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Press and daily Dakotaian. (Yankton, Dakota Territory [S.D.]) 1880-1889, February 24, 1887, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91099608/1887-02-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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','V
lilfi NEWS EPITOMIZED.
Judge Oonrad yesterday morning
granted a temporary injunction against
the big international distillery at Dea
Moines, Iowa.
Judge Barrett in the Mew York court
ot oyer and terminer.han adjourned the
oate of ex-Alderman Thomas Olery until
Monday the 28th inst.
Newspapers in Paria are jubilant over
the result of the eleotions in Alsaoe and
Lorraine. They say Germany ia unable
to obtain the hearts of the inhabitants
of the annexed provinces,
County Attorney Ward of Oedar
Rapids, Iowa, has instituted suit in the
superior oourt for $17,600 against the
Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul and
the Chicago and Northwestern roade for
failure to comply with the Sweeny laws.
Reports reoeired at the office of the
Colorado oattle growers' association
indicate that south of Montana to the
Gulf of Mexioo oattle have wintered
better than for years. Western Canada
reports also show that oattle 'have not
suffered more than usual.
RsagaD, of Texas, asked unanimous
consent yesterday in the house for the
immediate consideration of. senate bill
inaorporating the Atlantio and Pacific
ship railway company, but Anderson,
ol Kansas, objected and the bill was
referred to the commit tea on commerce.
Up to 1 o'clook yesterday offioial re*
turns of the election in Germany had
been received from 821 districts showing
the eleotion of 170 septenists and 108
opponents of the government. In the
other forty-eight distriols. the leading
candidates failed to obtain a majori
ty, necessitating a re-ballot in enohof
the districts.
Tho tobacco workers' and cigarmakers'
assemblies of the knights of labor of
Newark, New Jersey, have decided not
to obey the general assembly of the
knights, which orders that all persons
engafted in the oigar trade who are
knights and members of the interna
tional oigarmakers' union shall with
draw at once from the union.
DA HOT
A CONDENSATIONS.
Lincoln oounty is in need of a new
ooort house.
W. C. T. U. services at Sioux Fails
Monday night were attended by 1,500
.people.
At no time since 1880 has the mail been
delayed so often at Brookings as this
winter.
It is stated that the dosing of the
Canton saloons has not stopped the sale
of liquors.
The people at Woonsooket and Grow
Lake are moving to establish anew mail
route from one plaoe to the other via
Parsons and Gordon.
The engine of Greenwood mill at
Dead wood was blown up Monday with
giant powder. It is said that dissatis
fisd workmen are responsible.
Elk Point revival meetings are. being
largely attended and with good results.
Rev. Mr. 8elleck, of Watertown, is there
assisting at the M. E. church.
On acoount of sickness Rev. Mr.
Waird ot Mitbhell will not be able to fill
his engagement for a series of meetings
in the Congregational ohuroh at flqron.
Miller's ministers, with the aid of
Others from Huron^ Bluut and Pierre are
still continuing their meetings in which
the oitizans are taking considerable in
terest.
Huron attorneys are not anxious to
have Kingsbury eonnty taken out of
the fiftb judicial district, nor are the
attorneys of that oounty desirous of
change.
Jim Merrill has lived twenty yean in
Big Sioux township. He says he never
saw so little hay and fodder between
JSlk Point and the Big Sioux bridge at
this time of the year.
The extreme cold weather, scarcity of
water and in some oases scarcity of feed
are hard on stock in Hand oounty. Many
oattle owners are compelled to sell at
low prices or suffer total loss.
The general store of McDonald &
Ensign at Cando, Towner oounty, was
totally destroyed by the Are Monday
morning, Loss, $8,000 fuiiy insured
The firm will probably rebuild,
Arousing railroad meeting was held
at Canton Saturday evening, and eon
sideralle talk was indulged in for and
against the completion of a branch of
the Burlington, Oedar Rapids and North
ern to that oity.
Preparations have actively begun at
Mitchell for the firemen's tournament in
one. At a meeting Monday the Byci
ole dlnb, of Mitohell, numbering over
twenty members, deeided to co*operate
with the firemen.
In a letter received by a Mitohell at
torney from a Washington gentleman
the following occurs: Sou may look
for a surprise in the general land office
before long, and I think an agreeable
one to the people of Dakota."
A division of the uniform rank,
Knights of Pythias, has been organised
at Huron with the following officers
John H. Alexander, captain L. F.
.• Friabee, first lieutenant
lO.
.P. Helm,
seoond lieutenant W. B. Oronk, guard
Ed H. Aplin, sentinel.
The care belonging to the Milwaukee
& St. Paul road in which tbe steam
heating apparatus has been plaoed, were
successfully operated on the Chioago
division daring the past eek. The
T'five cars oomprising the train will be
transferred to Dakota in the hope of
-encountering a genuine Western blizzard,
as a test before being finally adopted.
Some anxiety is coming to t'oe surface
at Huron among the liquor men as to
the final outcome of the looal option
bill. A8siimipg that the measure will
become a law the liquor sellers and
aaloonmen ars preparing to meet it with
J» mnoh defianoe iss possible. They will
their forces well drilled and every
nan at his post on eleotion $ay in ooun
wece there ia any show for the
Jllfdefeat of the bill.
ii
P^have
felTY COUNCIL,
Official PrStttttlai* of the Monday
Krolng's Fleeting.
Council Chamber, City of Yankton,
Feb. 21,1887, 7 p. m.—Council convened
in regular session. Mayor Harris being
absent Alderman Balmat elected presi
dent pro tem. Moll called. All mem
bers present except Alderman Brauoh
and Mr. Mayor.
On motion reading of minutes of pre
vious meetings dispensed with and same
approved.
Committee on finance and taxation
presented the following report:
To tho Mayor and Council: Your
committee to whom was referred the
bill of Tfcos. Stewart, street commission
er, would respectfully report that they
would recommend the payment of same,
providing Mr. Stewart will furnish the
oity w'th an itemized statement of the
labor performed by him during the
month of January.
M. P. OliEUAV,
W. BBTJOE.
•v JHOJ.MAX.
Finanoe Committee.
Alderman Crowe offered the follow
ing amendment "That the street com
missioner be allowed bill for January
and that he be instructed to keep an
itemized account of work performed
each day and present tbe same with bill
at the end of tbe month."
On motion report as amended adopted*
The city engineer presented tbe fol
lowing report:
Oity Engineer's Office, Yankton, Feb.
97tb, 1887—To his Honor the Mayor and
Oity Council of the Oity of Yankton—
Gentlemen: In oomplianoe with your
resolution of Feb. 7th requiring a detail
ed statement and cost of all improve
ments made by orders from the oity
conn oil during the present flsoal year, I
present herewith the following report
BBiixna.
There has been oonatruoted one new
wood bridge with pile substructure and
iron railing, with iron lamp posts on
opposite oorners, 60 feet span, 18 feet
roadway aoross Rhine creek on Burleigh
street, near the Milwaukee railroad
depot, and the approaches from each
end filled up to tbe street grade, well
graveled and finished to a 2u foot road
way, fenced on both sides, being a per
manent and much needed improvement.
A similar bridge was also built on Wal
nut street, with the addition of a five
foot side walk on the west side, the ap
proaches being graded up to the atreet
level, with a 24 foot roadway graveled
and fenoed. The old Broadway bridge,
built in the spring of 1881, was raised
up, new timbers put in where required,
and the straoture generally overhauled
and repaired, making it perfeotly safe
for some time to oome. A foot bridge
was built aoross the Rhine
on Piootte street, for the accom
modation of oitizens living on Main
street and on the hill, the total cost ol
these several bridges being as follows
Walnut and Cedar street original con
tract $749.90. Sidewalks to Walnut
atreet bridge $36.00, approaches on
Burleigh street $655.00, approaches on
Walnut street $632, graveling and fenc
ing on both streets $897,00, repairs on
Broadway bridge $63,00. Foot bridge
$15,00.
.SiDBWAlAS,
There has been constructed during
the past year about tour thousand lineal
feet of new plank sidewalk six feet wide
nearly allot whioh was built by tbe
property owners with but little expense
to the oity, except for advertising and
services of oity engineer and something
over three hundred feet of brick walks,
of the same or greater width. When
well laid briok for walks is certainly pre
ferable to wood, being equally cheap to
begin with and more lasting.
WATXB WOBXS.
Under this head there has been numer
ous important improvements made
during the past year involving the ex
penditure of what appears at first glance
a large amount of money bat when the
amount of benefits and conveniences re
uniting therefrom are taken into consid
eration the costs dwindles into insignifi
oanoe. At the beginning of the present
fiscal year the supply from the old well
was not sufficient to supply the demand,
besides it had to be raised into tbe tanks
by one of the most uncertain oontriv
ances ever invented, "a wind mill,"
thing ot beauty and a pest forever, and
on the first of July it was found that
$407,00 dollara had been expended
tor
coal, engine, attendance &0., ia aiding
the wind mill to pump a very inadequ
ate supply of water into the tanks. A
new well was sunk at the cost of $2,800
dollars, proper conducting pipes with
the neoessary valves, out offs,
Sea.,
were
put in place at a Ooat of 458.00 dollars,
and the tanks were kept full whether the
wind blew or not. Eighteen hundred
and fifty feet ot new six inch mains were
laid, with the neoessary five plugs, T's
and crosses at oonvenient stations at a
cost of 1,609.00 dollara. A new bouse
was built-over the well for the storing
of implements and protection of valvee,
&oM at a cost of 150.00 dollars making a
total of $5,658.10 expended in this de
partment.
BTBEJBT8 AND HIGHWAYS.
In this department during the past
yeai? there haa been opened under the
supervision of the street commissioners
twenty-three thousand lineal feet of water
ditches and gutters, tbe benefits of wbiob
may be easily seen in the now dry and
well drained localities where but a year
ago it was impossible to travel without
wading through from six inohes to a
foot of mud, slush and dirty water. A
little more than a mile of new streets
have been built and nearly two miles
have been permenantly repaired and im
proved, twelve hundred cubio yards of
new filling being placed in Douglas ave
nue alone between Third and Fifth
streets. Main atreet from Piootte west
has been improved by the removal of
ten thousand oubio yards of dirt, con
verting a dangerous and almost impassi
ble country road into one of the finest
and most used thoroughfares in tbe
oity. The south side of seventh street,
between Broadway and Linn, was filled
up, requiring twelve hundred oubio
yards of material, thereby diverting tbe
waste water from the artesian well and
also from one of the tributaries to the
Rhine into a proper ehaBnel and re
claiming nearly a block of valuable
ground whioh is now being rapidly im
proved by the oirners. The total 'ex
pense of the abov4 improvements being
'ourteen hundred and fifty-aine dollars.
Seven new brick oulverts have been
built and oovered with three inoh plank
at an average oost of sixty-five dollatv
each and are the first brick water ways
ever constructed by the oity.
Sixteen new plank street crossings
and water ways have been put in, in
various parts of the oity,and one oovered
flume or water way on the west side of
Capitol street, between Bixth and
Seventh streets. In addition to new
crossings there haa been continual re
pairs demanded on nearly every one of
the old ones in tbe city. Eleven tinn
dred and twenty-three dollara have been
expended in this department. The street
commissioner bas often been hampered
and embarrassed in the discharge of bis
dutiei for lack of proper tools tu work
with. Pour worn out, worthless sorapers.
two old plows and half a dozen shovels
with an old saw and a solitary hand axe
oonatitute the entire stock of appliaooee
for building streets, making ditohee,
cleaning gutters, leveling turnpikes, re
pairing bridges, orossings&o., whereas
tor the speedy and eoonomioal work the
«ity should own, at least, a good heavy
roller and a grading machine, Of not too
expensive a kind, whereby three times
the amount of work could be done for
the same outlay, and the street com
missioner respeotfnlly requests tbe oom
mittee on streets, grades and alleys to
examine into the merits of anew grading
machine recently invented by Thomas
Finnegan, of this oity, and now on ex
hibition at his reeidenoe on Douglas
avenue.
ED. PAIIHBB, Oity Engineer.
Ou ipotion report eocepted and ordered
published with minutes.
Moved and seoonded that contract of
T. L. Pratt with oity, relative to build*
ing of sidewalks on Broadway in front
of O. Hameister property, be extended,
giving Mr. Pratt until April 1st to com
plete same. Carried.
On motion council adjourned.
J. H. BAUCAT, President pro-tem.
Attest: E- M. O'BBIKN, Oity Olerk.
.."V
BO
felMS
SIOUX CITY BLAZES.
MM
Wedneaday's Experiences Not so Bad
as Reported.
Sioux Oity Tribune, 23rd: Shortly
before 4 o'clook this morning the people
of this oity were startled from their
early morning slumbers by the ringing
of fire bells and blowing of whistles.
The fire was located in the basement of
W. W. Hall's jewelry store on No. 508
Fourth Btreet in the Sohulein block. It
wus first discovered by a colored young
man, Robert Miles, a porter at the OBfe
de Frank. He was sleeping on a bunk
tbe north end of tbe restaurant base
ment, and wee woke up by being nearly
suffocated by smoke. He escaped in
bis night olothes to the Hubbard
boose where he gave the
alarm and where he was provided with
wearing apparel. He states that when
he got up there was no fire tbe res
taurant basement, but it was filled with
smoke. The fire department promptly
answered the alarm. They experienced
mnoh trouble in reaching the flames,
whioh soon spread from the rear end of
the basemen* under the jewelry store
to other part* ot the building. The
basement under Hall's store was large
ly utilized for storing old orates, boxes,
ete., and it is believed that the fire was
the work of an incendiary, as there wss
no stove, lamp, or anything there which
could have oaused a blaze. The back
joists of this basement were
burned
badly that they have
partially given way, oausing the floor to
settle. Everything in the rear end of
this cellar was destroyed. The fiames
were suppressed before doing mnoh da
mage up stairs. The injury to the stooks
and restaurant was mostly done by
smoke and water. The east room of this
building was occupied by W. W. Hall's
jewelry stock and tbe musioal instru
ments and the merchandise of Pollard
and Tuttle._ The west room was occu
pied by the Cafe de Frank. The stock,
fixtures, eto., ot the latter are badly da
maged, as is also the stooks of Mr.
and Pollard Tuttle.
Webster & Skinner's book store .next
door west was filled with smoke, and
their stock considerably damaged. Mr.
Hathaway'a grocery store next door east
of Mr. Hall's was also filled with smoke
and his goods injured to some extent.
The offioes on the seoond floor of the
Sohulein building were smoked a trifle.
An alarm of flre was again sounded
just before noon to-day, and in a few
minutes Fourth street was lined with
people. It was learned that the alarm
came from the Davenport bouse, and
the crowd rushed in that direotion
headed by the flre department, The
alarm was a little premature, and was
caused by a burning chimney at the
house. No damage resulted.
»A-" ———an——
The Bleettena In Germany.
Belin special, 22nd: "The septennate
means peaoe,"—a paraphrase of Napo
leon's ''L'empire o'est la paix"—was on
many tongues this evening.. In recall
ing Yon Moltke's words much regret
expressed by old Berliners at the in
gratitude of the working class Voter, for
nationalization is claimed to have in
creased the wealth and opportunities of
the people. Mnoh sorrow appears to be
expressed by citizens here of Hamburg
that the town should have so unani
mously declared at tho polls for enmity
to German unity, public order and con
stitutional government. Almost the
same can be said of Nurem
berg. Others relieve this pioture
by showing that in the manufacturing
aud mining districts—in Prussia and
Saxony especially—the anarchists have
largely suffered in the balloting there.
Another good omen aeleoted by the
Bismarokiana ia that although sooialism
has, in a few places^ enormously increas
edits voting strength, its parliamentary
power has diminished 25 p«r oent on tbe
returns already here. Prehaps very
ourious statistics will appear when the'
total *ite of all the imperial opponents
is compared with that of Bismarok sup
porter*
Herr Riohter, in bis Freisinnige
Zeitung of this evening, writes that the
septennate ia sure of a majority in the
new reiohstag.
The Berliner.Fagblatt adds: "If the
septennate means peace we may now
go quietly to bed for, to judge from the
eleotion returns already to hand from
town and country, the aooeptanoe of the
army bill is assured. If Prince Bismarok
aimed at oreatmg a parliamentary ma
jority, on whoae blind devotion to tbe
government he oould always oount, he
seems to have suooseded in achieving
this. Henoeforth the will of the oban
oelior will be tho one determining fao
tor of the German reiohstag, and no
serious obstacle now seems to stand in
the way of hia realizing all his well
known ideas."
The Evening Preese remarks that
suooess begets suooess, and that in the
supplementary Bismarok will, through
prestige and perhaps weariness of
radicalism, still further gain seats.
Onenrtioas at the Mint.
Washington speoial, 32d: She report
of the direotor of the mint, containing
atatiatics of tbe production of the pre
dona metals in the Uuited States for the
oalendar year 1886, was transmitted to
congress, to-day. From tbe report it
appears that the production of gold
during 1886 exoeeded that ot any
previous year since 1880, and almost
equalled the production ot that year,
Tbia amounted to $36,000,000 in tww,
against $11,800,000 in 1886, an increase
'of over $3,000,000. Tbe production
of silver, as nearly as can
.be ascertained, waa $49,895,930. The
amount of gold bullion imported into
the United States wss $17,947,518 and
the exports $27,862,437. The importa
tions were made almost exclusively smog
August last. There was also imported
gold coin of the value of $23,861,603 and
gold coin was exported to the value of
$18,39S868. The total exports of gold'
bullion and ooin waa $41,281,276, which
corresponds almost exaotly with the
amount imported into the Uuited States,
so that there has been a tlight gain by
the movement of gold to and from tbe
United States during the calendar year.
An
Old
Budden
death. Visitors to the
city were thoroughly frightened and
BO
severe that rooks
were detached from the oliffs and hurled
into the sea. Many, casualties are re
proted. The residents are panio strioken
and have abandoned their dwellings.
The streets are orowded with people who
are flooking to the parks and open places
with a view to safety. Camps are already
bekjg looated. Several persons are
known to be buried in the ruins.
To Change Inauguration Day.
Washington, Feb. 22—There is to be
an earnest effort made by the house
committee on the judioiary to pass the
senate proposition to ohange inaugura
tion day to April 30. There are two
reasons urged for this ohange. One is that
tbe date would add to the pleasure and
convenience of the general pnblio. The
other is that the change would furnish a
better opportunity to oelebrate the oen
tennial of the first inangoration. March
4 ia generally a disagreeable day in
Washington, while by April 80 the spnog
haa oome. The house committee on the
judioiary
haB
ohosen to complioate the
simple proposition by adding to it a bill
introduoed by Crain of Texas, whioh
proposes to ohange the time of the
meeting of the fifty-first congress. Tbe
measures have no neoessary oorelation,
and while every one seems to favor the
ohange of the inauguration day, there
area great many who are opposed to a
change of the time of the meeting of
oongress. In view of this complication,
there is dangor that tbe senate proposi
tion may fail
.Wilt Work lionger if not JaaiAer.
Washington, Feb. 22—Congress has at
last become aroused to the fact that but a
few days remain of the iorty-ninth con
greas, and that but one of the fourteen
regular appropriation bills has beoome
a law. Mr. Allison, the chairman ol tiie
committee on appropriations, has repor
ted from that oommittee to the senate a
resolution fixing the houra of the session
from 11 a. m. to 9 p- m., with ope hour
for recess. This resolution
waB
28*
For the
-l€y
World Suthqualu,
Home, Feb. 23—Two shooks of earth
quake were felt at Nice at (jLo'oloek this
morning. Houses rocked, walls eraoked
and in aome oases frail tenements were
thrown to the ground. People rushed
from their houses and fell upon their
kneea in the streets praying for deliver
anoe from
w, f,
Tbe Value of liondoo liandi
Court Journal It has been ascer
tained, with regard to tbe Imperial in
stitute, that the site of about five aores
recently seoured for the new admiralty
and war. offices ia valued at £820,000, or
rather over £160,000 per acre that now
vaoant in Charles street, opposite the
India office, is less than an aore, and
would oost at .least £125,000 probably
another aore might be seoured by pri
vate contract^ so that tha value of a
limited site in this position would not
bejess than £250,000.
It has been suggested that a Bingle
aore not far from Charing Oross might
be obtained for £*324,000. Two and a
half aores on Thames embankment have
been offered for £400,000 and it Is stated
that six aorea may be. prooured from
Christ's hospital at £600,000. Another
good central position haa been suggested
consiating of two and a half acres, which
baa been valued at £668,000.
Even if a reduoed prioe were aooepted,
no site in that direotion is to be had tor
less than a quarter of a million. This
explanation is offered for falling baok on
the site whioh belongs to tbe oomro/ia
sioners of the exhibition ot 1851.
An JLimhiat Parson Frayed.
Cincinnati, Feb. 22.—Last Saturday
Mr. Donglass, secretary of tbe national
labor convention committee, telegraphed
to looal oommittee to seoure the servioes
of a clergyman to open the convention
with prayer, but the loosl oommittee con
cluded there would be more oaths than
prayers during the convention and did
not seoure any minister. The national
oommittee insisted so strongly upon it
however, that the local oommittee seleo
Jjd Kev. M, u. Ltockwood, of tbe First
Baptist ohuroh here. The reason we
seleot him," said Mr. Butterworth. a
committeeman, "is that be was fired
from his church in Albnay for advocating
socialistic and anarcbistio views, and aa
he has suffered some for us we should at
least reoognize him this far."
l-tid over
for a day, and may be adopted. The
object is to provide for the more rapid
and orderly tranBaotion ot pnblio bnsi
ness, andto avoid the fatigue and the
great danger of night sessions. The
house has already decided to meet eaoh
day at 11 o'clook, and as the work of the
committees ia already mainly done this
change will facilitate legislation.
I have need several bottles of Ely's Balm
with great mom. Had the catarrh wjKS
when«Ter I woald blow mj not# it would
tU» entirelT,°nt
I hare weed several tattle* of Ely's Cream
Balm iorw Catarrh with most favorable n
stilts.—A. F. loaog, Aroo, Idaho.
.w. THE MARKETS,
OsiOAOO.
Febrnary
Hay
28ft
WmmAm
WiDKAC.**,
jjs
ggf
June
Bye 84*
Barley—tOOS3.
Per dam.
S9K.
8
1
Flax-§l04©l.«i.
Whisky—$1.18.
Cattle-Shipping ateerstS.a0OS.10
aad feeders
tl.7SQI.70 bulk
eows $2.60.
stookers,
ai««». bulls and mixed
at $2400)1410 through Texaa
KH.WAOXU, F.broary M.
Oat*—No. 2,' 81.
Bye—No. 1, MX.
Barlsy—Ho, 2. Bl.
t»nh(wi
MifJtot
Xaakton, February 84.
•sSfcfiS.
are
leaving the plaoe. Many persona were
injured by falling debris. Much alarm
ia felt lest there be a recurrence of tbe
shook. The Prinoe of Walea who was in
Nioe a few days ago witnessing the fes
tivities whioh preoede toe lenten season
is said to have taken his departure and
is safe at Oanness. Shooks were also
felt mi Monte Carlo and Monaoa at wbioh
plaoee they were
20
.*ew w.e,e.4ee....e,eee„4
Ut •aaaa.eeaa* *V.
WP aa aal
per
--.a*y'a.eaaa. m.mh
LOMS aaaaaaaa a a. aaaa.
Wool*
PotATon« p*r tadMl
........... AO
77
MM
...... HLOO
11.71
.........j IS.2S
S.2S
1.00
...$5UXK 6.00
...llaao
it
•••tea*
a«\«aa«.«v
aoio
7
Corner of Third street and
Douglas Avenne.
A N
X. I?
Keeps the largest stook of
IBoots ds Slioes
IN DAKOTA also.
HaSa, Caps, Gloves and Men's
Hosiery. Is Agent for
Sign ol the
jO HEAD)
TmRl
HOOH
J.
OAXPBH.L,
LOAN OFFICE.
W'-LL ATTEND to oases in the distriot,
MM-
Drapate aad supreme oonrts. oonvey
titles. We nave
only abstract of titlos in
xtiinon oounty* OoUeotioiui promptly*
Money to loan on real estate.
Ompe ia Dadlej't block, oorner of Third and
Uonglas avenne.
5$-?JOS. SOllELTZ'S
Milwaukee Beer
On dxanght
GEORGE BROWN'S
Xhird tW. «amphr Snu.
•a#'.-'.
of breath.
pino6 uuig the B&im I axn anito a differ****
S5"«l "f™.1'? ^utj'-OhVrlS,'
Mont
Infantry, Fort Ouster,
£1.
Floor—Steady, aad tuiohaaged.
Wheat—Oash 78V May 79 IMS Jnca 81V.
Oorn—Oasit May ifiK Jnne40K.
Oato-Casta
JgBOWg hdUUe, (or' l^vslioer
rz aad fresh arc UAeqa^lledwadbe is at al
times prepared to famish this inv igorttiiii
beTerage at hia popalsa eetabUahiaeat.
Winen, liiqaers and Cigars
J^OkUa tboroi'sSaauple rooms oa Shi*
stwot whon Xaaktnn.
OBOBOK J1BOWH.
DAKCiTA
COMMEKCIAL COLLEGE,
TANKTON ...DASOT
White & Sharp,
I nsurance.
wm
I*ire« Marine, Life, Accf
dent, Tornado,*
I clone.
IV^iaiaasa pmatptly attmded to
WHECK ft 8HABP, Tanktoa^
JOHN L. PENNINGTON
Asmuunnr
AS LAW
Batufce
and
Lou
Uif v-ndtinlnnitaiiMt ij
Next TweijjyJjays,
We will Offer our Stock of Coal
Heating Stoves at Cost.
Some Bargains on Second Hand Heaters,
Dudley, Richey & Gross.
Prices given at the Popular
Shoe Store. A Good Clean
Stock to Select Irom. must
make room for Immense
Spring Stock to arrive soon.
Popular Shoe Store,
JOHN A. WEEKS.
E. C. Bart, Reynolds Bros., lieed and Weaver
and J. & J. Cousins fine Shoes for Ladies, Gents and
Children Burt & Packard, Burt & Mears and
Stacy, Adams & Co's. Fine Shoes for Men.
I. PILES,Yankton
Dealer in
BUILDERS' HARDWARE
Garland Stores, Buck's Brilliant, Gasoline Stoves
and Tinware. Wagon and Carriage
Wood Stook. Wagon and Carri
age Hardware, &c
Garden Implements,
G. H. VAR&HTWSBF.
Civil Engineer aad
Ouonty SorTeyer.
Attorney at Law.
Campbell 8c Van Antwerp
LAW, REAL ESTATE,
—AJID
GROCER
OeaIerkis Staple-?
Groceries and Provisions, Dried
Fruits, Wooden and Willow
Ware, Tobacoo, Cigars,
•-•P:
Supplies!
STREET, YANKTON, DAKOTA
C. H. BATES
WHOLESALE AND BETA1L
Eto., Eto., Eto., -t"
Opposite Cos, Odiorne & Go's
TANKTON
trw-
1
A-
'f
Thlia amd OapiioIJirtraets,
fp
.'"A
-v
SSt
51
I
.DAKOTA
of
Base.
Yankton Omnibus
-AND—
Transfer Line.
liimry, Feed and sale stable in oonneotion.
WOTIOXto my frieads and patrons: 1 hare
remoyad my Uvery stock and 'Bus line
from the Bradley barn on Walnut street to the
He™?r.
or the Xankton Auotion Market
•u.Capital street, where all luuiness in my line
willreoeiTomj bent attentidn.
Calls oan be left at my reiidenae on Walnut
street, at tha Morrison Hoatte. Telephone
and 80. M. B. DaOAuF
Livery, Feed
a
fi
«,
-AND
rtfr€
Most Commodious in tho Northweel.
PETEK STEFFIN, Prop.
rummB 01
Bre!tmr,
DOUOI
Fourth
streeta, fo
liDoee) h*i tbe iwrtt
•nd sale Stable tn Dakota,'
*m» ^ak
ATXNUI and
Oardeuer's ware
U«erjr outfit
aaliMtad aad
fetbrst:
hailhoa.08.
:r
cmcAg:
Mnwm
IT
\Ul
OWNS
ond operates neatly s.son -n I
thoroughly equipped .roadip life,?1
Dakota^1"'
Ml8a0uri'
is
THI
BUST Dnwoi
Bonn:
BT-For notices
Btnm,
^,
FBINOXPAX* POINTS IS THI NOBTHW»8T, 8OJJ,,
WEST AND
FAB WEST.
or toe umeago, miiwauaee & 8t. P.ni S
wS\df
40^
rMlroBd ,gent
*n**aw« uyj I
B. MILLKR, A. T. H. OABPRKtpti 1
General Manager. Gen'l Fuss. and WtB1 1
J. F. TDOKEd, QtO. H. HRAFRnm 1
Aas't Oen'i U[au. Ass't den Psas
ID
reference to Swoiai v.
oumiona, ohanges of time, and otheHtMiS
interest in connection vrith tht
wankee 4 St. Paul BsUway, please r^rto
looal columns of this paper*
Sioux City & Pacific
fc, r- -i'
A
s4
I'
RAELROi^D
^i\
IX OONNKOTIOK WJXB Mj
Chioago & Nortlrwestrn ItAllwayi
1 opnlar Pioneer Koutt
8K'fWUa~
Sioux
CRI' AND UHIOAOO
Two daily trains. The only lise running
O A N A A O a
tng oars between 8iua City and Ohiaua
throuun wittout canoe. Eledant Dinino «ri
are also inn on Trains between
Chicago and Oouneil Bluffe,
These oar are the most modern, oomplett
and mafinifioent Dining Oars in existenoe, and
aro managed and run entirely in the lntraiM
of the traveling pnblio, and without regard to
expense in maintaining the table. The meali
furnished will inolude all the delioaoiea ot the
season, and equal to those to be had atanj
striotly first-clans hotel. Bpeed, oomfortwi
safety are oombined. whioh render thia tha
PEOPLES' FAVOrilTE ROUTE
FBOM SIOUX OITY TO
Chicago
AND AXJj
Milwaukee
Des Moines
St. Louis
POINTS JBABI
ln
8obU""
41,0 Po!at8
All Trains are fulL
LEB 8AFET2 FliATFl
with the 1HL
and WE8TISa-
HOUSE AUOMATIO Allt BBA&E8.
Trains leave Sioux uity dally at 2:2S p. a
and 4^0 a.m.
Passengers taking this line make dlroot x®
neotions in Ohioago with all fast train* for all
principal points east, and at D. P. Ti inafer
Oonneil Blofis, with all tr- ins for pointi
SODUI
and west. Baggage oheake* through to 11 tht
pnnolpal poina.
J.
B. BGOHANAN,
General Passenger agent.
O. M. Iawuo, Oen'l. Hup't^
Missouri Valley, lowii
t. W. BDDDI. Agent. Bionx Oity.
THE PEOPLE'S LINE.
jsX
'Si -'•'L'."
Fargo & Southern
RAXLWAY, between
FARGO & ORTONVILE
Is prepared to handle both
FREiCHT & PASSENGER TRAFFIC
With promptness and (safety. Oonneetinr
at Ortonville with the Ohfosso, Mil
waukee A St. Paol ayafem.
the Fargo & Southern
thus makes another :,
Great Trunk Line
To all eastern and southern states. The
Peoples' Iiine is superb in all its appointments
elegant coaohec, Pullman sleepers on all nigm
trains and its rates are always as low and tinar
as quick as other lines.
IVWhen you go east or oome west try ths
Fargo and Southern.
Trains leave Fargo for Stinneapolis, St. Pan
and intermediate stations, at 7 AO m. and 7 JU
a. m. Arrive at Fargo from St. Paul and Min
neapolis at ft. m. and 8:20 p. m.
Tiokets for sale at the principal stations
ttt. Paul. Minneapolis, Obioagu and all eaatcru
and southern states. For fnrther information
address A. T. H. OAKPENTEB,
Gen. Freight and Pass. Agent. Milwauk
n*KOM LBOAL BLANK8.
*.
J.
•"iv
PRESS AND OAKOTAIAN LifcT:
It St
FOB LAWYERS,
w,11 ,, I
Sale Stable
JU8TIOEB OP THE PEACE
IBOBATE JTJD3ES
CLEBKB OF OODBT
v. a COMMISSION ER?
MINERS
8HEEIFF8
NOTAKIE8 PtJJfiUO
CONVEYANOEE8
Ut S. JLand Office Blanks
!^.OBtalo|tae ftmtiahed on application
Addma. BOWBN A KINQBBUBY
"7T
•ankton. Dakota
HEMTiSTRT, BEKT1MXBT fe
Dr. w. H. H- HROWH, Oealiat. "Usli
Wouk. Zankton. Fr«fc gao.alwaffsoa kamd.

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