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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, June 23, 1921, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1921-06-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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Page Two
THE BRIDGEPORT TJMES
Thursday, June 23,
Papers Approve
King's Address
London, June 23 Relief over the
safe return of King George and
Queen Mary from Belfast was ex
pressed by today's newspapers, which
also voiced appreciation of their cour
age in making the trip to open the
Ulster parliament. Editorials warm
ly approved the king's address, espe
cially his plea that the Irish "for
give and forget, and joie in making
for the land they love a new era of
peace, contentment and good wilL"
The Daily Xews, However, strongly
criticized, the government which
framed e speech for "simultaneous
ly making a mockery and reproach
of -these moving words" by its deci
sion to send more troops to the south
of Ireland. The London Times also
denounced the government for "dash
ing ail hopes by decreeing intensified
warfare in Ireland to the bitter end."
It accused the government of failing
to play the game with the king, who
was said to have done all he could
do.
Belief was strongly expressed by
some papers that the opening of the
Ulster parliament might lead eventu
ally to the harmonious establishment
of a parliament for uniited Ireland.
Commentators reasserted that to
grant full independence to Ireland
was "utterly impossible" but 'they de
clared that Great Britain was entire
ly willing to allow the Irish to man
age their own affairs in their own
way. The Daily Telegraph, contend
ing that in South and West Ireland
the Irish already had secured more
than their constitutional leaders ask
ed, declared concessions would not
long be withheld from a southern
parliament which gave its hand in
true friendship.
R rests with Irishmen," the news
paper continued, "to say when that
shall be. They are the arbiters of
their own destiny."
Taking a similar view, the Chron
icle maintained that "the perversity
which flouts good prospects and in
vites bad is too abnormal to last for
ever, and the question is how .far
Southern Ireland wll be carried aiding
the path of ruin before it abandons
it."
The Morning Post, which professed
to see the beginning of a new epoch
in the relations between Great Britain
and Ireland in yesterday's ceremony,
said the king's hopes for a future
nnited and peaceful Ireland could
"never be fulfilled until that country
Is delivered from the conspirators
who let it in its fall."
What purported to eb a copy of a
tetter Field Marshal Sir Henry
Hughes Wilson, chief of the Imperial
Btaff, sent to Prime Minister Uoyd
George, giving his reasons for not
accepting the premier's invitation to
attend yesterday's opening of the
tjlster parliament was circulated to
day in Irish quarters here. The field
marshal's reasons for declining to go
to Belfast were given as follows:
"Being the senior officer of the
British army, I do not think it right
or proper for me to be present.
"In view of the fact the govern
ment appears determined to increase
its pressure on he south and west
of Ireland to bring the Sinn Fein re
bellion to an end, and that orders for
all troops to go over will emanant
from me. I think, perhaps, it would
bring politics into the army if, as
preliminary to ordering thousands of
troops over to crush the rebellion, I
was seen to take part in the opening
of the northern Darliament."
The copy at the letter was printed
In the Irish Bulletin, which said that i
it regarded the letter as "authentic
proof of the military and political
motives which dictated the partition
of Ireland and the establishment of
the Ulster parliament."
The interment will be in Park cemetery.
SOPHIA MARIA DBARMAX. fifty-six
years, widow of John Dear
man, who died yesterday at the home
of her son, 9"3 Dewey street, will
be buried Friday. A private fu
neral will be hold from the home ot
her son on Dewey street, the bod
later will be taken for interment in
Oakland cemetery, Yonk-ers, X. Y.
OBITUARY
HAZEL RRILLT, wife of Frank
Reilly, of 1175 Korth avenue, died
yesterday morning at her home.
Besides her husband she is survived
by two daughters, Mildred and Alice
E. Reilly. The funeral will be held
from her late home on Friday
morning at 8:30 and a half hour
later a solemn high mass will be
celebrated in St. Augustine's church.
The interment will be in St, Mich
ael's cemetery.
ABBIE J. TRYOCS died yesterday
at the home of her daughter,, Mrs.
William G. Oldershaw, of Milford.
She is the widow of Capt, John Wes
ley Tryon, formerly of East Hamp
ton. The funeral will be held from
the home of her daughter, Mrs. Old
ershaw, of Milford, on Friday morn
ing, at 9.3 9. The interment will be
in Lakeview cemetery, East Hamp
ton, Conn.
ArvNA GADUS, forty-one years,
who died last Tuesday, will be bur
ied Saturday morning. The funeral
will be held from the late residence,
609 Berkshire avenue, at 8, and at
10 o'clock a solemn high mass will
be celebrated in St. Johns Greek
Catholic church. The interment
will be in St. Michael's cemetery.
JOHX ETRUZSLYAK. fifty-seven
yars, who died last Wednesday at
his home in Fairfield, will be buried
Friday morning. The funeral will be
held from hi home on Old Field
road, Fairfield, at 8:30, and a half
hour later a service will be held in
St. Thomas' church. The interment
will be in St. Michael's cemetery.
AUGUSTUS J. JOXES, forrv-three
years, who died last Tuesday, will be
ouriea Saturday morning. The fu
neral will ba held from his late home.
966 Stratford avenue, at 8:30. and a
half hour later a solemn high mass
will be held in the Blessed Sacra
ment church. The interment will
be in St. Michael's cemetery.
DONALD ALLEX FTJLLETR, ten
months, only child of Francis Evan
and Ruth A. Stowe Fuller, of 4 5
Jackson avenue, died yesterday. The
funeral will be held Friday from the
home of the parents at 2 o'clock.
See Decided
Change In Athens
Paris, June 2 3 There has been a
decided change of sentiment in Ath
ens upon the allies' offer of mediation
in the Turco-Grecian war and the
impression is gaining ground that the
Greek government will accept the alu
lies' proposal with certain reserva
tions, said a wireless dispatch from
Athens todav. Greece was warned
that if she continued her war against
the Turkish Xationalists she must
bear the responsibility for develop
ments in the Xear t,ast.
EXTRA TRAINS MONDAY, JULY 4
New York to Xew Haven: Leave
New York, G. C. T. 9 p. m., rsew
York, 125th St, 9hll p. m.; Stamford
9:5 p. m.; South Xorwalk 10.08 p
m.; Due Bridgeport 10:21 p. m.
Wlnsted to Xew York: Leave Win
sed 4:10 p. m.; Torrington 4:2S p.
m.; Thomaston 4:47 p. m.; Water
bury 5:11 p. m.; Xaugatuck 5:21 p.
m.; Ansonia 5:39 p. m.; Derby 5:43 p.
m.: BridceDort 6:17 p. m.. Due New
York, 125th St., 7g26 p. m.; Due New-
York G. C. T. 7:37 p. m
h Stops to take.
S Stops to leave.
MARKET CHIEF RESIGNS.
Washington, June 23 George Liv
ingston, chief of the Bureau of
Markets, has presented his resigna
tion to Secretary of Agriculture
Wallace effective July 1, and will en
ter private business. His successor
has not been selected.
TO I'l T DOWN REVOLT.
Vera Cruz. June 2 3 General Guad
alupe Sanchez, chief of military ques
tions in the state of Vera Cruz, has
left for Minatitlan, In the southern
part of the state, with 1,500 soldiers
to put down a revolt reported to have
been started by General Castulo Pe
rez and other followers of Felix Diaz,
who was deported shortly after the
inauguration of President Otoregon.
IS PROFESSIONAL NURSE
Salt Lake City. Utah, June S3.
Mrs. Jennie P .Musser, one of the
first women appointees of President
Harding, who was nominated for col
leotor of customs here, is a profes
sional nurse. She is a native of Pay
son; Utah, and prior to taking up her
residence here was for several years
a school teacher in the Hawaiian Is
lands. Two years ago she ran on the
Republican ticket for county recorder
and -was defeated.
Bridgeport, Conn.,
Thursday, June 23, 1921.
HOWLANDS
Entrances in Main Street, Fairfield Avenue, and Camion Street
Weather Partly cloudy today: Frt
day unsettled, probably showers.
Cool delightful
new dresses $12.50,
SALE
PHONOGRAPHS
AT ABOUT
V2 PRICE
Famous makes ! Flcror-samples, demonstrat
ing instruments slightly shop-worn phono
graphs and other practically; new instruments.
A limited number of
Genuine
Victrolas
35
in full -sized floor-model
cabinets as illustrated
CALL. EARLY
Summer dresses of ideal sort; cool and lovely, charming and dainty.
With just that gay touch of bright color or of deep contrast that the season brings to highest
favor.
With smart and attractive trimming.
Some unique combinations of organdy with vo He.
A number of notably pretty dotted organdies a nd voiles.
Rare combinations of white with splendid color.
Quietly beautiful small checks and plaids of fine taste.
Every dress a genuine tub dress, to be always fresh and delightful after an easy journey through
the laundry.
Ginghams. Voiles. Organdies, Tissues
Your personal favorite among colors is almost- surely included in this special -g A
Second floor.
collection at
Every instrument fully guaranteed same as
instruments sold at regular prices 62 years
of Sonnenberg prestige is back of each sale.
Don't Worry About Terms!
Our liberality is well known. Come in and
let's talk it over. Well make buying easy.
COME EARLY! THEY'LL SELL FAST!
Bridgeport's Leading Victrola Store
0 iUSl-C GDJM
1127 Broad Street fpfesl Bridgeport
tern
Keep cool in
) Palm Beach suit,
Mr. Wise Man.
Fabric without weight Palm Beach suits weigh
little more than your athletic nainsook underwear Sir !
Keep a man just about as cool as though he was sit
ting on a shady porch where a good breeze blew !
Hold their shape well. Look well. For these are
thoroughly tailored and that insures shape and service.
Pencil stripes, plain grays, good tans, light g
shades.
Tropic serges of blue are close rurmersup.
Mighty fine of appearance. These, too, at $15.
Outing trousers of gray and tan very-lightweight
woolens $5 to $7.50.
Fine white flannel trousers of special quality, regu
lar and full sizes, $10.
2 big Summer
home specials.
More than comforts: real needs of today and all Siun-
Each at a big fine saving of at least $12
Refrigerators
Strong oak
case wifli
heat-turning inner lining.
Food hamber with white
enameled lining. Extra
room for food. Flat top,
three doors, ice put in at
side. Holds 60 lbs. ice.
$21.50
Gas Stoves
Three-burner stove built
with great strength yet
light. Top is extra large
with plenty of room for
utensils. Sixteen inch
oven, broiler. Large drill
ed burners. Bright nieklo
trimmings.
$20
Fourth floor.
Main floor, rear.
Palm Beach
suits for boys.
Norfolk Palm Beach suits; tailored as well as Dad's
and with the same cool comfort.
Cray or tan or sand shades.
Jacket with yoke and box pleat at back, belt all
around, patch pockets.
Sizes 7 to 16
$10.75
Front basement.
Wondrous pretty
cool waists $2.95.
Unusual in design and beauty and as cool as re
freshing breeze at the shore.
Fine voiles and fine batistes, splendid white or deli
cate hue of pink.
Handmade styles. Hemstitched styles. Lace-trimmed
styles. Uniquely charming new frilly fronts mark
some of them.
Splendid companions for the pretty sports and
white skirts of today with extra price- dJO QC
Becond floor.
interest at
A great sport
suit for boy $2.25.
Khaki sport suit that's a real one for a real boy.
Tough khaki ; will stand up.
Blouse has short sleeves and sport collar.
Trousers are either shorts or knickers.
Sizes 6 to 13 $2.25
Front basement.
Galusha the Magnificent
Joseph Lincoln's best book.
Galusha is a delightful hero. He dominates the en
tire village. Yet he is an absent-minded little professor:
an Egyptologist !
'Tis a real human American story: Lincoln at his
best. Just published $2.
Vision House C N and A M Williamson. A story
really, and dramatically different. $1.90.
The House With Golden Windows J E Buekrose
$1.90.
The Man Killers Bane Coolidge $2.
What Next ! Dennis Mackrail $2.
A Courageous Marriage M Bryant $1.90.
Crimson Blotter Isabel Ostrander $2.
Main floor, rear.
THE HOWLAND DRY GOODS CO

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