OCR Interpretation


Press and daily Dakotaian. (Yankton, Dakota Territory [S.D.]) 1880-1889, February 19, 1887, Image 4

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91099608/1887-02-19/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

JOS. H. CAMPBELL,
Machinist, Boiler Maker
-AND-1-
Engine Jfurnitiungs,
Drawing* And tracing*
heavy lraming.
for machinery and
IVZnventori' original* perfected.
If your steam engine is wasteful in her steam
by attaching my valve motion, I oan make it
jast economical a* the beat OorliM engine
made of those dimension*.
JOS. H. CAMPBELL.
PostofHoe box III Yankton, D, I.
Yankton and Swan Lake
Stage and Express
Line.
J. N. MOORE, Proprietor.
BATE Yankton Monday*, Wednesdays'and
irridays at 7 o'olook a. returning TaeT
dur. Thursday* and Saturday*.
Established by a People's Convention.
Operant on justness Principles.
Approved by Business Men.
Publicly Endorsed by Territorial Farm-1
ers' Alliance
Risks Limited (n Amount.
Insurance Well Distributed.
Collects Assessments Before LOSS.
No Liability In Excess of Premium.
Does Business 6taxurhtr* In Dakota.
S^.uftP^rofV^'-'vu i'yiL,ly. •,%
A"!" U.IK.
Ky »0s
E.
A. BRUCE, A Rent.
LAM
THAT
FACTUHED
ITTSBU
PORSA
New Advertisements.
TO ADVERTISERS!
Fora check for |20 we will print* tea4b
advertisement in One Million issue* of badii
AmerloanNjwspapera. This is at the bated
only one*flfth of a cent a line, for 1,000 Otroula
Ji?1 Mi?«°
•i75*ti»eneat
will be plaoed'before
Wie Million dxff«MrUnewirp«per_ parohMer*
or Fits Muuon Bjcadebb. Ten line* will
aooommudate about 75.word*. Address with
copy °f Adv. and check, or lend 10 ocnts for
Book oIJTS pages.
iff GEO. P. HOWELL 4 CO..
10 Bravo* Bi., Naw Yoax.
A POSITIVE
W O to be 1 A 1 8 7 0
OF the most obstinate OSM in four dan or
HUk
ALLAN'S SOLUBLE MEDICATED BOUGIES
ADVERTISERS
can. learn the exact cost
°f proposed line of
advertising in American
papers by addressing
Geo. P. Rowell & Co.,
Nswspspsr Advertising Bureeu,
10 Spruee St., New York.
k*aA lOota. tor lOO-Pags Pamphlet.
DAN. aScDBYITT,
Dtalw In
.erooariM, WtaM and Uquw*.
ud PtovistoDM^"-»
XAjfsqpoir^^ ~..H£AJLOTA,
'29S!
"i.
MILLWRIGHT
TRIED
fit-
CURE.
Jars w»d for ciroular. p. O..
BO*15". J. O. ALLANOO.,
«o. 81. hn street New Tork.
MARVELLOUS MEMORY
DISCOVERY
WheUyanlike Artificial SysUms-Ouw of Hind
Wandering—Any book learned in one reading
Frospeotns. with opinion* of Mr. fBoOTOB, the
Astronomer, Hons*W. W. Abtob. Jnai» p.
BKHJAmir, l)rs.MiiiOB, Wood and other*, sent
pest nunc by
PJKOF. loibbttb
*S7 ruth Avenue, l^w Tork.
a SBB "i
CRUCIBLE,
s,
VATARBH
HAY F|VE?
orJti
from rfrtfvrioi
»i*i ni at
rhl
li
CHIMNEY
PIOTURE.
s/
Abaci twenty yean ago I dUoorered a attto
•ore on my cheek, and the doctor* pronounced
lt eaaeer. I have tried a number of physlelMttt
but without receiving any permanent boned.
Among the number wero oneor two apeoHUsta.
The medicine th*y applied was 1 Ike lire the
sore,e*u*ln«Intense pain. Xs«wa itttwnt
In the papers tolling what 8. B, s.h*AJon*for
•then similarly afflicted. I procured some at
onoe. Beforo had used the second bottle the
neighbor* could notice thaf my cancel was
healing up. Ky general health had been bad
for two or threoyeon—I bad a backing oough
and spit blood continually. I had a severe
pain In my brsast. After taking six bottles of
6.8.8. my oough left me and I grew stouter
than had been for *averal years. Hycanoor
has healed oyer all but a little spot about the
else of a half dime, aad it iinpldly disappear
ing. would advlseeveiy en* with cancer to
givs B. 8. B. a talr trial.
Kb*. SANfc J. McCONATjpHET,
Aihe Grove, Tippecanoe Co., lad.
Fob. 16, 1886.
I
swift's Spoeipe entirely vegetable,' and
seems to care cancers by forcing out the Impu
rities from the blood. Treatise on Blood and
Skin TMaeaws mailed free.
THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO.,
BRA WEB- if ATLANTA, OA.
GittiReUifaif
md Uwefi
COLD IHHEi
CATARRH
Cream.Batof
r&ry~-Ba--FEyift1
of
1 1
aJSS"
^tP. Balm is applied into eaoh
2*I£?E*W0 TO use and I* qnickly ab.
•Orbed, effectaally cleansing the naml pas
m^e^oi oatarrhal vuus causing healthy sec ra
it Alay* paiu mtfft infiammation, proUet* the
membranal linings df the head from additimai
colds, completely lieils die sore* and restores
the sense of taste and smell. Benefioial result*
are realised by a few applications.
4
PP
thorough (rtaUrum mil atr*.
Prico SO cent* at druggist« by m*il. registered,
80 oenfab Oirenlan. sent free
ELX-BBQXHBBS. IWUggisU, Owego,N. T.
ill asu.
"n]
Absolutely Pure.
po*dcT never varie* A marvel *f{pi
j.
More eoonor
strength and wholeeomeni
2*" .ordinary kinds, i.
opmpetitlpn with the multitude of low test.
short Weight, alum
8old only in ean*. Bo
pany, lot WaU street
kinds, and cannot be
or jphoephate powdei
yal Baking Powder Oom
new Tork.
DOCTOR
WHITTIER
mVST. CHARLES STREET
Lgvis. mo-
M. Rcjnlsr Gradasto ofdtreo medicAl col
leges, hst been Ibug-er engaged in the trestment
oTtltronle» Nervous* Shin and Blood
ANMASM than any other ph^Bician in A|aMUT'
J®Sjf Consultation at office or by mafl, free, and
Medicines lent by mail or express evervtf heVe,
wcoitly packed tree from obeerrktloa.
Merrout Prostration, Debility, Mental
an4 Pbytieal Weakness, arising .from
Indlacrettou, Excess, Exposure or In*
anlffence. producing some
of
the followi,pc.
effects: Nervousness, Dobility, Pirnntss oi
Sight, Defective Memory, Pimples on the Pac^
Avenion to Society of Females, Want ot Pleas
ure in Life* Unfitness to Marry, Melancholy,
J}7'PeP*lfc»Stunted DeYelopmcnt,I'Oss of Power
Pains tu the Back, etc., are treated with ttopa^'
alUIed success. Safely, privately.
A Positive Written Guarantee
given in every
curaslb case
TESTED SBMIDIII. STIFF
and
where nocbT ex
Uteit Is frankly suted. CoiopLrtesymptomlblank
enabling you to properly state your cue, sen.
free. 30 page boolc either sex, one stamp.
Blood Impurities and Blood Poisoning,
Mercurial and other Medians of Throat,
Skin and Bones, Blotches, Eruptions, Old
lores and Ulcers. Painful Swellings,
irom whstever cause, positively and forever
driven from the system, by means of
tAFK timi
and
rheumatism,
SWOLLEN JOINTS
the result of blood pkriaon.
positively (urea* Ko polsonoos drugs' used.
Catarrh, Throat, Hoss, Lung Dtseasas,
Cea*tltat!onal and Aesslrsd Vssk
•eases of botta isxei, treated successfully.
A(* and experience are Important the
pr»v4gMxt remedies of all ages and codnrtriiia.
are used,and knowing what to give, no
»ireri
mentt
are made. On account of the great num
ber of eases S^plrinir, the charges are"kepYlow.
than is demanded by others.
often lower than
MARRIAGE tUIDE
990 Pagesi Hne X*listen.
lgwho may marrv, who
net, why. Proper age to marry. TVhomarA first.
Manhood. Womanhood. Physical decay. Who
should marry. How life and happiness rasy^be
Increased. .Those married or about to
should read it: of interest and value
thinking man-and woman. Popular etli
•aper cover, 30c. Address DM. WHOTX
VSJH?
FREE!
RELIABLE SELF CUBE
A favorite priwcripuon of one of the-files
noted and Muvc^glul kxcuIiik in the
jiow retired) for the cure of X.rvon* DebilHv
'.OH MuntooJ. We.u«M
I ptuu »e»lcd envelope Free. Druggtettavs'Sllil
Address OR. WARD & CO.. Louisiana, pi*
MgOBTg-Tolnm**
and
CHDKOH DIRECTORY.
CONQBIAATIOJTAL Ohtoch—Corner"Walnut and
Sthatreet. Bev. C. F. Olapp, pastdr. Ser
vice* at 11 a. m. and 7 30 p. m- ffanaaj *ohoolat
14 m.
Chmst Ckdbob—Corner Douglas Ave and Sixth
•treet. Bev. Dr. Hoyt. rector. Servioe* at 11
a. m. and 7:80 p.m. Sunday School at 12 m.
H. E. Church—Fourth street, between Dougla*
and Walnut, Bev. 0 K. Hager, pastor, bun
«ay boar* of servioe: Morning sermon. 11 a.
m. class meeting, 12 Sunday school 2:80
p. m. young people's moeting, 6:10 p.- m.
I*jie* prayer meeting, Tuesday afternoon
ta.£^dK£"taf
K5=Ue
CatholicOhtjbch—Bev. Father Soallan^pastor.
Capital street, corner 5th. Servioea at 8:80 a.
jR2 j. Services in the afternoon
Mid Sunday school at the hoar announced by
the pastor.
BaptiseChpboh—Qornerof Douglas and Sixth.
8oAKoraAYi^f LuTHK8A2iOHTJBni—Pearl street
near 8th.* Bey. Dr. Andieassen, pastor. Ser
•loes, morning and evening. Sunday school
at« p.
eq.
Zion's Chuboh, Giuma* Lothkbar—Corner of
Uougia* and 4th. Ber. Dr. Hilger, pastor.
Service* at 11 a. m. and 7:80 p.m.
Otoboh,
(Qibmak)—Sixth
Uclub
street,
Ohas* Wemlafl, conductor of services* Ser
vices at 11a. m. andS p. m*
IjCthw»a« Cbtowh.(Gibhak)—Fifth street, be
tween Linn and Locust, Bot Hents, pastor
Sermon at 10 a. m. Sunday school at lp.
PROFESSIONAL 'CYCLIST8.
An American Team That Proposes to Try'
the Speed of the English Wheelmen.
[Special Correspondence.]
Boston, Fob. 14.-—Although a number of
English bicycle riders have visited this coun
try to display their prowess on the cinder
path, it is only at this late day-that a repre
sentative team of American 'cyclists has set
ottf fot a test of speed with our transatlantic
cousins. The team is composed of Woodside,
Temple and Morgan, all professionals. It
will be interesting to watch their movement*
on the other side, because so mlich been
claimed for the "fastness" of American tracks
as compared with those of England. All the
fastest records have been made on this side
of the water, though it is yet to be seen
whether our champions can cut through Eng
lish fog as well as through American sun
shine.
William Miller Woodside is 26 years old,
and was born in the city of Philadelphia.
His father's health was not good, which in
duced the family to cross the Atlantic and
take up a residence in the north of Ireland.'
After finishing his education, young Wood
tide came to Nevr York and engaged in busi
neea pursuits. He learned to ride the bicycle
in 1873, but. did, not show much speed until
1879, when he was a member of the old Man.
hattan Bicycle club, of New York city. He
aoan became
chainpion," and. in 1880
and 1881 was considered the amateur cham
pion of the United Statea In 1881 he went
to Ireland, and the following year be won
the ten and flfty mile amateur championships
of that country. He yeoct went to England,
where he defeated such men as West and
Frye, of Bristol Vesser, of London* and
others, winning eighty, first and second prizes
inside of twelve months.
Coming again to New York, he met John
8. Prince,' then the American professional
champion, but was defeated. Later on he
defeated Prince many times, and also showed
his superiority over all other American
riders, and several years ago was looked upon
aa tiio fastest man in.^Ainorica, Laat suni
mer, in the circuit of five tournaments^ he
defeated all comei-s, including Fred Wood,
the great Leicester professional In October
he &st)ed A challenge to all.'America for the
championship- and $1,000 a side but, as no
one seemed anxious to meet him, at the end
of a mohth's time lie withdrew the challenge
and now rightly Aonaiders himself the Ameri
can Champion He has a fine physique,
Ktands 6 feet 1 inch) weighs 190 pounds and is
vecy active,. He is probably the richest pro
fessional in America, as he owns real5 estate
to the amount of $10,000, and is also heir to
On extensive property in Ireland.
Ralph Temple (whose real name, by the
way, is'IMedberg), was bornW Chicago May
19. 1865. .He has been a.'cyclist since 1882,
and is very well known as a "road rider."
He is also a trick or fancy ridor of no mean
ordeiv and has given numerous exhibitions of
this (specialty all through tho west. Ho is a
Well developed iathlete, stands 5 feet 5 inclis,
weighs HO pounds in training, atfd treasures
88 inuhes chest, thighs. 83 inches, calyetf li
inches. He comes of an old western, family1
of note, and has. contributed article* ,an
•cycling subjects to the leading journals of
the west. Ho is a graduate of Knox College'
in the.stntoof Illinois., Mr. Temple.iajfcb be
matched for'$l ,000 against any man in the
worlil af trick ieind ifast'rlding
Williani. Jr Morgan i* thet-manager of the
toBK'.d^sta^sr cbampion
of America,. He was bora in England
in 1862. He learned to ride a bicycle
when he was about 16 years old. In 1880 be
sailed for Canada, And settled in, Toronto.
He was the first man to introduce bicycle
racing into Canada, and formed the St Cath-'
arine Bicycle olub. In 1883 be came to the
State* and raced against Prince, Rollinadn,
the Harrisons and others, being particularly
fortunate at long distances.-' In this fiild ^e
•hsttlncfrdefeatedHighaift, Woodside, Sohock,
-Pi-inoeatid many other ^riders of let*i note.
Ia*tyear he was matched for (1,000 in it tlx
day contest-against. Albert Schock. In this
«ace Morgan astonished the cycling world by
riding 235 miles (beating all previous records)
without-stopping or making one disniount.
He lost this race, however, through an attack
of sickness on the fifth day. Itr. Morgan
standi 5-feet inches high, and weighs 145
pounds. He ha* b*en'a frequent contributor
of sporting article* to the press, and whil*
abroad will act as the' special correspondent
of several journals. J. L. Manning.
(.-j ... The Tbeate*the Futon,
The- United -State% is -to-day the' most
liberal patron of dramatic artists. W* have
more theatres than any country on eat-th and
a greater number of peoplowho makea liv
ing by entertaining the public than the cor
responding olas* in England, FraAce and
Germany. There ar*onore places of amuse
ment in New York and it* neighborKood to
day than were in the whole XXtoSaA forty
years ago. Time, was when the churches: made
the theatre unpopular' outside of the very
large citiesJ The concert andi the lecture
was the only relaxaUon permitted ^in the
rural loc?Jitics some'twenty y6Ars*ago, but
now every town of 6,000 inhabitant! or more
has iU opera house and theatre -tor ooca
idonal, if not regular, dratnatio 'perform-
Just at present there is a veritable
craze under, way on the part of young men
and women to become dramatic artists^ lift*
pays well to those who are talented enough
to get engagements-, tind -then the 'applause
from the front appeals to theapprobattve in
stincts. of those who have artistic abilities.
In no other profession is public favor ^o In
stantaneous or so gratifying. Partt has
long bad ite Conservatoire, where as
pirant* for dramatio fame couid procure
ihei naceesary instruction. Of course, every
^eatre is .« practical *chool tor teaching
•rtists,bat the, neoyhyte* cannot obtain the
*11 round instruction which the stage de
Biands in all Ha departments. In New Tork
a
«»™««Uo «jbool fa operation,
Ctlitlol? "•tthe lMd of Which Mr. Fankliii 8ar
jent, where young men and women are drilled
in voicd culture, pantomime, dramatio ex-^ $ a
pression, fencing, dancing and all ibe accom- di*tinct families,
plisbments necessary to express emotibn or
portray character upon the stage. There is
really a* much reason for dramatio schools as
for training in any technical art The supe
riority in the French acting drama is enmies
ttooably due to tie elaborate culture given
to French artists in the famous Conserva
toire. There are those who believe that the
Hew Tork school will grow Into an institution
quite as important in it* *ay We also nee?
u«knml *BnMMl' c«Jle(fe,
-^^rl**-ft00.". perhaps he supplied in time by th* National
nanon, Dakota. '1 company. It ft gauging to kaow
whfch
that there are a greater number jf persons
stadying music, both vocal and instrumental,
in the United States than in any other coun
try, We have as fine Toices as any in the
world Indebd, the time Is not distant when
there will be more American sopranos and
contraltos than in all Europo pombined. In
jnale voices we are not so fortunate. Good
tenors and baritones are scarce everywhere.
This is probably due to the fact that more
girl* than young men study music as. a pro
fession.
THE M00DT SCHOOLS,
UNIQUE INSTITUTIONS AT NORTH
FIELD, MASS.
The Houso in Which Mr. Moody Was
Born^Hia Fiftieth Kirtliday Celebrated
at the Admirable Schools He Has
Founded.
One of the most unique and successful sys
tems of education for the youth' of both
sexes is in operation on the banks of the Con
necticut river at Northfleld, Mass. This sys
tem is due to the energy and ability of
Dwight L. Moody, the evangelist, and it
seems fitting and praiseworthy that he should
have returned to the spot where his own
youthful studies were pursued to put his idea
as regards the education of the young into
practical shape. Mr. Moody was born at
Noi'thOeld, Feb. 5, 1837. At the age of 4
years he lost his father, and the mother had a
hard struggle to provide for her family and
give them the simplest elements of an educa
tion.
In his 17th year he went to Boston and
found employment in the shoe store of bis
maternal uncles, Lemuel and Samuel Holton.
Two years later he went to Chicago, where he
was again employed as a salesman. Here, as
In Boston, he showed unusual capacity fdr
business, and, in fact, throughout his whole
career his executive ability has been very
great. In all bis plans his head and heart
have been enthusiastically enlisted, and his
efforts have boeu rewarded with uniform suc
cess. His appearance is that of the prosper
ous man of business, and despite the Wear and
war ot his manner of life he has been growing
stouter year by year.
MR. MOODY'S 11IHTIIPLA.CE.
Northfleld is situated at a point where
three states—Massachusetts, Vermont and
New Hampshire—meet and where the scenery
begins to show evidence of the mountainous
character that it obtains farther north. The
project of the Moody schools was broached
by their founder in 1870, and his troops of
friends in Europe and America stood ready
with pecuniary aid. Mr.' Moody had very
clear ideas of what he wanted to make
tea Bible- tha foundation of all culture,
to prepare young men and women for life'by
combining classical and industrial education
—these wore his objects. Ho has succeeded
admirably, for there are now many more ap
plicants for admittance than the schools can
accommodate.
The points of difference between the Moody
schools and other institutions of learning
with the same or similar avowed objects are
many and interesting. In the first place Mr.
Moody has acquired sufficient land to enable
him to put into practice any plan he might
afterward'wish to take advantage of so that
the grounds of the giris' seminary comprise
850 acres, and those of the boys'school 400.
In both schools a rigorous exclusion of appli
cants, who seem from habit or otherwise to
be unfit for admission, is exorcised. In the
seminary girls wishing to enter must be 15
years of age and In good health.
A
mar
RBCITAT10R
HALL.
This last stipulation is very necessary, as
they are expected "to perform all the work
of a house under the supervision of a matron."
There are two courses of 'study, each cover
ing three years. In the. Iiatin course Cicero,
Ctesar and Virgil are read, while English
composition Is a prominent feature of both
courses. Greek, French and German are
elective studies, as is also trigonometry, while
algebra and geometry are required from all.
In every class the Bible is a text book. The
whole cost of board and tuition for a year is
•100. Though others have failed in the com
bination of household and school duties, Mr.
Moody seems to have struck the golden mean
in not making the exercises of the one branch
to heavy as to prevent the proper operation
of those of the other.
The boys' school is four miles -distant from
the site of the girls' seminary, and is named
Mount Hermon. It is just as rigorously
selective as that of the girls, the trustees stat
ing that "lazy, disorderly or vicions boys
will not be received knowingly, or long re
tained if received ignorantly." Pupils must
be 16 years of ago, and are received on pro
bationonly. Here are some of the questions
proposed to the candidates for admission:
"Has the candidate shown an ambition to ex
cel in anything?" "Ha* he formed any pur-'
pose in life
J" "What are bis prominent trsi*«
of character?" "Has he had any bad compan
ionships?" "Why do you .wish to send hiw to
this school?" It will be seen that tlie'exami
nations are of the most Searching kind, and
they will effectually debar from membership
•ny one who has no real interest in his own
culture and advancement The boys are also
required to work on. the farm two or three
hours each day, and to turn their hands to
•11 varieties of field labor and to the care of
live stock. This department of the work is
ander the supervision of a practical farmer.
DORMITORY.
The buildings are well and solidly fymt,
with a view to the njjeturesque as wel{ as to
comfort They are featei} by Meant and
have hot and cold water on -evurf goor. The
hoys aredf'rfded into grontwf abput twenty,
forming a, num
is very much of
an improvement
over
RIVER STAGE COMPANYi
Mail, Passenger and Express.
From Armour!to Fort Bandall, yia Grand View
Andee Jbftke. Yankton Agency
*. fUte fc.
.BATES Armour at lit in. fiiily, exoept San
day for Fort Bandall ana intermediate
poinln, arrivinsat Fort Bandall at 6:10.
Leave Fort Jtandall at 9:80 a. m. and arriv.
at Armonr at 12 o'olocic.
Thi* liqe ,i* thon
tort of stock, ua el
•8, lakuring
With th*
BD OGAGH-
Oomfort, Speed and Heemrtt}
To its patron*.
VOtTSB SON... Proprietor*.
Best Free Lunch
IN YANKTON
-AT-
YIIKE DEMENDES,
OURTH 6TBEET. I
EVERY EVENING.
To School Officers.
School Township Bookstand Blank
8ohool Distriot Books and
Blank*, compiled and
arranged under the
Sohool Law ot
1888,
FOR SCHOOL OFFICERS a DAKOTA
Pnblldied aad for *al* by
BOWEN & KING8BUBY,
Tank
ton... Dakota.
|^AKOTA UOAI BIiAMKS,
FOR LAWYEfiQ,
•i-tvl
*r:
PRESS AND' DAKOTAIAH LIST:
"ft3
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE
PBOBATE JUDGES
CLERKS OF,'COURT
V.
8.
COMMISSIONERS
MINERS
I
rit
8HERIFJB
I NOTARIES PUBLIC
CONVEYANCERS
I
ok I
(J. S. Land
Office Blanks
V9k»Cataloga« farnlshed on application
Addretw, BO WEN. A KINGSBURY
Yaakton, Dakota
Sioux City & Pacific
RAILROAD
Mr oar* between
through Without own.
are aleo inn en Truni
Elegant
between
Ohloago andOounoil Bi
.n^M^VS^O^in
PEOPLES' FAVORITE DO
Chicago
Hi usual doAftttjk^
•ystem.-trtattS'fKHn fifty to seventy-flve boys
are huddled together on one lai^ge Hnwt
their very tmmber prevents the oonstant^^
and supervision to which boys end girliare
accustomed in the hoO^, but miss so sadly tat
the school,
Tueli—iTukton ooanty
®ow, Pay op
AMD
Milwaukee
ta
Des Moines
St. Louis
{Hooipal
jr. w.
.f-.a
taxes
W 9»
Sjjbma* Bt.tmuiy
Ooanty Trsamwr.
ASD ALL Polnta Hoath
JFte^^rer^?r£5xSf0,®d th* MIL-
Sloax Uity dally at Idl p. a
afWe are
guarantee
f. I
IX OOMXKOXION WITH THF
IT .0
». it I. iliv Sj- ri
1
.1.
Chicago A Northwestern fUilva}.
1 opular Pioneer
Roate
SIOUX CITY AND CHICAGO
_Twod»ilj trains. The onljf liiie1
PDTitiMAN A1 iAOBI Drawing-Huoy
81ou*_Oitj
Wholesale and Retail
so, nne line
WcvtmjIBB,r.^%
WE ARB GENERAL
rilil8Q
tWifc is
o.-n
expenae in maintaining the table. The meal
funuahed will inolnde VI the delioaoie* ol the
•eaooa, and eooal to thoae to be had at any
•tnotlf ftrat-oUa* hotel Bpeed, oomfort aad
•afety are oombined. whioh render thi* the
38a*i
fi
A30.J.U
-'i
FBOM SIOUX Oin TO
•Useoteen
«jaliui tor a!)
—t tad rt U'lP. 1? jmfei
ail fp!Ins fee Mink :eoath
oheeke4 throvchto.il the
IOHN L. PENNlNOTOJj
4«rc(Bannr at LAW
Beal XUato/aaA
-ij
•nKir^
Da. I.
i'. 1 jf ii 7i is^
We ean fnruith the (Session Laws
EXCELSIOR DRUG STORE
ESTABLISHED IN 186ft
Purdy & Brech
-v f. V:' ,•- v-\
Books and Stationery, Gold
Wall Paper and Ceiling Decorations
I# Special attention given tills Lino, fi
»r6 prepared to fill promptly «nj and all orders for goods in our line and
satisfaction both in quality and prioes* Send for oiroalars and prioe lilt
ADLER & OHLMAN, Yanktol
(Ml on or address, 8A.M KAUOIXBB. Uarohrats Hotel, Xtukton, D.
a- "w
•K,
M)I-"
a
iU*
'j#
4^
a a
of. Dakota for the yean vj
iMktOB
1883.
& VTH
BOWKSfA KIN08BDBX,
•Dakota
ists
Pens
PURDY & BRECHT, Yankton,
WHOLK3AXK LIQCOiiS A.Nil CIQAK8.
ESTABLISHED 1870.
E.De8tilief84Agents and Wholesale dealers In
Kentucky and Domestic Whiskies,
Liquors and Wines.
DriW6tat«!Oh,0*«0 *u1 daplieate.pri°e* of any house, without' any exoepUoM
Goods sold only at
f*S -»i
from U.S.Bosib
We oarr the la
Wholesale
AGENTS IN DAKOTA FOB
XoMph SSohlits Brewing company, Milwaukee, Wis. Dnheiser-BreMh Bte»
lng oompany, St. Lonia, Mo. Cheater man Barrow's Bottling Works,
lie Man, towa Bronswiok Billiard Tables, Chicago, Illinois:
propneton of Yankton Steam Bottling Works of
i' Bohlitz's Milwaakee Beer,
Furnisher!
^ew proceis—
and jrradual
Bemiotion
lis,
IRON
POROELAIK
ROLLS.
Supreme Court Reports
•oiamea one ana two,
Dakota Beports!
•sS a
i.
X'
95.00 PER VOLUME.
M&Ttm, BOWBN KBfOSBVBY
TanJktoo.DakottbS

xml | txt