OCR Interpretation


The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, April 03, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1918-04-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

J-
ir
A
ET"3
C U) i- f jU
4 II ii Islm broki
The Weather Report
it o)
For Bridgeport and vi
cinity. Unsettled, probably
showers tonight; Thursday
fair; cooler.
VOL. 54-NO. 80 EST. 1790
Count Czernin Asserts
Loyalty to Cause of
Hun Ally.
NATION RECENTLY
WAS NEAR PEACE
Terrible Revenge Will
Be Inflicted Upon
Italy and France.
London, April 3 Austria
Hungary recently was "almost
on the point" of beginning
peace negotiations with the En
tente, Count Czernin, the Aus-
tro-Hungarian foreign minis
ter, declared yesterday in an
address to the Vienna munici
pal council. The wind "sud
denly veered," he added, the
Entente deciding to await de
velopments in his country
which caused it to hope the
dual monarchy "would soon be
defenseless."
The foreign minister's words were:
"Recently we were almost on the
point of entering negotiations with
the western powers, when the wind
suddenly veered round, and as we
know with certainty, the Entente de
cided It had better wait, as parlia
mentary and political events In our
country Justified the hope that the
monarchy would soon be defenseless,
Csernin declared Premier Clemen-
ceau of France had asked Austria
Hungary on what basis she would ne
gotiate peace. Austria replied that
the only obstacle to peace with France
was Alsace-Lorraine and Premier
Clemenceau said It was Impossible to
negotiate on That basis.
"Some time before the western of
fensive began," Count Czernin said,
"Premier Clemenceau addressed to
me an inquiry whether and on what
basis. I was prepared to negotiate. In
agreement with Berlin I immediately
replied that I was prepared to ne
gotiate and that as far as France was
concerned, the only obstacle I could
see in the way of peace was the
French desire for Alsace-Lorraine.
The reply from Paris was that It was
impossible to negotiate on this basis.
Thereupon there was no choice left.
"I do not intend to go begging for
peace or to obtain it by entreaties
(Continued on Page 2)
COUNT CATSPAW
IN PEACE MOVE
Washington, April 3 Count Czern
ln's statement that France had sug
gested peace discussions with Austro
Hungary was characterized by officials
here today as the beginning of a new
German peace offensive with the Aus-tro-Hungarian
foreign minister acting
at Germany's behest.
muring
STARTLES
A battery of boilers was closed down and work stopped in
several departments of the Liberty Ordnance works today when
several workers declared that they smelled human flesh burning.
RUSSIAN SCHOOL
MARMS ON STRIKE
Petrograd, Jan. 31 (Correspon
dence of the Associated Press)
Russian school children are rejoicing.
Not only have the school teachers
Cone on strike, but the Bolshevik
government has adopted phonetic
spelling, which will eliminate some
of the difficulties of Russian orth
ography. The national commissioner of edu-
cation, with a view to raising thejani not oniy caused a partial shOy
general standard of education, has is- i down of the olant. but was the eausJN
sued a decree that from Jan. 1 the. of great uneasiness among the hun
new simplified spelling is to be taught dreds of workers who Imagined all
In the schools. I sorts of calamity.
f NOYON CATHEDRAL
REPORTED BURNING;
HUNS BLAME FRENCH
Amsterdam, April 3 The
cathedral In Noyon is afire, ac
cording to a semi-official state
ment from Berlin. The blaze is
attributed by the Germans to the
French bombardment.
The cathedral in Noyon is one
of the most beautiful French ex
amples of the transition style of
architecture of the 11th century.
A portico was added in the 14th
century and the chapels of the
nave were built in the 14th-16th
centuries. Bound and pointed
arches are - used throughout Hie
building and the two western
towers, which are unfinished, are
20 feet high.
JUDGE MALTBIE
SUSTAINS JURY
IN HUGHES CASE
Judge William M. Maltbie of the
Superior court today handed down a
decision on a motion asking him to
set aside the verdict of the jury in the
case of Frank J. Hughes against Hugh
Keegan and George Bums, in which
ho denies the motion and sustains the
verdict. He points out that Burns has
a remedy in appeal to the Supreme
court.
In his decision Judge Maltbie finds
that the verdict was in accord with
the evidence and that it-was not ex
cessive. He also finds that a section
of the charge, which attorneys for
Burns argued was erroneous, was
misquoted in the argument.
Frank J. Hughes was injured In an
automobile accident May 28, 1915, at
Connecticut and Central avenues, and
i?ued tt3 recover damages of 510,000.
He sued Hugh Keegan, driver of the
machine in which he was riding at the
time, and George Burns, driver of the
machine which collided with Keegan's.
The jury found Burns at fault for the
collision, and rendered a verdict for
Hughes to recover $8,600, one of the
largest amounts ever granted by a
Fairfield county jury in a damage
suit.
It is probable the case will go to
the Supreme court.
ELECTRIC PIANO
GIVES FIRE ALARM
Grand Rapids, Mich., April 3 Six
persons, awakened by an electric
piano, escaped from flames that
destroyed the Owashtaning club and
Ross pavilion early today. The loss
was estimated at $135,000.
The police were immediately noti
fied and Captain E. O. Cronan detailed
Detective Garrity to investigate. As
soon as possible the fires were drawn
and the coals and cinders thoroughly
searched.
What appeared to be part of the
body of a child was found and imme
diately taken to police headquarters
for further examination. In the
Emergency hospital Drs. Keegan,
Carroll, and Pharmacist MaPherson
declared that the incinerated mass
was nothing but an old shoe.
Who started the rumor of the burn
ing human flesh is now under inves
tigation. The story spreaii rapltfy
SHOP HANDS
and
BRIDGEPORT,
VICTIMS OF FAMILIES
RENTING APARTMENTS
MRS. SWITKA ACCUSED OF GIVING LEASES OF
MANY HOUSES OWNED BY REMINGTON CO.
AND COLLECTING RENTS FOR SAME.
John Patrichinko, employed at a munition factory, com
plained to the police today he had been swindled of $190 by
Mrs. Ellen Switka, lately of 491
unknown,
According to John's story she sold
him the contents of her home and
told him the rent was paid. Now he
finds the beautiful furniture was from
an installment house and the land
lord is positive he has received no
rent.
Mrs. Switka not only sold Patrich
inko other peoples' property, but the
detective Ibureau was swamped today
by compainants who declare she
rented more than a dozen houses,
which did not belong to her, and
collected the rents in advance. When
they went to see her about the matter
they found that she had left town last
Saturday. - '
IDetotive Garrity has .been assigned
to the case, and is now conducting an
Investigation which bids fair to ex
pose a startling story of swindling toy
renting houses belonging mostly to
the Remington- Arms company, ana
collecting the rents in advance.
From what can be learned Mrs.
iStwitka, an English woman, qiuotied
the terms in such moderate ngures,
the DrosDective tenants, mostly newly
married couples, jumped at the chance
to secure model apartments lately
erected by the Remington Arms com
pany for employes.
What methods she employed to
make the deals with sucn raipiauy
are at present unknown to the au
thorities. There was considerable ar
gument and consequent confusion,
with a few touches of pathos thrown
in, when the would-be tenants tried
to' install themselves in the homes
they had picked out.
Tit aranears Mrs. Switka's husbanS,
a Russian, is in Philadelphia, where
he went after the big lay-off at tho
iocal plant. His wife has been living
alone for the last three monms anu
(Continued from page 1)
DREW TO SERVE
30 DAYS IN JAIL
Frank Drew, who was arrested last
October, charged with the theft of an
automobile, was found guilty and giv
en a sentence of 30 days, but had
sentence suspended, was again before
Judge Wilder in the City court today,
charged with violating his parole.
The charges against him this time
were being drunk and disorderly, so
Judge Wilder ordered that he serve
the term of 30 days.
TO INVESTIGATE
DISCREPANCIES
Washington, April 3 A special in
vestigation was begun today by the
government to locate large apparent
discrepancies in alien property re
turns. There is a severe penalty for con
cealment of any kind of enemy prop
erty and the alien custodian's offlc.:
announced today that it would en
force the law to the limit.
MISS MULLEN IS
STILL MISSING
Paris, April S Miss Emma G.
Mullen, a memiber of the American
colony, has been missing since Good
Friday, when the Germans bombard
ed a church here.
Should Miss Mullen prove to be
among the dead, the number of
Americans killed by the German shell
will have been increased to five.
Evening Farmer
CONN., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1918
IN
Helen street, and now of parts
TRAIN LEAVE
STATION MINUS
BASE WORKMEN
New London, April 3 As a result of
controversy with three special rail
road agents at the union" station here
this morning 1,200 men employed at
the submarine base refused to take
the train which carries them to their
work.
The train, which leaves here at
6:45 a. m. makes up west of the
station and two carloads of men got
aboard before it pulled up to the
starting point. Three special agents
locked them in and declared that
they were under arrest for trespass
ing on railroad property.
The conductor let them out and
the whole force refused to make the
trip, jeering the train as it pulled
out empty. Two officers from the
submarine base came down and ad
dressed the men, appealing to their
patriotism to continue their work, and
arranged to have them cross the
river on the ferry and be transported
to the base by automobile. The
men went that way, and business is
going on as usual at the base.
Two men who tried to stir up
trouble were arrested. The men are
employed erecting buildings and do
ing other work at the base.
SWINDLES LOCAL
MERCHANTS WITH
BOGUS $7 CHECKS
- r
The cities of Bridgeport and Hart
ford were flooded with spurious checks
last Saturday by a man who wore the
uniform of a United States army lieu
tenant and said that his name "was
Leslie It. Stanton. The victims were
mostly storekeepers who taking the
uniform the man wore as sufficient
recommendation, obliged him by
cashing the checks, as it was after
banking hours.
All the checks were for seven dol
lars and were signed George W. Wil
lett. They were all drawn on tha
Connecficut National bank, and the
First-Bridgeport National bank.
Simultaneously with the report.3
from local victims coming topolice
headquarters, inquiries began to come
in from Hartford, and it now appears
to the local police that the man call
ins; himself Leslie R. Stanton, has
simply smothered the entire state of
Connecticut with bad checks.
Capiiiin E. O. Cronan refused to
state the amount so far reported as
being th. loss of the local victims,
but staled that he expected the figure
to be a largo one as there are a num
ber of people who have been victim
ized who will . never say anything
aboul their loss. He understands that
the swindler has made a rich haul m
Hartford, where the uniform he wore
gained him ready access to the conri
dence of the merchants. -
mm
800,000 Will Be Summoned
. to Colors Sooner Than
Formerly Planned.
TO HAVE 2,500,000
SOLDIERS BY 1919
Will Be Shipped to France
With Shortest Possible
Delay at This End.
Washington, April 3 Meas
ures to speed up the draft pro
gram are in contemplation and
an official announcement is ex
pected soon.' "
The intention is to meet the
emergency in France. For that
reason the 800,000 men who
are to be called this year will
be called rapidly, more so than
was previously planned.
The War Department offi
cials said no arrangements
were in sight looking to calling
out more than the 800,000 men
it was planned to take into the
service.
Reports that the draft would be
raised from 800,000 to 1,500,000 were
denied.
Officials do not regard it as possi
ble that more men will be sent
abroad this year than the department
already has arranged to summon,
even with additional British shipping
made available as troop transports.
There are now under arms here and
in Europe more than 1,500,000
American soldiers. The number will
have been raised to about 2,500,000
by the end of the year, counting
drafted men, volunteers and special
technical forces to be enlisted.
The present effort is directed
more toward getting the men to
France early in the year to meet the
emergency there than toward increas
ing the number to be sent during the
year.
UNITED STATES
TO HELP SWISS
Washington, April 3 In trying to
protect neutral European nations
from the consequence of the ruthless
submarine warfare, the United States
i": preparing to go even farther than
its original promises to keep Switzer
land supplied with food and if neces
sary will allow that country to take
grain through France.
LENROOT LEADING
IN 66 COUNTIES
Milwaukee, Wis., April 3 Unoffl-
cial returns from. 66 out of the 71
counties in Wisconsin, including 17
counties with complete returns and
all of Milwaukee county and city ex
cept four precincts, gave: ,
Lenroot, 128,028; Davies, 120,286;
Berger, 87,096. i
The Milwaukee city and county fig
ures were:
Lenroot, 15,442; Davies, 29,997;
Berger, 31,907.
ASKS DAMAGES OF
$1,500 FOR HURTS
Damages of $1,500 for injuries re
ceived is claimed in the suit of Mory
Graham of State street against Kol
man Nemis of this city being heard
today in the Superior court before
Judge John P. Kellogg. Mrs. Graham
was crossing State street the evening
of September 2, 1916, and alleges she
was struck by a bicycle ridden by
Nemis.thrown down, and her leg frac
tured, besides suffering other injuries.
She claims Nemis was riding reckless
ly. Mrs. Graham conducted a lodging
house and was unable to care for her
house after she had spent seven weeks
in the Bridgeport hospital. The de
fense is a general denial of the com
plaint. .
FRANCO - ENGLISH
POSITIONS FOLLOWING SMASHING OF
GERMAN DRIVE HUNS RESUME
SHELLING OF PARIS.
Local attacks on several parts of the battle front in north-
ann Trn nin Ae4nrlntr ti A Inl n
in me ouiposi areas, wnne nacK
jvent on for the'renewal of the
which the logic, of the situation
Fortified by the news that
as yet virtually intact and by apparent evidences of Teutonic
nervousness, Entente opinion views the outlook hopefully.
American aviation mechanics, part of the forces trained
in England, now are reported by the U. S. Army Head
quarters to be eo-operating with the British royal fly
ing corps on the battle field in Picardy. Several were
within an aerodrome west or reronne wnen tne ier
rilans heavily bombed it.
REPULSE TENTATIVE THRUSTS
The reports from the field
lished after the first German push had spent its force, holding
firm against newly launched tentative thrusts here and there,
while at two or three points the Franco-British forces were able
to push back, the hostile line
to improve the tactical position.
This latter process resulted
the reoccupation of the town of
fas, wnicn tne uermans a iew
cleared of British forces and in
had made heavy sacrifices. On
gain was on the southern side of the Montdidier salient north
of Plemont, where the French position wt s appreciably ex
tended. French troops repulsed a German attack south of
Moreuil and the British drove off the Germans who assaulted
near Fampoux, in the northern part of the battle area.
CZERNIN SPEECH PEACE FEELER . -The
speech delivered yesterday by Count Czernin, the Aus-
tro-Huncrarian foreign minister again took up the series
that has excited much comment. The address, it is noted, fceJEiS''
at the moment when the great western drive, widely advertis
ed to the people of the Central powers as a "peace offensive,"-
lias largely lust us impetus sum lias jjccii iuiccu id jiaiu -
In Washington official circles the speech is regarded as a
political maneuver timed to follow the breakdown of the Teu-
1 - T ."III...... 4 f - n t -r n .i-i t i 1 J i ; TTlIll rr r ti i n minlnlni.
LU1HU HH1XLCU y uiiciibivc Willi in uatiu-iiuiigaiiaii 1U1U13LCI
acting as Germany's spokesman. It is decla red that "Teutonic
suggestions that the time for peace discussions is near will find
no favorable response in this country.
Continued on Page 2.
UNABLE TO AGREE,
JURY IN ROSWELL
SUIT DISCHARGED
Unable to agree after two hours'
deliberation the Jury in the Common
Pleas Court which heard testimony in
the suit of Andrew B. Roswell, Supt.
of Hillside oHme, and Roberta Bios
well against the Ira Gregory Co., Inc.,
was discharged anidi the case dropped
as a mistrial.-
The Roswells sued for damages of
$500 for injuries to an, automobile
which collided with a truck owned by
the Gregory Co., October 10 last at
High street and Washington avenue.
Each party blamed the other for the
accident, and the Gregory Co. made
a counter claim for damages of $700.
Testimony was heard yesterday, ar
guments were made this morning,
and the case was given to the jury
about 11 o'ctock. Its members re
ported at 1 o'clock they were unable
to agree, and Judge John J. Walsh
discharged them from further consid
.eatlon of the case,'
SATURDAY IS
Liberty Loan
DAY
PUT OUT YOUR
Flag.
PRICE TWO CENTS
FORCES IMPROVING
i r-l- 4- T .- r v f V-tl-i rl - r c fo! tt KiiCTf
01 tne lines me preparations
engagement on a vast scale to
points.
the powerful Allied reserve is
show the Allied lines as estab
for short distances in operations
notably on the British side in
Ayette, on the front below Ar-
aays ago aeciarea naa neen
attempting to hold which they
the French side the notable
IRDICT
IT LOCAL
GABLE COMPANY
New Haven, April 3. A verdict of
$10,000 in favcr of the plaintiff was
returned by a jury in the . United
States court today in the suit of Mary
Englesbe of Bound Brook, N. J., -against
the Electric Cable Co. of
Bridgeport, the action being one to
recover damages for the death of Jo
seph Englesbe, husband of the plain
tiff and an employe of the company.
Englesbe was killed while handling a
portalHs electric lamp.
The allegation was that insulation
of the wire of the lamp was defective
and this permitted a current of 208
volts to enter the employe's body. The
widow is administratrix of the estate.
The United Illuminating Co. was made
a co-defendant but the complaint
against it was dismissed by Judge
Thomas. A motion to set aside the
verdict made by Carl Foster, attorney,
was denied by the court. The verdict
is said to be the largest ever returned
in a Federal court in this state in a
case of thl "
HEAVY V
AGAINS

xml | txt