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Tabor City tribune. (Tabor City, N.C.) 1946-1991, March 20, 1963, Image 15

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068761/1963-03-20/ed-1/seq-15/

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county Farmers Advised To
'' Plant Produce ToProsner"
ημ>··ΐ(, ηι-αιιατ anu iraeiors
on the move mean it's time
to "Plant Produce to "rospor."
farmers of lower Columbus
and upper llorry counties
I Wert« reminded today.
The reminder came from
•nree fronts: (1) Vocation <|
I Agriculture teachers; (2) C«>
I *mty Agents offices; and the
Horry County Marketing Com
mission.
In all six vegetables arc re
commended for planting in
this area, sine«.* they best nu*ct
the needs of a large «roup of
buyers who have indicated
they will bo on hand at th*>
Horry County Farmers Market
when these produce items are
ready for Ιι irvesl.
Last Spring farmers sold j
through the 11m ry County ,
Farmers Markt t at Loris, 35.
i(!Sl haiiifK-rs tit pole be,«lis; f>.
S47 hampers ot peppers; 1,593
hampers of cu'umbers; 133 [
hampers of Wade beans; 2.5811 j
hampcis of buncii beans; 25
hampers ">f Hlack Valentines;
1.4W7 haniuers of squash, J!)
hampers of butter beans, 14.~>
l> 'ys (50 Hi.) of Irish potatoes
and f< lit- hampers of tomatoes,
for a total of 58.335 hampers.
Fall sales totalled 2.(i I hamp
ers.
Uliyers hnve S'»id repeat· ·Ίν
that two things <>ro needed t«>
st lengthen the market at (.oris;
(1) greater volume; und (2)1
Kr -ater variety. Either or both
would make it far easier lor
any given buyer tu make up
a truckload of produce to be
shipped out.
Recommended for planting
this Spring are:
Pule Beans
Varieties: Kentucky Wonder
191
Rate of seeding: 50 lbs. per
acre.
Date of planting: March 15
through 25
Fertilization: 1000 to 1200
lbs. of 6-12-(i per acre
Sidedrcssing: 20 lbs. of Act
ual Nitrogen per acre at the
time first blooms are set.
Itunch Beans
Varieties: Harvester, Wad«.,
Extender, White Half-runner
or Dwarf Horticultural (Shel
ly)
Rate of seeding: 40 lbs. per
acre.
Date of planting: March 20
through 30
Fertilization: 1000 to 1200
lbs. of 6-12-0 per acre
Sidedrcssing: 20 lbs. of Act
ual Nitr< :<·ιι per acre at first
cultivation.
Squash
Variety: Yellow Crook-Neck
Rate of seeding: 2 to 3 lbs·,
pei acre. thiiMied to 12 inches
in row.
Date of planting: April 1
through 10
Fertilization: 800 to 1000 lbs.
<.f 5-10-10 per acre.
Cucumbers
Varieties: Ashley, Paloinar
or Polaris
Hale of seeding: 2 to 3 lbs.
per acre, thinned to 12 mchcs
in row
Date of planting: March 25
to April 5
Fertilization: 1000 to 1500
lbs. of 5-10-10 per acre.
Sidedressing: 20 to 25 lbs.
of Actual Nitrogen at time
first runners appear
Tomatoes
Varieties: Homestead or
Marion
Spacing: 2 ft. in row, rows 4
Ιο (ΐ feet apart
Fertilization: 1000 to 1500
ibs. of 5-10-10 per acre
Sidedrcssing: 30 lbs. of Act
ual Nitrogen when first blooms
appear.
l'epper
Varieties: California Wond
er or Yolo Wonder
Spacing: 4 foot rows, 18 to
24 inches in row
Fertilization: 1500 to 1800
lbs. of 5-1010 per acre.
For information regarding
insect and disease control,
control, contact your Agricul
| lure Teacher or County Ag
' out.
YOURS! 1MB LIVING CROSS
TW* Ik-Iou»I, (dotting croM, rmlifjilfj in α
|i<<lrsljl (onljiiiiitK ill«: mi· m-J earth of Ml.
4altar yhero Jcmi* Mifh-ird ami «In.I to
Ii« (I»* pirmiM* o( eterrnd life.,, ran In
viurs! Hois luminous. shimmering white i iim
i% a »hilling »>ml»ol of Jwus, 'IImiusiiiiK
fulfil image lo Ml. f'altary lor comfort nmt
nrarnrM I» llim. 'I'lir same Kt«*r«d earth.
Mained an«l clean*ed %% ill· the |»re« ious I»!«mi«I
ami lear* of our Savior, can Im* yours tSplit at
your finger lifts... always! Heeau«e thi« tarred
him glows like a living thing, >ou mt it at
tiiftltl when >ou awake from troubled »Icrj».. .
aUay* nrar tu comfort you ami your* in
health and sieknei*. Keep a protr« ting cro*s
in your car and where you work, al>o. Send
lor your crow today! If you're not enthralled
fcwith tili» glowing crow «snhrddrd in ymred
feurth, return it within ten da>s and \our
money will lie fully refundrd. Satisfaction i%
absolut eh guaranteed. Send cash, check or
money order (no c. o. d.) lo:
CHRISTIAN IMPORTS
P.O. h« 7132 · St. Lowii 71. Mo.
EMBEDDED IN THE SACRED
EARTH Of MT. CALVARY!
You'll roceive an
authentic large
photograph from
Mt. Calvary, the
same view as
seen by our
dying Savior. [
I ··.··' 11 . C„|, ^ Chtti _
Men·« Ort». PlM„ ink Likiltf CfOM *i
V Z ,5 M- '""«· Pod.
-Mhe...si*ic
Shipment Of Cockcral l>al>y Chicks
Each Tuesday — Heavy Cockcrals
Only $4.00 Per Hundred
SEE FONVIELLE FOR
• GARDEN SEED AND PLANTS
• STRAWBERRY INSECTICIDES
• CARPET GRASS AND KOBE LESPEDEZA
• HEAT BULBS PIG BROODERS
• PURINA CHOWS AND SANITATIONS
• HOG AND CATTLE DUST (Lice Killers)
• V1GORO FOR LAWNS, ROSES & GARDENS
E. W. rORVIEM.2 & SONS
Railroad Street Tabor City, N. C.
THE
Center
LOCATED NEXT TO THR1FTWAY FOOD STORE ON HIGHWAY 410
III TAB OR CITY, NX.
ν
The Most Modern Automatic, Complete Cleaning, Drying,
and Dry Cleaning Operation in Southeastern North Carolina.
NEWEST m BEST EpIPMENT AVAILABLE
WATCH FOR OUR BIG
Grand Opening!
Williamson Serves
On 14 Committees
In his weekly news bulletin
to Columbus County residents,
State Representative Arthur
Williamson listed some 14
committees on which he is
serving during the current
legislature.
Williamson is Vice-Chair
man of both the Committee
on Manufacturing and Labor,
and the Committee on Penal
Institutions. He is a member
of the Committees on Agricul
ture. Appropriation. Educa
tion. Employment Security,
Expenditures of the House.
H< ilth. Insurance, Irrigation
and Drainage, Propositions
and Greviances, Public Wel
fare, Roads, and Wildlife Re
sources.
Current arguments which
prevail the attention of the
Columbus County representa
tive include the debate on the
absentee ballot laws, which ho
j predicts will be killed in com
mittee.
When asked last week for
his views on the proposal for
: a $200 million road construc
tion, he replied in the affirm
; atlve, listing reasons such as
the retirement of former Gov
| ernor Scotl's bund issues for
i road work which were issued
; in the late 40s.
According to Williamson,
there would be a surplus in
taxes when the old bonds are
paid up in 1907. Williamson
ι confered with State Treasurer
Edwin Gill, who stated pub
j licly that the proposed bond
I issue could be financed with
out a single penny of addi
tional taxes.
Other proposed laws con
fronting Williamson this week
included a proposal to stream
line the welfare program, mak
] ing it more efficient. William
I son commented on the need
j for such proposals and pledg
I cd "general support" in their
direction.
Williamson, according to his
weekly report, has spent con
siderable time in committee on
! slate appropriations. Under
North Carolina law, the state
j must operate on a balancer!
! budget and if that end is not
I achieved, the governor is re
quired to cut back salaries or
state services.
Of particular interest local
! ly is the rage over the use of
j Μ Η-30 treated tobacco. Ac
cording to Williamson's report,
j "A resolution submitted to
the House early in the sessioi
, asking the General Assembly
to go on record in support of
MH-30 treated tobacco ap
i pears dead."
Williamson speculates that
i this is not because the legisla
ture is against MH-30, "but
because of recent announce
ments that the U. S. Depart
ment of Agriculture is plan
ning tu require tagging of leaf
that is not treated with MH-30
. . . which is the same thing as
tagging tobacco that is." Wil
liamson predicts new legisla
tion which would offset this
threat.
Grades
Last Thursday the local
high school students received
their report cards.
Reaction, per usual, was
varied and most often, spirit
ed.
Pined one young thing, "Oh.
for the good ole A-day."
Another lamentation was
"Well, D-Day."
In some cases, however,
slight injustices seem to have
I been done.
One student was observed in
a local drugstore trying to
drown her sorrows in a root
I beer. When one inquired as to
the reason for her desponden
cy, the following item came
to view: This girl was dis
! tressed because one of her
teachers had been using her
as a bad example. Whenever
any other student made a mis
: take in their work, the teach
er would sharply insert, "Well,
I you're getting as stupid as
•lane Doc." News of this had
reached the girl and she was
distraught.
Modern-day living decrees
that students be able to roll
with the punches. But we
don't recall anything being
said about blows below the'
bei tl ine.
Military pay increase bill
setit to Congress.
Fish Bait
CRICKETS
$1.00
Per Hundred
• At
Dicus Firestone
Tabor City
in a
great
new
fabric
Farex
The style's traditional — the exclusive Farah
fabric is a wonderful blend of 50','« Karex
Polyester and 50% Cotton, created for longer
wear and lasting good looks. The slacks you'll
want to wear for every occasion.
Sizes 6 to 12 Regulars and Stints
Students: Waists 25" to 30"
Lengths 27" to 31"
Huskies: Waists 26" to 36"
Colors: Heijtc, Mushroom, Fuel·..I
Dark Olive, ltlaik
S450
$5r>o
$598
L>iuc, Dark blue,
JUST LIKE OLD MAN RIVER
If you want a truck that does its work without yell
ing for attention all the time, buy a "new reliable"
Chevrolet.
You have to take care of it; it's a machine. But
this isn't a full-time activity. The clear idea is that
the truck works for you, not vice versa.
The way to build such a truck is to
put more quality into it. For example,
Chevrolet doesn't build one type of sus
pension system for all sizes of trucks.
Chevrolet designs suspension systems to
fit your need. The light-duty type is strong on com
fort. Another kind for heavier trucks stiffens up as
you increase your load and vice versa. Make sense?
Conventional pickups have double-wall construc
tion in cabs, doors, lower side panels. Hoofs arc
insulated. Body floors are select wood,
nut metal. Tailgate chains are wrapped
in rubber. If you'd like to examine
or drive a new '(>:> Chevrolet truck,
just call us. We'll be right over.
QUALITY TRUCK COST LESS
BUY A CHEVROLET "NEW RELIABLE"
Tmlmphon· your Chmvrotat dmalar for a demonstration
PRIME MOTOR COMPANY, INC.
ι TABOR CITY, N. C. Manufacturer'· Licene« No. 110

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