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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, January 31, 1918, Image 1

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SWINDLES TOTALING $200,0
"S'matter Pop"
The Times has obtained for
its readers, the " famous
"S'matter Pop?" comic car
toon. It -will appear In thir
newspaper daily. See Page 8.
The Weather Report
For Bridgeport and vi
cinity: Unsettled -tonight;
Friday lair, colder.
and Evening Farmer
VOL. 54 NO. 27 EST. 1790 m
BRIDGEPORT, CONN., THURSDAY, JAN. 31, 1918
PRICE TWO CENTS
MAI DISAPPEARS AFTER
mm
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SMART If Hill POSING -AS AMERICAN HUM BOMBS turbulent mobs clash
Mrs. Charles T. Chapman Played No Favorites in
Her Cassie Chadwick Bunco Games She
Cleaned Up Barbers and Bankers, Society
Women, Maids, and Housekeepers.
Posing as being the heiress to $7,000,000, owner of five big
factories and as being a cousin of Ex-Governor Charles Hughes
of New York, Mrs. Chas. T. Chapman, who has been living in a
palatial residence at Lordship Manor, "Cassy-Chadwiked"
Bridgeporters, from bankers to barbers, out at least $200,000.
Detective Captain Cronan of the Bridgeport Detective Bu
reau is already in possession of many of the facts covering the
"frenzied finance" campaign which Mrs Chapman is alleged
to have carried on in this as well as other cities. Capt. Cronan
expects that before twenty-four
drastic action will be taken by
In answer to the many inrairies as
to .who bequeathe! her the vast es
tate, she invariably answered that
she was under a bond of $50,000 not to
divulge the name of her benefactor.
Khe also said that the private papers
of inestimable value were locked up
in the safety deposit boxes of the
Bridgeport Trust Company.
Notice -was first attracted to the ac
tions of the woman by the return here
of William Rich, one of her chauf
feurs. She had borrowed $4,000 from
him and had given him power of at
torney to manage a factory she
claimed to have in Chicago. Rich
travelled to Chicago and spent many
fruitless hours trying to locate the
factory. At last he decided that the
plant was a myth and returned to
Bridgeport only to find" that Mrs.
Chapman had left for parts unknown.
Inquiries started by Rich aroused
the deep suspicions of all those with
whom the woman has had dealings.
Now a flood of creditors are daily
beseiging the deserted mansion at
Lordship Manor.
The Lordship Manor home of Mrs.
fhanman was built by John Sullivan,
'The Policy King" of Waterbury, at
a cost of $100,000 and rented for $10,
000 per year. It appears that it was
(Continued on Page 2.)
LANTERN LIGHTS
ON HEAD, SEEKS
$15,000 AWARD
Claiming that she has been made
deaf and otherwise injured through
negligence of the defendant, Lillian
N. Sherwood, of Fairfield, has
brought suit in the Superior. Court
against the New Tork, New Haven &
Hartford Railroad Co., asking $15,000
damages. Trial of the case was be
gun today.
The complaint alleges tnat, on June
29, 1916, Miss Sherwood, about noon,
walking on a highway in the town of
Fairfield and was about to pass un
der the railroad bridge at the Rubber
Works crossing. She stepped aside
before going under the tracks to al
low an automobile to pass. A lan
tern fell from a train passing over
head and struck her on the head.
GAS CO. COAL SUPPLY
IS ALMOST EXHAUSTED
The Bridgeport Gas Light Co. is the
first public utilities corporation in
Bridgeport to feel the serious effects
of the shortage ot bituminous coal.
The company has only a three days'
supply ahead. A shipment of 10 car
loads is relied upon to prevent the
city's gas supply from being shut off.
At press hour this shipment had not
been reported in transit.
Shipments y rail and water under
the government's orders are expected
to reach this city within a day and
consequently the shutting up of more
than a score of Bridgeport's facto
ries, as predicted by Administrator
Carl F. siemon a few days ago, will
be averted.
Harry Walker, an associate mem
ber of the fuel committee, Is In Waali-
.artnalnlatratnr Sia-
hours have elapsed, quick and
the local authorities.
TAGS FOR GOAL
INSTEAD OF FOR
SHOVELS ASKED
The distribution of coal shovel tags
in Bridgeport is regarded as a "joke"
by householders who have been given
the tags to tie on their coal shovels.
In the coal line this morning one
woman said, "We're all -trying to be
patriotic and everybody knows enough
to conserve coal, because we all know
how hard it is to get. How are we
going to conserve what we haven't
got?"
Here is a letter, to which a coal tag
was attached, received at the fuel
committee's office today:
"Perfectly ridiculous to allow such
a thing to be circulated amongst peo
ple unable to get a shovel full of coal
to save. We are lucky to have our
rooms at 50 degrees let alone 68 de
grees." It was signed, "A wife and
mother of three children."
SEEKS RETURN
OF REALTY SHE
GAVE DAUGHTER
Restitution of ProDertv alleeed to
have been deeded while . she was ill
and not competent, is asked in a suit
filed today in the Superior Court by
Delia B. Legere against her daughter,
Mary Lynch. There are three pieces
of property, one in Main street, one
in Waller Place, and one in Ezra
street.
In the complaint it is alleged that,
on August 10. last. Mrs. Lesere own
ed the property in question, and was
seriously ill. Yielding to representa
tions of her daughter, Mrs. Legere
consented to execute deeds transfer
ring the property to Mary Lynch. It
is charged that there was no adequate
consideration.
Since recovering from the illness
Mrs.1 Legere has asked for a recon
veyance of the property, but Mrs.
Lynch has refused.
imon hopes his trip will be more pro
ductive than the last. Administrator
Siemon has promises that several
barges of loth soft and hard coal are
i billed for this city.
The rec?nt order of State AJminis
i trator Russell preventing dealers from
issuing orders, except by order of the
jfuel committee, has greatly increased
the coal line at the committee's office,
jH2 Golden Hill street. Siemon eald
today, "People ar wasting their time
by calling dealers on the telephone
and the quicker they learn that this
office Is the only place to obtain an
order the better it will be for them."
The coal line at the Warner Broth
ers factory will be opened again to
morrow and Saturday for the distri
bution of coal in small lots between
and 11:30 a. m. and 1 and 4 n. m.
TAXPAYE
RS
ILL A
F0RCUT
Board of Relief to Meet
Storm of Protests at
First Meeting. .
The Boarf of Relief is prepar
ed to meet a throng- of disgrnn
tld property owners at Its first
meeting tomorrow. ,The official
, total of thegrand list to be filed
with the town clerk today will be
near the $198,0OO,(H.O mark, an
increase of "approximately $32,
00,0,00 over Oh ..st of last year.
Seventeen million dollars of .the
amount of increase is levied on
. dwelling bouse property. It is
predicted that 75 per cent, of the
owners whose valuations were
raised will appeal to the Board of
Relief for a reduction.
It is estimated that the board
will make redactions of more
than $2,000,000, bringing the net
grand list between $195,000,000
and $196,000,000. The rest "of
the increase is divided among
manufactories, which were hit
to the extent of $12,000,000 and
the other million has been taxed
on automobile owners, many of
whom had never listed their ma
chines. BRIDGEPORT FIRM
SUES TO COLLECT
ON WAR CONTRACT
Payment for work and materials
furnished in the manufacture of gun
sights is demanded in a suit filed in
the Superior court by the Lindstrom
Die, Tool & Gauge Works of Bridge
port against the DriggS Ordnance Co
of New York, and Charles E. Tucker
Manufacturing Co. The amount of
the bill is $7,500.
A contract for the work is alleged,
the plaintiff performed its part, and
payment has been demanded Of the
Tucker Manufacturing Co. r and refus
ed. -The Driggs Co. guaranteed the
payments, according to the complaint.
LOSES 4 FINGERS
IN MEAT CHOPPER,
YOUTH SUES BOSS
Alleging that a meat chopper upon
which he was asked to work in the
market of Louis Dubin, in Milford,
was defective, and through this defect
he lost a part of his thumb and three
fingers, Edward J. Joy, through Culli
nan & Cullinan, has filed suit against
Dubin for $10,000. Joy is 12 years
old.
In the complaint Joy recites that he
was employed in the market, that it
was Dubin-'s duty to furnish tools to
work with, and that they should be
in good condition. The meat chopper,
he alleges, was not in good condition,
and due to its defects the accident
which disabled his hand- occurred
GREAT EXPLOSION
FOLLOWS RAID ON
ZEPPELIN WORKS
Zurich, Wednesday, Jan. 30 A tre
mendous explosion, accompanied by
gunfire and followed by a huge col
umn of fire, was heard in the direc
tion of Friedrichshaften this morn
ing, a telegram received in St. Gall
from Rosenberg, on Lake. Constance,
reports. - The explosion probably was
the result of an aerial attack on the
zeppeliri works in Friedrichshaften.
Boston, Jan. 31 The snow storm
predicted for New England for last
right and today passed out to sea
auxin the night. - - - -
Two U. S. Soldiers Kill
ed, One Missing and
Four Wounded in
Enemy Attack.
With the American Army in
France, Wednesday, Jan. 31
(By the Associated Press)
An American position on a cer
tain section of the French front
was raided during a heavy fog
shortly after daylight this
morning. The attack was pre
ceded by a violent artillery
barrage. Two Americans were
killed and four wounded. One
soldier isbelieved to have been
captured.
Casualties have been occurring al
most daily for several days on this
sector. It now is permitted to dis
close that all the recent casualties
given out from Washington occurred
in this sector. The deaths were caus
ed by shell fire, mostly shrapnel.
I -est . night was fairly quiet
throughout the American sector. The
usual number of shells came over, do
ing no damage, and there were the
customary sporadic outbursts of ma
chine gun fire from both sides at
points where the opposing lines are
nearest.
At daybreak this morning the heavy
fog that had been' enveloping the
whole position and the country for
miles around for several days, became
still thicker, blotting out all except
the nearest enemy positions. At 7
(Continued on Page 2.)
LAST OF CITY'S
DRAFTEES START
FOR "FT. WRIGHT
Twenty-six Bridgeport youths, rep
resenting the city's last contribution
of its quota of 2,125 men for the first
National Army of 687,000 men, left
shortly before noon for New London,
from where they will go to Fort
Wright to replace Bridgeport draftees
rejected for physical defects. When
the roll was called every man was
present. They assembled at the sta
tion shortly after 9 o'clock, but the
train did not leave until nearly noon.
The youths were proud in spirit
and nearly all had friends or relatives
to see them oft. . Scenes similar to
those exhibited at previous times
were enacted and when the train
whisked over the roller lift bridge,
tear-filled eyes followed it until it was
lost to view.
The local boards have practically
completed their work on the first
draft and are ready to begin exam
inations on Sunday for men of the
next quota.
1918 WILL DETER
WAR ASSERTS WILSON
Washington, Jan. 31. To the far
mers of the United States President
Wilson sent a message today in which
he called attention to the country's
need of their assistance during the
coming year In winning the war. The
message was sent through the Far
mers' Conference held at the Univer
sity of Illinois in Urbana.
x The message was delivered by
President James of the university, in
the absence of Secretary of Agricul
ture Houston, who was to have rep
resented the president. The Presi
dent had expected to attend, but in
disposition made it impossible and he
delegated Mr. Houston, who was pre
vented from participating by the tie
up of transportation.
The President's message said:
"I' am vecv sorry indeed that 1
Fourteen Tons of Explo
sives Dropped From
Air on French
Capital.
Paris, Jan. 31 German aero
planes raided- Paris last night.
The alarm was given at 11:30
o'clock. Bombs were propped
in various points in Paris and
suburbs. Twenty persons were
killed, 50 were wounded, and
material damage is reported,
according to an official an
nouncement. One of the German machines
was brought down. The oc
cupants were made prisoners
Berlin, Jan. 31 via London "As a
reprisal," says the official statement
by the war office, "we dropped 14
tons of bombs on Paris."
The official statement adds that the
raid on the French capitol was the
first systematic attack from the air.
AUSTRO-GERMAN
FORCES CAPTURE
ITALIAN PATROLS
Berlin, Jan. 31, via London :The
Italian attacks which were launched
yesterday against the Austro-German
positions southwest of Asiago, on the
northern Italian front, broke down
under the Teuton fire, the German war
office announced today. In the recent
fighting' the Austro-German forces in
creased the number of prisoners tak
en to more than 600.
FRENCH SQUADRON
OF AIRMEN BOMB
RAILROAD STATION
Paris, Jan. 31 "French patrols op
erating at various points on the front
took prisoners," says today's official
report. umerwise tnere were no
developments during the night.
"On Tuesday a French squadron,
including Capt. Guillemon and Lieut
Lancred bombed from a very low ele
vation the railroad station in Lanselot.
A large fire was observed."
WAGE DEMANDS
TAKE HALF R. R.
OPERATING CASH
Washington, Jan. 31- Demands for
wage increases pending before the
railroad wage commission are for an
aggregate average of 40 per cent.,, it
was disclosed today. The demands
represent a total of nearly $500,000.
000 this year, or about half of the
railroad operating income of last year.
I cannot he present in person at the
Urbana Conference. I should like to
enjoy the benefit of, the inspiration
and exchange of counsel which I
know I should obtain, but in the cir
cumstances it has seemed impossible
for me to be present and therefore I
can only send you a very earnest
message1 expressing my interest and
the thoughts which such a conference
must bring priminently into every
mind.
"I need not tell you, for I am sure
you realize as keenly as I do that we
are a nation in the presence of a
great, task which demands supreme
sacrifice and endeavor of every one
of us. We can give everything that is
needed with the greater willingness
and even satisfaction because the ob
(Continued on Page 2.)
MINE
WITH SOLDIERS AND
BLOOD IS SPILLED
Germany in Throes of Incipient Revolution Army
Units When Ordered to Fire on Strikers Re
fuse to Obey- Industrial Tie-up Spreads
Incendiary Pamphlets Distributed.
(LATE BERLIN STRIKE BULLETIN)
London, Jan. 31 The Socialist party leaders in
Germany have asked President Kaempf of the Reich
stag to summon the Reichstag immediately in view
of the alarming events of the last few days.
London, Jan. 31 The industrial disturbances and strikes
reported throughout Germany, have ignited the flaming torch
of revolution in various parts of
to disperse and shoot down rioters who have adopted the slo
gan, "An immediate peace. No
have in some instances refused to fire on the mobs of marching
workers.
Turbulent scenes are being enacted in the suburbs of Ber
lin. Street fighting has occurred between striking munition
workers and soldiers, in which lives have been lost. Some sol
dier units are reported to have ignored the orders of their of
ficers when commanded to fire upon the workers.
In Berlin alone, 700,000 persons are on strike, 58,000 of.
these being women. The government has caused the arrest of
large numbers of Socialist leaders in various towns. Revolu
tionary literature is being distributed in pamphlet form in Ber- ,
lin, and the efforts of the authorities to prevent this, has been
entirely thwarted, owing to the fact that the city is enveloped in ,
a very thick fog.
SUSPEND SAILING
OF 5 PASSENGER
SHIPS TO SPAIN
An Atlantic Port, Jan. 31 The sail
ings of five passenger steamers mak
ing ready here for voyages to Spain
were suspended today it was announc
ed, on orders from Washington.
WILSON FORECAST
ON WAR AFFECTS
STOCKS FAVORABLY
New Tork, Jan. 31 President Wil
son's letter to the farmers' conference
today, expressing the opinion that the
issue of the war would be determined
this year, favorably affected the stock
market.
Gains of two to three points during
the forenoon were- substantially, in
creased after the' publication of the
letter at noon, railroads and repre
sentative industrials featuring the
movement. There was urgent cover
ing of short contracts and buying of
standard stocks was reported to be
of an impressive character.
J. W. FOLK QUITS
AS CHIEF COUNSEL
FOR I. C. C. OF U. S.
Washington, Jan. 31 Joseph W.
Folk sent to the interstate commerce
commission today his resignation as
the commission's chief counsel, to take
effect before Feb. 15. He will return
to his home in St. Loifis to become
general counsel for the chamber of
commerce there.
Mr. Folk has served as the commis
sion's counsel for four years. He di
rected interstate commerce commis
sion investigations into business con
duct of the New Haven, Rock Island
and Louisville & -Nashville railroads.
NEW OIL STOVE
FOUND BY "COP"
ON MAIN STREET
Patrolman Tobias found a new oil
stove in the doorway of Kresges' Five
and Ten Cent Store, on Main street,
early, today. No one in the store
knew who owned the heater, so it was
brought - to police headquarters,
where it notr awaits its owner.'
the empire. Troops called out .
annexations; no indemni&ieSvV- -
The strike movevent has spread to '
such an extent that government and
private ship yards, the mining cen
ters and' numerous important factories
in the Berlin district are inactive.
Herr Walraff, the Minister of the
Interior, has received a dembnd to
sanction meetings of the Workmen's
Council, a newly born organization
patterned "on the model of the Work
men s. and Soldiers' councils of Rus
sia. -The provinces reported seething
with industrial strife, and the situa
tion has become so acute that a gen
eral meeting of labor heads was
called, their discussions to take place
in Berlin.
Agitation for a general . strike in
(Continued on Page 2)
RECEIVER STARTS
SUIT TO COLLECT
FOR CONTRACTORS
James F. Quinn, receiver for the
Dowling & Bottomly Co.-, has brought
suit in the Superior court against tha
Churchill Co., of Boston, to recover a
balance of $3,648.98, alleged to be du
for work and materials on a school
being erected in Stratford. The con
tract was made previous to November
9, 1917, when Quinn was named re
ceiver. Up to that time work had
been done and materials furnished
amounting to $10,515.61. Of this only
$6rS66.63 has been paid. Payment of
the balance has been demanded and
refused, according to the complaint.
GRAND CHAPTER
OF 0. E. S. OPENS
ANNUAL SESSION
' New Haven, Jan. 31 The grand
chapter of Connecticut, Order of thfe
Eastern Star, held its 44th annua!
session here today. The gathering
was opened by Past Grand Matron
Mrs. Jennie Margroff of Waterbury, ,
and Leonard J. Nickerson, grand mas
ter of Masons in Connecticut, made
an address of welcome. The necro
logy, report for the year included the
death of Mrs. Ida Fiske of Hartford,
grand treasurer. Officers were elect
ed during the afternoon.
DESIGN RED ARMY
TO FIGHT IN BIG
EUROPEAN REVOLT
Petrograd, Jan. 31 An official
statement issued today by the Bol
shevik government says that the
"new workmen's and peasants' Red
army will serve to support the com
ing social revolution in Europe."
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