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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, January 26, 1918, Image 11

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1918-01-26/ed-1/seq-11/

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THE TIMES: JANUARY 26, 1918
11
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HOE-BUILDERS
ARE HELPED BY
EQUITABLE PLAN
A. new method has been evo'ved by
which the stringency in the mortgage
market can be overcome by people
wishing to secure loans on property.
For some time past it has been ex
tremely difficult for the home seeker
to obtain loans on property without
having to give a bonus or through
various forms of expense pay a high
rate of Interest. The Home Purchase
i plan recently placed before the pub
lic by the Equitable Life Assurance
Society solves the problem. By this
means, six per cent mortgage money is
placed on desirable residence prop
erties on a basis not to exceed fifty
per cent of a conservative appraised
value, payment on mortgage to be ex
tended over a period of ten years.
There is the additional feature of a
monthly premium life insurance for
the amount of the mortgage. This is
usually issued in the ordinary life
form but can aluo be issued upon any
other higher premium form at the
repular monthly rates.
The policy is Issued for the max
imum amount of t'i loan and is as
signed to the Equitable as additional
security. If death occurs within the
loan period the amount due on the
loan will be deducted from the amount
due on the life insurance policy and ,
the balance will be paid to the bene
ficiary. Home purchase loans are made only
in moderate amounts, the maximum
limit for any locality being determin
ed by rules fixed by the society but
in no event will a' home purchase
loan be made in excess of $5,000.
After cancellation of the mortgage
at maturity the life insurance policy
may be retained by continuing the
monthly instalments which will be re
duced to the Equitable's regular
monthly premium rates for the ori
ginal age of, entry. Or the policy
may be cashed in for its then attain
ed cash value or converted into a paid
up policy for the amount stipulated in
the policy.
There ' are many other exceptional
features in this plan that will be ex
plained by the local representative,
Percy P. Anderson, 306 Fairfield Ave.
FOREIGN TRADE
OF LAST YEAR
NINE BILLIONS
The country's foreign trade
amounted to over $9,0,000,000 in
1917, exports reaching a total of $6,
226.000.000, while imports amounted
to $2,952,000,000, according to a state
ment issued today by the Bureau of
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, De
partment cf Commerce This is a gain
of nearly $1,300,000,000 over 1916,
when tho total trade amounted to
$7,874,000,000.
December exports amounted to
$589,000,000, an increase of no less
than $100,000,000 over November.
The imports for December amounted
to $228,000,000, an Increase of $7,-
000,000 over November.
Free imports formed 76 per cent.
of the total in December and 72 per
cent, of the total for the. calendar
year.
The excess of exports over Imports
has nearly doubled in the last two
years, amounting to $3,274,000,000 in
1917, against $3,091,000,000 In 1916
and $1,776,000,000 in 1915.
The imports of gold during Decern
ber amounted to $2,600,000, a3 com
pared with $159,000,000 in December,
1916. For the year the gold imports
amounted to $538,000,000, against
$686,000,000 in 1916. The exports of
gold amounted to $4,600,000 in .De
cember, 1917, against $28,000,000 in
December, 1916. For the year the
gold exports amounted to $372,000,
000, as compared with $156,000,000
- in 1916.
Silver imports amounted to $6,000,
000 in December, as compared with
$3,500,000 for the corresponding
month in 1916, and to $53,000,000 for
the year, against $32,000,000 in 1916.
Exports of silver were valued at $10,
000, 00 in December, 1917, and $9,
000,000 in December, 1916. For the
year the silver exports amounted to
$84,000,000 against $71,000,000 for
1916.
LONGSHOREMEN IN
IN NEW YORK GO
OUT UPON STRIKE
New York, Jan. 56. Longshoremen
. employed on five piers of the Southern
Pacific Steamship Co. on the North
river went on strike today for higher
Although trnr.ni ira
rn onmrrt the anlillnni vm reinforced
by the New York police.
One 'thousand men were reported to
'have quit work. E. H. Patton, agent
for the company, charged repudiation
by the workers of an agreement ef
fected In their behalf last October by
the wage commission of the United
States shipping 'board.
Freight for coastwise ports is held
? by the strike. The men demand
75 cents and $1 a hour, according
to Mr. Patton, as compared with the
wage commission's award of 45, 65
trd 85 cents an hour.
TODAY'S WANTS
"AGENTS 200 per cent profit; won
derful little article; something new;
sells like wildfire. Cai.y right in
your pocket. Write at once for free
samp'. F. M. Feltman', Sales
Man;u,or, 1J09 American Bldg., Cin
elnnatl, O. ap
AUCTION KALE of household furni-
ture, 61 Vine St., 10 rooms of fur-
niture must be sold to highest bid
ders, Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 9:30 sharp.
Jmn Jcguaon. 121 John St.
I'immiiiiiiiiirmiiiimiiiiiiii: uiuiiiiiiii
STOCK MAHKET
?iiimiimiimiimiiiiiiiMiiimiiiiimimi:
New York, Jan. 26. Opening Stocks
showed an irregular undertone at fhe
oenlng of today s market, but soon,
strengthened on a moderate inquiry
for leaders, including United States
Steel and transcontinental railroads at
gains of substantial fractions to a
point. Coal shares were represented
by Norfolk & Western, which rose
1 3-8. Minor cessions were made by
Mexican Petroleum, American Smelt
ing and Bethlehem Steel.
Closing. Trading in stocks during1
today's short session reflected next
Monday's holk'ay and the uncertain
attitude of the speculative element.
Prices hardened soon after the open
ing, but yielded moderately on pres
sure against United States Steel, Cop
pers, and equipments. Railroads were
relatively the strongest feature, Pa
cifies, Norfolk & Western and- some of
the low priced western group scoring
extreme gains of one to almost two
points. These were partly sacrificed
in the final dealings. The closing was
firm. Sales, 275,000 shares. Liberty
J l-2s reacted from 98.08 to the new
low record of 97.94, the first 4s sold at
96.90 to 96.80, and the second 4s at 96 JO
to 96.22.
New York Stock
Exchange Quotations
Reported over the private wires of
T. L. Watson & Co., Bankers and
"Jrokers, corner Main and John streets,
Bridgeport, Conn. Members of New
York Stock Exchang.
Jan. 26, 1:30 p. m.
Allis Chalmers
Am. Beet Sugar
Am. Car & Fdy.
Am. Can
Am. Cotton Oil Co.
Am. Locomotive
Am. Tobacco
Am. Smelt. & Re. Co.
Am. Sug. Refg. Co.
Am. Tel. & Tele.
Am. Woolen
Alaska Gold
Atl. Gulf & W. Indies
Atch. T. & S. Fe
Anaconda Copper
"Baldwin Loco.
Baltimore & Ohio
Bethlehem Steel "B"
'Brooklyn Rapid Trans.
19
77
71
36
28
56
160
82
105
104
47
2V
102
84
61
61
50
55
43
18
15
64
43
20
20
62
62
16
42
53
32
55
31
110
37
15
24
129
117
45
26
95
45
28
7
24
91
27
17
32
113
26
90
22
32
18
43
103
70
46
23
73
Butte & Sup.
Calif. Petroleum
Cen. Leather Co.
Chi., M. & St Pattl
Chi. & Great W. Pfd.
Chi., R. I. & Pae.
Chi. R. I. & Pac. Pfa. A
Chi.,' R. I. & Pac. Pfd. B.
Chile Copper
Chino
Chesapeake & Ohio
Corn Products
Crucible Steel
Cuban Cane Sugar
Del. & Hudson
Distilleries Securities
Erie
Erie 1st Pfd:
General Electric
General Motors
Goodrich Co.
Gt. Northern Ore
Illinois Central
Inspiration Copper
International Nickel
Interborough Cons.
Inter. Mer. Marine
Inter. Mer. Marine Pfd.
International Paper
Kansas City Sou.
Kennecott Cop.
Louis. & Nashville
Maxwell Motors ,
Mex. Petroleum
Missouri Pacific
Miami Copper
Nevada Cons.
Nat. Enameling
Norfolk & Western
N. Y. Central
Pennsylvania
Ray Cons.
Reading
Repub. Iron & St?3l
By. Steel Spring
Sinclair Oil
Southern Pacific
Southern Railway
Southern Railway Pfd.
Studebaker Corp'n.
Texas Oil
Tob. Products
Union Pacific
United Cigar tores
United Fruit
U. S. Ind. Alcohol
XJ. S. Rubber
U. S. Steel
jU. S. Smelter
75
51
32
82
23
58
50
150
54
114
94
120
119
55
91
45
82
8
90
40
17
97.94
96.30
uah Copper
Wabasn
West. Union Tel.
Westmghouse Electric
Willys Overland
liberty bonds 3s
Liberty bonds 4s
Boston 1:30 P. M. Prices Reported
Over Private Wire to T. L. t
Watson & Co.
Arizona Com.
Butte & Superior
Cal. & Arizona
Centennial
13
18
65
13
5
9
14
59
5
5
11
8
Davis Daiy
i Bast Butte
North Butte
Osceola
Shannon
U. S. Smelting
Utah Consol.
Ventura
DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR
OFFICIAL DROPS DEAD,
San Francisco, Jan. 26 iTrank H.
Gould, surveyor general of the de
partment of the interior of the United
States, dropped dead here today from
apoplexy in a corridor In front of his
office. '
Stanea Want Ada. One Cent Word
50,000 INCOMES
WILL BE TAXED
IN CONNECTICUT
Estimates Made by Collector of
Internal Revenue for
This District
SALARIES AS LOW AS .
$1,000 ARE AFFECTED
Married Men Who Earn $2,000 or
More a Year Must Pay Payments
Computed on Actual Net Income
for 1917 Law Must Be Compiled
With Before March 1 Under Penalty
of Heavy Fine.
Hartford. James J. 'Walsh, internal
revenue collector for this district, has
announced that he estimates that there
will be npward of 50,000 Income tax
payers in the state of Connecticut for
the yelr ending December SI, 1917,
taxes on which are due on or before
March L 1918.
The income tax law has been great
ly changed during the past year and
thousands of Connecticut citizens not
included in the list liable to pay the
tax a year ago must this year pay the
tax on their 1917 Incomes.
All persons liable under the Income
tax law are required to secure the
proper forms from Internal revenue of
ficers, file their returns and pay their
taxes. Those neglecting to obey the
provisions of the law are subject to
penalties ranging from $20 to $1,000
and also to Imprisonment.
Salaried men, wage-earners, farmers,
merchants, professional men trades
men and all other classes of citizens
and residents should familiarize them
selves with the provisions of the new
income tax law for their own protec
tion from the penalties, according to
Collector Walsh.
If your salary, or wages, or Income
amounted to $84.33 a month (that is,
$1,000 a year) or over during 1917, and
you are unmarried, you must make a
statement of this income to the gov
ernment and pay an income tax.
If you are married or support a fam
ily It will be necessary for you to
make an income return and pay the
tax if your Income for 1917 amounted
to $166.66 a month (that is, $2,000 a
year) or over.
The tax is on "net" Income, and
net" Income means what is left after
subtracting expenses (but not family
expenses, money used to pay off tha
principal of a mortgage, new machin
ery, buildings or improvements). Ex
penses as meant by the law include
what yon spent in making your in
come interest charges, taxes paid.
hired help, amount paid for goods
sold, seed, stock bought for feeding,
rent (except for your dwelling), and
so on.
A large number of special revenue
officers have been Instructed . In the
provisions of the new income tax law
and will visit various parts of the
state in order that all citizens may
get in touch with them and learn what
they must do.
Collector Walsh advises that every
citizen learn at once when the Inter
nal revenue expert will be available so
that the proper advice and blanks may
be secured and the returns filed. Any
postmaster or banker can give Infor
mation as to when this expert can be
seen. Collector Walsh has prepared
the following list of places and those
showing when and where representa
tives of his office can be seen concern
ing income tax returns. Unless other
wise indicated they will be found at
the post office In the town or city
named :
New Haven January 2 to March 2
Deputy Collector's stamp office, Fed
eral building.
Ansonia January 2 to January 31.
Derby February 1 to March 2
Meriden January 14 to March 2.
Waterbury January 2 to March 2
Deputy Collector's stamp office, Fed
eral building.
Wallingford January 2 to January
12.
New London January 2 to March
2 Deputy collector's stamp office,
Federal building.
Norwich January 2 to March 2.
Willimantlc January 14 to January
26.
Plainfield January 2 to January 12.
Putnam January 14 to February 4.
Rockville January 28 to February 9.
Winsted January 7 to January 19.
Torrington January 21 to Febru
ary 9.
Litchfield January 2 to Jasuary
Middletown January 2 to January
3L
Essex February 1 to February 16.
Bridgeport January 2 to March 2
Deputy collector's stamp office; Fed
eral building.
Stamford February 1 to March 2.
Greenwich January 2 to January
31.
Norwalk January 2 to March 2.
Danbury January 2 to March 2.
Hartford January 2 to March 1
Collector's office. Federal building.
Thompsonville January 2 to Jan
uary 12.
Windsor Locks January 14 to Jan-
nr.ry 19.
Bristol January 2 to January 81.
South Manchester January 2 to
January 12.
New Britain January 2 to March 2.
No merchant ever failed
if he advertised as WELL
and as MUCH as he could.
I). S. ASSEMBLES
LARGE CAVALRY
UNIT IN TEXAS
El Paso, Texas, Jan. 26. Formed
quietly along the Mexican border, with
headquarters here, during the last
month or two, the largest body of
mounted United States troops under
one command since the close of the
Civil war, the Fifteenth Cavalry divi
sion of more than 18,000 picked men,
is training for its ostensible purpose,
that of strengthening the overseas ex
peditionary forces, meanwhile keeping
vigil on the Mexican uncertainty Ir
any marauding band along the Rio
Grande doubts that the boundary is
not under about the best protection
it has been since the Mexican troubles
began, an attempt to cross and raid
would bring such an answer as the
Eighth cavalry has been giving in the
Big Bend region of late. The swift
riding protectorate extends from No-
gales, Ariz., to Brownsville, Texas. It
is peculiarly a cavalryman's job.
Organization of the Fifteenth divv
slon is part of the war department's
program to form three such bodies of
mounted troops. Major General
George Wmtle Read, West Polnter.and
native of Iowa, has practically com
pleted his staff organization in El
Paso, where all the headquarters
troops provided for in the new tactical
schemes of a mounted division are as
sembled, besides one brigade of three
regiments, the Fifth, Seventh! and
Eighth, the Eighth being temporarily
directed from Marfa, Texas. Another
brigade, made up of the First, Fif
teenth, and Seventeenth regiments has
its headquarters at Douglas, Ariz. The
other brigade, the Sixth, Thirteenth,
and Sixteenth, reports to San Antonio,
Texas. At Columbus. N. M.. the
Twelfth cavalry holds the port where
Pershing's expedition entered and
emerged from the Villa chase.
At Fort Bliss, El Paso, the 82nd
Field Artillery, a cavalry outfit con
verted, is under canvas, with all aux
iliaries such as supply, sanitary, am
munition, signal, engineers' and head
quarters trains," plus an expected
squadron of 12 airplanes, and other
useful units.
General Read's command follows.
historically, the famous cavalry di
vision of the Army of the Mississippi,
commanded by Major-General James
Harrison Wilson, daring leader under
Sherman, who vanquished the Con
federate Forrest, captured Jeff Davis,
and destroyed the last arsenal in the
old South at Selma, Ala., after a me
morable campaign, offshooting from
the march of Sherman's columns to
the sea. General Wilson still lives
at Wilmington, Del., in his 82nd year.
His memories recount war adventures
of that epoch that have caused his
command to bew ritten by military
authorities, home and abroad, as the
best body of mounted soldiers ever
gathered together up to that time
in the western hemisphere.
Wilson, however, had only 13,500
men. The 15th Cavalry division on
this border numbers 5,000 more. Wil
son had only three batteries of artil
lery. Read has twice that number.
Wilson's men had to pick up horses
best they could. Read's troopers
have the finest trained animals in the
service and many remount stations to
back them up. Scouts in the Civil
War discerned only by ground ap
proach. Flying cavalry in the shape
of Liberty motors on wings witf" pilot
the new division and set its fire
ranges.
Wilson was a hustling engineer and
was proud of his men's achievements
in that line under fire, but modern
science has furnished the 15th Divi
sion with apparatus not dreamed of
a hair century dock. Non-eaective
troopers now will be cared for in the
field as in a home with the aid of
hospital and ambulance units, motor,
and horse. There is no danger of
food or fighting materials lacking,
with companies of motor trucks to fol
low the fighting men.
General Read is recently from Camp
Upton, N. Y., whence he received his
second star. He is a medal of honor
officer, and won that on the Mexican
border last year. His service in In
dian wars, Cuba, and the Philippines
has been notable. His elder son. Cap
tain Burton Y. Read, is on his staff,
and his younger, George W. Read, Jr.,
is a sergeant at Fort Bliss. Mrs. Read
and his daughter, Miss Margaret Read,
are prominent in Red Cross affairs.
Any threatening developments in
Mexico will find United States cavalry
firmly holding the north line of this
country ready to put down lawless
ness. If the Blantom bill passes Texas
may be authorized to mobilize a divi
sion of cavalry for strictly border pa
trol. There is sufficient infantry along
the border to keep the peace, but in
fantry is most needed in the great
struggle overseas. Cavalry, therefore,
and especially this greatest body as
sembled in 50 years, will no doubt
have the irksome job of riding the line
for some time to come.
No merchant ever failed
if he advertised as WELL
and as MUCH as he could
if
Money
ON FIRST
TEN YEAR LOANS
UNDER
Home Purchase Plan
PROTECTION NO COMMISSIONS
For Particularly Apply to
PERCY P. ANDERSON, Representative.
BOILERS BALK IN
STEAMER AT SEA
WITH FOOD LOW
An Atlantic Port, Jan. 26 The
steamer City of Wilmington reported
by wireless today that she was dis
abled at sea because of boiler trouble
and .that the supply of provisions was
about exhausted. Naval authorities
did not reveal the vessel's position, but
it was said that ships have been or
dered to her assistance.
TWO DIE AT FRONT
Washington, Jan. 26 Gen. Pershing
reported today the following deaths
from natural causes among the Amer
ican expeditionary forces:
Corporal Clary Osborne, pneumonia,
McKeesport, Pa
Private Frederick L. Curtis, frontal
sinuisuta, Lynn, Mass.
STATE OF CONNECTICUT,
DISTRICT OF BRIDGEPORT, 6
PROBATE COURT.
January 23, 1918.
Estate of Bradley B. Meeker late of
the town of Bridgeport, in said dis
trict deceased.
The Court of Probate for the Dis
trict of Bridgeport hath limited and
allowed six months from the date
hereof for Creditors of said Estate to
exhibit their claims for settlement.
Those who neglect to present their
accounts properly attested, within
said time, will be debarred a recov
ery. All persons indebted to said
estate are requested to make imme
diate payment to
ADDIE F. MEEKER,
Executrix.
Address, Care Beardsley and Beards
ley, 11-12 Franklin Building, Bridge
port, Conn. A 26 s'
STATE OF CONNECTICUT,
DISTRICT OF BRIDGEPORT, SS.,
FKOBATJU VUUK1'
January 24, 1918.
Estate of Bridget Kiernan, late of
the town of Bridgeport, in said dis
trict, deceased.
The Court of Probate for the Dis
trict of Bridgeport hath limited and
allowed six months from the date
hereof for Creditors of said Estate
to exhibit their claims for settlement.
Those who neglect to present their
accounts properly attested, within
said time, will be debarred a recov
ery. All persons indebted to said Es
tate are requested to make imme
diate payment to
MARGARET McDONALD,
Executrix.
A 26 s
NICHOLAS FAG AN
VS. Order of Notice
AGNES SMITH FAGAN
STATE OF CONNECTICUT, v
FAIRFIELD COUNTY, as.,
SUPERIOR COURT.
Bridgeport, Jan. 23. A. D, 1918.
Upon the complaint of the said
Nicholas Fagan of Bridgeport, Fair
field County, Connecticut praying, for
reasons therein set forth, for a di
vorce, now pending before this Court,
having been returned thereto, on the
first Tuesday of February, 1918.
It appearing to and being found by
this court that Agnes Smith Fagan
the said defendant is absent from this
State and gone to parts unknown
and that notice of the pendency of
the complaint was given as required
by order of notice heretofore issued,
and now the plaintiff asks for a fur
ther order of notice in the premises.
Therefore Ordered, that notice of
the pendency of said complaint be giv
en by-publishing this order in the
Bridgeport Times and Evening Far
mer, a newspaper printed in. Bridge
port,, three . (3) times successively
commencing on or before the 24th day
of January, A. D., 1918.
By the Court,
FRED W. TRACY,
Assistant Clerk of the Superior Court
for Fairfield County. A 24 s
DESIGNER ON JIGS
AND FIXTURES
Best of work, wages and
conditions. Only competent
men need apply.
BILTON MACHINE
TOOL CO.
990 Housatonic Ave.
A 26 u
TOOLMAKERS
on Jigs and Fixtures
Also LATHE PLANER
HANDS AND CUTTER
GRINDER
on close accurate work.
A No. 1 men are the only
men we can use. There
fore no other need apply.
BILTON MACHINE
TOOL CO.
990 Housatonic Ave.
A 26 u
To Loan
MORTGAGE
Easy Monthly Payments
THE
A 25
FINANCIAL
OVER FIFTY TEARS
3 PER CENT. INTEREST
YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT
We think this will appeal to yon particularly in view of our experience"
of over fifty years in banking. We can assure yon of safety, satisfactory
conduct of your business, and courteous treatment.
Interest credited to accounts monthly.
We would like to tell you about our methods.
Call us on the 'phone or come in and see as.
T. L. WATSON & CO.
PRIVATE BANKERS
CORNER MAIN AND JOHN STREETS .
Established 1866
SAVE YOUR QUARTERS
HELP WIN THE WAR
Sixteen 25c Thrift Stamps with 12c buys a War
Savings Stamp for which the U. S. Government will
pay you $5.00 on Jan. 1, 1923.
The easiest way to save money and at the same
time help whip the Hun.
BRIDGEPORT SAVINGS BANK
COR. STATE AND BROAD STS.
Open Monday Evenings 6:30 to 8:00.
n
Local owners of Liberty Bonds are
offered special service without charge
Bonds will be cared for in our Impregnable
Vault we will clip coupons and collect interest
for you, crediting same to you on the day it be
comes due, thereby relieving you of the fuss and
bother of clipping and collecting.
We become absolutely responsible for the
Bonds. Gome in and
detaii '
This Special Liberty Bond
Service Is Absolutely Free
169 STATE STREET
Member Federal Reserve System
ABUNDANT
EVIDENCE
that payment by check is the most
practical medium of settlement ia
noted every day. No worry about risk
of funds or missing receipt.
For safety and good service, have a
Checking Account with us. Come in
and start one now.
JAMES STAPLES & CO.
189 STATE STREET
T. B. WARREN
Real Estate and Insurance
179 Golden Hill St.
Tel. 2417
PATENTS -
A. M. WOOSTER
Late Examiner U. S. Patent Office
1115 MAIN STREET, BRIDGEPORT
Send for booklet on patents
AUCTION SALE
SUPERIOR COURT,
FAIRFIELD COUNTY.
The J. II. Coughlln Company
37 Randall Avenue,
Bridgeport, Conn.
By Order of Court, I will sell at
public auction on Wednesday after
noon, January 30th, at 1:30 o'clock
the entire stock and equipment, in
cluding the following: of the J. H.
Coughlin Co., at the former place of
business, 37 Randall Ave.:
2 G. M. C, 1600 lb. Motor Delivery
Trucks.
1 Ford Commercial car.
1 Delivery Wagon and Harness.
Platform scales.
Gas Ovens.
Cleveland Electric Chopper with
Motor.
Crescent Silent Cutter with Motor.
Crescent Pneumatic Stuffer with
Motor and air equipments complete.
1 Brecht Stuffing Sanitary table.
2 Steel Cooking Vats, sanitary
trucks.
2 Smoke houses equipped with iron
doors. t
2 Refrigerators.
1 Boiler, 18 h. p.
1 Crescent Dump Mixer with motor.
Sausage Carriers.
Overhead troUey tracks.
Steam fixtures. -Electric
motors and fans
Grind stone.
Spices of all kinds.
Casings.
Hog Rounds.
Sheep Casings.
Weasards rounds.
By Order of Henry 3. Stevenson,
Receiver.
. DOC ELWOOD, Auctioneer,
2 SO Fairfield Avenue.
Tel. Baraan SS86. . A-24 r ,
FREE
LIBERTY
BOND
SERVICE
weH explain our plan in
The City National Bank
Savings Department Pays
4 Per Cent Interest
Start Saving Now
107 WAI1I1L STSEBT
THE CONNECTICUT
NATIONAL BANK
OF .
BRIDGEPORT
Opr. Main and Wall Streets
What Is Concrete?
Concrete a manufac
tured stone is made by;
mixing together Port
land Cement, sand and
stone (or gravel.) Var
ious proportions of each' .
are used, depending upon
the use to which the con
crete is put. About hal
an hour after mixing
these materials together,
the mass begin to stiffen,
until, in from half-a-day
to a- day, it becomes so
hard that you cannot
dent it with the hand- By
a month the mass is hard
like stone indeed, hard
er than most stones.
We have many book
lets relating to concrete
and cement work which
we would be pleased to,
send you. V
The
Wheeler & Howes Co.
MASONS' MATERIAL
BRIDGEPORT
Phone Bannm S44-3453

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