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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, November 05, 1919, Image 15

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1919-11-05/ed-1/seq-15/

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13
TRUCKING AXT STORAGE
THE TIMES: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1919
WT1
VAX furniture moving1. Local
and Ions ilium nee. Now York, Hart- j
ford, Worcester, Boston, New Lon
don, Providence; reliable; leaving1
town at a.11 times; reasonable rates.
SIS East Ave. Call Bar. 7128-4.
HI a!
FRANK IZZO, local and long distanca
trucking. Up-to-date storage ware
house ?n" furniture, pianos, mer
cnandise. auios, etc. Fireproot
vaults. Best care gruaranteedl Safety,
superior service and satisfaction oup
motto. 4 S3 William S:. Barnum
275 5. Bridgeport. SSaj
EASTERN MOTOR TRUCKING an4
S.orage Co, 46 Kossuth St. Dat:y
trips New York, Newark and Phil
adelphia, Springfield and Worcester.
Phone Bar. 3612-2. Hltf
ymnp toiip
IIIU 1 Ul i UUUl
VERCQME
FUEL PROBLEM
COSTUMEHS, The Elite Company.
V."suie3 to rent for Balls, Mas-..-aiis
and Parties, 327 Fairfield
Bridgeport. Conn. Phone
Phone Barnum 1612. G18d
W. H. FRAZIER L.ocal and long dis
tance express and light trucking,
7 4 5 Union Ave., Bridgeport, Conn.
ACME TRUCKING CO. Furnitura
moving and general trucking. Local
and long distance. Factory con
tracts solicited. Tel. Stratford 9 7.
A. PALUMBO, local and long distance
trucking und furniture moving; ve
guarantee satisfaction. 10 Calhoun
Ave. Phone Barnum 6713-12.
19R9a!
TORTH END TRUCKING Local, long
distance furniture moving; clump
truck for hire or heavy hauling.
John Mikos, 320 iUver Si. Barnum
903-23. '19130a!;
I 7CAL and long distance furniture,
piano j.-.oving. Satisfaction guaran
teed. P. J. Murphy, office il 7 llon
rv St. Phone Barnum 4449.
6UTO TRUCKING, local and long
distance furniture moving. L. A.
Frish. 1412 State St. .opposite Bryant
Electric Co. Barnum 1154; house s
2Fi07-12. I
AUTOMOBILE TRUCKAGE See me
first. A.D.Stowe, storage and ex
press, day and night. 64S Newfieli
Ave. Barnum 63 88. D21ai;
TRUCKING Ross Farrar, trucking
and ash carting done at short no
tice, IS Reservoir avenue. Phone
Barnum 4S1-12. D7a'!
FURXITUK-1 noving; guaranteed
from breakage; local and long dis
tance trucking. Hanson Trucking
Co.. 1 Hiilhouse Ave. Bar. 3451.
'19L22aj
LIGHT AUTO TRUCKING Local
and long distance, reasonable price.
261 Stale St. Tei. Bar. 1084.
R2a!!
AUTO TRUCKING and furniture re
moving, local and long distance;
rates reasonable. P. F. Miller, 21
Jones Avd. Barnum 732S.
19R2Sa!'
ll'HOLSTERING
C. STRAM for your upholstering and
refmishing of antique furniture.
Mattresses made over, 226 Colorado
Ave., in rear residence, 1231 State
St. Barnum 1194.
WANTED TO BIT
HERMAN JUNK CO. pays highest
prices for ras, papers, rubber and
metal. 9 5 Frank St. Bar. :2 8.
19B17ai
WE PAY highest prices l'cr second
hand furniture. Call Barnum 4915.
We also do stove repairing as a
specialty.
Handle Distribution of Many
Gallons Daily by Auto
Trucks.
The immense problem of supplying
the world with gasoline for usb in
automobile vehicles is best illustrated
by the fact there are over 6.000,000
motor vehicles in the United States
today, and the demand is far out
reaching the supply. The allied coun
tries of Europe have 350,000 motor
vehicles. In 1S17, in the United
States alone there was one motor
vehicle to every IS persons. These
figures, compiled recently by the re
search department of the Federal
Motor Truck Company of Detroit,
Michigan, give a fair estimate of the
immensity of the distribution problem
in the oil and gasoline industry.
In the city of Chicago, there is one
vehicle to every 33 persons. Every
one of these cars or truc'ts must have
its ration of gasoline to enable it to
make mileage. A minimum of 2 gal
lons of gasoline per day, which is
very conservative, makes over 12,000,
000 per day to be distributed. In
addition to this the gasoline must be
convenient to the motorist. It must
be distributed from roadside stations
from one end of the country to the
oiner. in every Dig city there are
thousands of oil stations throughout
the rural districts they are dotting the
landscape and now even the "gen
eral store" at the cross roads has its
gas station.
The problem of supplying gasoline
to these stations has been success
fully solved by the motor vehicle it
self, it has worked out its own salva
tion. As an illustration of the im
mense organization and business
equipment which is necessary to per
mit you to buy gasoline conveniently
let us tell you of one convenient cen
tral oil distributing station in Chi'
cago.
Th's station the Standard Oil
(Indiana) plant at 1350 So. Leavitt
Street, Chicago, employs 150 men.
Here more than 200 motor trucks
are serviced, rebuilt, new bodies mane
for them and the whole organiza
tion works 24 hours per day to keep
the trucks1 on the job supplying
g.asoline to the wayside stations of
this company in Chicago. With the
system utilized by litis company, this
big plant is able to instantly repair a
damaged truck; thus the truck is idle
a minimum time and the gasoline is
kept going into the capacious maw of
the motor vehicles tank.
All this is done to supply Chicago
with motor fuel. It is only a typical
example of what is being done in
every part of the United States. Upon
its operation and efficiency depends
to a certain extent, the low price of
gasoline and the constant flow of
gasoline which must meet the de
mands of our millions of motor
vehicle owners.
UNITED STATES
CHIEF SOURCE
OF GOALJSUPPLY
More Than Half Resources of
World Locat ed in
America.
JEW AND SECOND furniture and
trunks bought and sold. Bridgnrt
Trunk & Furniture Co.. 486 East
Main St. Barnum 6599. ,19G2a ;
OLD GOLD, silver, diamonds. We
pay the best price. First West End
Jewelry Store. 12S6 State St., Lib
erty Theatre Bldg. '19D3a!
"While the Reds are agitating on
soap boxes, their wives are at home
getting red in the face splitting up
the kindling wood.
YALE MISFIT CLOTHING CO., pays
highest prices for gent's second
hand clothing. Send postal, will
call. 63S Main St. L9tf
FRANCIS J. DION, auctioneer
Furniture bought and sold. An
tiques a specialty. 1041 State St.
Barnum 7659. 19P25a
Ml SCKLXiAN EOUS
ATTENTION, Building Movers If
you would be interested in a job
of moving a number of tenement
houses in Waterbury, Conn., drop
a line at once or see B. C. Atwood,
236 Grand St., Waterbury. Conn.
H4 s
BEST PRICES paid for second hand
furniture and books United Second
Hand Furniture Co., 861 State St.
Barnum 1088-13. 'lSDHa;!
BOARDERS WANTED At 91 S Broad
St., Stratford, Conn. Covenient to
all industrial plants in Bridgeport.
Reasonable rates to workers. G15tp
RELIABLE FURNITURE CO. Sec
ond hand furniture bought and
sold. Stove repairing; also buy
junk. We pay best prices. 752 East
Main St. Phone Bar. 1649. B7a
PARK CITY FURNITURE CO. pa3
best prices for second hand furni
ture. All kinds stove repairing. 713
Last Main St. Noble 602-2.
19P30 a
Attention!
Cash or Credit
LARGE ASSORTMENT
NEW AND SECOND HAND
Household furniture, rugs, beds,
springs, tableF, rocking, Morris and
kitchen chairs; pictures, china and
glassware, mirrors, vases, Rogers
silverware, etc. Call and inspect
our stock. Selling at bargain prices.
Terms to suit. Bridgeport Auction
Pales Co., 286 Fairfield Ave. R6tf
ALL KINDS of second hand furniture;
we pay highest prices. Thomas
Tongas, 69 7 Broad St.. corner South
Ave. Phone Noble 1125-2. '19L7ai.
WTE PAY highest prices for a second
hand furniture of all kinds. Chas.
Oppenheim, 14S4 Main St. Noble
103S. '19P15a
FURNITURE of all kinds. We pay
highest price. M. Gelfend, success
or to Scalley Bros. 405 State St.
Phone. '19S12ai
LADIES' AND GENTS' second hand
clothing bought and sold; also fur
niture. Mrs. C. Meyer, 419 E. Main
St B. 5174. PSa
Attention!
Yanted for Cash
HOUSEHOLD Furniture of all kind3.
Office furniture, stock of goods and
merchandise, every description
bought. Let us quote you prices if
you have anything to sell. Spot
cash. Bridgeport Auction Sales Co.,
288 Fairfield Ave. RGtf
WANTED TO BUY all kinds of sec
ond hand furniture. Geo. F. To
tams, Redfiold's old stand. 42 Har
rison St. Phone 1015-2. D21tf
OLD FALSE TEETH, gold, silver,
platinum and diamonds, at market
prices. E. T. Goldberg. Jeweler. 46
Cannon St. Tel. B. 916-2. R30tf
SELL YOUR furniture, antiques,
books, show cases, stoves. Junk,
merchandise to Daniel P. Keane,
1885 Main St. Phone 4952-2 Bar.
CHOICE WINTER
POTATOES
FOR SALE
111
Southport, Conn.
TFIjEPKOXE FAIRFIELD 109-3.
To be sure you got my potatoes
see that tlie name of Wm. F. Ior
sey Is on the wagon.
HI tf
That the United States will soon
become the chief source of coal sup
ply for other nations of the world is
ihe belief expressed in the November
issue of Commerce Monthly, the mag
azine of the National Bank of Com
merce in New York.
It is. pointed out that this coun
try, although it produces more than
half of the world's coal, has in the
past left the export trade domination
in this commodity to England, whose
deposits are but a small percentage of
ours. England, however, with pro
duction dwindling as a result of the
war and her labor unrest, seems in
evitably bound to yield place to us.
"More than half of the total coal
resources of the world are located in
the United States." During the past
ten years, production of coal in the
United States has developed remark
ably, showing- in 1918 an increase of
32 per cent, over the average produc
tion during the five years 1919 to
1913. The most rapid increases in
production have taken place in Illi
nois and West Virginia, the output
of the former of these states for
1918 being 31,000,000 tons and of
the latter 24,000,000 tons over the
1909 to 1913 average.
Pennsylvania increased her bitum
inous output 22,000,000 tons as com
pared with her average of 1909 to
1913 and anthracite production for
191S was 11,000,000 tons over the
average for the same period. j
"While American coal production in
1918 broke all records, output for
the current year will be far below
that level. If the present rate of out
put is maintained, anthracite produc
tion will be about 76,000,000 tons and
bituminous production 432,000,000
tons, a total 508,000,000 tons, the low
est production since 1915. It is be
lieved that anthracite production is
adequate, but at the present time it
is not possible to determine whether
or not the country faces an actual
shortage of bituminous coal during
the coming winter.
"The acute problem is not, however,
the domestic but the international
coal situation. The present coal short
age in Europe is due to many causes,
chief among them being shortage of
labor, reduction in hours of work, and
more than all, a general state of in
dustrial unrest and disorganization as
a result of the war.
These factors have all contributed
to an enormous increase in the cost
of production, variously estimated at
from 75 to 150 per cent., over the
cost of production in 1913. Prior to
the warT the coal importing countries
of Europe were supplied by GTeat
L Britain, Germany and, to a small ex
tent, by Belgium.
Although Germany was 'bound
under the Peace Treaty to deliver 43,
000,000 tons of coal to France in the
next six months, she was not able to
furnish this amount and the require
ment was reduced to 20,000,000 tons.
Belgian coal production is proceed
ing at a satisfactory rate. Her email
exports, however, are not a large fac
tor in meeting the European situa
tion. Great Britain has been the
world's greatest exporter of coal both
in the form of coal for bunkerage,
and exports In the strict sense.
"British production which in 1913
was 287,000,000 gross tons, decreased
to 228,000,000 tons in 1918. Sir Auck
land Geddes, president of the Board
of Trade, states that for the twelve
months beginning July 16, 1919, when
the miner's seven hour day came Into
effect, the production of British coal
will he approximately between 214,
000,000 and 217,000,000 tons. Even if
the amount of coal retained for home
consumption were kept down to 196,
000,000 tons, the strictly rationed
basis basis of 1918, there would be
available for export only about 20,
000,000 gross tons.
Not only is the ability of Great
Britain actually to produce coal for
export and ship bunkers curtailed,
but the price of coal is now so high
there as to open the field to all com
petition, and especially to competi
tion from the United States.
"Although the foremost coal pro
ducing nation, our exports of coal
have never been large. In the five
pre-war years, 1909 to 1913, our ex
ports averaged only about 16,000,000
tons, the greater part- of which went
to Canada. Whether in the immed-
i iate future we are able to supply the
i coal which Great Britain cannot fur-
! nish will depend partly on our ability
I to increase bituminous coal produc
: elon, that being the kind primarily
needed both for export and for ship
; bunkers. It will also depend on ob-
i taining adequate tonnage. Whatever
; the outcome of the present situation,
it seems inevitable, however, that in
time the United States will assume in
the coal export trade and in the
business of bunkering ships, the posi-
! tion to which her coal resources en
title her."
BRAZIL FORGED
TO DEVELOP HER
OWN INDUSTRIES
Brazil, wich in past years import
ed a large variety of manufactures
from the United States, has been
forced by war conditions to develop
industries of her own until she is
now rapidly growing self-sufficient,
the National Bank of Commerce in
New York says in the November is
sue of its magazine,' Commerce
Monthly. The article says in part:
"More than one-third of the total
Imports into Brazil during 1918
came from the United States. What
share of this consisted of manufac
tures Is not yet known, but, in 1917
more than half of the total imports
from this country was made up of
manufacture!,! goods. While the war
has increased our productive capa
city until we feel the necessity of
finding a market for our surplus
manufactured product, it has exerted
an equally stimulating effect upon
Brazilian industry. The development
which has taken place in that coun
try since 1914 would serve as a clas
sical illustration of the steps by
which industrialization occurs in any
country.
"As war cut off the imports of tex
tiles and clothing, Brazil set out to
clothe her own people. Now the ma
jor portion of Brazilian cotton is con
sumed at home. Between 1915 and
1917 eight mills for the manufacture
of knit goods were established in
Sao Paulo, and more than seventy
textile mills of all classes are in op
eration in that that state alone. One
million, two hundred thousand hats
were made In that district in 1916.
The output of footwear in Brazil is
now 20,000,000 pairs a year. A large
number of plants for making pre
serves, sweets and chocolates have
begun operation. Corn milling and
other manufactures of food products
increased rapidly. In 1914 no lard
was exported from Brazil. In 191S,
13,270 tons, valued at about $8,000,
000, left Brazil for foreign ports. The
exportation of refrigerated meats
as expanded from 8,500 to 60,500
tons.
"The state of Sao Paulo is the main
center of Brazilian manufacture.
During the years from 1915 to 1917,
323 manufacturing concerns capital
ized at a total of 53.500,000, or an
average of over $10,000 each, were
established in that province.
IELD MARSHAL
LORO HAI6 NOW
KINGSTON EARL
London, Nov. 4. Field Marsha'.
Lord Haig does not after all become
"Earl Haig: of Bemersyde," as he had
wished, but "Earl Haig of King
ston," it is announced. His residence
being at Coombe there were objec
tions, it is understood, to the terri
torial designation of Bemersyde, the
Tweedside seat of the head of his
family and remote kinsman. Colonel
A. H. Haig.
There are well defined rules as to
the assumption of territorial titles,
and the lord of a manor can object
to a new peer taking his title from
a place over which the former has
"rights."
Lord Fisher, for example, vt ished to
be Lord Thetford, but his Norfolk
manor belonged to W. D. MacKenzie.
Lord Strathcona wanted to be Lord
Glencoe, but the rights of the ancient
MacDonalds stood in the way.
United Kingdom of Gt. Britain &
Ireland 5 Conv. Gold Bonds,
1929 to Yield 6.25
Legal Investment In Connecticut.
WILLIAM R. BULL
Bonds Stocks
Phone Barnum 1089
Security Bldg. Bridgeport, Conn.
The City National Bank
COR. MAIN AND BANK STS.
Capital 1500.000
Surplus and Net Proflta... 750,00
T. B. WARREN
Real Estate & Insurance
New Office, 220 Meigs
Building
THE CONNECTICUT
NATIONAL BANK
BRIDGEPORT
WB PAY BEST PRICES for scrap
iron, rubbers, metals, etc. Bern
stein, &09 State St., cor. Norman St.
Barnum 2213-12. '19R20a
K SIDE JUNK CO. pays highest
p for rags, rubber, paper, met
al iron and furniture. 14
Kvii iane. Bar. 2351-4. L12d5
RTTVrri
WE BUY' men s second hand clothing.
Call at 9 4 Congress St. Drop postal
or phone. We Call. David Geist.
Barnum 984-4. R15al
CLOTHING Highest prices paid for
men's second hand clothes. Koenig.
957 State St. Barnum 6328. We
buy and sell. R22a
WANTED AT ONCE
4 die makers, 1 die repair
man tor blanking cues.
Steady employment for men
qualified. Write or apply
at the
General Electric Co.
Employment Dept.
Taunton, Mass.
G 8 s
WE BUY AND SELL all kinds of sec
ond hand furniture. Cohen & Feck.
295 State St. Bar. 4987. G12aN
BEST PRICES paid for all kinds of
second hand furniture. George
Dukas, 261 State St. Phone Bar
1084. P4ai
WANTED TO BUY Upright Piano,
also - Victrola and Graphonola.
Will pay cash; state price. Box E.
care Times. A 7 tf
BEST PRICES paid for all kinds sec
ond hand furniture. Louis Fode
man, 1449 Main Et. Bar. 1038.
W. LIEFF & SON, dealers In serai
metals, rubber, rags and paper, 610
Main Bt Barnum 1827.
WANTED
25 Vertical Turret Lathe and
Vertical Boring Mill
Operators
MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE
Apply Employment Office
BULLARD MACHINE T'JL
COMPANY
BROAD STREET
H 4 p
"Progress toward Industrialization
as a result of the war, so marked in
Brazil, has been made in almost every
one of those less developed countries
of the world which in the past has
been looked upon as sure markets .
for the exportable surplus of stable j
manufactures from the chief manu- j
facturing countries. So far as they at- j
tempt to compete with articles of j
local manufacture, Americans must
either meet the local price, offer a bet- I
ter article or develop specialties, the
market for which is easier to hold
than is the market for staples."
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES
We have a fine new equipment of safe deposit boxes of various slses,
and we would be pleased to show them to you.
Coupon booths are conveniently arranged, and wo collect coupons
without charge.
T. L. WATSON & CO.
PRIVATE BANKERS
Established 1866
CORNER MAIN AND JOHN STREETS
P. L. Holzer F. T. Staples
JAMES STAPLES
& CO.
Private Bankers.
139 State St., Bridgeport
Insurance.
Heal Estate.
Safe Deposit Vaults.
PATENTS
A. M. WOOSTER
Formerly Examiner U.S. Patent CTi
1115 MAIN ST., BRIDGEPORT
Send for booklet on patents
School of Commerce and Finance-
Bridgeport Dilvslon Northeastern College s:
A Y. M. C. A. School of College Grade with Dergee granting power,.n j
offering Business Training to Employed Men
SOPHOMORE CLASS ?uainc Finance. Monday
Law, Tuesday
Accounting, Friday
FRESHMAN CLASS Accounting, Monday
Correspondence, Wednesday
Law, Thursday
ADVERTISING SALESMANSHIP opening
Tuesday
ucwuer . , at 9 o'ciock. amission tlCKels iree
Advanced standing given to former students In Accounting
Classes meet from 7-30 to 9:30 P. M.
LADIES ADMITTED
Call, Write or Phone for information
Educational DepartmentYM.CX.
Barnum 4853 833 Main Street, Bridegport, Conn.
I29s 1 3 S
3
Session,
evening, '.
Jku.
OLD REICHSTAG
BUILDING AGAIN
IN GOOD SHAPE
Berlin, Nov. 6 (By The Associated
Press) The Reichstag building has
undergone a rirorous renovation and
has been pronounced again fit for Par
liamentary occupation. The work
occupied nine months. In ridding the
great gilded-domed edifice of all
traces of the revolution the largest
call-bred vacuum , cleaners, the most
powerful of disinfectants and the
deadliest of vermin exterminators
were employed.
While in addition to the damage it
had undergone, the building contain
o many reminders, unpleasant re
i tbrances of the days when civil
w. r was waged in Berlin .the Nation
al Assembly had a reasonable excuse
for prolonging its sojourn In Weimar.
But now that disinfectants and Vermin-exterminators
have completed
their work such excuse no longer exists.
9 jiSaS
mymM$xwwi Mm mm Mm Wltf .. m6 mm mm Vftwpiwi
Nov.
Dec
Take No Chances with Wet,
"Skiddy" Pavements !
In these days when almost any tire with a raised tread Is
claimed to be non-skid, bear this in mind:
The Vacuum Cup Tread is the ONLY tread
GUARANTEED not to skid on wet, alippery
pavements.
In buying Vacuum Cup Tires you pay only for the quality
the safety costs you nothing.
Sold at economical standardized prices, uniform throughout
the United States. Pay no more do not expect them for less :
Vacuum Vscutan choITr St- tXSI-
Siso . C"P rCSw,. Casings ifiSf Tubs
Ct Cord SSlS?
30x3 18.45 3.00 3.73
30x3 23.70 38.55 1 35.85) 3.50 4.4
32x3 27.90 42.95 Ji 39.95 W 3.80 4.7S
31x4 37.30 5.M 6.50
32x4 37.95 54.43 49.05 5.25 4.55
33x4 40.05 56.00 50.45 5.50 6.90
34x4 40.85 57.40 51.65 5.65 7.05
32x4 52.73 " 61.35 53.75 6.89 8.50
33x4 54.90 63.00 55.20 6.93 8.70
34x4 55.35 64.65 58.20 7.00 . 8.75 I
35x4 57.6O 66.15 59.60 , 7.10 8.90 I
36x4tf 58.20 67.80 61.00 7.30 9.15 I
33x5 67.40 76.60 68.95 8.05 10.95 I
35x5 70.95 80.35 72.35 8.50 10.65 I
37x5 74.6O 84.05 75.70 8.85 11.05 I
Adjustment basis par warranty tag attached to each casing :
Vacuum Cup Fabric Tires 6,000 Miles
Vacuum Cup ana Channel Tread Cord Tires, 9,000 Miles
PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER COMPANY
JEANNETTE. PA.

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