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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, May 20, 1919, Image 16

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1919-05-20/ed-1/seq-16/

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16
THE TIMES: MAY 20, 1919
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BOLSHEVIK DOCTRINES SPREAD BY
THE "AGITATION DEPARTMENT"
Ko department of the Russian gov
irnmcnt Is reckoned of more lm
ortance man th Agitation Depart
ment of the Ministry of Foreign Af
talrs. The chief Is Kroblch. a Jew
tnd a lawyer. The scale of Kroblch&'s
ictlvltles la evidenced by the fact
3iat In the month of December alone
le expended the sum of 6,600,000
joubles. The center of Bolshevist Ab
lation Is Stockholm. Under Krobl
lh 1 a airl who Is commonly be
leved to be much of the brains of the
ork that la done. Her name la Mrra
Heta, and It Is said that she has con
lol not only of the work of agitation.
ut also virtually of all the political
aplonage. For the work of sulfation
n Poland Mrra Hetst Is associated
1th a man of the name of Grunbaum,
who. according; to these reports from
rtussla, has been eminently success
!ul, at least In the matter of Ret
ting a great number of aa-ltators into
the country. Most of these agents of
tropaffanda enter Poland as refugees
n special refugee trains. Very few
If them arrive from Moscow, because
n Moscow there is a most strict con
trol by a representative of the Pol
Ian government of every person going
le Poland, and In consequence near
ly all of the amenta of the Bolshe
Mat come In from the Russian prov
kicea. Uterature Is chiefly Imported by
tromen. In Moscow, however, there
a not only a polish representative In
wrested In passing the refugees back
:o this country but also a so-called
Russian Committee, the rhlef of whlrh
H Unshllrht. Whenever a Polish re-'ua-ea
applies to the police or other
luthorirtes, to be returned to his
tountry he Is -despatched to this
L'nshllcht. Vnschlicht Informs the
lppllcnt that at least two weeks will
le required to arrange for the trans
fer. During this time the refugee Is
v liven an apartment, amply fed, and.
uhlch Is most Important, supplied
lally with a ttratltultoua copy of the
tewspnper Trlbuna, of Moscow, which
las gone completely over to the Bol
ihevlst cause. In short, it is a definite
part of the propaganda scheme of the
Bolshevists to hold Polish refugees
In Russia as lonp as possible, and
during that time to Instill the Bolshe
vist doctrines.
The RolsherlKt Motto.
Wilh regard to the internal poli
tics of Russia, the old Bolshevist mot
to, "Hit the Hourgeols," has rather
lost Its force, for the simple reason
that the Russian Bourgeois have be
come virtually extinct. There are lew
against whom the blood-thirsty can
take action. For this reason both
Xyenlne and Trotsky are encountering
a certain amount of difficulty. The
people want an organized eysie-m of
work, and It is generally conceded
that the single department of Gov
ernment In which the Bolsheviks have
made any success Is In the Depart
ment of Education, under Lrtinarch
arsky, who. long before the present
upheaval In Russia, was recognized
as a specialist In educational work.
It Is also pointed out that not a single
one of the many promises made to
the proletariat In October. 191T, by
the Bolshevists has been granted. The
partition of land between the work
ers, for the accomplishment of which
a special committee was nominated
more than a year ago, has not been
accomplished. One, effect of this is
that at present there are a great num
ber of petty wars going on within
the country between bodies of peas
ants on the one hand and workmen
on the other, endeavoring forcibly
to seize territory.
Very little law and order prevail
In the greater part of the Russian
farm lands, and until there can be
some settlement of the now hopelessly
involved matter of Ruf-sian land own
ership there Is little hope of peace
for the rural dlstrlfts. Throughout
the entire country there Is great dis
content with the Government system
of requisitioning supplies. No pay
ment Is made for anything the Gov
ernment takes, and as a result the
peasants have virtually only those
things which they can grow them
selves. For example, they may have
potatoes and corn, but cloth, sugar.'
tea, petrol, and Iron are virtually un
known to them. Add to this the -fact
that the Bolshevist regime endeavored
to enforce a mobilization and it Is
easy to understand why in many vil
lages bloodshed Is almost a dally oc
curence when Government officials
appear. A crowd of peasants killed
several Bolshevist Commissioners on
ly a few days ago at Rostoff, til the
province of Jarsloff on the Volga,
burnlnff the house occupied by the
local Soviet, together with five of the
Soviet deputies who were in the build
ing at the time. In consequence of
this outbreak Bolshevist troops were
sent out from Moscow to Rostoff and
160 persons were summarily execut
ed. The only solution of thins difficulty
te Bolshevist leaders can see Is the
opening of factories, which is Vir
tually Impossible unless relations can
bo established with the Entente.
Economic Weapons.
The Russian economic situation
iiaa been well summed up by Len
Ine himself, who has publicly declar
ed that Russia can be crushed not by
the bayonets of the English and
French but by their economic weap
ons. In this connection there has come
to me a picture of Petrograd as tt
Is at the moment. Food tickets are
Issued, but they are useless. There
are no horses in the city, nor dogs.
Tram cars run rarely. Produce Is vir
tually the only recognized currency,
although the Tsar roubles, If anyone
is lucky enough to possess them, are
accepted. More commonly, however,
a coat Is clven In exchange for bread
or meat. There is no coal in the city
and people are burning the houses
and e ven the wooden pavements,
which have been largely torn up. The
Bolsheviks frequently enter a house
and demand the family accounts. If
a family maintains a servant a special
levy Is made upon them by virtue of
that fact. Everyone in Petrograd
makes a point of being shabby in ap
pearance. For a long time the middle and
upper classes looked to Germany for
their salvation: now such of them as
still survive look to the Entente.
The city Is filthy. Xot a store remains
open and food Is purchased at the
Government food thops. Butter, when
obtainable, costs so roubles a pound;
sugar, 140 roubles a, pound; black
flour, 20 roubles n pound, and white
flour Is unobtainable. Pork costs 60
roubles a pound, and there la no milk.
I have been reliably informed that
it Is impossible to live in the capi
tal for less than 15,000 roubles a
month. The few trains that are still
running in the country are composed
of cattle and luggage vans. Smallpox
and cholera are extremely .prevalent.
No one Is allowed to bo ill in his
own house; he must go to a hospital.
Whenever a person dies there Is not
necessarily an immediate burial. The
authorities wait for a sufficient num
ber of corpses so that there may bo a
general collection and a burial at one
time. Very few children are in Petro
grad, and the faces of the adults who
are there are reported to be either
horribly swollen or emaciated by
famine. This is said to be due to the
utter lack of fats of all kinds. Moscow
is reported to be In almost as Dae
plight as Petrograd. Many of the
churches of Russia have been con
verted Into theaters and the altars
are now often made the scenes of
Incredible obscenities. The banks have
been utterly forsaken ana remain
open for those who wish to loot.
Spy System.
Social life in Russia, according to
my informant, does not extst, and
this is largely because of the pres
ence everywhere of Bolshevist spies.
Everyone is supected of being a Bol
shevist spy, in consequence there are
almost no gatherings of any sort.
This state of affairs exists both In
the towns and in the rural districts.
Frequent conflicts occur between lo
cal governing bodies and the central
governing body. For example, in the
town of Smolensk the Executive Com
mittee of the Soviet acts absolutely
without regard to the Trotsky-Lenine
Government, and very often directly
counter to Its Instructions. The Com
mittee is onevof the cruellest and most
high-handed of the Soviet Committee
of Russia, jWring the last four months
they have shot over 400 more or less
well-to-do persons. Including students,
doctors, lawyers, a.nd artists. And the
system upon which these people were !
phot was barbarous in the extreme. 1
On the 5th of January 62 condemn- j
cd persons, of whom 20 were boys j
of 17 years of age, were forced to I
diff their own graves. They were then i
told to stand before their graves and j
were shot down by a machine gun.
When all had fallen hand grenades
were thrown Into the pit to kill those
who were still living. This action was
purely local in character.
TODAY'S AXXIVERSAR.T.
William George Fargo, founder of
the first express company west of
Buffalo, was born in Pompey, N. T.,
101 years ago today. Fargo entered
the express business in 1S43 as agent
of the Pomeroy Express Company
of Buffalo. He then became partner
In the firm of Wells & Company,
founded in 1841" by Henry Wells,
who operated an express from Albanv
GIVE
GIVE THAT THE DEMOCRACY
AVE HAVE WON MAY BE HOS
OR.VBIV SUSTAINED.
T&CAiT Jofc
-I HAUE
To
CANNING TIME
Canning days are due soon. From
now on the garden will be furnish
ing tings should be and can be can
ned and put In storage for next win
ter. Fruits and vegetables cannot wait to
be canned. For this reason canning
material should always be on hand
ahead of time. Xow is a good time
to stork up on all your canning
noerts.
You will find here fruit Jars at 75c
a dozen and more with all the other
smaller and necessary canning material.
A mencan-Eardware-St ores
(ISCOKPORATED)
Fairfield Ave. & Middle St.
-- .- --ft-
to Buffalo. Fargo believed that the
West was a fine field for the extension
of the express business, and launched
the project which gradually devel
oped Into the great corporation now
pany, which controlled the express
panyh, wlch controlled the express
business in the entire West for many
yearn. William G. Fargo died in
Buffalo in 1881.
Aline and her brother attended a
birthday party of a playmate. Ice
cream, cake and lemonade
oerved. The boy asked t,.
for a glass of water,
"Drink your lemonade. I want wa
ter' said the boy, looking pleading
ly at his hostess.
"Don't be silly. Drink voui. i.rr,-
ade," said the hostess.
w rfuob irtu
water."
V
United States Food Administration. License No. .
G02142.
n
On Sale Wednesday
MAY 21st, '19.
MEAT DEPARTMENT.
Fresh Chopped Steak ...
24c lb.
n
r
PENNSYLVANIA Vacuum Cup
6,000 Mile Tires and Pennsylvania
"Ton Tested" Tubes (guaranteed tensile
strength Va tons per square inch), under
an economical and efficient zone selling
plan, are marketed by responsible
dealers at standardised net prices uniform
throughout the United States.
Price Schedule Effective May 12th:
Dismiss the idea
that they are,
High Priced!
1
Vacuum Cup ' Vacuum Cup 'Ton Tested"
Size 6,000 Mile 6,000 Mile Tubes
Fabric Tires Cord Tires
30-x3 . 2.70
-.. t 1
30z3 21.20 26.85 3.15
32 x3k 24.95 385 3.45
31x4 3335 4.70
32x4 33.95 48.70 4.75
33 x 4 35.85 50.05 4.90
34x4 36.50 5135 5-05
': - 4- ' -' '
32x4& - 47.20 54.90 6-10
33x4& 49.10 5635 6-20
34 x454 -r 49.50 5735 6.30
35x4K 51.50 59.20 6-35
36 x4& ' 52.05 60.70 6.50
33 x 5 1 60.30 68.55 7-25
35 x 5 63.45 71.90 7.60
36"xr5 64.65 7.70
37 5 66.75 75.20 7.90
PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER COMPANY
JEANNETTE, , PA.
NEW YORK BRANCH: 1889 BROADWAY
JJ v TT
FRESH SEA FOOD. -
Large Bloater Mackerel 20c
Soft Shell Crabs 75c doz.
Green Steak Salmon ; 35c lb.
Steak Cod 16c lb
BteaK niensn 20c lb.
Steak White Halibut 32c lb.
Weakflsh 18c lb!
Shore Haddock lOc lb.
Market Cod lOc lb!
Butterfish 12y2c lb.
Crockers 15c lb.
Flatfish 10c lb.
Sea Bass 18c lb.
Large Salt Water Eels 30c lb.
Large Live Lobsters 38c lb.
FRESH NATIVE VEGETABLES.
pa aiive opmacn zzc peck
uucumoers 5c each
Rhubarb - 4 lbs. 18c
Scallions 3c bunch
Radishes 3c bunch
Native Asparagus 38c bunch
Small bunches 22c
New Beets : 12c bunch
P.
m
i
FRUIT.
Extra Large Navel Oranges 60c doz.
Valencia Oranges 17 for 65c
Pineapples for canning, special price by the
crate or dozen.'
BRIDGEPORT
PublicMarket&Branch
STATE & BANK STS. E. MAIN ST.
PHONES.
u2
NOTICE
Each wagon has a certain route to cover.
Wagons whose routes are on the outskirts of
the city are not allowed to peddle on the route
that they pass through in order to get to their
own route, j
Miaepwl Ice
HAYES FISH COMPANY
Dealers In All Kinds of High Grade -
FISB, MEATS, GROCERIES and VEGETABLES
200 F AIRFIELD AVE.
TKLKPHONB BAR. 1 41S MS7
r" "TIt TFt7 a t txj . Pi m W. WATKR
A healthful drink which is absolutely uncon-,
taminated by impurities of any kind. State Liceuse
BOTTLED DAILY. DELIVERED DAILY
TEIiRPHONE OS-l
W. M. LANE Distributor of
HIGHLAND SPRING WATER
R. F. D. NO. 2, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
OQQ MILE
TIRES
s
t
!!! ICE & GQ.1L CO,
KAXt
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