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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, February 01, 1918, Image 15

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

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THE TIMES : FEBRUARY 1, 1918.
15
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World of
30NDS ARE READY
FOR SUBSCRIBERS
FOR LIBERTY LOAN
The Liberty Loan Committee of
New England has received statements
from a number of people that they
have not received their first or second
Liberty Bonds. To the subscribers of
the first and second Liberty loans,
this information should be Interesting!
The Treasury Department has fur
nished the Federal Reserve Banks
with 8 per cent, coupon bonds and
4 per cent, conversion coupon bonds
In sufficient quantity to complete de
liveries on interim certificates pre
sented for exchange for bonds. So
- far as the department is advised there
Is no reason yriiy every subscriber
should not receive the bonds to which
he is entitled upon presentation of
Tiisirrterlm certificate to the Federal
Reserve Bank. Inasmuch as a holder
of Interim certificates is entitled to
receive the denominations of bonds
desired at the time he presents his
certificates, it Is not always possible
for the department and the banks to
anticipate requirements and it may
be found, upon pr jntation of such
certificates, that the bank Is not able
to make delivery in the denomina
tions required; but the department
has abundant bonds on. hand to meet
all requirements in this respect, and
the delay would be momentary only.
Regarding the registered bonds,
those at 3 per cent, have been is
sued as rapidly as requisitions have
been received from Federal Reserve
Banks. December 15th Interest,
however, has been paid and the bonds
are in process of issue. The issue is
current. These at 4 per cent, have
not yet been Issued.
To close of business Jan. 26, 12,272,
677 Second Liberty coupon bonds of
the denominations of $50, $100, $500
and $1,000- of total face amount
$2,426,147,600 have been forward
ed to Federal Reserve Banks for de
livery on subscriptions. In addition
thereto something over 92,858 coupon
bonds of the $5,000 and $10,000 de
nominations of total face amount of
$704,080,000 also have been for
warded. Total shipments of coupon
bonds accordingly aggregate $3,130
227.600. .
Requisitions for Second Liberty
registered bonds so far received total
, $167,222,600. These bonds are in
process of issue. Practically every
requisition from Federal Reserve
Banks for coupon has been filled and
requisitions for registered bonds are
being executed as rapidly as possible.
''Miiiiiiiimiiiiiriimiiiiiiiinimiiimiirj
1 STOCK MARKET 1
iiiiiimimirminiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiii"
New York, Feb. 1 Opening: Rail
roads, Industrials and the more prom
inent war issues were in further de
mand at the active opening of today's
stock market. Coppers, shippings
and specialties also moved forward,
gains extending from large fractions
to slightly more than a point. United
States Steel was again the outstanding
feature, its first offering of 10,000
shares showing a moderate advance,
from which It soon reacted. St. Paul
common and preferred. General Mo
tors and Industrial Alcohol were
among the heavy issues.
Noon Profit taking was tnduced
by the advance on the first half hour.
Steels and railroads, reacted a point,
and some of yesterday's spectacular
features, notably General Motors and
General Electric, receded 2 . to 6
points. The reversal was soon over
come in the broader inquiry for lead
ing stocks. Pools were active in
specialties. Alcohol rose 6 points
from its early decline Shippings,
especially Atlantic, Gulf and United
Fruit were materially higher, and
railroads showed renewed strength.
Liberty bonds rallied, the 3s selling
at SR. 30 to 98. the first 4s at 96.68
to 9G.60 nnd the second 4s at 96.04
to 95.98. i
OHIO RIVER GOES
TEN FEET ABOVE
THE DANGER LINE
Cincinnati, Feb. 1 The Ohio river
went over the 60 foot mark here dur
ing the night, or more than 10 feet
above the danger line, and it is bring
ing privation and hardship to hun
dreds of famines living in the low
lands.
The ice gorge that runs from Ris
ing Sun, Ind., to Madison, Ind., con
tinues to hold.
TODAY'S WANTS
WANTED to buy farm, 100 acres,
fully equipped. Address with parti
culars and price, no agent. Peter
Sopinsky, 313 East 71st, St., New
York city. B 1 sp
MILLWRIGHTS
WANTED
Apply Employment Office.
Locomobile Co. of America.
LI GAL NOTICE All pledges up to
number 4018 dated before Aug.
' 2, 1917 are for sale: 49008, 49004.
49001. 4S987, 48984, 48982. Aug. 1;
4S95S, 48941. 48928. Julv 31; 48914,
4i, 48896. tmSI. 4iSl. July 30;
4m. 48827', 'W,. Jwlv 28: 4S81S,
4879'', 187:2, 4?u, 48785, July 27;
48773, 4876S, 48766, 48762. July 28;
41740, 48729, July 26; 48712, 48711,
f 48798, 48693, July 24; 48680. 48676.
48674, 48661, 48648, 48644, July
1117. has. A. Peck, 4a Middle
a'p
pinance
New York Stock
Exchange Quotations
Reported over the private wires ot
T. L. Watson & Co., Bankers od
brokers, corner Main and John streets,
Bridgeport, Conn. Members ot uw
York Stock Exchange.
Feb. 1, 1.30 P. M.
Allls Chalmers
Am. Beet Sugar -
Am. Car & Fdy.
Am. Can
Am. Cotton Oil Co.
Am. Locomotive
Am. Tobacco
Am. Smelt. & Re. Co.
Am. Sug. Refg. Co.
Am. Tel. & Tele.
Am. "Woolen
Am. Zinc
Alaska Gold
Alt., Gulf & W. Indies
Atch., T. & S. Fe
Anaconda Copper
Baldwin Loco.
Baltimore & Ohio
1
79
72
39
32
58
166
84
107ft
109
49
15
2ft
108ft
85
64
64
51
79
102
46
20
149
15
68
42
21
21
64
Bethlehem Steel "B"
Beth. Steel 8 per cent.
Brooklyn Rapid Transit
Butte & Superior
Canadian Pacific
Calif. Petroleum
Cen. Leather
Chi. M. & St. Paul
Chi. & Great W. Pfd.
Chi. Rk. Island Pac.
Chi., R. I. & Pac. pfd. A.
Chi., R. L & Pac. Pfd. B.
Chile Copper
Chino
Chesapeake & Ohio
Consolidated' Gas
Col. Fuel & Iron
Corn Products
17
44
54
92
38
33
. 57
31
115
39
15
26
138
135
49
91
27
42
47
28
8
121
25
95
29
13
33
78
59
28
93
45
22
32
19
44
106
86
Crucible Steel
Cuban Cane Sugar
Del. Hudson
Distilleries Securities
Erie
Erie 1st Pfd.
General Electric
General Motors
Goodrich Co.
Gt. Northern Pfd.
Gt, Northern Ore
Green Cananea
Inspiration Copper
International Nickel
Interborough Cons.
Inter. Harvester
Inter. Mer. Marine
Inter. Mer. Marine Pfd.
International Paper
Kansas City Sou.
Kennecott Cop.
Lackawanna Steel
Lehigh Valley
Maxwell Motors
Mex. Petroleum
Midvale Steel
Missouri Pacific "
Miami Copper x-div.
Nevada Cons.
Nat. Enameling
Norfolk & Western
Northern Pacific
N. Y. Central
N. Y., N. H. & H.
71
30
Pittsburgh Coal
48
46
64
24
76
77
53
33
43
84
24
60
63
17
156
54
116
96
128
56
97
47
84
8
42
91
42
Pennsylvania x-div.
Pressed Steel Car
Ray Cons.
Reading
Repub. Iron & Stel
Ry. Steel Spring
Sinclair Oil I
Sloss Sheffield & Iron
Southern Pacific
Southern Railway
Southern Railway Pfd.
Studebaker Cor.
Tenn. Copper
Texas Oil
Tobacco Products
Union Pacific
United Cigar Stores
U. S. Ind. Alcohol
U. S. Robber
U. S. Steer
U. S. Smelter
Utah Copper
Wabash
Wabash Pf j. A.
West. Union Tel.
Westinghouse Electric
Western Maryland
Willys Overland
U. S. Government Bonds.
Liberty 3s
14
18
98.20
96.06
Liberty 4s
Boston 1:30 P. M. Prices Reported
Over Private Wire to T. L.
Watson & Co.
Ariaona Com. 1314
Am. Zinc . 15
Butte & Superior SP
Cal. & Hecla 435
Copper Range 48,
Greene Cananea 42
Island Creek 56
I Isle Royale 22
I North Butte - 16
Old Dominion 44
Osceola 60
Pond Creek 18
Shannon ' ' 5
U. S. Smelting 48
Ventura 7
STATE SUES TO
COLLECT BRUNO
FORFEITED BOND
Civil suit in the Superior Court has
been Instituted by the state's attorney
for this county in the name of the
State of Connecticut to recover on the
bond of 81,000 forfeited by Mollie
Bruno at the September term of the
Criminal Superior Court. Maria
Izz'o was the surety ana Is defend
ant In the suit.
Mollie Bruno was arrested In July
last on charges of receiving money
from Stella Ferrara in a "white
slavery" case. After a trial in the
City Court she was bound ever for
trial in the Superior Court. Maria
Izzo furnishing the bond of $L,0oo.
When the cftse was called Mollie
Bruno failed to appear. The amount
of the surety has never been paid.
Damages of 81 150 are claimed. .
23,
St.
Advertise in The Times
Will Be Substitute for Small
and Will Combine Best
Delivering New Type of
Department Says.
Washington, Feb. 1 Henry Ford
is building a new type of steel sub
marine chaser, which will be ready
for active service by summer, Secre
tary of the Navy -Daniels told the
House committee on naval affairs
yesterday.
He also informed the committee it
had been decided to abandon tem
porarily the three-year shipbuilding
program, so as to meet the demand
for small fighting craft to combat the
submarines. Hearing this, members
of the committee said the pending ap
propriation bill will carry no money
in furtherance of big ship construc
tion, but smaller craft will be provid
ed for by large appropriations.
The Secretary told Representative
Eritten he was opposed to increasing
the Marine Corps force. Mr. Britten
declared he would offer an amend
ment to provide for the enlistment of
30,000 additional marines. He said
this would enable the department to
send at least 37,000 to France to fight
with the army.
Chasers for Inshore Duty.
Telling of the Ford U-boat chaser
Secretary Daniels said:
"The new type of fighting ship will
be between the ' present 110-foot
wooden hull submarine chaser and
the destroyers. We can get them in
large numbers and get them quickly.
Mr. Ford is using a part of his auto
mobile plant to fabricate the parts,
which will be assembled and put to
gether on the Atlantic seaboard. It is
possible some of them may be put
together on the Great Lakes, since it
would be an easy matter to bring
them out through the canals.
"The new craft will combine all the
good points of the destroyer and the
110-foot chasers and eliminate the
bad points of the latter. They -will
be equipped with all modern devices.
"The new type of submarine hunter
will be not unlike our older destroy
ers, hut many features will make
them ,by far the most efficient small
vessels now engaged in the war on
submarines. They are not intended
for deep sea submarine hunting, but
for harbor and other inshore work. I
do not care to say just how many
have' been ordered. We have con
tracted for a large number, and can
get many more if necessary.
"The essential thing is that the new
craft promises to be a highly impor
tant factor in the fight on submarines.
The plans weTe perfected by an en
gineer brought here by Mr. Ford, Ad
miral Taylor, Chief of the Bureau of
j Construction and Repair, and Qon
structor Stocker. Sir. Stocker went
Detroit and assisted In getting the
fabricating work started. The new
ships will ibe motor driven, and Mr.
tFord win make all the parts."
The understanding is that Mr. !Dan
iele plans to put $50,000,000 in the new
chasers. They are intended to take
up the convoy of American troop and
supply ships and Allied vessels after
they arrive on the other ide, thus re
lieving the destroyers more quickly
than is now possible.
The plans for the new vessels were
perfected during the past two weeks
and Mr. Ford got to work Immediate
ly. (Mr. Daniels said it would not be
necessary for Mr. Ford to utilize his
entire plant in . the fabrication of
parts and the construction of motors
for the new vessels. He said other
automobile concerns could build them
if necessary, hut would have to pre
pare their plants fr the work. The
Fond! plant is ready and working.
The Secretary would not give de
tails of the new craft. It is known
they will be able to handle the depth
bombs which have pioved so satisfac
tory in putting submarines . out of
ibusiness, and wil carry armament
sufficiently heavy to take care of the
U-boats.
Secretary Daniels said the Admi
ralties of Allied nations have exam
ined and approved the plans for the
new American submarine hunters,
and some of them probably will give
contracts for similar vessels.
All Shipyards Busy.
The change in the shipbuilding pro
program is in line with the recom
mendation of Secretary Daniels in his
annual report that authorizations for
completing the program be deferred
until the next Congress. - The fact
that practically all the shipbuilding
facilities are now occupied, largely
In turning out ships already author
ized, members of the committee de
clared, is responsible for the tempor
ary abandonment of more appropria
tions for the big ship program.
"The department is using its chief
energies," said Chairman Padgett, "in
the construction of torpedo boats,
destroyers and the smaller boats re
quired in operations against the sub
marine and in preparation for the
transportation of men and equip
ment. "With all the ltimp sum appro
priations and the additional appro
priations made by Congress they have
now got all the money they can
spend."
What the Navy Costs.
Secretary Daniels submitted to the
committee an outline of the work
and money expended in putting the
navy on a fighting basis. He said
preparations for increases had been
under way since the fall of 1915,
when estimates were submitted for
ti e preparedness program, which was
put into operation by the act of Aug.
29. 1916.
"This foresight on the part of Con
gress and the Administration," Mr.
Daniels said, "is x largely responsible
for the generally acknowledged good
showing the navy thus far has
made
He said that altogether there has
Patrol Boats and Dpstroyers
Features of Both Will Be
Boats This Summer, Navy
been appropriated in bills handled by
the Appropriations Committee $1,
076,241,057.37 for current year ex
pense of the naval establishment. He
continued:
"It is very difficult, as you can ap
preciate, to foretell just what our fu
ture requirements will be. Since
you convened, I have so far found it
necessary to recommend further ap
propriations for the current fiscal
year to the extent of $45,269,935. It
is more than probable that still fur
ther submissions' for both the present
and next year will come later. No
one can say what the requirements
will be."
Lind Chairman of
Labor Advisory Body
John Lind, former governor of Min
nesota, was named by Secretary Wil
son chairman of the advisory council
that will assist in the administration
of a war labor program intrusted to
the department of labor by the presi
dent. Six men and one woman were
named on the council.
STAMFORD FIRM
DEFENDANT IN
CONTRACT SUIT
Baer Brothers, of Stamf jt d, mann
facturers of bronze powders, are de
fendants in a suit in the Superior
Court brought by George Muench of
Stamford, in which damages of $16,
000 are claimed. Several contracts
for machinery were made between
Baer Bros, and Muench, one for 16
"stamper machines," which were to
cost $975 each. Half were delivered,
November 22 and the defendants re
fused to accept them. Storage charges
of $300 in addition to $7,800 for the
machines are claimed. On another
contract for machines the earn of
$552.49 is claimed; on a third $2,400,
and on fourth $3,516.77, and a fifth
$158.
FINNS ALL OVER
COUNTRY WINNING
OVER RED GUARDS
London, Feb. 1 The situation in
Finland is more reassuring, accord
ing to the latest reports received at
the Finnish legation in Stockholm.
The Red Guards have been disarmed
or are willingly surrendering their
arms all over the country. The rev
olutionists still hold Helslngfors, the
capital.
A Helsingsfors dispatch of Wednes
day says the diet and the legitimate
government are prevented by the rev.
olutionists from exercising . their du
ties. The suspension of all the general
activities of religious bodies until the
restoration of order has been an
nounced by the central association
of officials.
The dispatch reports that a dele
gation from sympathizers among the
people with the Bolshevik! delivered
an address of cordial greeting to the
Bolsheviki government in Helsingfors,
assuring it of solidarity "m the com
mon struggle against capitalism."
The foreign governments which
recognized the independence of Fin
land are said to have been notified
by the revolutionists of the change
in government brought about by the
revolution.
The White guard, it is announced.
has taken the town of Tavistahues,
60 miles northwest of Helsingfors and
Juveskyle, in south central Finland.
Strikes continue in Helsingfors and
the revolutionary government is said
to be fomenting similar outbreaks in
several other districts, ,
- London. Feb. 1 Austria is abso
lutely dependent on Hungary and
P.umattia for grain, Heir Hoofer, the
Austrian food minister, said in an
Interview in Nieus Wiener Tageblatt.
Since last August only 150,000 tons
of wheat has been received from Ru
mania, while shipments from Hun
gary were quite Inadequate .to meet
present needa.
1,000 MEN NEEDED
FOR MOTOR SERVICE BY
RED CROSS IN FRANCE.
More than 1,000 motor truck
drivers, mechanicians and help-
ers are needed immediately by
the American Red Cross for
service In France. The duties
of these men will be to operate
and repair the Red Cross motor
4 tracks which transport supplies
to war hospitals. Men In this t
service will receive pay and, ex-
penses. .
A recruiting office has been
opened at the headquarters of !
the Atlantic Division under Mr.
J. Leo Skelley of the Red Cross
Foreign Transportation Depart-
ment Recruiting Service. Appll- 4
cants must be- over thirty-one
years of age.
RED CROSS ISSUE
CALL TO HORSES
WAR SERVICE
Statement Says Between 30,000
and 40,000 Will Ba Needed
in a Short Time.
A call to qualified nurses to enlist
for war service has been issued by the
American Red Cross Nursing Service,
the mobilizing agency for nurses for
the United States Army and Navy.
Attention is called also to the Imper
ative need for an increased enrollment
in training schools so that fully quali
fied nurses may be released from civil
ian hospitals for military service.
Citing an estimate of the Surgeon-
General's office that the Acmy alone
will need between 30,000 and 40,000
nurses in short .time, the Red Cross
Nursing Service makes it clear that
the present average enrollment of
1,000 a month falls far short of the
military needs of the Government.
Moreover, it Is asserted, the Allies are
depending upon this country to sup
plement their nursing service.
The fact that the recruiting of
nurses does not keep pace with the
military needs does not indicate that
the women in the nursing profession
are slackers, according to Miss Jane A.
Delano, Chairman of the Red Cross
Nursing Service. It Indicates merelyi
that the rudden and extraordinarily
heavy demand for nurses has not been
thoioughly realized by the women
available for this service.
As demands grow dally, the prob
lem of home nursing for civilian
needs becomes harder to solve. It Is
estimated by the Army Nurses' Corps
that over 30,000 nu ses will be need
ed, on the basis of the present esti
mates, for an army of 1,000,000 men.
16,500 Enrolled.
Statistics prepared at the headquar
ters of the Red Cross Nursing Service
in Washington show that there are
between 80,000 and 90,000 registered
nurses In the United States. Of this
number approximately 16500 are en
rolled Red Cross nurses, the majority
of whom are In active service or
ready for mobilization for specified
purpose. The Red Cross enrollment
forms the reserve of the United States
Army Nurses' Corp. and the United
States Navy Nurses' Corps.
Already 1,790 nurses haw been
equipped and sent abroad by the Red
Cross Nursing Service. For service
at home the Red Cross has provided
2,500 nurses. More than 2,000 addi
tional nurses have been organized
into units which now are ready for
mobilization.
Red Cross nurses also are doing
special work In sanitary zones sur
rounding cantonments. " Eighty-nine
are serving in a public health detach
ment under the American Red Cross
In France. Twelve public health
nurses are In Ronmania, three In
Greece and one In Serbia.
Requirements Modified.
All Red Cross nurses assigned to
duty In military hospitals automatical
ly become members of the Army or
Navy Nurses' Corps and are no longer
under the supervision or direction of
the Red Cross. These nurses, when
on active duty, we. entitled to the
same Government war risk Insurance
as Army or Navy officers and enlist
ed men.
To meet the Increasing demands of
the Army end Navy Nurses' Corps the
Red Cross has modified somewhat the
former requirements for enrollment.
The age limit Is lowered to twenty
one years, and in special cases nurses
over forty may be accepted. Small
schools for training nurses have been
placed en the accredited list
Since the entrance of the United
States In the war the number of pu
pils entering nurses' training schools
has Increased 20 per cent. Within the
last few days the Red Cross has re
cruited and equipped a group of 10ft
nurses for the Army Nurses' Corps
for serviee witK the British Expedi
tionary Forces at the request of the
British Government. It has also
mobilized several highly specialized
groups of nurses for orthopedic, psy
chiatric and facial surgery hospitals,
as well as mobile operating units and
other important groups.
Distributing Depot Opened.
The Atlantic division has established
at 1018-22 Washington street. Hobo
ken, a distributing depot for outfitting
the soldiers embarking for service
abroad. This depot will be under the
Urectlon of Mrs. A. G. Olney.
No merchant ever failed
if he advertised as WELL
and as MUCH as he could.
FINANCIAL
OVER F1ITY TEARS
3 PER CENT. INTEREST
ON .
YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT
We think this will anneal to von roarticiilarlv in view of our experience
of over fifty years in banking. We
conduct of your business, and courteous
Interest credited to accounts monthly.
We would like to tell you about our methods.
Call us on the 'phone or come in and see us.
T. L. WATSON & CO.
PRIVATE BANKERS
CORNER MAIN AND JOHN STREETS
. Established 1866 .
rliII!IIIIIi:::iIIIIIllllllHIUIIllllIlil!lililUllli!lllllllll!IUIIlMIII!llllllllllillll!llllllUIi:
The Mission of This Bank
The First-Bridgeport National fills a broader mis
sion than acting as guardian for depositors funds, al
though this is paramount.
It is here to serve with courtesy, promptness . and
ability not only the interests of its depositors but the in
terests of the city, the state and the nation.
FIRST-BRIDGEPORT NATIONAL BANK
MAIN AND STATE STS.
rniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiieiiniiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiTi?:
M'ADOO EXPECTS
GOAL SITUATION
TO BE BRIGHTER
Washington, Feb. 1 Clearing
weather needed to insure coal move
ment sufficient to avert another acute
shortage in the east was in sight
today and Director General McAdoo
of the - railroads expressed confidence
that the country would pass through
the crisis "without any further shut
down of industries."
Although les optimistic, Fuel ad
ministration officials said the food sit
uation depended entirely on the
weather, and coal would continue to
go first to ships, households, public
institutions and preferred war indus
tries. Under present conditions they
saw little chance to supply the less
essential industries.
State fuisl administrators received
notice today that before making gen
eral interpretations, of the Monday
closing order they must first have
the changes sanctioned by the na
tional administration. This step was
taken to end confusion existing be
cause of different interpretations of
the order in various states.
RED CROSS ASSIGNS
WAR WORK TO SCHOOLS.
Schools In Sew York, New Jersey
and Connecticut, which have been en
listed for war work In the Junior
Membership and School Activities De
partment of the Bed Cross, have been
asked by the Atlantic Division of the
Red Cross to make 56,000 French and
Belgian refugee garments.
This Is the first definite task to he
e Jmlor DepartlnenL
It is the result of an appeal from
Red Cross representatives in France
who cabled that thousands of home
less and helpless women and children
there are in need of warm garments.
Work upon these garments has been
allotted through the school commit
tees ef Red Cross chapters. The or
der most be completed In three
months, and chapters have been asked
to report to the Junior Department
on February 10 the portion of the al
lotment then completed.
RED CROSS IN SCHWAB HOME.
The home of Charles M. Schwab
and the town house of John D. Rocke
feller, Sr., In New York city, are among
the latest additions to the list of pri
vate dwellings where Red Cross aux
iliary work rooms are being Operated.
PERSONAL TAX NOTICE
Notice is hereby given "That by an
act of the Legislature, it is provided
that every male person, between the
ages of twenty-one and sixty years,
shall except as otherwise provided by
law, be liable annually to pay a per
sonal tax of two dollars for town and
states taxes, in lieu of a poll and com
mutation tax. This tax is due and
payable at the Office of the Tax Col
lector, Rooms 4 and 5 City Hall,
Bridgeport, Conn., on and after Feb.
1st, 1918.
The undersigned will he at said of
fice between the hours of 9 a. m. and
4 p. m. for the purpose of collecting
said tax.
HOWARD F. SMITH,
B 1 a Tax Collector.
DISTRICT OF FAIRFIELD, ss.,
COURT OF PROBATE.
Jan. 30th, 1918.
Estate of James P. Flangan late of
Fairfield in said district, deceased.
The administrator having applied
for an order authorizing and empow
ering him to sell certain real estate
belonging to said estate, as per appli
cation on file more fully appears; it
is
Ordered That said application be
heard and determined at the Court of
Probate in Fairfield in said district on
he 6th day of February, A. D 1918,
at 11 o'clock in the forenoon, and that
notice be given of the pendency of
said application and of the time and
place of hearing thereon, by publish
ing this order once in some newspaper
having a circulation in said district:
and by giving notice to all parties in
interest either personally or by mail
ing to each, postage prepaid, a copy
of this order all on or before the 1st
ay of February A. D. 1918, and re
turn make to this courVof the notices
given.
BACON WAKEMAN,
Judge.
can assure you of safety, satisfactory
treatment.
The City National Bank
Savings Department Pays
4 Per Cent. Interest
Start Saving Now
107 WAlhl STREET
THE CONNECTICUT
NATIONAL BANK
OP
BRIDGEPORT
Cor. Main and Wall Streets
IT HELPS
CONSERVE CASH
to pay by check lessening the temp
tation to purchase thing3 not actually
needed. V
Are you paying by this safe.
nomical and convenient medium? -Checking
Accounts, large or snaSP'
are solicited. - . .
JAMES STAPLES & CO.
189 STATE STREET
PATENTS
A. M. WOOSTER
Late Examiner tj. S. Patent Offie
1115 MAIN STREET, BRTXK5EPOKB
Send for booklet on patents
TRUSTEE'S SALE
All the stock in trade, consisting ot
ladies' cloaks, men's suits, waists, etc..
1 and fixtures of The New York Clothing
Co., formerly conducted by Max Cohen.
502 East Main Street, Bridgeport, Ct,
will be sold on. said premises at publio
sale, Tuesday, Feb. 5th, at 2 p. m.
The right Is reserved to reject any)
and all bids.
A. K. ABRIOIA, Trustee,
1996 Main Street, Bridgeport, Corns
A31 s Phone Baraum 3759
that Is Concrete?
X
Concrete a manufac
tured stone is made by
mixing together Port
land Cement, sand and
stone (or gravel.) Var
ious proportions of each
f e used, depending upon
the use to which the con
crete is put. About half
an hour after mixing
these materials together, ,
the mass begin to stiffen,
until, in from half-a-day
to a day, it becomes so
hard that you cannot
dent it with the hand. By
a month the mass is hard
like stone indeed, hard
er than most stones.
"We have many book
lets relating to concrete
and cement work which
we would be pleased to
send you.-
The
Wheeler & Bowes Co
MASONS' MATERIAL
BRIDGEPORT
Phone Barman 344-345-348
St. Louis, Feb. 1 Rumors that
Fielder Jones is to retire as manager
of the St. Louis Americans were de
nied yesterday when word was re
ceived from him at his home in. Port
land, Oregon, denying that he intend
to resign. President Phil Ball assart
that Jones will pilot the Brown tM
season as usual.

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