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Tabor City tribune. (Tabor City, N.C.) 1946-1991, June 19, 1963, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068761/1963-06-19/ed-1/seq-8/

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Family Reunion
Approximately IIS relative
and friends of the family ο
the late John Horace Thoma
gathered at the home of Mi
and Mrs. John D. Hill on Sun
day, June 9th, to celebrate th<
annual Thomas Family Re
union.
The meeting was called U
order by the President, Dr
John D. Thomas. Sr., of Loris
Mrs. Mary Et tu Permeter ο
Murion, gave the scriptur«
reading and Miss Inez Coving
ton of Bennettsville, led th<
group in a prayer of thanks
After the devotional, the grout
enjoyed a picnic dinner servec
in the backyard of the Hill
home.
After lunch a business meet
ing was held at which timt
the following officers were
elected: President — Dr. John
D. Thomas, Sr. of Loris: Vice
President — Mrs. Helen T.
Moore of Conway; Secretary
Treasurer — C. A. Thomas of
l^mgs; Recording Secretary —
Mrs. Judy Anderson of Myrtle
Beach.
Miss Irene Covington thank
c dthe group «η behalf of all
visitors for inviting them to
join in the celebration.
The 1964 reunion will be
held at East Cherry Grove
Beach with Dr. and Mrs. John
D. Thomas, Sr., of Loris as
hosts.
Herbert Dorman
Herbert Brooks Dorman, 69.
farmer of the Good Hope sec
tion of Horry County was bur
ied Sunday in Good Hope
Baptist Church Cemetery. He
died Friday, June 14th after
suffering a heart attack.
Funeral services were held
Sunday at 4:30 p. m. at the
Good Hope Baptist Church
with the Rev. Henry Yarbor
ough an dthe Rev. Moroan Gil
reath officiating.
Mr. Dorman was born in
Columbus County, N. C. June
1, 18514. a son of the late John
A. and Mamie Lewis Dorman.
He was a member of the Good
Hope Baptist Church and a
veteran of World War 1 hav
ing served in the U. S. Army
with overseas duty in France.
Surviving are: his widow,
Mrs. Blanche G. Dorman; three
son s EKvood Dorman. Tabor
»..h.« μ to iuris? ·ω- ··"»p'"*«"«"»»"
BOULEVARDS BETWEEN GROCERY SHELVES—Wide aisles with plenty of passing;
room was one of the main features Claude Boyd, owner of the Piffiy Wi«ly supermarket
here, planned to obtain when he be ran remodeling his store some weeks ago. As the
above picture shows, he obtained his coal. Floor space was doubled inside the store from
5 000 to 10,000 square feet. Boyd has owned and operated the Pi**ly Wifely store here for
10 years, and has lived and worked in Tabor City for 15 years.
Consumers Shift To Dairy
Products Rich In Solids
j Counting those calories? Try -
! skim milk. Skim milk has the
j food values of whole milk ex
I ccpt in butterfat, the vitamin
j A carried in the fat, and the
fat's food energy or calories.
These values are lower in
skim milk.
However, much fluid skim
milk sold today has vitamin
A added, thus returning the
vitamin A removed with the
; fat. Skim milk is interchange
ame wun wnoie milk in bev
erages, cooking and baking. It
is especially suite dto persons
on low calorie dishes.
The USDA Economic Re
ί search Service says the use of
I dairy products has changed
I since 1947-49. Dairy products
I which have decreased in use
include evaporated milk, but
i ter. cream and fluid whole
milk. Nonfat dry milk and cot
! tage cheese have increased al
! most -00 per cent during this
time. Other products which
have shown an increase in
j elude American cheese, other
types of cheese, condensetj
milk and frozn desserts.
Nonfat dry milk solids have
the same nutritive value as
I skim milk except for a partial
loss of thiamine and ascorbic
acid. These milk solids keep
well, are convenient in cook
ing and can be added to other
j foods to increase their protein
1 content. Research is continuing
on the development of an equ
ally stable dried whole mill
product.
With dairy foods in tht
news now during "June Dairj
Month," homemakers shoult
plan to feature milk and dair>
products in their everydaj
menus.
Personal Standing head soc Ί
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Buffkii
have returned from Jackson
ville, Fla. Mr. Buffkin will b«
employed at Buffkin Grocerj
and wil Ireturn to his home or
Shelly St.
^Ry^kflsorT" Sörmän^Έt^^
Conway, Harry L. Dorman. U
S. Navy, Little Creek, V«.
four daughters, Mrs. Lloyd Η
(Irene) Hardee, Rt. 4, Loris
Mrs. Robert (Clarice) Ford
Rt. 1, Conway, Mrs. Pau
(Hilda) McDowell, Rt. 4, Lor
is, Mrs. John D. (Ninaree
Hardee. Rt. 5, Conway, II
grandchildren; three brothers
Hallie Dorman, Longs; Howarc
Dorman, Rt. 1, Conway; arx
one sister, Mr«. Lutie Parker
Longs.
RETURN FROM CAMP
By Patricia M. Kiaer
One hundred an eighty-eight
Horry County 4-H Club mem
bers attended Camp Bob Coo
per June 3-7 with Charleston
and Beaufort counties.
Monday was the beginning
of a full week for Horry
County 4-H'ers. Sallie Moore.
Dan Bellamy, Wayne Mishoe,
Evelyn McNeill, and Linda
Gore Ure.Sfnted 1h#» Viwnpr nrn.
gram υη Monday evening.
During the instruction per
iod on Tuesday morning. Eve
lyn McNeill and Wayne Mis
hoe gave a skit for senior 4
H campers entitled "Duds and
Suds."
On Wednesday evening, a
talent show was held with
Charleston, Beaufort, and Hor
j ry youth participating. Sallie
Moore of Horry County and
Ted Davidson of Charleston
County served as mistress and
master of ceremonies for the
event.
Outstanding Campers for the
week were selected on Thurs
day morning to serve as Spirit
of Light and Escort.
Sallie Moore and Dan Bel
lamy, both of Horry County,
were selected to conduct the
candle light service on Thurs
day evening as well as the
citizenship program on Friday
morning.
A joint vesper program was
held on Thursday evening with
all counties present participat
ing. Taking part from Horry
County were Jeannette Har
relson and Wayne Mishoe.
Adult leaders who attended
I camp with the gorup from
Horry County were Mrs. Mary
land Johnson, Mrs. Billy Gore,
Lula Snowden, Jane Lee, and
Phil Hucks.
MIRAGE
A little trouble looks like a
mountain to the man who is
backed up against th· wall.
RICK-BACK
Usually the man who lend«
his influence on any matter
expects big interest on the
loan.
ON TH* TOWN
Too many men make the
I mistake of trying to make
■ their mark in the world in red
paint.
TIP TO MOTORIST
Slow down — th· few sec
onds you save by speeding may
be the first you spend in eter
nity.
EACH HIS OWN
Experience is a succession of
lessons — and only by living
can thoy be understood.
LESSONS LEARNED
Getting experience is no
problem — it's the knowledge
that one gains that really
counts.
Rain Brings
Optimism For
Cotton Crop
Warm weather last week and
showers over the weekend have
brightened the state's cotton
outlook.
But the Clemson Extension
C ο t to η Committee meetisfi
Monday said the rains would
hasten boll weevil emergence.
It advised farmers to follow
strict five-day insecticide treat
ments to kill weevils before they
can reproduce.
"Weevils puncturing squares
this week will produce a new
generation which will begin
I damaging «*otton during the
middle of July." a member said.
The Pee Dee Experiment Sta
tion at Florence reported 22
weevils caught in traps last
week compared with 31 a year
ago. County agents reported
that bollworms were attacking
you η squares. They said thrips
and aphid damage was dimin
ishing.
Favorable weather last week
allowed most farmers to temp
orarily lick the grass threat. All
counties reported cotton was
making good growth. First
blooms were reported in several
southeastern counties.
The five-d a y agricultural
weather outlook Monday called
for temperatures ranging from
69 at night to 92 during the day
—four to six degrees below nor
mal. Moderate to heavy rainfall
was forecast averaging wrom
one -half to one inch.
The committee suggested in
secticide applications between
showers if necessary to keep on
schedule. The use of insecti
cides effective against both boll
worms and weevils was recom
mended.
Record Attendance
KOCK HILL A total of 1,561
students are registered for the
summer session at Winthrop
College.
This figure represents an in
cresc of 62 per cent over the
previous year.
This is the second year of re
cord breaking enrollment at the
South Carolina College for Wo
men during the summer.
The previous high- which was
reached last year, was 982.
Winthrop officials attribute
the sharp increase in the num
ber of students attending in the
summer to a diversity of pro
grams which permit students to
Lo cover the same work as dur
ing the winter for undergradu
ates who wish to accelerate
their college programs and to
i larger number of students en
rolled for graduate credit.
NO CHATTER
It'll be a sad day for the
boss when automation takes
over and he has to take his
coffee break alone all the
time.
41
Farmers Continue To Lag
In Levels Of Education
I North Carolina farm people,
like their counterparts on the
national level, continue to lag
behind urban and rural nonfarm
people in education.
Census figures show 22 per
cent of the farm people »" North
Carolina 25 years old and ovtr
have less than a fifth grade ed
Thls compares with 17.5 per
cent of the rural nonfarm ana
13 1 per cent of the urban, in
the state 16 5 per cent of all
people 25 and older dldn t ad
vance through the "<thgradep
This gap between urban-rurau
nonfarm and rural farm has not
narrowed In the past decade for
the nation as a whole, the cen
sus repoit points out.
Nationally, the gap between
urban whites and farm whites
is about 15 per cent. Between
rural nonfarm and rural farm
the difference Is about fhe per
eint About 32 per cent of th^
iural faim white people 25 and
over have completed high
school.
1 In North Carolina the median
year of school completed for
urban fhiles is 11.5· ^ rural
nonfarm whites it .s 9. and for
for rural farm whites it is 8.1
—a gap between urban and farm
of almost three and one-half
I yeBy breaking the figures down
by sex. it is shown that North
Carolina females. <white and
nonwhite» 25 and over are bet
'ter educated that the males.
The uiban women have com
pleted 11.8 years of
the men 10 years. Rural non
farm women have finished nine
vcars and the men 8.7.
' The median year of school
completed by r.rm *
8 1 as compared with 7.2 for
farm mals.
For all people of the state 25
and older, the median yearof
school completed is 8.9. or
than junior high school.
Census Survey i
To Begin
Local resident will help de
termine national trends in em
ployment and unemployment
when they answer questions in
the Census Bureau's Current
Population .Survey this week.
Earlier aurvgys indicated a
monthly average of nearly 87
mililon Americans employed
and 4.5 million looking for j
work during the first four I
months of 1963. _~nv i
The facts collected locally ^
will be sent to Washington for
processing in the Census Bur
eau's electronic computers, and
national estimates of the June
employment situation will be
released early in July by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.
S. Department of Labor.
Families interviewed in the
survey here and in the 356
other sample areas in tW
country are chosen to provide
representation in the sample
for all types of areas and all
major groups of the Nation's
population. They are selected
by address rather than by
name, and the information
they contribute to the survey
remains confidential in the
Census Bureau's records. Only
statistical totals are published.
Census Bureau interviewers
who will visit local families in
Juni include: Mrs. Sarah McC.
Loehr of Conway.
Horry Highways
Claim 27 Lives
During 1962
Traffic accidents claimed the
lives of 757 persons in South
Carolina during 1962. giving
the state a population death
rate of 31.1 fatalities per 100,
000 citizens, the State Highway
Department has announced,.
Included among the state's
highway deaths were 27 per
sons killed in Horry County.
A Highway Department re
port reveals that the popula
tion death rate for the coun
ty, based on the number of
traffic fatalities per 100,000
population, was 39.56.
South Carolina had a popu
lation death rate higher than
any southern or eastern state
last year. Six western and
midwestern states had rates
higher than this state.
In addition to the 755 per
sons killed in traffic, 15.851
were injured to various de
grees in South Carolina last
year. Accidents reported to the
Highway Department totaled
40,519, including 620 fatal.
9,842 non-fatal and 30,057
property damage mishaps. The
economic loss resulting from
the accidents, injuries and
deaths was estimated by the
Highway Department at more
than $36 million.
LESSON LEARNED
The value of experience can
be determined only when the
after-effects have b«en ana
lyzed.
BE PREPARED
Practive your chosen religion
today — it might save you
looking for loopholes later in
life.
BEST POLICY
Be on the square in your
dealings — truth can be bot
tled up, but eventualy it pops
the cork.
Horryites Go
To State HD
Meeting
By MAE M. ANDERSON
Hone Agent i
Nine Home Demonstration
club members and the two
Home Agents left for Win
throp College on Tuesday^
June 18, to attend the State
Home Demonstration meeting
for three days.
Those attending are: Mrs. S.
H. Strickland, Mrs. G. R. Shel
ley, and Mrs. Joe Williams all
from the Pleasant View Home
Demonstration Club; Mrs. Har
ry Davis and Mrs. L. P. Jor
dan from the High Point Club;
Mrs. Evcrette Vaught, Stat·
Chairman of Citizenship and
Civil Defense, representing
Sweet Home; Mrs. Gussie G.
Watson from the Green Sea
Club; Mrs. D. Mason Graham,
President of the Horry Home
Demonstration Council, who
is also from the Zion Red Hill
HD Club; Miss Patricia Marie
Kizer, Assistant Home Agent
and Mrs. Mae Anderson, Home
Agent accompanied them
the trip.
These ladies leaving on Wed
nesday will be Mrs. T. Ow
ing« and Mrs. R. W. Thigpen.
Sr. who are representing the
Conway Home Demonstration
Club.
WEEKS' ACTIVITIES
Wednesday, June 19 — High
Point HD Club 2:00 P. M|
Demonstration by Leaders.
Monday, June 24 — Radio
Program, WLSC Loris, 10:15
A. M., Spring Branch HD 3:00
P. M. Demonstration by Mrs.
Thelma Grainger.
Tuesday, June 25 — Green
Sea Η DC 3:00 P. M. Demon
stration by Mrs. Ernest Hayes
and Mrs. Bradley Grainger.
Thursday, June p7 — Con
way HDC 7:30 P. M. Demon·]
stration given by leader.
NOT PRACTICAL
A man's days may be num
bered, but some drive on the
highways as though they were
endlest).
HUMAN NATURE
Prosperity breeds extrava
gance — many families feel
they must live up to it and a]
little beyond.
DESTRUCTIVE
Setting too fast a pace can
be harmful — after all, a tor
nado is just a gust of wind in
a hurry.
Most people find it a lot
easier to think.
Ritz
Theatre
Tabor City, Ν. C.
Get More Out Of Life
Go To A Movie
Wed.-Thür».
DEBRA PAGET·ROBERTALDA
TBCMNICOLON [ .. ULTMWOW *
Sfakrifr
9k ^ 1^ HhnjlilTA» ill
IW
Iii
Ü
.mma»
"MEHIttH
(TELEVISION'S GRANDPA McCOY)
They Used A Weapon No
Badman Could...SEX!
m
'smm
' EASTMAN COLOR
ι β«π.·η·υπ.· ι UCI.
THt fiSSJ JPPS JAMIS »OHO
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aMiJtih m
JLLZ3 i
IAN Ρ LIMING'· I
DkNo
fECHNtCOUK* Mmm *r. *»T(| BrnM!
POTTER
Lorie — Tabor
\
N
GLERfiHM
SPECIAL «WHS OM MIAM-HAME SPRING AM SUMMER SHOES
VRE HHUli
LADIES' SHOES
Were 12.98 To 14.98
NOW
ONLY
9.00
WE HAVE
ALL jWIDTHS
4ATo Β
SIZES
4'/2 To 11
MEDIUM TO HICI
HEELS
*?eoje\-poum
■ ■ pgrigammBTgm···
O/EPHRT HEN Τ STORE 5 <»
1X51118 TABOR CITY
OHE RACK
SHOES
Were 8.98 To 9.98
HVff
ONL Y
«.00
— 1-AMOUS BRAND NAMES -
CARESSA
• PENAL JO
• FOOT FLAIR
• PARADISE KITTENS

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