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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, February 21, 1918, Image 1

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The Weather Report
For Bridgeport and vi
cinity: Fair and continued
cold tonight and Friday.
VOL. 51 NO. 45 EST. 1790
LACK OP YANKEE MACHINES AT FRONT MAKES
PERSHING'S MEN UNPROTECTED TARGETS
OF HUNS TROOPS HELPLESS AS AERO
TURNS MACHINE GUN ON THEM.
With the American Army in France, Feb. 20 (By the As
sociated Press) Control of the air in the American sector be
longs to the enemy. Any officer at the front will make this
declaration all have made it. The control is obvious. German
aeroplanes come and go over the American lines almost at will.
Every time the Germans come over their path through the
sky is followed by fleecy shrapnel puffs, but the chances of hit
ting an aeroplane with anti-aircraft shells is so remote that
the enemy aviators calmly fly along as if on a pleasure trip.
Every now and then aeroplanes on
this side attack the enemy. They
always do this when they get a
chance. But the boche is clever
while flying and manages to come
over and take pictures, make observ
ations and do virtually whatever else
he desires and then calmly sail home
without interruption. Nearly always
he is at an altitude of about 3,000
metres where he is comparatively
safe from anti-aircraft fire and knows
it.
It is not permitted to name any of
ficers of the American expeditionary
force. It is not permitted to quote
them. If both were allowed it would
be possible to carry quotations from
virtually every officer at the front urg
ing a speedy appearance of large
numbers of American aeroplanes
with American pilots.
For there is only one way to wrest
control of the air from the enemy.
That is to fight him for it in the sky
and to relieve him of it by force of
overwhelming numbers.
Right now, if the Germans knew
American aeroplanes were waiting
for them every time they came ovei
the line their trips would be less fre
quent. Neither would they dare to
attempt such a bold piece of work
as when they recently flew over th
line in an aeroplane disguised with
the Allies' red, white and blue bulls
eye marking and cut loose with a ma
chine gun on American soldiers in
the trenches.
Had there been American planes
nearby the chances of the Germans
fretting back home after such a trick
would be small. And it is extremely
doubtful, officers say, whether they
(Continued on Page 16.)
SIEM SEEKS ABOUT
0
: ABLY OLD
CONSERVATION MEASURE IN VIEW OF LENGTHENING
OF DAYIGHT HOURS DOES LITTLE GOOD AND
IS INJURING. RUSINESS OF CITY.
Garfield Mondays having been abolished, Local Fuel Ad
ministrator Carl F. Simon recommends rescinding the gover
nor's proclamation, regarding ahortened business days for sa
loons, merchants, and places of amusement.
AGREE TO OPEN
SHOP IN REPAIR
OF LOCOMOTIVES
Washington, Feb. 21 To hasten
repair work on locomotives and rail
road rolling stock, an agreement .in
volving lengthening of working hours,
promotion of apprentices and helpers
and maintenance of open shop condi
tions has been reached between Direc
tor General McAdoo and A. C. Whar
ton, president of the railway employes
department of the American Federa
tion of Labor. The agreement af
fecU more than 300,000 workmen. ,
STIIJj SERIOUSLY ILL
Deputy City Auditor Henry Waters
continues to be critically 111 athis
homo in Elmwood place.
BRITISH TROOPS
TRUMPETING AT
JERICHO WALLS
London. Feb. 21 A further ad
vance of three and a half miles on
a front of seven and three-quarters
miles bas been made by the Brit
ish forces in Palestine, the war
oflice announces. The British arc
now within four miles of Jericho.
The operations are continued.
The British losses on Tuesday
when an advance was made on a
15 mile front cast of Jerusalem
were very small. Yesterday's
losses have not been reported.
The British also advanced
northwest of Jerusalem to a maxi
mum depth of one mile on a front
of four miles.
AMOROUS UNCLE
GETS TRIMMING
George D Mugerichin, of 193 Bun
nelll street, complained to the police
today that when he visited his nephew,
Mike Krikorian, at his home, 1ST Hol-
ley street, last night, he was set upon
by Krikorian and his wife, beaten, tied
hand and foot and robbed of $250.
When the police investigated Krik
orian a.nd his wife denied the charge
and allege that De Mugerichin had
made himself so obnoxious at their
home by his persistent love making to
Mrs. Krikorian that a sound thrash
ing was administered to him when he
called last night.
Because of the lengthened days."
Siemon says, "the conservation meas
ure is doing little good now, but
working a hardship upon scores of
merchants."
The administrator has appealed to
officials at Hartford, asking exemp
tion for Bridgeport business men on
the ground that tbey have done more
toward fuel conservation than any
other group of business men in any
city ot town in the state. Siemon
points out that before the governor's
proclamation was issued local bodies
had formulated regulations of their
own, which were more favorable t(p
fuel conservation than the hours set
by the governor.
The local administrator also de
clares that Bridgeporters have closely
followed the conservation ordeYs,
while they were grossly violated i.i
many places. For this reason Sie
mon believes the hours should be sus
pended immediately. The gover
nor's proclamation automatimillr
ceases on March 31.
"The original hours should prevail
now," Bays Siemon. "because Bridge
port has done most for fuel conserva
tion." ,
SIN6
ORDER
Senator Lewis Predicts
Public Ownership Pol
icy for U. S.
RAILROAD HEADS
ADMIT FAILURES
Government Control of
Telephone, Telegraph,
Etc., Inevitable.
Washingon, Feb. 21 Sena
tor Lewis of Illinois, speaking
in the Senate today, declared
the administration railroad bill
is a forerunner of government
control over various public util
ties and predicted that the
auestion would be the great
domestic issue in the next
presidential campaign.
"Let us not deceive ourselves as to
the meaning of this meascfo," Senator
Lewis declared. "This is the be
ginning of the government taking the
railroads as a government agency.
The roads will never be permitted to
return to the former state of per
sonal control for private benefit. At
the same time this country takes over
the railroads it vill take the tele
graph and telephone privileges and
then the products for fuel, particular
ly' the lands of coal and oil and put
these under government direction.
- "All agencies of this nature in this
republic, necessary for the public
welfare of man, will be taken by the
government as a necessary protection
of the republic."
The railroads. Senator Lewis de
clared, confessed their inability to
meet the situation and by surrender
ing to the governmentadmitted that
the one power capable to carrying on
the work under the existing condi
tions was the government itself.
"The government now conducts the
roads and directs them as the proof
of its power and ability to do so," he
asserted. "Private ownership of rail
roads failed us for the purpose of
sending supplies to ships or for trans
port of soldiers for foreign service.
Wlhat would be the calamity under
private ownership if enemies were at
our gates and in possession of 'our
country.
"Let us announce that the United
States is a government and shall as
sume governmental responsibility in
protecting all public agencies of hu
man welfare from being a monopoly
of private pillage."
If this is done. Senator Lewis said,
any Bolshevik uprising in the United
States will be avoided.
WORK CAR GOES
OFF THE TRACK
A work car ot the New, York, New
Haven & Hartford Railroad was de
railed near the Burr Road crossing at
4 o'clock this morning, but, according
to railroad officials, it was righted
without delaying traffic. No dam
age was done and one of the crew was
i injured, offcials report.
FLOOD DANGER
IN N. E. IS PAST
Boston, Feb. 1. Danger of seri
ous Roods m New England, at the
end of a winter seldom equalled for
its severity, is believed to have -been
considerably reduced by the alter
nate thaws and freezes of this month.
A great deal of the snow and ice,
particularly in the southern section
of New England, has melted gradual
ly this month.
DID BUSINESS AT LOSS.
Amsterdam, Feb. 21 The Berlin
Motor Omnibus Co., which was oblig
ed to conduct its business last year
almost entirely with horses and steel
tired vehicles owing to the prohibition
of the use of gasoline or rubber tires
ended the year with a deficit of J375,
000. .
and Evening Farmer
BRIDGEPOET, CONN., THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1918
German Goods Already in
Manchuria, Where Ex
Prisoners Work Mines.
Harbin, Manchuria, Saturday,
Feb. 16 German goods already
have reappeared far east of
Irkutsk, according to information
received here. German mer
chants are active In Harbin and
the Bolsheviki are arming releas
ed German prisoners to guard the
Siberian railroad and facilitate
the movement of traffic.
A "British mining engineer
named Piper, who has arrived
here from Krasgoyarsy says the
Bolshevik! have seized the gold
mines there and that Austro-Ger-man
prisoners are working them.
The Austro-Germans have plenty
of money and are purchasing per
mits allowing them to circulate
freely In Siberia, The Germans
are taking charge of electric pow
er stations, railroads and depots.
-Quantities of raw materials are
shipped to Germany from the dis
trict. Most of the Germans are
said to speak Russian.
Piper declares that unless the
Allies take immediate steps to
send supplies and raw materials
into Siberia the intellectual and
present classes will throw them
selves into the bands of the Ger
mans. II. S. AERO CLUB
SEEKING REMED
FOR AIR MEI
New York, Feb. 21 A special
meeting of the executive board of the
Aero Club of America was called
here today to consider and take action
on the aeroplane situation on the,
American front in France as told in
dispatches from the American front.
"The reports would indicate that
the situation is indeed serious," an
official of the club said. "Our execu
tive board will meet today and we
shall take immediate steps to ascer
tain whether we can do anything
that will assist the government in re
moving the menace. It has been truly
said that 'the war will be won in the
air,' and if the Germans, as the dis
patches say, are in control, we must
speed up our preparations to wrest
it from them."
The dispatches said "control of the
air in the American sector belongs to
the enemy," German machines com
ing and going "almost at will" over
the American lines.
ELEVEN HELD FOR
5,000,000 THEF
OF WAR SUPPLIE
New York, Feb. 21 Eight cloth
ing manufacturers, two employes and
a clerk in the quartermaster depart
ment of the army were indicted by
the federal grand jury here, today,
charged with being concerned in ex
tensive army uniform cloth frauds.
Cloth' and other army supplies
worth approximately $5,000 000 were
stolen, according to Lieut. George D.
Barnit of the New Tork police, who
in conjunction with the federal au
thorities investigated the alleged
frauds which he said included thefts
in other parts of the country. He
asserted that a plot of nation-wide
proportions had been uncovered and
that investigations in other cities
probably would be undertaken.
The indictments are based on evidence-
gathered by the federal dis
trict attorney's office in connection
ivith the arrest about two months ago
of Louis Davidson, head of the Uni
versal Cloth Shrinking Refinishing
Jforks here.
MARRIAGES FALL OFF.
According to statistics prepared in
the town clerk's office there were 12S
marriages performed in the city dur
ing the month of January, while in
the samemonth of the preceding
year there were l8'- ,
After Two Months Peace
Sisters Would .Take
Farm From Gustav.
ALSO SEEK MONEY
FOR LAND'S USAGE
Will of Mother Left An
Estate of $60,000 to
Three Daughters.
The Molls are at it again.
After two months of peace, lit
igation in the famous Moll pro
bate case has again broken out,
starting on its 25th year in the
Probate Court. . The principal
in the case was Theresa Moll,
who died, a nonogenarian, last
year. Gustav Moll, her son,
had been conservator, and filed
his final account Jan. 25.
The report was accepted by Judge
Daniel B. Bradley, acting for Judge
Paul L. Miller.
Today, Mrs. Lillie Moll Thorp filed
notice appealing from the acceptance
of the report, representing that she is
aggrieved by the action. The other
two sisters, Mrs. August Stadtler and
Theresa Oberly, are in sympathy with
her.
In addition to the appeal from the
acceptance of their brother's report,
the sisters will file a writ of ejection
in the Superior court today and will
also file suit to recover a total of $6,-
000, which they allege their brother
owes them for rental.
Gustave Moll has been living on hi
mother's farm on Madison avenue for
20 years or more. The sisters claim
rental on the theory that the place
was deeded to them by their mother
during her lifetime.
The aged woman left a will giving
'her estate, estimated to be worth
more than $60,000, to her two daugh
ters, Lillie Thorp and Theresa Oberly,
cutting oft Gustave, Mrs. Stadtler and
another son, who lives in Chicago.
The will was accepted in the Probate
court, but an appeal is pending in the
Superior court.
KpWDLwN HEOECK
WIFE REMOVED TO HOSPITAL INFERS HUSBAND MERE
LY DEMONSTRATED AFFECTION FOR HER RE
FUSES TO HAVE POLICE PROSECUTE IN CASE.
" Josephine Maleska, 32, and comely, residing at 33o Vul
lard street, is at the Bridgeport hospital in agony from scalds,
but happy for she knows that her husband John, loves her
dearlv.
BOLSHEVIKISTS IN
CHINA PROMPTING
NOTHER REVOLT
Peking, Saturday, Feb. 16. Bolshev
iki from Russian Turkestan as well as
Germans and Turks are inflaming the
Chinese Mohammedan population ot
province of Singiang, Chinese Turke
stan, against the government, says a
report from Gen. Tang Tseng Sin,
governor of the province.
The general warns the government
that arms and ammunition are sup
plied: by the enemy. Hs says there
are prospects of a Mohammedan re
bellion similar to the one that began
in' 1861. Even the loss of Chinese
Turkestan is possible, he added. -
HAPSAL AND MOLODECSNO TAKEN, GERMANS
PUSH ON TOWARD VITEBSK, MINSK, PSKOFF
AND REVAL AIRMEN BOMB REGITSA
DVLNSK ENTERED TWO HOURS AF
TER ARMISTICE ENDED.
Petrograd, Wednesday, Feb. 20 (By the Associated Press)
Dispatches received here indicate continued German move
ments along all fronts toward Vitebsk, Minsk, Pskoff and Reval.
German airmen are reported to have raided Regitsa, on
Monday. Many bombs were dropped and several persons were
killed.
Troops that occupied Dvinsk are advancing toward Pskoff,
180 miles south southwest of Petrograd, according to a Reuter
dispatch. They "also have .occupied Hapsal, Esthonia, and their .
cavalry is pushing toward Mohilev, the former Russian general
headquarters.
ANY STORES IN
CITY WILL KEEP
OPEN TOMORROW
Many of the business houses of the
city will keep their doors open to"
morrow, Washington's birthday. The
cause for the non-observance or tne
holiday is attributed to the many days
which they have been forced to ob
serve in the past few we-eiks.
The TKst office will be open as usual
tout only one delivery will be made
(by the carriers. The federal income
tax office wil 'be opened from o ciock
in the morning until 6 o'clock in the
afternoon to accommodate the holiday
crowds. All of the theatres of the
city will toe open as usual with holiday
bills.
The various schools of the city will
be closed! as will the banks and many
offices. The draft board offices will
be closed, it was announced today.
The public library will be closed all
day with the exception of the reading
room which wil be open from 2 o'clock
in the afternoon until 9 o'clock in the
evening. All of the city hall offices
will not be opened. The barber shops
will follow the custom of former years
and remain closed.
H-9 had emphasized this fact by
throwing a kettle of boiling water at
her last nignt whils the pair were
having a little family argument aris
ing from jealousy.
Josie feels so happy that sh would
not hear of entering a complaint
against John, although she admitted
he had: been a trifle lough, but then
Josie liked "cave man" methods and
reasoned that in order to hit a poor,
weak, clinging and defenseless woman
with a kettle of boiling water, ore
must love her madly.
Her husband contends that while he
hates to shatter this blissful dream,
he insists he did not throw the boiling
water at his spouse, but that con
trary to her assertion, he was merely
defending himself and beat her to it.
as she grabbed the kettle first, with
the intention of pouring its contents
down his neck.
Shrieking -with pain Mrs. Maleska
rushed from the Maleska "dove cote"
and wildly appealed to neighbors for
help. An ambulance removed Mrs.
Maleska to the Bridgeport hospital.
Today she insisted that her husband
Injured her because he loved her.
The Want Columns '
- Classified advertising in
this newspaper Is effective,
no matter what you may de
sire to advertise. Try it once
and seo.
PRICE TWO CENTS
The Novaia Viedomsty, the dispatch
adds, says the Germans have occu
pied iMolodecsna, an important rail
road junction northwest of Minsk.
According to the Fravda the Aus
trians have begun an advance on the
Ukrainian front.
Just two hours after the- armistice,
ended G-erman troops entered Dvinsk.
It was 2 o'clock on the afternoon of
Feb. 18 that German patrols unex
pectedly appeared around! the city and
seized the railroad stations and other
central points. Only small skirmishes
with fleeing soldiers took place. The
Red guard offered no resistance, while
the artillery and infantry were de
mobilizing and unprepared to fight.
Attempts to evacuate th city were
unsuccessful. Much heavy artillery
and large quantities of ammunition
fell into the hands of the Germans.
The civilian population had no oppor
tunity to escape.
The commissaries of the local work
men's and soldiers' council triedi to
escape disguised as soldiers, but they
were seized toy the Germans.
The decision of the Soldiers' and
Workmen's delegates to accept the
German peace terms was reached by
a majority of only one vote after a
heated debate lasting throughout Mon
day night. Great secrecy was observ
ed in regard to the meeting, which
was adjourned several times to permit
the Bolsheveki and the Social Revo
lutionists to hold party caucuses'. -There
were divisions in both parties
on the subject. .
Premier Lenine, Foreign Minister
Trotzky, Ensign Krylenko. commander-in-chief,
and many other leaders
addressed the council. Military men
explained the impossibility of offer
ing effective resistance, but no deci
sion was reached until messages had
been received showing that the Ger
mans had captured Dvinsk with ease
and were advancing all , along the
front.
This news reached the council early
Tuesday morning, and influenced the
delegates to .decide for peace. Before
the capture of Dvinsk Premier Lenine
said he was opposed to peace, but
finally urged that peace must be ob
(Continued on Page IS.) . !
HINT 0
iOTY TAKEN BY
IN RUSSIA
Berlin; Feb. 21, via Lon
don The war office an
nounced that 1,531 guns
and between 4,000 and
5,000 motor cars have been
cantured from the Rus
sians. The Russian town of
Rovno has been cleared of
the Russians, the war of
fice reports. Trains' with
about 1,000 ears, many
laden witli food, have been
captured, as well as aero
planes and an incalculable
amount of war material.

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