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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, January 30, 1918, Image 12

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1918-01-30/ed-1/seq-12/

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12
THE TIMES: JANUARY 30, 1913
r (Continued from Pag 11.)
praying, ce
menting, -
etc. l,50f 00
Filling at Sea
. side Park,
west of Bar-
num Dyke, 5,000 00
Salaries, 4,980 00
Electric Light
4ng, , 4,000- 00 -
Feed .Including
.hay," oats, straw,
bran, etc, 2,000 00 '
Telephone, 100 00,
Water Sup- '
ply, 1,000 00
Irfalntenance of
Automo-
. biles, 3,000 00
General Re-
pairs, 3.500 00
Insurance, 1,250 00
Repairs and .
- Maintenance . i
to horsedrawn .
ehicles, 1,000 00 ( "r
New Harness
and repairs, 200 00
Flowers, and ,
Trees, 1,506 00
Seeds, bulbs, i
etc... f 1,000 00
Hardware and
General sup
plies, 3,000 00
New Horses, 800 00
Oils, . paints,
etc., 250 00
Printing and
Stationery, 150 00
Fertilizer for
'all parks, 500 00
Coal, 400 00
Crushed stone
for top dress
ing Beards- !
ley and Sea-
-ia riflrc 2 000 00
Maintenance . " . '
of Play-
'rrounds, 1,000 00
Development
of upper .end
. of Beardsley
Park, 2,000 00
Horseshoeing
and Misc.
; Stable Ex
penses, eoo on
Maintenance
of Golf
Links. 1,000 00
Green Im
provements,
Grade A, 137,700 00
2, Patrolmen,
Grade B, 2,600 00'
90 Patrolman,
Grade C ' 10,800 00
Increased pay,
. as per or-- . N
dinanca, 6,854 11
Increased pay
of Patrolmen
detailed as
. Detectives, 3,000 00
50 new Patrol
men, 60,000 00
S 419,294 11
POLICE & CHARITIES BLDG.
Salaries
Sundries . .
Water
Cartage
Insurance
Light .
Coal
Telephone
Telephone
Operators
Remodelling
12,500 00
350 00
175 00
100
662
2,500
1,500
1,400
00
00
00
00
00
2.340 00
5,000 00
Totals,
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Engine and
Apparatus
Mainten-
$15,927 00
Regular,
ance
Wagon and
Truck Re
pairs Hydrant
Repairs
Fire Alarm
System
Hose Renew
als Chemical
Supplies
Msicel-
laneous
Telephones
Water
Coal and
Wood
Electric
Light and
Power
Repair Shop
Supplies
Furniture
Gasoline
7,500 00
500 00 5
SPECIALS.
82,230 00
Dexelopment
of Beachwood
' Far, 5,000
Equipment for
new playground
corner of
Bostwick- Ave.
and Pine St
(on land leas
ed free) 750
Furniture for
New Bath-
' house, Sea
side Park,
.United States
Volunteer
Ufe Sav
ing Corps,
Bandstand,
Beardsley
00
00
2,000 00
500 00
2,000 00 $ 10,250 00
Total,
392,480 00
CITY ENGINEER,
Salaries, , $20,500 00
Supplies, , 2,000 00
1,000 00 $
Auto Ex
penses,
23,500 00
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Salaries
as per
schedule,$419,294 11
Janitor, 2nd
Precinct, 360 00
Janitor, 3rd
Precinct, 360 00
Janitor, 4th
Precinct, 360 00 ....
Sheriff Fees, ,25 00
' Ptiysiclan, 250 00
Superintend- .
ents Fund, 800 00
Meals, 2.00 00
Badges, 900 00
2nd Precinct
1,400 00
3rd Precinct
1.4A0 00
4 th Precinct
Malnten
- ance, 1,400 00
Disinfectants, 200 00
Signal Systemi.2,500 00
Bertillon
System, 150 00
Reform School, 100 OW . ,
Sundries, 1.000 00 .
Printing,
Stationery,
Ice, Postage,
Telegrams,
Express,
Auto Main
tenance, Motorcycle
New Signal
Boxes,
President'
Fund,
Office Equip-
" ment.
New Motor
cycles, New Lockers,
Repairs, 2nd
Precinct,
Repairs, 3rd
Precinct,
Repairs, 4th
Precinct. 300 00
Auto Patrol, 2,000 00
Replacing and
, installing
new lines.
Rent, Wall St.
' Lot and
Depot,
Expenses,
Superintend
ent to Con-
vention,
Motor Gen
erator, Drill Master,
2,500 00
2,000 00
4,000 00
7,500 00
1,200 00
12,000
1,200
360
00
00
00
6,000,000
of
8,000
Culvert Re-
pairs, 250 00
Common Road
Repairs, 6,000 00
Street
Cleaning 180,000 00
Street Cleaning
Equipment 5,000 00
Macadam Re
pairs, 65,000 00
Sidewalk
Repairs,
Sewer Re
pairs,
Salary of ,
Director
and Clerks, 6,900 00
Street
Sprinkling 25,000 00
Watering
Trough Re
pairs, - 2,500 00
Sewer Well
Cleaning 14 000
Sewer Well
Cleaning,
Supplies, 500
Sewer Clean
ing, 2,000
Trimming trees
as per re
quest of Bus
iness Men's
Asso. 3,000
River Street
Pumping
Station, 2,000 00
New Macadam and Top" Dressing
Andover.St, $2,338 00 '
Boston Ave,, 8,400 00
Berkshire
Ave., 7,466 00
Beechwood
Ave., . 19,665 00
Bedford Ave., 2,566 00
Crescent Av., 12,000 00
Cleveland
Ave., 4,2.00 00
Circular Ave., 1,866 00 ' '
Courtland,
Ave., 7,932 00
Chalmers Av,, 4,432 00
Catherine St, 4,200 00
00
00
00
00
325 150 50
6,000 00
3,500 00
1,200 00
1,500 00
6-.000 00
Salaries 359,000 00
$415,460 00
Special.
Hydrants and
Settings 10,000 00
Building Re
pairs 10,000 00
Underground
Cable 8,500 00
Fire Alarm
Boxes 3,000 00
Firemen's Re
lief Fund 13,574 72
New Equip
ment 66,500 00
Combination
Pump and
Hose. Wag
on 9,000 00
Drill Tower 4,500 00
Store House
(City Yard) 1,000.00
Deficiencies.
Sidewalk
Tree removal, y
setting back -
curbs,
Stowe, $ 722 34
Tree removal,
setting back
curbs,
Herthal, 1,643 00
Tree removal,
setting back
curbs,
Fitzgerald, 832 47
Tree removal,
setting back
curbs,
Center St,
Cowles St,
Central Ave.,
Davenport
Ave.,
Dewey St.,
Eagle St.,
East Ave.,
Edna Ave.,
New
7,200 00
3,500 00
4,666 00
5,600 00
3,402 00
7,466 00
6,062 00
6,070 00
Macadam & Top Dressing
(Continued)
Ellsworth
St
Edwin St
Fairview
Ave.
Federal St.
UarUeld
Ave.
Goddard
Ave. -Gurdon
St.
Hoilister
Ave.
Harborview
! Ave.
! Herkimer
7,463
2,100
Clark,
Street
Grading, .
Stone,
Grading,
Total,
1 021 05
$7,676 11
5,039 72
623 26
4,218 86
13,339 09
$375,797 45
SINKING FUND.
Retirement
of $400,000
4 per ceflt
Bonds
due 1919, $6,000 00
Retirement
of $220,000
4 per cent
Bonds
due 1924, 5,000 00
66,074 72
Total,
$481,534 72
03
14,305 83
13,200 00
16,676 28
13,183 48
13,283 48
11,783
14,165
48
94
FIRE DEPARTMENT.,
Recapitulation.
Officers $35,400 00
Fire Alrm
Dept. 13,827
Engine Co.
No.
Engine Co.
No. 2
Engine Co.
No. 3
Engine Co.
No. 4
Engine Co.
No. 5
Engine Co.
No. 6
Engine Co.
No. 7
Engine Co.
No. 8
Engine Co.
No. 9
Engine Co.
No. 10
Truck Co.
No. 1
Truck Co.
No. 2
Truck Co.
No. 3
Chem. Co.
No. 1
Chem Co.
No. 2 10,091
Drafter Men 7,620
New Men and
New Offic
ers 12,069
1,000 00
300 00
. 100 00
3,500 00
500 0
2,000 00
1,500 00
600 00
750 00
500 00
500 00
300 00
1,000 00
13,183 48
14,172 54
11,800 00
15,808 42
17,077 17
17,097 73
12,958 86
01
00
76
St.
Hewitt
St.
Island Brook
Ave.
James
St.
Keeler
Ave.
King
St.
Lexington
5,600 00
7,932 00
9,332 00
7,466 00
12,600 00
7,870 00
. 6,532 00
3,732 00
2,800 00
7,232 00
4,432
3,732
00
00
2,338 00
11,000 00
CITY COURT
3,000 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
1,800 00
1,000 00
300 00
Judge,
salary
Deputy
Judge,
Prosecuting
Attorney 2,500 00
Asst., Prosecut
ing Attorney
Clerk
Asst. Clerk
Janitor
Probation
officers for
City Court
and Juvenile
Court, and
Matron for
Jvenile
Court 3,000 00
Liquor Agent 1,000 00
Witness
fees 2,500 00
Interpreters 1,800 00
Printing, post
age, stenograph
ers, Sheriffs'
fees, jurors,
etc. 3,000 00
24,400 00
Ave. 6,600 00
Logan
St. 6,300 00
Livingston
Place 4,900 00
Melrose
Ave. 3,262 00
Morehouse
St. 3,962 00
Midland
St. 3,962 00
Monroe
St. 6,062 00
Martin
Terrace 3,962 00
Miles
St. 3,263 00
Norman
St 14,932 00
Osborne
St. 13,062 00
Oak St $1,728 00
Orchard St 7,700 00
Park St 2,800 00
Prince St. 6,538 00
Ridgefield
Ave. 8,400 00
Scofield Ave. 7,000 00
Roosevelt St. 3,738 00
Smith St. 6,538 00
Seaside Ave.
(private) 3 500 00
Spruce St. 2800 00
Stoehr Place 1,862 00
Summitt St. 5,600 00
Summerfield
Ave. 9,800 00
Stillman St 13,604 00
Suburban
Ave. 6,062 00
Tom Thumb
St 1,440 00
Thorme St. 3,728 00
Vine St .6,538 00
Wade St 6.062 00
Wood Ave. 7098 00
Woodland
Ave. 4,200 00
Wilmot Ave. 3,600 00
Waterman
St. 1,800 00
BOARD OF APPRAISAL OF
BENEFITS & DAMAGES
Salaries,
3 Appraisers
g $1,000 3,000 00
Clerk 1,000 00
Notices and
incidental ex
penses 1.4UU wu
PRINCE RUDOLPH
DEATH MYSTERY
STILL UNSOLVED
Tragic Death of Hapsburg
Prince 28 Years Ago Has
Never Been Explained.
For twenty-eight years the thirtietn
of January has recalled bitter memor
ies to the Austrian royal family, for
it marks the anniversary of the mys
terious traelc death or Crown Prince
Rudolph; Only son of the late EmDer
or Francis Joseph. It is supposed
that he committed suicide in his hunt
ing box at Meycrting. The real cir
cumstances of his death are known
only in the inner circle of the Austrian
royal family. All that the world at
large Knows is that the heir to the
throne of the dual monarchy and his
beautiful mistress, Marie Vetsera,
with whom he was desperately infatu
ated, were found dead together in a
room of the hunting lodge.
Only three persons, it has been al
leged, were acquainted with the actual
facts connected with the end of Ru
dolph and his sweetheart. These were
the Jate Emperor Francis Joseph,
Cardinal Rampolla, and Count Hoyos.
it was the latter who told Francis
Joseph the details of the tragedy, and
after his recital of what took place
the Count was dismissed, an,d was
never again permitted to come with
in signt or the Emperor.
Prince Rudolph was the son of mis.
mated parents, and shortly after his
birth the Empress Elizabeth left her
husband. Until her tragic death. at
the hands of an anarchist at Geneva,
the Empress spent little time in Aus
tria. Rudolph's mother was eccentric
to the point of madness, and tne
Crown Prince, although possessed of
marked artistic and intellectual gifts,
was also wild and peculiar by nature.
He married "the Princess Stephanie of
'Jelgium. but It was purely a union
of convenience. In 1887 the Prince
met and fell wildly in love with the
Baroness Marie Vetsera, a Vienese
girl just out of a convent, and all the
tongues in Viertia were soon wagging
about this royal scandal. Their rela
tions continued for about a year and
o half, when the world was startled
by the tragedy at Meyerling. .
It was officially announced that
the latest victim of the "curse of the
'Hapsburgs" had died of apoplexy, but
this was a barefaced invention, and
did not account for the presence of
the dead body of the Prince's sweet
heart The court then announced
that the Prince had cdmmitted sui
cide, and refused all other explana
tions. . ., ;
Hundreds of rumors about the trag
edy have gained circulation, but the
version most generally accepted is
that Rudolph was told by the emper
or that he must give up his sweet
heart, and rather than do that, had
killed the girl and himself.
ETTER BUTTER
RULES SET OUT
BY U, S. EXPERT
400,609 00
5,400 00
STREETS AND SIDEWALKS
COMMITTEE
Street. Grading
$277,704 49
Reserve force
8 new men 9,600 00
$287,304 49
Total,
Cost of Installing Two Platoon
System.
Asst. Chiefs,
$4,000
$2,000
3 Drivers
. 1,500
52 Firemen
1,200
1st year,
2nd year,
3rd year,
4,500
62,400
70,900
76,100
81,300
70,900 00
Albion St.
j Andover St
I Bennett St.
i Bradley St.
Boston Ave.
Charron
St. (Private)
Cleveland
Ave.
Davis St.
(Private)
Englewood
Ave.
Ellsworth
St
Fairview
Ave.
Fern St.
(Private)
Foster Square
1,560
740
4,420
2,000
00
00
00
00
Total,
$358,204.49
310 00
300 00
Salary
Boat
Telephone
Incidentals
New Engine
Repairs on
boats
HARBOR MASTER.
$1,500 O0
400 00
.75 00
40 00
800 00
13,500 00
200 00
4,350 00
1,400 00
2,550 00
1,620 00
2,600 00
2,600 00
1,620 00
125 00
Total
$2,940 00
CITY ATTORNEY.
Salaries and
expenses $8,000 00
$8,000 00
25p
600
Total: $ 445,309 11
Salaries as per Schedule
1 Superintend
' ent $3,500 00
1 Aset Super
intendent, 2.500 00
Captains. 12,000 00 -15
Lieuten-
ants, 27,000 00 -
to Sergeants, 32,000 00
12 Doormen, 16,800 00
1 Stenograph
1 Matron, 800 00
er, 1,040 00
! 1 Clerk, ' 1,800 00
' 1 Asst
Clerk, 1,600 00 -
3 Chauffeurs, 3,600 00
It Patrolmen, -
Director of Public Works.
Bridges, Supt,
Salary. $1,500 00
Bridges,
Drawtend- ,
era. 17.337 50
Bridges, ex
tra labor, 4,000
Telephone,, 72
Hardware and
Supplies, 800
Machinery Re
pairs, includes
brake for T.
Mill Bridge 1 500
Masonry Re
pairs. 2,500 00
Painting, 300 00"
Lumber, 1,000 00
Coal and DiL 200 00
Motor Power, 2,040 00
Signal .
, Lights, 1.340 00
Electrical
Appliances, (00 0
00
00
00
00
(Private)
Garfield
Ave. 1,300 00
Glendale
Ave. 1,100 00
Golden Rod
Ave. ' 3,000 00
Gurdon St. 16,600 00
Jewett Ave. 2,800 00
King St, 740 00
Lexington
Ave., . 5,370 00
Ldndley St, 3,440 00
Martin Ter
race, , 460 00
Iarion St., 625 00
Monroe St., 1,400 00
Morris St., 400 00
Norman St, 5,340 00
Orland St, 1,740 00
Pennsylvania
Ave., 820 00
Querida Ave.
(Private), 520 00
Rossell St
(Private). 850 00
Ridgewood
Place," 740 00
Salem St, 5,550 00
Stoehr Place
(Private), 1,200 00
Suburban
i Ave., 2.500 00
Summitt St., 1,550 00
Woodmont
Ave., 1,300 00
York St, i 1.620 00
Lincoln Ave., 3,200, 00
Total, '
v Miscellaneous
Brewster St - ' -
Bridge, , $27,000 00
Capitol Ave., .
Culvert . 1.400 00
Cleveland Ave.,
S,089 501 Culvert, 1,300 00 .
SECOND DISTRICT REGISTRA-
TTONS NO. 10.
Streets & Sidewalks Com. Cont . .
Morgan Ave. $2,600 00
Bancroft Av. 5,200 00
Chalmers
Ave., 600 00
Sidewalk
Grading,
General, 20,000 00
State High
way Con
struction, 3,000 00
Sidewalk, Curb
and Gutter 28,000 00
Grading,
general, 25,000 00
New Street
Signs, 1,500 00
Land Dam- , .
ages, Gen- .
eral, 20,000 00
Tree Re
.moval, 12,000 00
BERNARD KEATING,
City Auditor.
SEVEN KILLED '
BY ALCOHOL AT
EGG NOG PARTY
Muskogee, Okla., Jan. 30. Seven
persons are dead, two others are ex
pected to die and nearly a score are
sick as a result of an egg nogg par
ty on Suncjiy at Francis, Okla., at
which denatured alcohol was used by
mistake, according to word reaching
here today.
UNITED STATES
HAS FINE ARMY
ENGLISHMAN SAYS
New York, Jan. 30.
States has the finest
world excepting none,'
tain A. R. Dugmore
"The United
army 4n the
' declared Cap
of the British
40
Connecticut Military Census
Proves Its Value to Nation
List of Enemy Aliens Made
Available to Authorities
When Needed Other Uses
to Which Registration Has
Been Put.
Government Calls Upon Men
Prominent in Work to Aid in
Draft Details First State
ment of Results Gained
From Survey.
35
114,805 00
; army as he stepped- from the steam
Uhip on which he returned to the
i United States after spending two
I weeks with the American forces in
France.
'-They are harpy- 'well fed, well
clothed and ! well equipped in every
way. Tales of illness among tne men
are rank fabrication?- Reports ot mis
conduct are even more malicious and
are vicious untruths.'
Captain Dugmore was enthusiastic
about the splendid morale of the
troops and their keen enthusiasm to
get into the thick of the fighting.
During his last talk with Gen. Per
shing, the General predicted that "the
Germans am cvrinx to pull something,
4 but iwe will bo ready lor them." ,
The butter made on the farms of
the United- States may ibe materially
improved in quality in most cases. If
standard methods are employed ana
greater care is exercised in carrvin
out me necesasry details, savs the
United- States Department of Agricul
ture. Tne department gives the fnl.
lowing outline of the essential steps
to -De taKen in making good farm but
ter:
. j-roauce clean mine and cream.
Cool the cream immediately after
comes from the separator. Clean and
sterilize all utensils.
2. Ripen or sour the cream at from
6a degrees to 75 degrees F. until mild
Iy sour. Always use a -thermometer
in order to know that the right tem
perature is reached.
3. Cool the cream to churning tem
perature or below, and bold at that
temperature for at least two hours
before churning.
4. Use a churning temperature
usually between 52 degrees and 66 de
grees F. that will require 30 or
minutes to obtain butter.
5. Clean and scald the churn, then
half fill it with cold water and re
volve until churn is thoroughly cooled,
after which empty the water.
6. Pour the cream into the churn
through a strainer.
7. Add butter color from 20 Vo
drops to a gallon of cream except
late in the spring and early in the
summer.
8. Put the cover on tight; revolve
the churn several times; stop with
bottom up, and remove stopper to per
mit escape of gas; repeat until no
more gas forms.
9. Continue churning until butter
granules are formed the size of grains
of wheat.
10. -Draw off the buttermilk through
the hole at the bottom of the churn,
using a strainer to catch particles of
butter. "When the buttermilk has
drained out, replace the cork.
11. Prepare twice as much wash
water as there is buttermilk, and at
aibout the same temperature. Use the
thermometer; do not guess at tem
peratures. Put one-half the water
into the churn with the butter. .
12. Replace the cover and revolve
the churn rapidly a few times, then
draw oft the. water Repeat the wash
ing with the remainder of the water.
13. The butter should still be in
granular form when the washing is
completed.
14. Weigh the butter.
15. Place the butter on the workef
and add salt at the rate of three
quarters of an ounce to a pound of
butter.
16. Work the butter until the salt
is, dissolved and evenly distributed.
Do not overwork.
17. Pack in any convenient "form
for home use. or make into one-pound
prints for market, wrapping the but
ter in white parchment paper and in
closing in a paraffined carton.
18. Clean the churn and all Dutter
making utensils. . ,
Uses to which Connecticut's mili
tary census has been put have Just
beea revealed for the first time In In
formation' secured at the offices In
Hartford, where the census results
are kept and where the cards are
sorted frequently when new calls for
Information from them are received.
Although much of what has been done
with the census is withheld, and will
not be told until after the war, the
details given make It evidei.t that this
inventory of the state's resources for
war In men and materials has been
one of the state's most effective war
accomplishments, that 4t furnished the
federal government with much vital
information, Including' the identity of
enemy aliens, and that the experience
gained In taking It was ised as a
basis for planning the letails of the
nation wide registration of men from
21-31 years of age on June 5.
The task of taking the Connecticut
censns was undertaken wunin mree
days of the diplomatic break with
Germany and completed a few days
before the declaration of war. Con
necticut was the first state In the
Union to take such a census, but sev
eral other states have since seen the
advantages of the move and have fol
lowed its example. Although he cen
sus was completed before the United
States had entered the war it is still
proving its value' and will probably
not outlive Its usefulness until some
time after the war is over. Originally
compiled' as -a military censns, it has
demonstrated Its worth in meeting
many war problems also that are not
strictly of a military nature, though
related to the successful conduct ol
the war.
Patriotic Spirit Awakened.
The first result of the census was In
arousing a spirit of patriotic enthu
siasm and preparedness in the state,
which naved the way for the war
tasks confronting its people In April
and May. When every man In Con
necticut was asked to describe the
ways In which he might be able to j
help his government each one realized
at once that the war was to become a
personal matter with him and that It
meant more than cheers and flag wav
ing. The sober side of the war was
brought home to every citizen quickly
and thoroughly.
Among the more tangible results of
the census few have been more mark
ed than the aid It furnished the fed
eral government in perfecting the elab
orate machinery of the selective draft
act Primarily the census has helped
most by providing a check on all draft
registrants in Connecticut Not only
has It enabled the government to de
tect slackers, who gavone age to the
census takers and another to draft
officials, but It doubtless prevented
many slackers from attempting to
evade registration who knew that
their ages as given in th! military
census were on file In a state office.
Help on Registration Day.
Just before Registration Day a list
of all the men of draft age within its
jurisdiction was sent to every town In
Connecticut This list of prospective
draftees served a double purpose
postcards were sent to the men just
before registration day warning them
to register, and the lists were compar
ed afterwards with the registration
lists to see whether any who. should
have registered had failed to do so.
The federal government In planning
for Its registration made use of the
experience gained In the Connecticut
military census.
When plans for the federal draft
registration were taken up men Iden
tified with the Connecticut census
were called to Washington, worked
out the whole plan with government
officials and made many important
suggestions which were adopted. One
of the statisticians in charge of tabu
lating the Connecticut census has been
commissioned in the army and Is work
ing In Washington in connection with
the tabulation of the federal census.
Lists of Enemy Aliens.
Connecticut with one of the largest
alien populations of any state, was
able as soon as the war started to
learn how many of its residents were
"LUCKY" OTJJfJT rEAT.
Baltimore. Mi, Jan. 30 William
("Lucky") Dunn, well known jockey.
died at his home in this city yester
day.' Dunn rode for Carter Hall,
Mike Daly and other prominent own
era.
aliens, which were subjects of allied
nations, which were subjects of Ger
many and the other central powers,
which were neutral and which of the
aliens had taken out their first citizen
ship papers. The census further dis
closed how these aliens were distrib
uted and In which centers, for ex
ample, there were a large number of
enemy aliens.
When the need became evident for
putting lists of enemy aliens in offi
cial hands it was possible for Con
necticut, -because of the military cen
sus, to aid the nation by furnishing
to the proper authorities list classified
by towns of all men ir. the state in
cluded in the provisions of ttfe procla
mation. British Subjects Disclosed.
In addition, lists of Canadians and
subjects of Great Britain have been
furnished to the Canadian and British
governments for the use of their re
cruiting commissions, and similar lists
of enemy, friendly or neutral aliens
can be furnished in the future to any
authorities who need them.
Complete lists of aliens classified by
nationality have been prepared for the
use of the federal government, and
especially the Connecticut State Coun
cil of Defense to be used as mailing
list Informative and patriotic liter- .
ature prepared especially for distribu
tion among aliens and printed In their
languages is being sent out from time
to time to various groups of, aliens by
the Council's Committee on Foreign
Born Population. Among other things
the census made aliens record them
selves definitely as aliens or declar
ants. Many men who have lived in
this country for years and were popu
larly thought to be citizens were dis
closed as aliens. One effect of this
disclosure was a great increase In the
number of applications for citizenship,
applications that had been deferred
through neglect or for other reasons.
Aid In Recruiting.
In addition to Its value in connec
tion with the draft th cansus enabled
the state to furnish to National Guard
and other recruiting agencies lists of
men available for military service, and
the notices and appeals sent out to
such men through the mail resulted
in many voluntary enlistments. Lists
of this kind were furnished to the
First and Second Regiments of the
Connecticut National Guard, giving
the names of all men of military age
In their recruiting districts.
Industries, Autos, Nurses.'
Three indirect military results of
the census were the classification of
every man In the state, according to
occupation, thus registering the man
power of Connecticut for use in any
emergencyt a census of the automo
biles and motorcycles of the state and
a census of all doctors and nurses.
The automobile census lists In six
classes motor trucks, pleasure cars and
motorcycles available for war servic?.
The medical census contains complete
lists of nurses, physicians,' surgeons,
dentists and other medical practition
ers who have volunteered for emer
gency service.
The industrial inventory of the mil
itary census has been of vast value to
the stata and nation. The government
has been put in touch with many man
ufacturers of war supplies and facto
ries able to adapt their processes to
war work because of It This in
ventory is now being used effectively:
by the Committee on Industrial Sur
vey of the Connecticut State Council
of Defense.
The military census has proved its
value for civic purposes in several
ways. Several towns have asked for
complete lists of the men In their
towns whose names are carried on the
census list. The military census has
also earned a considerable amount of
money by disclosing the name of many
men who have in past years failed to
pay their personal taxes and would
probably have continued without pay
ing unless the census had been taken.
These, according to the custodian
of the census results, are but a few of
many ways in which the census has
proved its value. Other, details can
not for obvious reasons, be known
until the war is over. ;
PHILADELPHIA
BUILDS HOMES
FOR WORKMEN
Arranges for Housing of 10,-
000 Shipbuilders for Neiir
, Hog Island Plant.
PHILADELPHIA
Philadelphia, Jan. 30. Virtually
every state in the union and many dis
tant parts of the world are represent
ed among the thousands of shipwork-
ers and their families who are hasten
ing to this city to settle in the new
community established in the Fortieth
ward for employes of a large shin-
building corporation which has estab
lished a plant at Hog Island. The in
flux, jvhich began with the establish
ment of the plant a short time ago,
will add, according to local officials
from 25,000 to 30,000 persons to Phil
adelphia's population. ,
Before the establishment of the Hog
Island plant, thousands of workmen
attracted ,to the Deleware River ship
building yards had utilized all the
housing facilities in the districjt. This
made it necessary for the cityHo co
operate with the government ill plan-nine-
for the receotion of the new ar-
I my which Philadelphia is called upon
fo accommodate.
i More than 10,000 workers will be
required to erect the houses in the
community which will In the future
be the homes of the new arrivals1. It
estimated, according to surveys
made at the instance of the city, that
from 5,000 to 7,500 dwellings will be
necessary. The cost will exceed 310,
000,000 including wages.
Another fortune will be required for
the construction of sewers, water fa
cilities and other sanitary arrange
ment in this new section. Streets
will be laid, miles of water pipes will
be installed and all the heating, light
ing and transportation accommoda
tions of a modern city.
This working program is to be has
tened with all possible speed so that
workman who could be used on the
scores snips contracted for by the
government in Delaware River yards
will h released without delay.
The city is still working on the
problem of police and fire protection
for the "Hog Island" colony along
with other details which cannot be ar
ranged until the homes are built.
DENVER MAN GETS
$53,000 LUMP OF
MORGAN'S MONEY
Denver, Jan. '30. E. C. Simpson
special master, filed yesterday a report
in the United States district court
here which allowed CoL J. A. Own
bey of Denver J53.000 in the'litigation
between the estate of the late J. Pie(r
pont Morgan of New York and Col;
Ownbey.
Advertise- in. Tt& Tines
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