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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, February 12, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1918-02-12/ed-1/seq-5/

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YALE PROFESSOR
GIVES POINTERS
Oil BURNING WOOD
Lockwood Tells' household
ers How Fuel Can be
Used Economically.
CARE OP FURNACE
FIRES EXPLAINED
Sprinkling of Any Kind of
Coal on Wood Fire Will
Keep Efficiency.
Hartford. Feb. 11 Economical and
efficient methods of burning wood in
in a coal furnace are described in a
brief series of directions which has
been prepared by E. H. Lockwood,
professor of mechanical engineering
at Tale University, for the committee
of fuel conservation, Connecticut
Sate Council of Defense.
Professor Lockwood's "Directions
for using wood in coal furnaces" fol
low: The simplest way to use wood Jn a
coal furnace and the most effective
-in producing heat is by using a com
bination of wood and coal. Any kind
of wood can be used that will go into
the fire pot hard or soft, large or
small and will burn with good effi
ciency when surrounded with coal. In
stead of shoveling on coal in the
usual way, place blocks of wood on
the Are to about the level of the first
door, 'then add coal on the top which
will fill the crevices between the
wood, making a level fuel bed with
the coal on top. Any size of coal ot
coke can be used but the small sizes
fill in best between the chinks in the
wood. Buckwheat coal can be burn
ed successfully in this way and its
low price will help to offset the higher
price of wood, making an economical
combination. From 25 to 50 per cent,
of the coal can be saved by substitu
tion of wood in Ihis way.
Caution When burning the small
sizes of coal take care to avoid gas
explosions by always leaving a flame
burning on some part of the fire in
other words, do not cover the whole
fire with fresh fuel at one time.
To Use Wood Only.
The best form of wood is short
sticks eight to 12 inches long, pre
ferably hard wood. The best method
of firing is to keep the furnace full of
blocks packed closely together with
a moderate draft to give the desired
amount of heat; as the wood burn
more should he added in order to
keen the deep bed of burning fuel
which is best for economy. It is not
necessary to buy new grates for
burning wood although the ordinary
coal grate is not well adapted for
wood. Banking a wood fire at night
requires an extra supply of the larg
est blocks and special attention to
closing the dampers tight. Exper
ience will show the best way, but it
can be done with success in most fur
naces.
Wood In Fireplace.
Where a fireplace is available, wood
can be used to good advantage as
supplementary to a furnace or even
to replace the furnace in fall and
Spring with decided economy. Few
persons know that a wood fire can ba
kept burning night and day in a fire
place with very Nttle attention and
with small consumption of wood. Any
. kind of wood can be used provided it
is dry and seasoned. The secret of
fireplace management is a plentiful
supply of ashes which should be kept
at the level of the andirons. As the
blocks burn an accumulation of glow
ing charcoal forms by falling into the
ashes and this keeps on burning
slowly and assists ignition of fresh
wood placed on the andirons.
To bank a fire in the fireplace,
cover the hot charcoal over with a
thin layer of ashes and a fire so
banked will keep for 10 or 12 hours
and will give out some heat from the
hot bricks all the time. A well man
aged fireplace will be found a great
addition to the heating system in any
residence.
BRITISH GET RECRUITS
Ten men were recruited for ser
vice with the British and Canadian
forces at the rally held ,last evening
at the High school assembly hall. A
U rge audience was present and lis
tened to the address of Lieut. H. B.
Pepler. "
WILL INCREASE CAPITAL
Capital stock of the Raybestos Co.
of thin city will be increased from $1,
750,000 to $2,000,000, according to a
certificate filed yesterday in the office
of the secretary of the state at Hart
ford. Extension of the business of
the company will absorb the new cap
ital. To Stop a Persistent,
Hacking Cough
The bt remedy la one yon ema
uuy make at home. Cbcap,
nut voi
Thousands of people normally hralthy
In every other respect, are annoyed with
' persistent hanging-on bronchial couch
year after year, disturbing their sleep
end making lite disagreeable. It's so
needless there's an old home-made
remedy that will end such a cough,
easily and quickly.
Get from any dmjrjrist "2Vj ounces of
Pincx" (60 cents worth, pour it into a
pint bottle and fill the bottla with plain
granulated, sugar Byrup. Begin taking
is an once, uraauauy nut surely vou
1 will notice the phlegm thin out and then
Disappear aitogetner, thus ending a
rougn that you never thought would end.
It also promptly loosens a dry or tight
cough, stops the troublesome throat
tickle, soothes the irritated nrmhnnri
that line the throat and bronchial tubes,
nnd relief comes almost immediately.
A day's use will usually break up an or
dinary throat or chest cold, and for
' bronchitis, croup, whooping cough and
bronchial asthma there is nothing
better. It tastes pleasant and keeps
peneeiiv.
Pinez is a most valuable concentrated
compound of Pennine Jorwav nine ex-
"tract, and is used by millions of peo-jjl-
every year for throat and chest colds
with splendid results.
To avoid disappointment, ask your
Urnggist for "2 ounces of Finex" with
fall directions and don't accept anything
else. A guarantee of absolute satisfac
tion or money promptly refunded goes
rith this preparation, Jha Pises Co
enocuv. m
HUNS REALI
AMERICA'S
IN WAR IS VAST
Unrest is Sweeping German Empire, Noted Writer
Says People Have Lost Faith in Reported
"Victories" and Foresee Grave Results of
Frightfulness.
BY VAN DER KLUTE
The Hague, Feb. 12 Whatever hidden strategy may under
lie this appearance of a great national dispute, it is impossible
to deny that the German masses are perceptibly nearer the
breaking point than they have
The signs of bitter discontent are more open than at any
time during the course of the war; and the causes are more
pressing and more varied.
Never has the general ill-health of the civilian population
been more apparent than now, just as the period of. extreme
scarcity is opening afresh for the winter.
Substitute goods, and substitute clothing have undermined
the stoutest constitutions, and now Germany wakes, to the rea
lization of the fact that no substitute can be provided for fuel,
to Warm and light the war-weary workers through the bitterest
winter they have experienced for a quarter of a" century. -
Victories no longer arouse any gen
uine enthusiasm among these people,
who have celebrated too many vaunt
ed successes in the field, only to find
themselves more destitute and hope
less as a consequence. !
The promised offensive in the West
is the cause of nothing but apprehen
sion, the relatives of the soldiers open
ly prophesying another "blood-batn
of Verdun."
Faith in the submarine campaign
has given way to loudly expressed
fears of the ultimate consequences of
frightfulness at sea upon Germany's
economic relations with the outside
world.
More important still, the German
public has at last realized that the
entry of America into the war is no
mere bluff, as they have so often
been assured.
The fact that millions of American
soldiers will be poured into the war
zone before the summer has reached
its prime is generally recognized, and
misgivings have turned to a profound
pessimism.
Wave of Crime
Self-restraint and respect for the
law have given way under the strain,
and crimes against property have in
creased abnormally. Many young wo
men have figured in the courts charg
ed with forgery, embezzlement, and
similar offences, and all seem to ad
vance the same plea.
Money will still buy necessities and
luxuries in Germany, though the
prices are infinitely higher. These girl
thieves all declare they stole to buy
food for themselves and dependents.
One girl who had paid $75 for a
ham and $40.00 for a goose, to fur
nish a dinner with other accessories
at proportionate prices was sentenced
to twelve months' imprisonment. Her
case was so common that it escaped
comment in the German press.
Political Chaos
The downfall of Hertling and Kuhl
man, like that of Bethmann-Hollweg.
represents the failure of the Kaiser's
attempts ,to adjust this popular dis
content and demoralization to the
aims and objects of the War party.
The fall of Michaelis represented
the failure of an attempt to ignore the
collapse of the fighting spirit in ci
vilian Germany.
All the portents point to another
attempt to ignore the spirit of the
people, and the insisten cry of Ger
many's Allies for peace. But popular
feeling flows much more strongly
than at the time of the last reaction,
and the experiment may prove a haz
ardous one.
The Crown Prince returned to Ber
lin the other day to accomplish- the
fall of Hertling, the Chancellor, just as
he had previously acted as the open
instrument in the down fall of Beth
mann-Hollweg. The great crisis of the
war finds Germany in the throes of
a political convulsion.
With Hertling, it is extremely like
ly that Kuhlmann will also be cast
from office, and that the old breach
between- the German and the Aus
trian Emperor will be re-opened,
The reconstruction of the Ministry
has again been brought about by the
military party, backed by the whole
strength of pan-Germanism, and the
money power of the great munition
kings.
Wily Bolshevik
Hertling, no less than Kuhlmann,
allowed himself to be misled by the
apparent simplicity of Trotsky and
his Bolshevik coadjutors, and the pair
found themselves in a cleft-stick.
On the one side the German Social
ists called upon the two Ministers to
live up to their' professions; on the
other side Kuhlmann's military col-
eagues at the peace table insisted
on the prosecution of Germany's mili
tary aims.
Encouraged by Austria, and espec
ially Count Czernin, Kuhlmann per
severed in his scheme for extending
the Russian negotiations to the con
sideration of a general European
peace.
Ludendorff, following the example
of General Stein, the Prussian War
Minister in the Bethmann crisis;
threatened his resignation, and
brought Baron von Kuhlmann up with
a round turn.
Nation's Dismay
It has been Impossible to conceal
from the German people the grave
danger of the peace negotiations with
Russia proving futile. No attempt has
yet been made to describe the dismay
cf the masses at the alternative a
continuation of war on all sides.
The hopes aroused were more san
guine than those excited by the Kais
er's peace "offer" of a year before.
In that case the enemy countries were
saddled with the odium due for the
continuation of. the war, but for the
almost inevitable breach with Rus
sia the masses openly blume the War
Party. .
A great popular outcry was only re
pressed by wholesale arrests of local
Socialist leaders, with whom the pris
ons of the big cities and industrial
centres are crowded. These measures,
as usual, were accompanied by a cer
THE
ZING
PART
ever been before.
tain amoynt of latitude to the Labor
rress, given under close censorship.
Important Council
The situation is so serious that it
has caused the most important coun
cil of the war to be summoned at Ber
lin. Not only the military chiefs and
the Crown Prince, but Buelow and
Bernstorff among others have been
called from their particular spheres
of activity to participate.
Both Bernstorff and Buelow are
mentioned as possible successors to
Hertling, while von dem Bussche. the
slimy young Junker, who formerly
represented Germany in Rumania,
and who is Kuehlmann's understudy
at the Foreign Office, is supported by
the pan-German section as successor
to his chief.
Once more the name of the Crown
Prince bulks greater in there-adjustment
than that of his father, the
Kaiser, and once more the war ex
tremists are calling for the appoint
ment of Hindenburg as Military Dic
tator. (By The International News Bu
reau, Inc., Boston, Mass.)
CHURCH HELPS
CONSERVATION
OF FUEL HERE
Ash Wednesday services at St.
John's Episcopal church, Park and
Fairfield avenues, will be as follows.
7:00. a. m., celebration of the Holy
Communion; 10:30 a. m.. morning
prayer, penitential office and sermon,
with choir; 8:00, evening prayer and
sermon, with choir.
Immediately following the early
morning service breakfast will be
served in the parish house adjoining
the church on Fairfield avenue. No
week-day services will be held in
either St. John's church or the Bur
roughs Memoriaal chapel during Lent
up to Holy Week. This is for the pur
pose of assisting in the conservation
of fuel.
St. Elizabeth's Guild room on the
second floor of the Parish house has
been fitted up as a day chapel. Here
on Thursday mornings during Lent at
10:30 o'clock a celebration of the
Holy Communion will take place and
the rector will give a series of devo
tional addresses on the general sub
ject, "God's Ideal for the Christian
Life."
Saint John's church, together with
the other Episcopal churches of the
city, will unite this Lent in an Inter-
parochial mission.
These services will be held on
Tuesday evenings in Lent at 8 o'clock,
The first service will be held at
Trinity church, Broad street and
Fairfield avenue. The other ser
vices will be held at the following
churches on the dates named: Feb
ruary 26 St. Paul's church; March
5, St. George's church; March 12, St.
Luke's church: March 19, Christ
church; March 26, St. John's church.
The preacher at the first five of these
services . will be the Rev. George
Thompson, D.D., rector of Christ
church, Greenwich. The preacher at
the last service will be the Rt. Rev
Chauncey B. Brewster, D.D., Bishop
of Connecticut.
Bronchitis
And Other Throat and
Lung Ailments Invaria
bly Yield to Linonine.
Nearly one thousand prominent
people in one city alone have pub
licly testified In signed statements
that Linonine cured them of coughs,
solds, bronchitis and other forms of
winter complaints that threatened
their very existence. Other thou
sands in other sections of the couutry
nave added their testimony, and all
unite in proclaiming Linonine the
most ecective medicine of its kind
knowil to science. Relief is wrought
by removing the swellings and irrita
tions that cause the disturbances. It
is a truly wonderful remedy and Is
pore and wholesome, being an emul
sion of Flax-Seed Oil, Irish Moss,
Kucalptus and other famous reme
dies, all combined In one, and known
the world over as
..fUX-SEFDr .
TIMES: FEBRUARY 12, 1918
CARDINAL LOGUE
WARNS AGAINST
IRISH N.0TTERS
Sure to End in Disaster, De
feat and Collapse, He
Declares.
BY MICHAEL CARDINAL IXX1UE
The misery and suffering which !
this lamentable war entails not only ;
cn belligerents, but on neutral coun
tries, has given rise to a widespread,
auu camcov iuuB"-o peace, let, as
far as human action is concerned and
human judgment can forecast, there is
little hope of peace in the near future.
The ruinous conflict stil goes on
with the sacrifice of young lives by
tens of thousands, a waste of treas
ure which will cripple the countries
engaged for generations, an ever
growing accumulation of present and
future evil consequences, and all this
with very little tangible result. The
pendulum keeps swinging from side
to side, with no decided leaning to
either.
Moved by this unavailing sacrifice
of human life and the sufferings of
multitudes so dear to his paternal
heart, the Sovereign Pontiff made a
disinterested and authoritative appeal,
such as his neutrality and position jus
tified, to the belligerent powers.
This appeal, where not misrepre
sented or coldly received, has hither
toahad no practical effect.
Some, at least, who have treated it
with scant courtesy, have since been
given reason to reconsider their view
of its importance for their own best
interests.
Since, therefore, the pride, jealous
ies, ambitions, and conflicting interests
or men leave little grounds- to hope
for an early peace, it is meet that
we should have recourse to Almighty
uoa, in whose hands are the destinies
of men, and who can direct their ways
and inspire their counsels.
Appeal to the Almighty
We must endeavor, by purifying our
motives and desires, to render our
selves more worthy of His favor. Then
we may hope, by fervent, persevering
prayer to move His mercy and obtain
the blessing, which we so sadly need,
of a just and lasting peace.
Nor is it for the general peace of
the world only that we should sue. We
have troubles and unrest and excite
ment and dangers here at home.
which render domestic peace neces
sary. Whether it be due to the demor
alization which this world war has
brought to almost every country, or
to the fate which seems to hang over
our own unhappy country;- blasting
ner hopes when they seem to brighten,
an agitation has sprung up and is
spreading among our people which,
ill-considered and Utopian cannot fail,
it persevered in, to entail present suf
fering, disorganization, and danger,
and is sure to end in future disaster
defeat and collapse.
His Warning Against Sinn Feinism
And all this in pursuit of a dream
which no man in his sober senses can
hope 'to see realized; .the establish
ment or an Irish rpnnhiiV oittio hu
ahppeal to the potentates of Europe
seated at a Peace Conference or an
appeal to force by hurling an unarmed
people against an empire which has
live millions of men under arms, fur
nished with the most terrible engines
oi destruction which human ingenu
ity could devise. The thing would be
ludicrous if it were not so mischievous
and fraught with such danger, when
cleverly used as an incentive to fire
the imagination of an ardent, gener
ous, patriotic people.
Peace Essential Everywhere
We have, therefore, need of peace.
Peace among the warring nations
vi hich will bring relief to so many suf -
iering peoples; peace at home, which
will enable us to unite quietly, pru
dently, and perseveringly, in consult
ing for the best interests of our com
mon country. If men by their designs,
their conflicting interests, their mis
taken views, stand in the way of this
blessing of peace, we should have re
course to the Prince of Peace be
seeching Him, through the interces
sion of His Blessed Mother, to grant
us doiii general ana domestic peace;
o-uuvc an, iu grant us that peace
wmcn surpassetn ail understandings;
peace with God, peace with ourselves
and peace with our neighbor. (By The
international xsews .Bureau, Inc., Bos
ton, Mass.)
ASK LIBRARIES
TO HELP STATE
W. S. S. SALES
Hartford, Feb. 12 The libraries of
Connecticut have been called upon by
Howell Cheney, state director of the
war savings campaign, to aid in
putting before the public the mess
age of the nation-wide thrift move
ment, so that every person in Con
necticut may realize how imtiortant
it is that he should loan his dollars
and their ability to buy goods and
services to his gvernment for war
purposes through the instrumentality
of the Thrift and War Savings
stamps.
The state director has sent leaflets
and posters tf all libraries with the
suggestion that they be placed on a
War Savings bulletin board in the
libraries. . Each librarian has been
asked to post -the names of the local
War Savings committee members,
and that so far as possible the names
of war savings societies and their
members be posted. It also has been
suggested that a shelf of leaflets and
books on this campaign be made
easily accessible to library patrons,
and that libraries and their employes
constitute themselves a bureau of in
formation upon Thrift and War Sav
ings subjects. It is also suggested
that newspaper clippings on this
campaign be posted, and that special
articles on the subject in current
magazines be listed and parted.
machinists in new quarters
The new rooms of the International
Association of Machinists at 1087
Broad street will be in readiness this
evening. The headquarters were mov
ed yesterday from Cannon street to
the new location.
LET TOUR VALENTINE
BE FLOWERS.
JOHN RECK & SON.
WILLIAM R. ROCKEFELLER, JR.,
'AND THE GIRL HE HAS MARRIED
William R. Rockefeller, Jr., grandnephew of John D. Rockefeller, and
Florence, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Lincoln of New York, who
were married on February 9. Mr. Rockefeller is shown carrying gasoline cans
at the aerial coast patrol station at Huntington, L. I., where he was a student
of aviation.
JMiene ver You Want to
Send Money QuicldyHiinkof
WESTERN UNION TRANSFERS
There are many, many uses for Western
Union Money Transfers. To meet banking
obligations to pay insurance policies to
purchase railroad tickets to pay taxes to
send anniversary gifts to supply salesmen
on the road to send money to soldiers in
camp. More than seventy million dollars
was transferred last year by
THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO.
:illlllllilillllllilllllll!illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllir.
M. J. GANNON
Funeral Director
Formerly Located at 1051 Broad St.
Wishes to Announce the Opening of
His New Office and Sales Rooms at
315-317 JOHN ST. 315-317
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
Centrally located and especially accessible
from all parts of the city. ,
A Cordial Invitation is extended to the pub
lic to inspect the modern facilities adapted
for the efficient care of
Funeral Cremation Cemetery and
Transfer Arrangements.
City and Out-of-Town Service Carriage
and Motor Equipment.
DAY AND NIGHT MANAGEMENT
M. J. GANNON
313-317 JOHN STREET. TELEPHONE
Representatives Throughout the United States
;illllllllll!llllllllllillllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIllllllIIII!IIHin
"Incorporated 1SS9
SAVE AND WIN SUCCESS.
The difference between wanting and winning is the
difference between wishing and working. You must care
for your money if t's to care for you. Then begin now by
saving it. It is the simplest matter in the world to open
a bank account in our bank. We invite you.
RALLY ROUND THE FLAG EVERYRODY
. Love of country should prompt you to invest as much
as possible in War Savings Stamps, and local pride should
prompt you to make War Stamp week a great success. Let
us go over the top. .
CITY SAVINGS BANK
MAIN AND BANK STREETS
(EVERY COURTESY EXTENDED)
Open Monday Evenings
from 6 to 8 o'clock. '
SPR AGUE ICE & GOAL CO.
DEALERS IN
' ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOTJS COAL "
EAST END E. WASH. AVE. BRIDGE :: !: TEL. 467S-4874
BARGAIN SALE
of -'
WOMEN'S
BOO T S
Plain leather combina
tion leather and leather
and cloth boots of high
' grade. '
Two forty-five
Three forty-five
Four forty-five
This sale is for the pur
pose of clearing the wy
for new full lines re
ceived. All separate
pairs of women's up-to-date
desirable boots are
therefore cut greatly in
price.
W. K. MOHAN
1026 Main SL
LOSS OF APPETITE,
LOSS OF WEIGHT,
SLEEPLESSNESS, ETC. ,
'
are all overcome by Recupertabs. the
are made after the formula of Dr.
Albert Robin, the famous French I
physician, and are geing used very
largely in Paris and other European
capitals.
When taken for a short while they j
will give positive relief In all cases of ;
nervous exhaustion, mental depres-
sion, lack of vitality, general debility, j
anemia, etc. '
The Glycerphoaprates of which Re
cupertabs aar composed, contain the .'
element necessary to overcome theso
conditions. Thev are now being pre
ecribed and recommended by many
physicians in this and foreign ' coun
tries as the best, quickest and surest
nerve- and blood tonic that they know '
of.
Recupertabs are for sale at all drug ,
stores at 50c and (1.00 per package or
will be sent direct upon receipt of
price.
Curtis Chemical Co., No. 414 West
23rd St, New York. Distributed in
Bridgeport and vicinity by J. D. Harti-
gan. No. 81 Farfield Avenue, Adv.
Rl tf
MONUMENTS
MAUSOLEUMS
M. G. KEANE
Stratford Av., Opp.St.Micli.iol9 Cem.'
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
Phone !!-i Phone 1398-4
M O N U M E NT S
HUGHES CHAPMAN--'-
ARTISTIC I ASH SG
Plant Operated by Pneumatic Ci tUng
and P-.lishing Tools
ioo Stratford ave vt'K
Phone onner'ion
M, J. GANNON
PTTNERAIi DIREOTOR
AND EMBAiiMKR
315 John street
'Phone 3493
Residence 297 Vine St.
'Phone 1259
Marcaret John
GALLAGHER & GALLAGHER
Undertakers and Embalmers
Mrart. T.i (illa?her. onlv 11-
i censed, graduate woman embalm- 8
I er and undertaker in uie city.
Mortuary parlors, office and
residence
571 Fairfield Av. Phone Bar. 1390
HAWLEY & WILMOT
Undertakers and Embalmers
No. 168 State St., Bridgeport, Ct. I
George B. Hawley, 113 Wash
ington Terrace; Edward EL Wil-
mot ,865 Clinton Ave.
GEORGE P. POTTER
UNDERTAKER
Automobile Service If Preferred
MORTUARY ROOMS
1133 BROAD STREET
Tel. Barnum 6848-2
ROURKE & BOUCHER
Undertakers
and Embalmers
1295 MAIN ST. Tel. Barnum 5409
Calls Answered Day or Nisht
HENRY H.
JOSEPH. P.
Lieberum & Heaphy
146 Austin St. 339 South Ave.
Embalmers and Undertakers
MORTUARY PARLORS
13 2 2 STATE STREET
Telephone Barnum 15-2
FRANK POLKE & SON
EMBALMERS & UNDERTAKERS
773 State Street
Phone Ramum 1590
I Brannh Office. 409 Hancock Ave.
Fhone Barnum 389
Department of Justice agents and
the United States district attorney at
New York will be present at the pro-
posed peace convention in New York,
Feb. 16.
A German critics on the submarine
campaign of Germany bls Von
Tirpitz for their, failure by not having
enough submarines built when, the
campaign started. .
Times Want Ads. One Cent a THn i,

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