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The Ohio organ, of the temperance reform. (Cincinnati, [Ohio]) 1853-1854, June 17, 1853, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91069452/1853-06-17/ed-1/seq-8/

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CampaJs Organ.
At th. iolloiUUfta at mr Mwds, we Intend
from and sfter this " the Orju as a
Cunptiga pp W th h ol de,lr to
with oifcrs yew. Wessowtbess ar m7
will only patron 1m pp during sxcltlnf ea
riu, and it U thta elaa of reud.n Hi at w elre
to tW. lt yery scUt temperance oie do hi,
dnly in oinwltlf the Campaign Organ, M
tend to ly on d ipw not. We bll expo the
enormltle of the liquor Uafflc, and the eUi result-'
in. inorefrom. The opponent of our (. bo
they Whom tiey may, IU be kwdlid without
floret. i ' i " :
Our Unst are U low u can bo nlTorded. A
eluba muat be tent to one addreaa..
: . , Term. :- --S
ginflo Copies.. i........ ..50 cents.
Ten ooplea.. ................ .. ... . ..;.t4,00.
Twenty eoplet and oror, eaolv. ......... 30 cent.
The paper will be tntanlil the October election.
'
l ;; AcbiowleSjments.':1
i-! ' vr to widnisdat.
.Our friendi are beginning again to exert
themselves in the spread of temperance
doctrine.-, Preparations art being made in
many counties for an extensive circulation
of the Organ daring; the campaign. One
(. Division baa already ordered $25 worth of
t the Campaign Organ for gratuitous circula-
'tion; which they consider a good invest
3 1 ment, aa tbej anticipate a rery considerable
accession to their numbers by the influence
that the Organ will exert There are many
- Other Divisions that would be greatly bene
fitted, and made to prosper by a similar in
' vestment. Let the ball roll on. ,
Bro. A. 0. Elliott, Adamsville, 0., $3 for
'' Organ and Tracts. The brother gives us
' some cheering words, which we would like
to insert We feel just as you do, brother,
about this matter. , But it will all end right.
Pearly Ayer, R. 8., Painesville Division,
No. 24, $3 for Campaign Organ. One bun
dred copies should be circulated in Lake
county. We hope some of our good brethren
will exert themselves to this end.
Bro. J. Barringer, Hanging Rock, Law
rence co., $25 for Organ. . This is a good
list of patrouc, and speaks well for the
temperance men of Lawrence.
1 ' Bro. D. W. Grear, , $3 for Organ.
Bro. G. T. Myers, Plymouth, 0., $5 for
Campaign Tracts. The brother says, they
have formed an Alliance, but that it is an
up-hill business, but hopes, by circulating
the " Documents," a better state of affairs
will soon exist. This is the right course
but 50 or 100 copies of the Campaign Organ
should also be circulated. Try it, brethren .
Bro. S. Emery, Maumee City, O., $8 for
Campaign Organ. The brother says, "tem
perance fiat duum " with them. Rather a
bad state of affairs for so prosperous a place
as Maumee City. Hope to hear a better ac
count ere long.
Bro. Wm. Hopwood, city, for C. S. Miller,
SpartaoBburgh, Pa., $1 50 for Organ.
Bro. T. F. M'Ailen, East Liberty, $12 for
Constitutions. Of the state of the cause, the
brother says: " The cause is prospering in
this place. Our Division is also prosper
ing in this place. . We have a fair prospect
of send 'Dg King Alcohol to the shades of
darkness, where he properly belongs, and
hope he may never be permitted to return
to onr village, or to any place in our be
loved country."
Bro J. C. Reynolds, Carroll, O. $2 for
Organ.
Bro. W. H.Dempster, Tabor, Tuscarawas
co., 0., $1 for Organ
When Santa Anna was on his way
to Mexico he called at Havana and had
a secret consultation with the Captain
General of Cuba, and since then it is
announced that he has applied to
Spain for troops to aid in suppressing
a filbuster expedition from the United
States. Puttinsr all the facts toorthp.r
relative to Santa Anna's movements,
there is ground for supposing an alli
ance to l)e on foot between Mexico
and Spain, intended as a mutual and
co-ordinate protection of Mexico and
Cuba, such as should be regarded
with extreme suspicion by the United
States.
The Bill for the Niagara Ship Can
al, has been defeated in the N. 8. Assembly
by the close vote of 50 to 48. '
THET0HIO .ORGAN: :0F.. THE I
1 1 ' J ' : Korgaa County, . 9 . r j
The friends1 of 'the' cause m this
county, held a rery interesting meet
ing' on tha 13th ult, in the Hall of
Malta Division. - Strong ground was
taken against thev miserable .attempt
at a law, manufactured, without any
outside assistance by the' late Ohio
State Legislature ; because it is not
suited to the wants of the people, and
because it is not the law demanded at
their hands," by 260,000 intelligent
men and women.' The following res
olutions, "were" severally and unani
mously adopted : j 'f
Resolved, That we view' with grati
fication, and feel that it is a matter of
great encouragement, that the cause
of temperance, at the present time' in
our own county ana throughout ine
country, has attained that prominence
never before reached, '.,..-
' Resolved, That we, to be consistent
temperance men, should, upon every
proper1" occasion,: so exercise the elec
tive franchjse that, it will tell to the
advancement of the temperance cause.
Resolved, That our confidence re
mains unshaken, in, the- fundamental
principles of the Maine Liquor Law,
and we do pledge ourselves th at we
will pot rest from -our efforts, until its
principles become embodied 'in a law
of our own much beloved Stale. '.
- Resolved, That we feel it our duty
to support men for legislative and
State offices, who are known and
pledged to be in favor of prohibitory
laws, suppressing entirely, the manu
facture and sale of intoxicating liquors
as a beverage,
Resolved, That ten delegates be ap
pointed by this Council, to ' attend the
mass temperanoe convention, to meet
is Columbus, on the 29th day of June
l next. )
Resolved, That a central committee
of nine, be appointed for this county,
whose duty it shall be,, to collect
funds, procure and distribute temper
ance documents, confer with the State
central committee &c.
Morgan County is " right side up,"
and we hope she may long remain so.
Brethren, let your light so shine, that
others may see and learn the ways of
total abstinence. Disseminate intelli
gence among the people, either by
lectures or tracts ; anyway, so that
the work is done. Do your duty, and
your reward will be great
' Vermont Maine Lav.
The Springfield (Vt.) Telegraph
says, that seizures and arrests, under
the new liquor law, are more numer
ous than ever. 1 here is no use in
trying to give a journal of them. We
now have, says the Telegraph, a li
quor law, about which there is nocom
plaint of its being a dead letter '
broke the rum tap so short off, that
even the fingers of avarice cannot pull
it out ; nor can the striped-pig root
under its foundation. We estimate
that in the year 1853, this law will
save Vermont, about one Lake Cham
plain of tears, seven double car-loads
of taxes, and sin enough to material
ly lessen the work at the day of judg
ment.
The amount of money expended
Vw tho Portland npvn1 fnr mm. an-
wj v . v. .
nually, before the Maine law, in three
hundred grog shops, was $328,6001
That was the rum tax of that city.
At the same time, the school tax
is only (20,00; the tax for streets and
sidewalks. 20.000: and the whole
tax for all corporate expenses, only
about siuu.uuu dui tne rum t
" was 328,500t " ' '
i
3IEMEEItANCE REFORM IT
. -r v.. . . .. For the Ohio Orgp.
Preparation! for State .ConTention.
v At a meeting of the citizens of Cv
Iambus held t the city hall on Mon
day evening the 13th inst., ( Dr. John
Dawson was called to the chair, and
S. B. HAimrM appointed Secretary,
On motion, a committee of five were
appointed to .report resolutions,', 'ex
pressive of the sense of the meeting,
who, after retiring, reported the fol
lowing resolutions, which were unani
mously adopted ; to-wit? ;
Resolved, That we extend a hearty
invitation to all the friends of temper
ance, throughout the State or else
where, to' attend the moss conTcntion
on the 29th and 30th days of June
,inst; and that we will cheerfully Wel
come and entertain all who may favor
' us with their presence, to the" utmost
extent of our ability. ,-'- ' :
Resolved, ThatwewiJl, collective
ly and individually, devote so much
of our time and labor as seems to be
necessary, in order to make all need
ful preparations for the reception and
entertainment of the members ot the
convention ( and .we wUl contribute
all in our power. to mase u a pleas
ant meeting . to our friends from a dis
tance, and subservient to the great
cause in which we are engaged.
Resolved That this meeting will
appoint a committee of arrangements
to -consist of: thirty," and that said
committee be requested, ,
1st. ( To take measures to have the
city thoroughly canvassed, in order to
ascertain who.: will entertain visitors,
and how many can thus be entertained,
and report the same as early as prac
ticable, to the reception committee.
2. To make arraneemente for the
suitable reception and entertainment
of the lion. JNeal Dow, ana other
distinguished : friends 'of the cause
from abroad, who may honor us with
their presence. ' ,
3. To provide places for meetings
to be held on the erenings of Tues
day the 28th, and Wednesday the 29th
instant, as well as tor a mass meet
irg during the day-time, on the 29th
ana autn.
4.' To appoint a finance committee,
whose duty shall be to solicit funds
and make provision for the payment
of the necessary expenses.
5.' Generally to do whatever in
their opinion, will be necessary , or
expedient, in order to render the as
sembling of the convention and its va
rious sessions, during its continuance,
pleasant and profitable. 1
Resolved, That a committee of ten
be appointed, to make such prepara
tions on the public grounds in Goodale
park, by the erection of platforms for
the speakers and seats for the aud
ience, as shall be deemed advisable
on consultation with the committee of
arrangements.
Resolved. That a committee of re
ception, be also appointed by this
meeting, whose duty it shall be, to
receive the members of the conven
tion as they may arrive, and assign
them to their quarters as far as possi
ble. Resolved, That a committee of five
persons be now appointed, to consult
with the teachers of schools, sabbath
schools and parents, and if deemed
advisable, provide for a sabbath
school and cold-water army delega
tion from the children of this city and
surrounding country, and that such
delegation be assigned a conspicuous
place in the procession and arrange
ments, for the second day of the cele
bration. Resolved, That all the papers in
this city, and elsewhere throughout
the State, be requested to publish
these proceedings, at an early a day
as practicable.
At Nottingham, Eng., they are
manufacturing a beautiful fabric of laos for
windows, bed enrtains, Ac. of iron wire.
.... m 1 1
jXemperanco Qvementa..
On Wednesday eyening there wasno
public assemblage, but the National,
Urand.' and Subordinate) jihyisions of
the vSons of Temperarce met at the
11 all of the latter, where many short and
interesting . addresses were delivered
by different repreotatiyes from seve
ral of the States and British Provinces.
The delegates from Maine were , i fre
quently r called out, as" the' greatest
anxiety was felt respecting the opera
tion of : the prohibitory,' jaw.; of, that
State., k, ,!, fc ?,;' , Mrr
T.Themo8t cheering intelligence, ;in
relation to the cause, .was given by
the delegates1 from both, Maine and
Vermont,. and Hon. . Neal Dow, being
appealed: to, stated that, thert teas not
a distillery or fin open grogthop in the
Stale of Maine, ....... v i ',;))
, The representative : from Michigan
expressed the, most sanguine expecta
tions that the "Maine Law" 'will be
ratified by the, vote of ; the popple, on
the 20h, jpsV, by a very large majority.
On yesterday afternoon aproces-
J -f il. 2 1 f it.-
stun, cumpuseu ui me memuers ui iuo
National Division, the Grand Divis- J
ion of this State, Radiant Templeof
Honor of this1 city, and Chicago Divis
ion S. of T. preceded by a line band
of musici marched through several of
the streets to Dearborn1 Park, where
seats bad been prepared and a large
stage erected; V f-'u
i Hon. ' J. B. O'Neale, of S.f C.J " M.
W. P., of the Son's of Temperance of
North ' A merica, made the opening
8peechari sole and interesting" ad
dress was followed by Gen. B. F.
Cary, of Cincinnati, in one of his most
masterlefforts; ' For two hours hekept
the audience chained in almost breath
less attention,' and in the language
of one present; by no means a warm
advocate pf temperance, "it was the
most powerfully convincing address
ever uttered here, worthy of an, audi
ence of ten thousand, and a tiiaster
piece of both logic and eloquence."
His speech was a complete vindica
tion of the expediency, morality and
constitutionality of the 'principle of the
Maine Law; every; objection ; v? as
weighed and answered, if notKarinihi
lated. by the withering sarcasm to
which heat times gave utterance .j jit
was ah address that will not scion be
forgotten by those who heard itj and
those of our thousands who did not,
can console themselves with thej reflec
tion, that, independent of the import
ance of the subject, they have missed
one of the greatest intellectual treats
that for a long time has been present
ed to them. . . ,., .
At the conclusion of his remarks, he
requested all in fayor of the measure
advocated to rise, when apparently
the entire audience, men and, women,
rose to their feet, and when the be
lievers in the opposite sentiment were
called on to manifest themselves, one
solitary youth appeared K
At the City Hull, last night, a dense
ly crowded house listened with enthu
siastic attention to Mr. Dow, as he
detailed the history and operations
of the Maine Law, and a much larger
body, came and went away, unable to
gain admittance. ! '
When Mr. Dow closed, -Gen. Cary
was loudly and continually called for,
f ho kept the, audience until a late
our, and was then hardly permitted
to close. He will most probably ap
pear again this evening.,
j&T James T. Drum has retired
from liquor business, in consequence
of the uncertainty of the license ques
tion. His occupation's gone. He is
no longer the "spirit stirring drum"
spoken pf by Shakespeare. 1
r'..-1-i V ' S ' ;,
Twenty-two cows and six oxen
were lately bitten at the Dutch settlement
near Chicago. .'"T" '' "' "

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