one of the peaks of the "Three Sisters" named after the leader of 'the famous "Lost Battalion." Colonel Whittle
sey recently jumped from a liner la inld-oi-enn ami wus drowned.
Funeral on Sledge and Skates in Germany
i
. i it a
'iHW if "'vc. - .-
An unusual funerul cortege passing over the frozen wnterwnys from a tiny village in the Sprecwald, near Merlin,
Coronation of Pope Pius XI
WILL CROSS NIAGARA
Judgment of Christ
The Judgment of Christ, the Son ol
Man, Is the revelation of things at
they are. Ills Judgment does no)
change the Judged; It simply show
them. It Is not, as far as we ran con
ceive, a conclusion drawn from tht
balnncing of conflicting elements or s
verdict upon a general Issue. Thl
Judgment of God Is the perfect manl
festatlon of truth. The punishment ol
God Is the necessary action of thl
awakened conscience. The Judgmenf
Is pronounced by the sinner hlmseli
sail he Inflicts Inexorably his own sen
tence. Bishop Westcott.
Bs of Good Cheer.
Be of good cheer, then. Let thli
be always plain to thee, that thlt
piece of land is like any other; and
that all things here are the same wltt
things on the top of a mountain, oi
onf the seashore, or wherever thot
cltoosest io ue. ror intra win nnc
Jti whet Plato says. "Dwelling with
la I the walls of a city as In a shep
head s tola on a mountain." Marcui
AuAeUus Antoninus.
I'ope Pius XI seated on the papal tlirmie in St. Peter's at Rome Just after f I
the triple tlra hud been placed on his head. j I
New Use for the Old Beer Bottles f MUi! I
Mllle. Eleanor, an English tightrope
walkur, who has created a sensation
nn th London stage with her remark
ubl stunts, Is to walk across N'lagurn
Falls on a tight rope early In June.
This has only once befora been suc
cessfully accomplished, and then bv
Blondln. '
One of tne settlers on a smnn rancn at uinury, Cal., was In the habit of
allowing his empty beer bottles to accumulate until be got a large number nn
hand, and then take them to the city and "cash In." Hut the country went dry
and there was no mora nse for beer bottles, so he conceived the Idea of build
ing this adobe house out of them.
ALL OVER THE GLOBE
Motor drivers licensed In the Lon
don area number 101,707.
Distinguished honors and medals of
the World war were won by 150 Amer
ican Indians from Belgium, France
and the United States.
The ordinary folding fan was In
vented In Japan In the 8eventh cen
tury by a native artist, who derived
the idea from the way in which the
bat closes its wings.
During the World war Germany lost
one field marshal, 167 generals, and
52,000 subordinate officers. .
Nearly 22,000,000,000 telephone mes
sages were sent In the United Stutcs
In the year 1917.
For store and office doors s com
bined lock and time clock has been
Invented, the Insertion of a key regis
tering the time an employe arrives or
departs.
Took No Chances.
North Well, you see It was this
way. The guide was wearing a fur
coat and, the bunting party mistook
liliu for a bear.
West And they shot the non fal
low?
North No, no. He starved to death
In the woods. You see, the rest of the
party were currying the provisions aud
he never could cutch up to them.
American Legion Weekly.
Varylno Positions.
The consideration shown by your
constituents Is an evident that you
are an upright muii."
"A man cannot always remain In
the same attitude," rejoined Senator
Sorghum. "It also Indicates that I
have known when to keep my ear to
the ground." ' r 10
Different Fih. '
Artist Do you reoulra roiir
trait done In oils J
Mr. Moneybags Done In oils?
What d'yer take me for a sardlmf

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