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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, January 31, 1918, Image 12

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THE TIMES: JANUARY. 31, 1918:
12
GARRANZA RULE
NOW TOTTERING;
PEOPLE STARVE
First Minister Sent to
America by Boumania
Washington, Jan. 81 Advices from
Mexico shew that conditions in that
country are becoming still more ap
palling. 7 he people are starving, the
troops sullen and given to looting,
brigandage prevails, the national
, t:easury is empty credit gone, and the
.government itself is leaning on a sin
r'trHcr reed.
That rec d, it is shown, ia not Car-ranza,-
the president, but one of his
konera's, l'ablo Gonzales, the newly
appointed secretary of government. It
is only the loyalty of this man, who
' is able i.ii i popular, which holds his
chief in nominal power.
The collapse may come at any mo
ment, the reports show.
concerned in the situation is admit
ted, f.ennan propaganda las so jois-
ti ed the Mexican mind that the peo
ple hate this country with a bitter
ness even greater than at the time of
the Veri Cruz landing.
German plotters have made- the
people believe the United State is their
natural enemy, b it that they need not
fear this country because Germany
will prevail in the war.
It is' this German propaganda w hich
has made it impossible for American
capital, no matter how well disposed,
tc aid Mexico. While the Mexican
government has been willing to give
satisfactory guarantees, the instabil
- itf of the government, coupled with
the attitude of the people themselves,
. has m;t le any advarces impracticable
Carrartza. does not even command
the loyUty of the army the reports
continue to show. That power be
longs to Gonzales. The 50,000 men
iu the feoeral forces are held to the
government only by this man, and
this in spite of the fact that the
troops' pay is two months in arrears.
They had even been induced to give
half of their daily wage to the gov
ernment, tut now that little remains
ing half in not in the treasury.
The result is general looting and
lawlessness by the troops. This, with
the activities of the Carrnnza enemies
in the fields, .puts the country in a
turmoil.
All paper money has disappeared
and there is very little bullion. Many
oi the banks have been closed.
The misery of the people was
brought to a climax by the failure of
the corn crop on the great central
plateau. .
Only work and food can save Mexi
co, according to the authoritative in
formation now available here.
i X
Dr. Constantin Angelesco, the first
diplomatic representative -Roumania
has ever sent to the United States. His
rank is that of minister.
BERLIN PLANNED
BIG BLACK ARMY
TO WIN AFRICA
EXPECT FLOES IN
OHIO RIVER TO
BECOME JAMMED
3ncinnati, Jan. 31. The ice gorge
in the Ohio river broke again during
the night, but daylight displayed the
fact that little additional damage had
ben done in addition to that suffered
London, Jan. 31 Lieut-Gen. J. C.
Smuts, lecturing before the Royal
. . Trftio and river mei predicted that it would
Monday night, contrasted the Bntisl. comine of coldeP
yesterday when three large steamers
were sunk and numerous smaller craft
were washed down stream.
The ice is moving slowly early today
FRENCH PATROLS
NORTH OF AISNE
TAKE PRISONEks
Paris, Jan. 30 "French patrols
carrying out operations north of the
Aisne brought back prisoners." the
war office announces. "In the Vosges
the artillery fighting was continued
vigorously during the night at Hart
mann's Weilerkopf.
"There is nothing to report from
the rest of the front."
Oysterless Day Soon
Merchants Predicting
The oyster, famous at the annual
church suppers in Hartford's sub
urbs, may soon be barred from those
innocent gatherings because of the
shortage of both oysters and clams,
fo that an oysterless and clamless
day is now being discussed. The oys
ter merchants say that the continued
cold weather is to blame for the shor
tage and the recent advance in price,
which is now 100 per cent, higher
than in 3 917.
Opened oysters are selling up to
$1 a quart, while bulk oysters are 80
cents a quart. Shell oysters are $1
a peck. Clams in the shell are 1 a
peck. Opened clams are 50 cents a
quart, an increase of 15 cents over
firmer prices.
Both the long clams and the oys
ters are expected soon to be regarded
as potatoes were last summer and- to
( be prized as highly as sugar is at
present. Most of the oysters come
from Chesapeake Bay but the freez
ing over of this body of water has
brought en a near-famine.
, The clams come principally from
Ctpe Cod and north shore of Long Is
land ,nl here again the weather man
has played his part. The supply can-i-.ct
be serired, and the oysterless and
clamless day is being anticipated for
the near future.
AVIATORS' DUTY
IS NOW HIGHLY
SPECIALIZED
"The popular notion is that an avi
ator's work is either scouting, fight
ing, or dropping bombs and that the
same aviator is usually simultaneous
ly engaged in these three duties,"
says Henry Woodhouse, the American
aeronautic authority who describes
the training of fliers in Everybody's
ftr January.
"As a matter of fact, the business
cr war-flying has become exceedingly
cr-mplex and specialized, and the avi
ator's duties increase in number and
importance daily. The flying service
is made tip of men trained and ma
chines designed for all the special
purposes which three years of. war
have developed.
"With the armies there is the
bnmbci' who usually flies in a ma
chine of special type, self-sufficient or
rotecied by fighting machines. His
work is to bomb the enemy's bases,
destroying railroads, trains and enemy
material.
Th'j flyer who enjoys the most
prestige and in a sense the greater
danger is the' fighter, the duelist of
the sky, who meets the hostile aero-
l lanes, fights them off, preventing
them from- making aerial reconnais
sance, taking photographs of one s
positions, directing the fire of their
artillery. Small fighting aeroplanes
are used for this purpose.
The whole vital work of watch
ing the enemy, reconnoitenng, deter
mining its strength, composition dis
position, and probable intentions; pho
tographing the enemy positions; di
recting military fire co-ordinating
the activities of the diiferent arms
during the attack, are done by aero
planes of special type, and by kite
balloons. In this role the aviator be
comes the master mind that watches
over evey movement of the enemy as
well as his own forces, and transmits
to his own forces information regard
ing the advance, retreat and other
movementc of the enemy, directin
the sending of re-enforcements to the
weak or threatened points, directing
the fire of the machine-gun batter
ies as well as of the artillery."
ACCOUNTANCY CLASS
FORMING AT Y.M.C.A,
FIFTY MILLION
TO HELP HOUSE
SHIP BUILDERS
and German colonial viewpoints.
Germany was not looking for homes,
for settlers and had no population,
particularly farmers, for emigration.
Germany's colonial aims, the gen
eral said, were dominated by a far
reaching conception of world poli
tics. Her real aims were military and
in getting strategic positions to exer
cise world power.
Germany's ambition, he added, was
for a great East and Central African
empire, embracing the colonies now
owned by the British, Belgian,
French and Portuguese, lying .south
of Lake Chad and north of the aam
besi river.
This territory. Gen. Smuts said, was,
first, to supply raw materials for the
German empire, but was mainly for
raising a great African army to carry
out her scheme of world conquest.
"Suppose that German East Africa
remains a part of the British empire
after the war," said Gen. Smuts. Cries
of "It will and must" interrupted
him, after which he continued:
"Germany's colonizing methods
really mean a policy of diametricallj
opposed to that of the British em
pire which has found its symbol in
the Union of South Africa. I do not
want to speak about the disposal of
German East Africa after the war,
but the law of self-preservation must
apply to that country, where Prussian
militarism must never De auowea ia
take hold.
The East African campaign may
be found to be a most important fac
tor in developing the future and per
manent peace of the world.
Germany, Gen. Smuts said, propos
ed to have harbors on the Atlantic
and Indian coasts of Africa for naval
nn1 submarine bases, from which
both ocean routes could be dominated
and Anglo-American sea power
brought to naught.
Native armies would be useful in
the next great war, to which Ger
many already was giving auenuuu.
asserted the general, who added:
The untrained levies of the bmon
of South Africa will go down before
these German trained hordes of Afri
cans, who will also be able to deal
with northern Africa and Egypt with
out any help from white troops from
Germany.
Thev will also mean a great army
planted on the flank of Asia and
whose force could be felt throughout
the middle East as far as Persia, per
haps farther.
Great Britain's objects in Africa
are inherently pacific and defensive.
Looking to the future from the broad
est viewpoint and looking further
upon Africa as a halfway house on
the road to India and Australia, the
British empire asks only internal
peace and the security of its external
communications.
It cannot allow a return to condi
tions which mean the militarization
of the natives and their employment
for a scheme of world power. It can
not allow naval and submarine bases
to be organieed on both coasts of
Africa to the endangerment of the
sea communication of the empire and
the peace of the world. It must in
sist upon through land communica
tion -from one end of Africa to the
other.
As long as there is no real change
of heart in Germany, no irrevocable
break with militarism, the law of self
preservation must be considered paramount.
No fresh extension of Prussian
militarism to other continents and
seas should be tolerated and the con
quered German colonies can only be
regarded as guarantees for the future
peace of the world.
gorge aain with the, coming of colder
weather today.
Washington, Jan. al. Appropriation
of $:0,000,000 to help ill housing the
great army of ship building workers
now recruited, was endorsed yester
day at a conference attended by Sec
retaries Baker, Daniels and Wilson,
Assistant Secretary 'Roosevelt and
Chairman Hurley and Vice Chairman.
Piez of the shipping board-. A bill to
provide that sum now is pending in
congress. Other appropriations for
taking care of the influx of workers
in industrial centers, where war con
tracts are filled, probably will be
urged later. Housing questions af
fecting other than ship yard workers
will be handled by the department of
labor.
Alexander H. Manes is the new in
structor in accountancy at the Y. BT.
C. A. He is with the Public Service
Commission at 120 Broadway, New
Tork City. Mr. Manes is a graduate
of the Pace & Pace School of Ac
, countancy and has had considerable
experience in teaching, toeing one of
their faculty in New Tork at the
present time.
The Pace, & Pace standardized
course in accountancy is given in
nearly all of the large cities tti this
country and it is so arranged that a
student can transfer from one city to
another without losing any time or
suffering any financial disadvantage.
New classes will ibe organized dur
ing February in semesters A and B.
These semesters represent the work of
the first and' second terms. This will
be the last opportunity to enter these
classes before next October.
On account of the smallness of the
classes the work bas never been a
financial success but both from the
patriotic and civic standpoints the ed
ucational committee of the T. M. C.
A. does not wish to discontinue the
course. It is their object to give the
young men of Bridgernrt what they
cannot secure outside of New Tork
City and in some respects it is supe
rior to the courses given in the large
cities as the students receive more in
dividual attention.
Toung men who have done work in
a commercial or high school should
take advantage of this opportunity to
, improve themselves both mentally
and financially. Our government
needs accountants in all of its depart
ments and big business cannot get
enough to meet its demands.
Inside News
HAVE a Secret Service all
your own. Get the in
side news on the best bever
age to bluff the blues.
Van Dyk's teas brewed
to a nicety and steaming
will warm the cockles of
your hqart and clear your
clouds away.
Duchess Coffee lb 30c
Maracaibo Coffee lb 20c
Winner Coffee lb 25c
Best J une Butter lb 54c
Selected Eggs Doz. 53c
Cheese, Whole Milk lb 32c
Mother's Delight lb 26c
Nut Butterine lb 32c
Smartlv at-tired.
HYour car will be smartly at
tired if it is equipped with
liepublics.
ICFor winter driving,' the Re
public staggard tread is
the real thing in sticking
to the road.
IAnd Republic Prodium
Process rubber is the last
word in long life and big
returns on the investment.
5Tire up with Republics and
forget tire worries.
AMERICAN HARDWARE
STORES
f Incorporated)
Lyon & Grumman. Retail DItMob
FAIRFIELD ATE. AND MTDUUS ST.
SHE SAW HIM, TOO
A BIRD OF ILLr-OMBN.
From Brand Whitlock's story of
German oppression in Belgium, which
begins in the February number of
Everybody's Magazine, we take the
following account of a singular inci
dent that occurred in May, 1914, just
before the war. Mr. Whitlock, with
other diplomats, was the dinner goest
of Mr. von Below, the German Minis
ter to Belgium.
"We were standing by a table in
the corner of the room and from
among the objets d'art, the various
trinkets, the signed photographs in
silver frames, with which it was load
ed, he drew forward a silver bowl that
he used as a cendrier. As I dropped
the ash of my cigaret into it, I noticed
that it' was pierced on one side near
the rim by a perfectly round-hole, the
jagged edges of which were thrust in
ward: plainly a bullet-hole:' doubtless
it had a history. I asked him." .
" 'Yes, a bullet-hole,' he said. 'In
China, it stood on my desk, and one
day during the riots a bullet came
through the window and went right
through it.'
"Several of the guests pressed up to
se; such a bowl with its jagged bullet-hole
and a history was an excellent
subject for conversation; the. German
Minister had to recount the -circumstances
several times.
" 'I have never had a post,' he said
'where there has not been trouble; in
Turkey it was - the Revolution; in
China it was the Boxers. I am a bird
of ill-omen.' "
A Chicago clergyman gives this ac
count of infant resourcefulness:
His little daughter was feeling a bit
under the weather one evening, and
consequently was put to bed early
She had not been under the covers
more than five minutes before she
called out: "Mother I want to see Fa
ther."
"Go to sleep, dear," answered the
mother. "Father can't see you now.
In a few minutes she called once
more: "Mother, I've got to see iam-
er."
"I can't disturb your father now
He is very busy. Go to sleep."
There Tias silence for nearly five
minutes. Then these words tloated
down the sairs: "Mother, I am a very
sick woman and I must see my pas
tor at once." Everybody's Magazine.
FUNERAL BOCQCET AND
DESIGNS
JOHN RECK & SON
Cuticura Soap
Ideal For Baby sSkin
FREE TO
ASTHMA SUFFERERS
A New Home Cure That Anyone Can
Use Without Discomfort op Loss
of Time.
We have a New Method that cures
Asthma, and we want you to try it at
our expense. No matter whether your
case is of lors standing or recent de
velopment, whether it is present as oc
casional or chronic Asthma, you
should send for a free trial of our
method. No matter what your age
or occupation, if you are troubled with
asthma, ' our method should relieve
you promptly.
We especially want to send it to
those apparently hopeless cases, where
all forms of inhalers, douches, opium
preparations, fumes, "patent smokes,
etc., have failed. We want to show
everyone at our own expense, that
this new method is designed to end all
difficult breathing, all wheezing, and
all those terrible paroxysms at once
and for all this time.
This free offer is too important to
neglect a single day. Write now and
then begin the method at once. Send
no money. Simply mail coupon below
Do it doday.
FREE ASTHMA COUPON
FRONTIER ASTHMA CO., Room
897 S, Niagara and Hudson Sts.,
Buffalo, N. Y.
Send free trial of your method to:
118
7MAtNST2!Sfg
' g yg upp, .jewr at.BABwum
ATCH REPAIRING
When you bring . your
watch here to be repaired,
cleaned and adjusted it is
done right. Our guarantee
is back of it.
How is that .watch of
yours?
How long since it has been oiled and
cleaned? Dont expect it to run on
forever without at least being oiled.
To assure accurate time a watch
should be oiled and inspected at least
once in every 12 months.
flip j
SURPRISES,
3
U. S. Food Administration License No. G02142.
FRESH SEA FOOD
for Friday; feb. 1st, '18.
Large Green Bluefish . . 28c lb.
Steak Tilensh . .20c lb.
Steak Cod . 20 c R.
Steak White Halibut 28 C R-
Steak Pollock ................ . . .... 18c E.
Large Bloater Mackerel 20 C lb.
Smoked Kippers . . 12c each
Finnan Haddies, green 25 c lb.
Steak Salmon 35 C lb.
Pink Alaska Salmon, can 20 C
Salt Cod Middles 22 C and 25 C
Flatfish ,.....12c lb.
Herring jQc lb
Green Smelts 30c lb.
No. 1 Smelts . . . ; 25 C lb.
Butterfish :. .-15 c lb.
Haddock 12c lb.
Market Cod 12c lb.
Spanish Mackerel 20c lb.
Escallops SI. 00 qt.
Whole Salt Cod : 15 c lb.
Red Alaska Salmon, can , .25 c
Boneless Herring .... .25c lb.
MEAT SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY AT
SATURDAY SALE PRICES.
Good Chuck Roasts of Beef . . . . .20c to 22 C lb.
Good Pot Roasts of Beef 18c to 20c lb.
Prime Ttib Roasts of Beef. .24c 26c & 28c lb.
SMOKED AtyD SALT MEATS.
Meadow. Brook Hams . . . . , 32 C
Swift's Premium Hams -34c
Corned Spare Ribs 20 C
Corned Beef Tongues . . . 28 C
Squire's Sugar Cured Bacon -.38c lb.
Sticking Pieces Corned Beef 22c lb.
m Corned Pigs Feet 10c lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
BRIDGEPORT
PublicMarket&Branch
STATE AND BANK EAST MAIN STS.
PHONES.
F-I-S-H spells FISH
And that is how
We spell it.
G-O-O-D Spells GOOD
And that is how
We sell it.
HAYES FISH CO.
629 WATER ST.
No Branch Market. Tel. Baranm 412, 413, 2697.
Raw weather catches you unpre
pared before you have a furnace
fire or steam. That's when
Perfection Heater comfort is a
gratifying revelation. The gener
ous warmth drives out every last
bit of chill and dampness.
The Perfection .Heater gives eight
hours of clean, odorless, portable heat
for every gallon of fuel.
It is economical much cheaper than
coal even when coal is cheap. Every
apartment and dwelling needs a
Perfection Heater to make comfort
secure.
Used in more than 3,000,000 homes.
The new No. 500 Perfection Heater
Wick comes trimmed and burned off,
all ready for use. Makes re-wicking
easy.
So-CO-ny Kerosene gives best results.
STAJVDAKD OIL CO. OF NEW YORK
Principal Offices
New York
AN AID TO HEALTH PURE WATER
A healthful drrok which is absolutely uncon
taminated.by impurities of any kind. State License
No. 10.
BOTTLED DAILY. DELIVERED DAILY.
Telephone 3802-12.
W. M. LANE, Distributor of
HIGHLAND SPRING WATER
R. F. D. NO. 2, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
SPR AGUE ICE & COAL CO.
DEALERS IV
ANTHRACITE AND BITCMTNOtrS COAL
EAST END E. WASH. AVE. BRIDGE :: :: TEL. 4673-4674
QUALITY Lumber Means ECONOMY
"Because" saves the workman ft lot
of h&nd work.
Enables him to do a larger day's trade.
There are lot at TiNUt WKLNHXXS ti booso txrffcCac
these day tn-tnetn tte oat of bona arecdon 4owm
to rock battrm. It yon ra tbbddns at baUdlac wm
would Ilka tm allow you then tUnga.
103
:THE
Frank Miller Lumber Co.
-Adv.
I ..Ft SP-i . I Albany 1 I
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I STANDARD OlLCaN.Y.
DON'T BOTHER WITH IT
It's poor economy to soil a perfectly
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waste time that you could be enjoy
ing in the car, by needlessly working
over a tire, under the car. Send it
to us. We'll fix it in a jiffy. Make it
as good as new, and the cost will be
comparatively trifling.
United Tire & Vulcanizing Co,
Distributors of
UNITED STATES TERES
342 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport.
Telephone WM Barnaul ' !
)

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