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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, March 31, 1919, Image 11

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THE TIMES: MARCH 31, 1919
SQUIRE EDGEGATE "And of Course There Was Nothing to Do But Serve After This Break!
BY LOUIS RICHARD?
HVNT GOT TIME
TTo SE&YE ON
THE. JURy
HQve to ao
tell, n
THE. SQuinz
JsP ( u
p. f
SsiPlCtfEFtELr I'VE.
Got to frme
up some e.xcusz
TO GET OUT OF
THIS MlESS
I 1
SQiSir?E- ;t yyaULO'r-BL - ,
Ffil& F6 ME TO SERVE. Tup FX I
ON THE JJf?y THE. jT . J,E JZ 'S
-P&tSOHER OvEf? THEPE P 1 IS MOT iH THE I
JM THAT CHAiR LOo3r-U$7 COURT ROOM Is 2
SO GUU.TV to ml JsvU- yTTHATS I ( .rSg .Nw
that im rz J Jr ! V the proslcuiwc sy yk , "
EPUBLICAN
FLAG WAVES
IN PORTUGAL
HENRY CLEWS'
J L. ft. W 1 L LU
IE.L..LI LL I t Lit
Oonf'.'irff growing out of the British
L'.sbon, March 31 The monarchy
ilillshed at Oporto and other dis
c'.s In the north of Portugal proved
Liermeral.
o.iamauon ano emnuwauu 1 control of sterling- he Uisco.it! n-u.-d
me, a counter-revolution within the (n this mark.-r, have been the domi-
Barely a month after .-government's announcement, referred j do a
jto ln our last issue, that artificial ; tui'iance.
treaty will be concluded and brought j
back to the United States early in
April. There need 'be no positive ex
pectations on this score, however,
since diplomatic procedure is notori
ously slow. Kvents in Southern Eu
rope nre such as to necessitate
prompt action ami, while they are in
themselves discouraging-, indicating- as
they do a continuous prospect of dis-
vigorous measures are evi
dently being concerted, for dealing
with them. The stock market has
. i ,v,r. k Teit tne aiscourasement e-rowms oul
woonamg tne atiacic iro.-u uui- ..... " . i .
, VAnKiin tr,nr,a Rent t.v .'l'ast week. Fnis lundaiuental an- ' 1 ' " "ll
lo by the republican troops sent u " Southern Kuronean countries and in-
. nouncement was promptly followed -"u-,iern tui uptan cuunujes, auo. in
e government, succeeded with equaJ , by a j from tho FeaerL, Re. .vestors have shown their concern by
'hiuiism in restoring the republi- l-oe,- p.(y,,r, that the control of 11m. : exhibiting- less active interest in the
j flag on the spires and steeples of I .xchang. which had been, exertoill b' market during- the latter part of the
.rtugaU the board, artinff jointly with the : w- '"--v "IU3L remrmuei,,
The royalists wore Jed by Paiva Cou- Italian Institute of Foreign Exchanye, ever' tllat if investments in tne Unit
iro. a, very brave and tenacious soi- had ,eTl relaxed. There has ibeen a ' ed States are not safe there is no
,-r, but an Ineffective organizer. The I notaible slackening- in the severity of safety m the world. Conservatism
ntinued dissensions between repub-iotir embargo on gold and eilver for and caution m the choice of securities
an faction', led him to suppose the some time past, while a strongr ten- ;aro always to be impressed upon the
v-,ent previous for a return to thejdency toward the slackening of finan- ! minds of intending 'buyers, but they
' :,hy, and without any agreement jcW censorship both here and ahroaid ! ma-v be carried to a .point where they
ith tliv royaiiSts of Lisbon and thelhas been otervable aided as it has jecome injurious rather than protec
uth, ho JCed himself at the head ; been by the pressure of financiers I tlve ln their influence,
f the monaihii-t elements of thoinrt nn-h, who ,ioiro tn see .1. i frices of commodities still show a
orlh, and. at ha head of several ! return to normal conditions. .healthy downward tendency, as ex-
lousand troops, proclaimed the This chanc-e of -oolicv represents. as i empllfied in the disposition of man-
.onarchy at Oporto and in the north- was indicated in the announcement infaurers to meet the grovernment
'rn nrovincea. concerning sterling, a definite step to- alf wav ln the V"ce fixing or price
A provisional government was es-lward the restoration -of pea,? time """""f process wiuan is now
iblished: laws were issued, and local i methods of trading. Taken in con-lKoln on- The declln8 lrl Prtces has
i.nilnistrative authorities appointed j junction with the necessary conse- reen onl' about ten points from the
ery where. Couceiro expected that 1 quences and Implications of the step, hlsh level- however' and hs no
her victorious royalist risings! it is perhaps the most important islg'n of 'Proceeding: so fast as to dis
ould follow all over the country. In- 'measure looking to International free- organize any business activity in
id of this, the Lisbon insurrection ! dom of dealing ln securities that has !deed Jt might well be hoped that
Monsanto failed, and the same oe- lyet "been ordered since the openiwr of jaomevrhat marked declines in values
urred ln other localities, while in the war. Pre-cd:d as It was toy the ! Eillo,UIa !;ur- wuo11 declines, would
-ny centers tnere were no disturb- j cessation of con-rrol of the i-ue of ".".s a-
ces of public order. isecurties b.y the so-called Capital Is- !t1n in cost ?f llvlne. to relieve
of the royalist danger, all iaea CoiiLniUlee cn? the United States'"1" emJ-u anu meuium consumer anu,
ubUcana Joined forces against . and reat Britain, it goes far toward (investor ana tnereby enlarge his sav-
mon enemy: momentarily for- liputrtnsr the world back unon a. .bnsia ilnKS margin. mat tnis iprocess will
clashing ambitions, and unit- lot free International competition for
combat the north. Thousands fcajpital. It 13 already seen that there
3, seconded by marines and cl- ;m-ust be immediate and' effective ac-
wflT-shfna nnti ftirrraft. wer I tion lriok-lne- tn lnpti.1 fl ti iw.in ihpmifl
full n.tion airainsf the '. nrivata r.haniwln of out- jrr-ftt ornnrt !some observers who seem indisposed
list hosts, whose strongholds, Imbalance. This balance still continues ! to. look dee,P'y lnt the logic of the
:r another, fell into the gov- j heavily in favor of the United States
's hands, e.nd the eurroundlng je.nd must in some way be settled,
to u merely a question of j-Forelsn oonmtrlea cannot afford to
;came the sudden dramatic ell- fTinduly low quotation, and sterling- ' f Jart ""n the past few days in Ibuy-
le royalist government had re- has already toeen quoted for checks '"1 aammning oonsnmpuon
appeal to the foreign powers i a W as .5S, while francs have Be- ! odf dealers generally are short of
nmMnn r t),.ir h.llb.r.n. iolined to fi oo -frajicn to th (Vvfto i- nrt "fi"" anu m augurs a longer pe-
publican oflcers ln Oporto, who i "re. according to some quotations, toiriod, of spring demand than is ordl
en meeting secretly and con-1 8.00 lire to the Kllar. This inevitably ; warily expected'. Agricultural pros-
to bring about the downfall ! means the opening of largo foreign ' verynere seem to oe
"Unrfnm" nf th. nnrih rtMrI- credits in the United States and tha ! e" w aavoranie, wnne
to wait any longer, as the ac- offering of securities in this country.
stance of belligerency by foreign : It foreshadows a very strong demand
vers meant the arrival of arms, I for American capital, and points in
munition and the moral support ;aH probability to strength and activ-
iich would weaken the claims of ai'ty dn the stock market. That the
uuDlloan victory, , -t, iuijx iuoj net uiuvk, xwi . Liiiit: h l
I Pnnnalrn nr. A V, ( es ntoff wan, lt OCClirV t'hft W!t1nn nf Tvrtrl rt
f Luting at Lamego on the" 13th, and financier and world craiStor is still ! ta!"lbly tr"e at the floating supply
gradually .be worked out there can be
but small doubt. So far as it has
gone it has .been helpful rather than
the reverse, despite the views of
situation.
With the return of spring, retail
trade is reported good throughout the
country, and there has (been, a dlistinct
there Is but little indication of
marked decline in food values. The
farmer should 'be a strong .buyer of
all classes of goods during this year,
and should, moreover, be a source of
substantial funds for savings or in
vestment. As for latoor, it Is unmis-
that day the counter-revolution at:''he opinion of come of the ablest
Oporto broke out. Sharp fighting financial nrlnds. Temporary disturb
ttpk place; but the big batteries ofiara(:ps of socuritrj" values, the fiuctua-
IBlxuos riay were in repuDiican : "lJ" ' i loreisn lssnieo.
' jids, so that the warships could ap- j oonas rtki stock wnora tno provision
is being absorbed, and that less trou
ble from unemployment than seemed
to e ln prospect 30 days ago is now
being experienced. It would be easy
to cause a setback in this favorable
koach and land their contingents at ! isi made for the payment of a stable . putlook Tby unwtae government pol
porto without dantrer. anmrest return ln dollars a.nl other
The royaliflt "govormnent" was plac- aml cntngea m tne local selling
1 under arrest; prisoners were freed, j procese of such foreign securities may
id the blue ind white flag- replaced ;1 exrtedt anl will continue until
the red ana green banner or tne CTl-M:i mm seiiii-ptTmanenx -ua-
'tjpubllc The royalist troops return-' 318 exenange is craved at through
cig from Lamejro and other ecenes ; cjTanementa for regular and ade-
hand flghtlns, weary, hungry and18 financing siich as -has alroafily
moralized, surrendered and were " wen aewnwa. ine war finance
isarmod by the republican forces 'orinoratlcm has already made pre
waltlng them outside the grates of j H miliary arrantm-.eiKs for the appli
oporto. oa- "on yf the birlion-dollar credit al-
About Couceiro there are many ru-I lotted t( 11 by Congress for the sup-
lors. some eay he is still nshtinff, u U1 VUI c.vpun u-auu a.nu may
hers that he has been killed, com
Itted suicide, or is safe over the
franish border.
The republican government is still
n Oporto reorpanizina: public ser
ices and reinstating loyal authorities.
.fhousands of arrests have been made,
nd many royalists are said to have
3caned Into Spain, where thev are
lisartned by the Spanish frontier i roaJ-
guards.
powerful factor in
a, more etaible situa-
prove to be ?
'brinsir.g- about
lion.
Domestically the most promising
financial event of the week has been
the definite establishment of arrangre
monts with the FMrrance Corporation,
and i n c i d n ta F y wi tfo the b an ka, for
the financlnsr of the needs of the rail-
Concrrcss may (be expected to
meet early in May, and this leaves
profb-aibliy not more than six weeks to
'be bridged over by the temporary
plans now iprojected. Tills ehould not
be difficult, and success eigiiries that
iN"EW AND STSCO:r HAND fumitur : thero fcQ serious interruption
iboniyht and sold. Kewfleld Furni- to purcnases ox supplies ana. equip-
ure Co.,1379 Stratford Ave. Phon ment. The outlook has had its duo
TODAY'S WANTS
icies. The situation is delicate and
will call for careful handling for some
months, but conditions today are cer
tainly increasingly favoralble. This
should help materially in bringing
about an earlier resumption of nor
mal industry. IFtnancially conditions
are as sound as could be reasonably
expected. The new Government loan,
whose terms are shortly to be an
nounced, will be a severe draft upon
the Investor's powers. ;but he will be
encourag-ed to renewjd effort Iby the
lact that the .Secretary of tile Treas
ury has assured the country that this
will tie the last of the series of Lib
erty loans and that in no future bor
rowing will there be the same wiidte
spread appeal to the rank and file
of the country.
A conra-s-eous attitude on the part of
the public and a demand for strict
economy in governmental finance,
couinled v.lth avoidance of private ex
travagance and supported -by genuine
saving arid conservative investment,
should insure early resumption of
prosperous conditions.
47-a Noibie.
I'lilTMBIXQ
NRT R. SANFORD,
a-nge connecting
tea. 843 South
Stratford 426-2.
ra
rrei
r
lers.
S31S1! 3 5 effect upon the quoted prices of rail
road shares and of equipment stocks
as well. In reachin.gr a fcasis of agree-
plumber 1 temporary exaote prices on
specialty low tfte cnier eteei (products, the eteel
Ave,, Stratford, manufacturers have taken at least
'19SSlai
MATiB KTEtiP WASTED
-First class cabinet mak-
Apply to the Port Chester Lim.
Ifeer Co., Port Chester, N. T., In per
Ison or by letter, statinsr wares
'wanted. S28s
L trOST Gray mackixiaw coat thrown
ln strange automobile -by mistake
en Bast Washington Ave. sewer
Job, Return same place. A. E.
Ambrpglo, foreman. SS8sp
Position aa working fore-
on farm; best referenoes; Da
nationality: age 40. Address
Farm Foreman, care Tlmee. S2b p
Milliners, Preparers or
Sewers Wanted.
, yon can sew we can find -work
leu. In oar' workroom. Apply to
H. DILLON & CO.,
lios-M&nr sc. s z b
tentative step toward facilitating the
resumption of (business on a normal
basis. Inhere are predictions that,
these prices may not prove to be
groat stimulators of ttwle, owing to
the fact that large portions of the
community believe further reductions
must be had before a profitable foot
ing for operations can Ibe arrived at.
This remains to be seen. If the gov
ernment will, as it evMbntly intends
to do, begin purchasing on behalf of
the roade, the navy and the army,
and the publio' service generally, upon
the new price schedule. It will itself
set a powerful example which should
have an important effect ln maintain
ing the quotation, not only of rail
road rshares but also of metal stocks
and, through indirect influence, of
many other issues as well. The not
aible strength of United States Steel
and other shares during- the past
waelc has . shown bow the markot
views tile prospect.
Politteal'Sy the outlook for the next
few weeks tm decidedly uncertain.
uHloperfcd -fiacttora are tfoujid In the
trone- Intimations from Paris that a
DEPEW FAVORS
KEEPING U. S
ARMY ABRO
OHERL1X COIiLEGE.
The founder of the town and col
lege of Oberlin, Ohio, was Rev. John
J. Shiphord, who was born 117 years
ago, March. 28, 1802. He joined with
Philo P. Stewart in founding the
famous educational Institution, wMch
was established in 1884 as Oberlin
Collegiate, and chartered in 1850 aa
Oberlin College. The institution was
named Oberlin as a memorial to the
Rev. J. F Oberlin. a Protestant pas
tor of Waldbach, ln Alsace, who was
born ln 1740 and died In 1826. Dur
ing the decade prior to the Civil war
Oberlin College became known as the
center of the abolition movement and
as a "station" on the underground
railway," a popular designation of
the secret means by which runaway
slaves were permitted to escape Into
Canada. In 1868 Prof. Henry E.
Peck, of the Oberlin faculty, and
others ware arrested, under the fugi
tive slave law, for rescuing the negro
"Little Joh" who had been taken
from Oberlin by a United States
deputy marshal. Oberlin College now
has a faculty of 175 and about 1,700
students, and Is one of the most
flourishing of the smaller American
educational Institutions,
Every nation in Europe and some
in .Aia want to aee peace last forever,
if It can get its terms adopted. Other
wise, otherwise. Pittsburgh InBpatoh,
New York, March 81 Former Sen
ator Chauncey M. Depew, chairman
of the board of directors of the New
STork Central Railroad Co., Just back
from the South, looking ruddy and
buoyant, says:
"Bread will beat Bolshevism.
"A large standing army will be re
quired in Europe after peace is de
clared. 1
"The present high wages must be
maintained.
"The Monroe Doctrine is our sure
anchorage, and any weakening of it
will be a grave mistake.
"An American merchant marine
cannot live unless it is subsidized, and
it is not likely to be subsidized until
the Middle West sees a commercial
advantage in such subsidization.
"The prohibitionists, if successful in
stopping the use of alcoholic bever
ages, will successfully prohibit tea and
coffee within the next few years."
League Cbanges Needed.
"It is a singular circumstance," said
Mr. Depew last night," that a sup
posably perfect document the Presi
ident so regarded it like the league
of nations covenant, should be found
by the President himself to need four
or five substantial alterations.
"Often it takes a little time for the
truth and the right thing to work
itself out of the twilight into the open
day, but usually the evolution takes
place. When I was a boy we used
to fight in my particular village in
Westchester county every Saturday.
That was the primitive way we had.
When one man had the other man fiat
on 'his back, in position to gouge out
his eyes or choke him to death, the
fellow on his back usually had sense
enough to indicate that he had had
enough fight. Ordinarily a definite
understanding between the combat
ants was reached then and there.
"That was Germany's position after
the war. The Hun was down and
gasping for terms. He would have
accepted any terms. That was the
time to impose the terms. Instead of
laying down the terms to him, the
Allies the oponent of the Hun sud
denly became so seized with the idea
that It would be well to settle a lot
of matters between themselves that
they let the Hun get on his feet. Now
the Allies are not just sure that the
Hun was licked at all, and the Hun
begins to think the same way about
it himself.
Europe In Chaotlo State.
'The present chaotic condition in
all of Middle Europe refutes the idea
that the small states of Middle and
Eastern Europe were ready for self
determination. "Ultimately we shall reach some
sort of a basis of settlement and
things will quiet down, but on ac
count of the ancient racial antagon
isms between the states and the in
flammation of the war any place will
need to be guaranteed by a large
standing army for decades to come.
"Our sure anchorage is the Monroe
Doctrine. Any weakening of it would
be a grave mistake for us. We do
not need to shoulder new and grave
international obligations on account
of the war. There is a clearer recog
nition today of the United States as
a great moral force than ever before.
At the Algeciras conference the
Kaiser was determined to seize Mo
rocco, which would 'have provoked a
war with France, and probably Eng
land. Our delegates protested against
the Kaiser's proposed action. It was
a display of moral force, and it count
ed. . The Kaiser didn't know just how
far we would carry our protest.
"The open door ln China was ob
tained without a gun behind our de
mand, because John Hay believed in
the potentiality of our moral force.
If we could do so much then, without
a show of physical force, we shall be
able to do much, more from this time
forward.
"We raised an army of 4,000,000
men ln a year and a half, and wo
drafted an army of IB, 000, 000. We
actually sent across 2,000,000 men.
Europe knows the result. Histor
ians for centuries to come will keep
that accomplishment in mind. More
over, we raised $16,000,000,000 for
towar purposes, and loan"1 Europe $8,-
000,000,000 more, without winking an
eye. That record will always giv
the United States a great moral force
In the eyes of the nations. We
should obligate ourselves to maintain
an army of our men in Europe.
"Bolshevfsm Is a nightmare In
Europe today, but It will not make
much headway here. Bread will stop
it as soon as anything", and gradually
the bread problem will be settled. I
look to see a tremendously rapid
commercial recovery on the part of
the European nations once peace is
restored, V
"The United States should -prepare
for the sharpest competition in its
history. I am a protectionist, and I
am a great believer ln high wage.
The present high wages should be
maintained. In order to" maintain
them we certainly shall need a pro
tective tariff."
Expects High Hail Kates.
When Mr. Depew was asked about
the national railroad policy he
said:
"In one respect the " problem of
rates and wages has been made more
easily solvable by the government
ownership or operation during the
war. The government found that
the revenues from, operation were in
sufficient to permit of a wage scale
that the government deemed neces
sary under the circumstances. The
government thereupon increased the
rates. Now, in time of peace, under
normal conditions, no such stiff! in
crease in rates would have been tol
erated, but the government did it, and
the people stood it without protest.
Substantially the same principle will
have to be adhered to. If the rev
enue is insufficient the rates will havs
to be advanced.
"What is needed is absolute gov
ernment control, without any half
way business about it. The country
should be divided into regional ter
ritory, with the direction of the rail
road business of each regional dis
trict allotted along natural lines.
Kijr Problem for Congress.
"It is going to be very interesting
to see how Congress manages to
finance the government during recon
struction. As a nation we have taken
a view directls' opposite c the one
exercised by Great Britain. That
country taN the appetites of the
people that is to say, Great Britain
imposes stiff excise and import duties
on liquors, tobacco, tea, coffee and
sugar, making all of its people get
under the tax burden. In this coun
try the Democrats always have ex
hibited a horror of taxing the poor
man's breakfast sugar. We have
Just thrown away a billion dollars a
year in revenue in adopting the pro
hibition amendment. If this coun
try In Its economic policy keeps on
burdening ordinary business with in
creasing income taxes and excess
profit taxes the business so overbur
dened will seek other countries.
"Now that the prohibitionists have
voted to abolish the sale of alcoholic
beverages. I look to see the same
people within the next few year?
bring about the abolition of the use
of tea and coffee and tobacco. Thej
already have started in on tobacco.
Tea and coffee will come next. Eng
land gets as much revenue as possi
ble out of its people's appetites by
taxing their indulgenciea. We get
the minimum and transfer the, tax
burden to other business."
Mr. Depew will be eighty-five years
old on April 23.
OVER FIXTT YEAES
3 PER CENT. INTEREST
OR
YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT -
We think this will appeal to yon particularly tn -rime of our experience
at over fifty years In banking. We con assure you o5 paftsty. Gtttisfactov J
rojiduot of your business, and cnorteous treatment.
Interest credited to accounts monthly.
We wcuid like to tell yon about our methods.
tall il' on tne 'phone or come ln and see ua.
T. L. WATSON & CO.
PRIVATE BANKERS
CONNER MAIN AND JOHN STREETS
Established I860
SHOP COMMITTEE ELECTED
The following shop committees were
elected Saturday at the Bryant Elec
tric company plant:
Machine room: .Tames Halsey,
chairman; Clara Johnson and Stella
Brennan.
Fuse department: Jennette Hager,
chairman; Agnes Williams and Rich
ard Taffolon.
Engine, Guards and Watchmen:
George Gusner, chairman; J. D. Por
ter and M. J. McNally.
Raw materials: Steve Vlador, chair
man; Fred Foster and John Lipthak.
Office clerks: V. Beegee, chairman;
Miss J. Keir and Miss H. Wiaichert.
Receoivers, etc.: W. Gleason, chair
man; Walter Stroh and Thomas Cus
ter. Socket, etc.: Agnes Gaynor, chair
man: Robert F. Miller and Grace
Bickford.
Snap, switch, etc.: Rose Smith,
chairman; Mrs. George Gogarty and
John F. Broisard.
Plating and Polishing: Charles Ri
ley, chairman; Andrew Popp and Miss
M. Delaney.
Carpenters, etc.: Henry Olsen,
chairman; Howard M- Sheldon and
Charles Sward.
Tools and Machines: 8. J. Williams,
chairman; E. W. MoCune and E. P.
Megus.
Drafting.' Letty C. Bryant, chair
man: S. J. Boardsley and M. Peterson.
' Models and Experimental: C. A.
Remboldt, chairman; M. Ward and
H. M. Smith.
JOHN HAYS HAMMOND.
John Hays Hammond, millionaire
mining engineer and former adven
turer, will begin his 65th year today.
He was born in San Franeiaco, the
on ef an army omcer. After an ad
venturous eareer as a mining en
gineer in California and Mexico, he
went to South Africa aa consulting
engineer for Barnato Brothers, and
later for Cecil Rhodes. After the
Jameson raid, with which, however,
he was not in sympathy, he was ar
rested, tried, convicted and sentenced
to be Banged, England and ' the
Unlted States interferred in his be
half, but it was not until after the
gallows had been bnilt that the Boer
government commuted the sentence
to imprisonment for 16 vears, and
later let him off with a fine of $125,
000, After thai: he became associated
with the Quggenheima. who paid him
a salary ef half a million or so a
year, - .
LIBERTY BONDS
ALL ISSUES AXD DEXOMIVATIONS IX LARGE OR SMALL LOTS
BOUGHT FOR IMMEDIATE CASH OVER THE COUNTER AT
MARKET RATES WITH ACCRUED INTEREST ADDED
CHARLES SCHWARTZ
207 Warner Building 83 Fairfield Avenue
Office Hours: 9 A. Jt, to 8 P. M,
Watch Our Advertisements
for Some News of
Can You Guess What It Is
Going to Be?
The
Wheeler & Howes
Company
'Phone
Barnum 344
The City National Bank
10T WALL STREET
Capital ..-w.... 9SOO.M0
Surplus anil Not Profits... TDOoea
THE CONNECTICUT
NATIONAL BANK
9
BRIDGEPORT
Cor. Main and Wall Streets
P. L. Holzer F. T. Staples
James Staples
& Co.
Private Bankers.
189 State St, Bridgeport.
Insurance.
Real Estate.
Safe Deposit Vaults.
T. B. WARREN
Real Estate and Insuranca
179 Golden Hill St
G26tl
TeL 2417
STATE OF CONVECTICUT,
DISTRICT OF BRIDGEPORT, m,
PROBATE COURT,
March 21, 1919
INSURANCE AND
REAL ESTATE
1 WANT TODR HOUSES AND IXTTS
TO SELL
D. R. WHITN3Y
" 83 FAIRFIELD AVE,
19B21tf '
r
Estate of John C. Orovetz, late
of the town of Bridgeport, in said dis- j
trlct, deceased. i
The Court ot Probate for tho Dis-
trlct of Bridgeport, hath limited and j
allowed six months from the dattf '
hereof for Creditors of said Estate
to exhibit their claims for settlement, j
Those who neglect to present their !
acoounts properly attested, within
said time, will be debai-red a recov
ery. All persons inaeDtea to sal a
Estate are requested to make imme
diate payment to
her
MART () OROVETZ,
mark
Administratrix.
400 Meigs Building. a
STATE OF CONNECTICUT,
DISTRICT OP BRIDGEPORT, 8s.
PROBATE COURT.
March 24, 1919
Estate of Anna Doyle Shearer, late
of New Tork, leaving estate ln oald
district, deceased.
The Court of Probate for the Dis
trict of Bridgeport hath limited and
allowed six months from the date
hereof for creditors of said estate to
ex-hlblt their claims for settlement
Those who neglect to present their
accounts properly attested, within said
time, wilS fee debarred a recovery. All
persons Indebted to said estate are
requested to make immediate pay
ment to
ANDREW J. DOYLE.
Administrator,
6 Hendricks Avenue, Norwalk, Conn.
PATENTS
A. M. WOOSTER,
Iste Kaamlner U. S. Patent Offlae
1115 MAIN ST.. BRIDGEPORT
Send for booklet on patents
TAXES ON GRAND LIST OF 1918
Notice Is hereby given to tne tax.
payers of the City of Bridgeport that'
the taxes on the grand list of 1918 are
due and payable ar the tax collector's
office, Rooms 4 and 5. City Hall, Tues
day, April 1st, 1919.
The undersigned will be t the col
lector's office as above on April 1st,
1919, and dally Ihereafter, Sundays
excepted, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. and
Saturdays from 9 a. m. to IS p. m. for
the purpose of collecting said taxes.
After May 1st, 1919, as required by.
law, interest at the rate of three-quarters
of one per cent, will be added to
all unpaid taxes and the same oa th
first of each succeeding month.
HOWARD F. SMITH,
SlaS Tax Collect or.
Somebody lectured last night en
"Our Dough-girls" in "France. What
we need are dough-girls in the homes
girls who knead the dough more
and more and need the dough leas.
Houston Poet. " xi
STATE OF CONNEUriOUT,
DISTRICT OF BRIDGEPORT. ML I
PROBATE COURT, . ,S '
March 28, 1919
Estate of Hull Shepard, late of the
town of Monroe in said district,
deceased. ' t -
The Court of Probate for the 154s-'
trict of Bridgeport hath limited and '
allowed six: months from ihe date.
hereof for creditors of said .estate tp
exhlbit their cialras Xor settlemenC
Those who neglect to present their ao-
counts properly attested, within aai4v"
time, will he debarred a recovery. Alt'
persona Indebted to said estate are
requested to make Immediate payment
to -
- RAYMOND H. SHEPARD,
. Administrator.
433 Golden Hill St.. Bridgeport, Caun.
B29s ,

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