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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, July 12, 1921, Image 4

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1921-07-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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,
IM,MOIIMIIMOdEft
THE
TIMES
AMUSEMENT
-PAGE
Tuesday,- July 12, 1921
geePour -
!I Elni1:113-
1
Marries 1
- By ANN -LISLE. I
- (Continued)
, , CEEAPTER cccxxl.
"Do, r trust yaw fully and entirely?"
repeated, fencing Jim in trtter aston'.-Ashment.
"Do I need you? How
-Thcanyou -ask that, Jim? Of course I
Z';doL"
: come-to..that later." replied
almost curtl3r. "Where Pat is
l,boncerned I see you may rteed me
that's my Edstees affaironly
-natttral you. should feel I can be trust
, Aed to -deal 'with it as best I know
thow-" '
- ' "1--doret-taiderstand Your' I cried.
1""Why are- 'you being so queer and
;LEIlarcastio? I've riot left- out anything
Paid..eald. I didn't tell you iny feel--
Irma but that was because I wanted
ate- 'get yolk opinion uncolored by
'mama"
,
- Jiro- grbarted at me, bolt in irrita;-Ption.
bait in amusement. Then he
out In a voice completely ruled
by-kJre-latter. emotion:
, "'You dear. funny little kid! Ás if
didn't" know-darn -well what's eating
1 ,Yort. Ire emit' long-journey stuff from
lel." You've got it sort of tan,-
''-111 your mind.-with that Sid
- Vner Carron speech in the "Tale - of
'.orwo-,Cities" Hero stuff.. Pat's no hero
.,--lttEC a regular guy. Darn nice one,
course"----
- - la. VIM Pat mean?" I
1 . . "But -what,else can Pat mean r-- i
- iesked. "Oh.,Jitrt---I know you think
.,,Pirt -all sorts of a fool and always
:4-wanting, to play fairy godmother and
i- elittleWiss Fix-it. But I'm so happy
said I have so many blessings
I-can't hely wanting other people
-Ito-base a taste of the wonderful joy
,
4---t' e come to me"---
I '"Yon-blessed darling! You blessed,
Yhtetsged honey-lanabl" Jim's voice
tcloodett-over and be flung himself on
' Mks krtee -and laid this face against my
- olteart. In-a. second he got to his feet
- stood looldng down at me like the
rot
tag, etrtmg man I adore -even more
.ihrth-the gentle lover.
. -,-:, "mlinnei," he said, ..1"1"9 teaSed you
i byg,ealling.you a Fix-it. But one of
tthe things--I love you for is the kind
?3,eact that hates-to see others suffer
!end -the steady bsain that so often
- I liodtr,the way out for folks who are
j'ibtind..cor b-elpless. If it weren't for
t that., you and I weuld have come
'I, taw s, naety place in our affairs more
)1lbser once withirT the past weeks."
, "What do you mean, Jim?" I cried
- : again t--opPressed by the sense of
I.-something mysterious just around
-:; the corner.
7 "We'll come to that soon," he re
: plied. "13nt tist. there's Pat to deal
? With. Vtr.hat do yott want me to do?"
, , "What do- you think he's going to
-I der' I parried
' , "Anne bave you come to me be
- 4-cense you believe in my strength. or
--,are you going to run-this, with a nt.-
:;!: tle-asstgtance fro-na me?" asked Jim.
-1'1 As I faced- him and his question I
' I. realized that we had co-me to a crisis
.-.1" in our lives. For a. mitmte I couldn't
"7., see why. Then I understood. Either
-4. I relied on Jim's judgment or my
1 0,7;32.1 If on his I could put all rny
-L cards on the table and trust him to
: :' play, them his own way. uninfluenced
' t by me-
'' "'You're running this," I said at
' I
' , lasthappy to know that I meant it.
.! "What I haven't told you is thisI
' l,feel sure that- Pat is going- togoing
-ir,to make 'way with himself. I dent'
el 4 see what other reason he'd have for
i, putting his. house in order- and send2;-
ing me the- miniature. I don't see
'.7 --1-whEd- else he can mean by that 'long
t
-,-tiourne he keeps talking about rui
-1.,. halt d with fear, and I have, no
1' hopeu less-you can stop him. You're
1 4 the- oni tme to handle this now."
;- "P'at no quitter.," replied Jim
i though tally. "Ile wouldn't talte the
i- -,:tiourne ne seeps, 1....,,,,,..- ..
--4, halt d with fear, and 1 have, no
1' hope- u less-you can stop him. You're
1 ,f, the col tme to handle this now."
-'. "Pat 110 quitter," replied Jim
.
- I though ully. "Ile wouldn't talte the
i ti coward's way out. And beside being
Itoo- Intliell of a man to--conaznit sui
. vide. he--has the brain to know that
I- Aloe:ding could more hideously cloud
- Vaud mar and besmirch Virginia's life
l than Just that."
I.:, "I'didn't think of that!" I confess
' --,,,, ed.
, ,'s" "No---but Pat will He'll see that
1 -,t,Ir 8.- diYOree, would point like a sign
:21,,post to -Virginia. and this darn Blake
-,t cub she's running with the other
l'atlaing would mark 'her all the more
iterriblyhe'll see that all right- But
- Pre one possibility of keeping him
..on even keel Uncle Ned's going
-Titintti. tomorrow to look after some
.
ttsvroperty that I'm sure adjoins Pat's
Fholdings- AnywaY. theY earns. troAAn-edl
' flogatter forabouyt 12 h
uld be a- tonic
R.and e-ssaving grace for anyone. He'll
e t:look out for -your Pat. I'll see to
I-' that."
; "Oh, Jim," I sighed comtfortably.
' 1. "I feel so much better already. I
LyraMoe masculine brains better than
' feminineyour's better than mine,
y. Prom this day on I'rrt going
twas
to cut out trying to run things and
, ,let Jim, de it- I amI swear it! I
, almost orazy with fear about Pat.
Arid novr Pm all reassured. I like
, peantrrg on. you."
. "I like having you lean on me,"
, Lsaid Jim, suiting action to word. "I'm
w-darn glad Uncle Ned ha.uled me out
of the office and then let me come
, - home early. He's going to 'phone me
I , et dinner tirne on a, matter"
, , Jim's voice- became remote and
- -Ir-4"business" came glowering into the
1 4 t room to shut me -out and to give me
, again the queer feeling of Jealousy I
ihad knovin a little while before.
;- Then Jim continued.
' "Just to ease both. our minds,
, ehowever, Pm going to call Pat and
Ç4, - f an-range to see him this evening--
- ',might even have dinner with him
' 't Irs darn lonely 8.nd morbid eating
k elone all the time." The latter part
f ,of his' sentemee Jim said almost to
!,himself as if coming to a decision, he
i "t-urrted to me:
t ,:4,.-s- -"Tell 'you what Pm going to do
tr ?little lady. I'll date Pat up for a.
' I stag- dinner tonight if he's free. You
-, i know how it is--men can talk so
--- ranch more frankly when there's no
- third party-around."
:- :' "At th-at -"third party"' I had a bad
.", ttirne to.keep from wincing or crying
r, wont a protat. Nor did 2t please me
, Pt have J-rrn forget that if it was
., Vortely eating a. solitary meal I
I' wouldn't fartc-y being doomed to, that
(' estate. I choked down rrrY petty feel
' , Irma, since all that counted was saving
4 1 Pat.
1 After a. few minutes' low-voiced
, ' 'reorrrersation over the telephone Jim
limi, fturned to me with a complacent:
. "Now it's all fixed. You needn't
, ,--svorr3r about Pat arty longer. I'll
1 t shave and cleaxt up a bit- and if the
. trztessage from. Uncle Ned -hasn't conae
- ; by the 'time leave. I'll trust you
,,, t,to take it- Only be sure to get it
"I otraight"
(To Bo- Continued)
, , SI - 7.7. lLNVE2orrS NEW Pli&N-B.
.
riI
f Itorae. July 12---An airplane cepa
1r L irae "dintig-113:rdh,aulLetlateo ni"ed ttlya
1 t t out zyi longe run besfrehsizsd, ablg to
, I,t 11121119 te neeessarY, to meander along
f t at brrt a few tryiles an hour. Is an
: Inormced es the Invention of -an nai
1 ge Ian engineer. Eparainonda Berticci, of
'1 - i i Rome.
. t . Therinventor claims that lie already
r i tried ent the machine- on a. small scale
s,.,.11 land regards his first experiments as
t 10rdcativo of theenccess of the inven'f-
tion- The new 'machine primarily is
4 Itntended-- earr--steriat war'chasing and
lAW,Lte bohsterried. -witittlavnachine.tgust.
WIN
11.
Poll Progmtri
. ,
- bouse packect-to capaCit3r greeted
a shcww filled with wonderful enter
tainment -value last-night-at Poll's. '
"Deception," the big feature pic
ture, came up- to expectations with
the projection of its - first hundred
feet and as .it proceeded carried the
audience far- beyond tbat Psychic'
condition- -called spellbound. "Decep
tion," purely from a mechanical arid
artistic standpoint, apotheosizes the
motion picture. It shows matchless
ly and bewilderingly the potentialities
of film narrative. - What personality
in history could be more interesting
than he who precipitated in the
world's greatest empire a religious re
formation of dynamic moment Henry,
the Eighth, of England, voluptuary
and roue as he was, nevertheless, had
marked:y what. modernists call the
"-power complex." The. anathema
pronounced by the papal envoy in the
stirring scene where Archbishop Cran
mer grants Henry a divorce from
Catherine of Aragon, moved- hint not
a. bit The crown tern from the
aging bead of the distracted Catherine
awaited its uneasy place on the beauty-crowned
locks of Anne Bole3rn.
"Bluff King Hal," oblivious of ties
sundered -till the crack of doom, went
blithely on his wanton way and now
a cinema. masterpiece is exhibited to
commoners bolding up to centempt
and derision he who has became
known as "the world's worst hus
band.' Poll's vatidevilie bill is good. Eddie
Foyer, "the man of a thousand
poems." only recites a. few. but these
few he decks in the flowers of decla
mation and tells the world by his
wonderful displayof- art that actors
, are born and not'-made. Some acts
' get a hand, others get a bearty hand
while others get a most excel
, lent reception. Last night - Eddie
Foyer got riotous appreciation and he
deserves everyone of ,the half-dozen
bows he took. "In Argentina" is un
like any offering heretofore appearing-
on the Poli stage. It is Span
ish clear through save for a lone
, Yankee comedian. The beautiful
senoritas even talk their native
tongue. The other acts on the bill
are all 41 lye rt n g and entertaining,
while Pathe News is the same old
atandby--always good. ,
Jack Norworth, the big musical
comed3r" star and highest salaried act
, in vaudeville, will be the xtar vau
deville offering Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday. Friday, as usual, will
be Amateur night.
PAGEANT OPENS
WITH SOUND OF
MANY TRUMPETS
Boston, Mass., July I2The pa-I
geant, depicting scenes from the
legends of the Norseman, 'through the
Pilgrim fathers and down to the
World War, celebrating the tercen
tenary of the Landing of the Pilgrims
bere will open with a. fan fare of
trumpets.
Then speaks a voice, from the rock.
which is illuminated but where no
human being is visible.
"ro, me the Pilgrims come?' the
voice declaims, after reciting the
!transitory visits of traditional Norse
men and of English, French and
Dutch adventurers. The prologue
concludes:
"Of me, the rock in the ooze, they
have made the cornerstone of the
Republic."
Scene after scene follows, passing
from the Norsemen crossing" the har
bor In their galley and fighting' with
the Indians On the shore, to authentic
Ihistory. The visits of early explor
ers, including John Smith and Chem
plain, are depicted in tableaux, concludi42-,
with a view of an empty and
desolete stage symborizing the great
pestilence which swept away nearly
all the Indians from the vicinity
shortly before the year of the Pil
grims' arrival. -
The scene shifts to England, where
the struggles of the Puritans for the
right of independent thinking and
worshipahre portrayea,l. The Pilgrim
Fathers themselves then appear, at
Scrooby, planning their migration to
The Netherlands, and later enjoying
Dutch tolerance and hospitality.
Next comes the departure from
Delftehaven for the New World, fol
lowed by the signing' of the Compact
in the cabin of the Mayllovrer, the
landing of Provincetown, on the
of Cppe Cod, on November 25, 16'20,
the final landing at Plymouth, the
dealings with the Indians, hardships
of the first -winter and the return of
the Mayflower, leavinr, behind the
remnants of the little Pilgrim band.
Two more scenes of Pilgrim life in
Plymcruth and in one Governor Brad
ford is seen writing his chronicles.
The other lights se higher and in
swifter succe ssion are revealed
Washing-ton, Lincoln and Roosevelt
A warlike clash in the orchestra and
the rulers of modern Germany, Tur
key, .Austria and Bulgaria. cross the
stage. Out in the harbor a. light
glows Irk the Mayflower. Convoyed
by the Pilgrims and the Dutch, the
forty-eight state flags are brought in
view. -The voice from the rock
cries:
"The path of the Mayflower must
be kept open!"
One final chorus, with pageant
ground and harbor ablaze with light,
then the stage darkens. Only the
light On the Mayflower remains. From
the rock come the immortal words of
Lincoln, combined from separate ut
terances: "-With malice tcrward none and
charity for all. it is for us to resolve
that this nation under God shall have
a new birth of freedom."
ONEIDA INDIANS
PLAN CELEBRATION
Green Bay, Wis.. July 12Oneida
Indians plan a centennial homecom
ing celebration here in August to
mark the hundredth anniversary of
the coming of the Oneida Indians to
Wisconsin after they had been crovrd
ed out of their hunting and fishing
grounds in New York state
When they settled here in the 'fall
of 1821 this part of the country was
a. vast -wilderness with few white set
Several thousand Indians are ex
pected for the celebration which
takes place Aug-.1 to 5. The Meno
minees, Chippewas, Stockbridges,
Munsees, Brothertons. Pottawata
mies and Canadian Oneidas are look
ed for in great number
Old Indian customs will be observ
ed Indian games will be played and
an Indian council will be held
This centennial celebration may be
the Oneidas' first and last to be held,
as the Indians are rapidly forgetting
their old ways and are entering- com
mercial and business life of every
community-
Personal invitations will be extend
ed by the Indians to President Hard
ing, Commissioner of Indian Affairs
Burke and Governor Blaine of Wis-COMM-
"Take It or Leave It" is a 11 lm-title
that gives the "fans" wids latitude
for freedom otlaction.
ina"2-11 g I ACIVertiSer:irUflthe4TMleS 'et
.-.,... .
Italy ffers Greater- Advantages To- Music ' Scholar,
0 w -
. . - , -
, , Says Bridgeport Girl, -Wecendý Rehtrned - -
, ,
.
ck From , Studying In , --4,z:, - - ,,,,i0,'-'-------:.,....-.---- --,: ". Was - Homesick - for Ice
aples Conservatou lass ',-'-'..;::,:',',-;..,.:-,":,:.--'44:It."---:'",,,:-:,,,-,:,-.--.--';.:' Cream,' SVhich Can't Be
,
,cala Makes Comparlsoms it",-,:..,:;.:,',,-,,,,,.,-,,,...., , ?,;,:,;.",:;,,,,,;,,,-:',:"'',".; .,,. :' - Bought In Italy
.
-, ,:z-- 4,--:,-..:,:-K,:,--,--- r---- --Y1;: ",;i;,
- By MAEDA BEDELL. k,::-.,:.-,, 140-::.::::::::Mi';i4fix:,:t.'4:-, '' -
..,,,,... :::i::::i,ii::i,:x:i,i,:,::... A .,...:; , shown between foreigner and native
, ..,,:,,,,,,,,,,,,:::-. , ,,LN-', there, which was particularly pleasing
-
Back From Studying - In
Naples Conservatolzy; lass
- Scala Makes Compans. oms
. By EMMA BEDELL.
'Back from "Sunny Italy." with a
diploma from the Royal Conservatory
of Music at Naples, and a store of in
teresting tales of her two years spent
there, is Miss Mary Scala of 8.5 Cen
ter street. Miss Scala is well known,
in musical circles in this city, having
studied here and in New Haven and
New York before she decidecl- on
further study in Italy, She .will be
'remembered for her excetlent solo
work in the choir of St. Augustine's
church, where she sang for a year
prior to Ilex trip abroad. -
But, like- all true Americans. Mary
was glad to get home again!
"Italy is - delightful; Naples is
especially interesting', but America. is
'home." she said; simply. -
"But I did enjoy my work there
and there is much about the Old
Worad -atmosphere that is pleasing.
The people for instance are so warm
hearted and kind. They - tried to
keep me from being homesick, but 1
fear they didn't, succeed very well,
fiir I r really did suffer from being
away from my own kind and kin.
- "The really -remarkable thing that
noticed. there Jo contrast to this
country was tbre tremendous advan
tages that are offered to. musicians.
The Conservatory,-for instance. opens
its doors to all. and for a-small sum
about three .dollars a monthhigh
grade 'instruction - may be obtain
ed. The conservatory is sup
,ported largely by the - Crown.,
which makes - possible tbe low
tuition. While all branches ott edu
cation - are taught in - the schools in '
Italy MUSIC iS given prominence, and
one may receive a splendid general
education and a musical education a-t
the sanae time.
Sing, in the Streets.
"Noples surely is musical." con
tinued Mies Scala. "At first I
Beach Capes Add Smartness to Seashore Styles '
a wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww,
, ,
,, ,
--,s4r If ,,t,,,,-, L ,, .
4 ' Allili k .
' ' ' ;.. 4Ait : . ' ' . . . : - ,
' . fss . - ' . - - . I
,....i.11"k f4---L4:;
VA A: ,,f,' '
i.e.,,S,,,,a4;1' . Vik.42tilliv-, :, 4 ..
I . k Nk ' -;-1-biti
In other days the seashore was a
place where people went to swim.
Those days apparently are past, for
the beach has become as much a
fashion parade ground as Fifth ave
nue. Beach carpes, mucth in vogue this
season. are one of the things that
have brought a change to bathing
scenery. They may be had in many
desig-ns and materials, taffeta with
gay design, soft woolly cap; of knit
materials, in all-white or in .thla,ck
and white and lined with American
beauty or jade green rubberized silk.
Then, too, there are capes suggestive
of ancient China. which hang in a
How To Be Happý, Thotigh ed
(By Irene. Castle - Trernan)
Some lessons in "How to be Hap
py Though Married" might be ob
tained from a story in a recest issue
of Photoplay Magazine, in which Irene
Castle, now Mrs. Robert Treman, sets
forth her views on the subject
through Ada. Patterson, the noted
magazine writer.
"To be happily married," says Miss
Castle, "at least one of the Parties
to the marriage must have a. beautiful
disposition. My husband has. In
consequence, we are supremely hap
py" "Fancy a man being so unselruh
that when he knows his wife is going
to dine that evening with another
man he sends hes a big bunch of or.
chide to wear. and a bottle of cham
pagne to add sparkle to the dinner!
'That Is what my husband does.
"There is his latest letter. I have
been away from horn three days, and
I have had six letters and telegrams,
and orchids every day. Vancy a. man
who, when some little disturbing in
cident occurs ,says to his wife: "Don't
be excited about it, dearest It will
make you ill and unhappy.' That is
what my husband does.
"No woman can scold such a man.
NO woman can quarrel with a man
who just looks adoringly at her and
smiles whatever she says. That is
what my husband does.
Fancy a man who, when his wife
grows restless and wants to go awaY
for a while says: 'Very well, dear.'
Even though business keeps him at
home. That is what my husband
does.
"When the bead of the Castle
School of Dancing came back from
London, she told me how interestec
England is in the dance, that it is
as deeply interested as this country
was seven years ago, and told me that
London wanted very much to see me
dance. I was interested. I had not
intended to dance again, but I had
not anticipated this. It would only
be for eight weeks. The amount of
fered for the engagement was flatter
ing. I talked to Captain Treman
about it He says: 'Of course I shall
miss you terribly, but if it will make
you happy I vrant you to go!"
"Mrs' can a woman feel toward Such
a man?. Grateful, of course, and
adoring! And no matter what her
temptations. shoe would never be
unfaithful -or insincere.
"4-...ilneatona;uir- ,Dersons-----mak--- -on
- - . , -
&ftiimio-
MISS -MARY SCALA.
couldn't get used to. the dkfference , But -she is well prepared to take
between Nevr York, for instance, and her place-in this ;splendid body, for
the city on the bay. ,People there go while in Naples she specialized in con
about the streets singing at the top cert pieces and operatic roles,- learn
of their lungs, if they want to, and ing thoroughly ten operas, which she
nothing. is thought of it. In New can sing in Italian, English, Spanish
York one would- prabably be arrested or French. Her instructor, the great
for doing the same thing. , Ferdinand De Lucia, whose tenor
"There is music everyivhere, for records are such favorites on Ameri
Latins are essentially musical. - can. phonographs, promises great
"I had the pleasure of singing in things for her.
concert at the Royal Gardens, a beau- Miss Scala's head has not -been
tiful concert hall in Naples, and sang turned however, -by all her good for
during my two years' stay at all the tune. She is loyal to Bridgeport and
concerts given by the pupils of the will give her first public recital here
Conservatory. There is no partiality .early in September.
145 Stratford Ave.Just Over the
Bridge
Genuine Panarnas in the rough
Direct from South Aznerica
made into your OWn style-
Ladles and Men 913 Old Petnamas
Bleached Natural Process- No
Acids Used
, By - A Hatter -
"But what I missed most of all,"
said Miss Scala, with a sndle, "was
our own American -ice cream. I am
especially - fond of it, and, as you
probably know it isn't made in Italy.
The nearest to it is what they - can
'cremolate, a - frozen eream mixture,
much coarser and not so well flavored
as our ice cream. This is sold in
'ertilk parlors,' and is rather expen
sive, as it carries a heavy luxury tax.
Milk, butter and cream are also sold
at these - parlors and - they are the
scenes of many neighborhood gather
ings." ' , '
. , .
. - Has Secured Engagement
Miss -Scala is more fortunate than
moert American girls who go over to
study, for she has come back with a
contract to sing next season with the
San Carlo Opera company, -and will
begin a tour of this country in Octo
ber. This ler a great honor for Miss
Scala, for she is 'the first American
girl to- be received into the organize
. tion; which is composed entirely of
Italian singers. .,
, . But - she is wen prepared to take
her place-in this -splendid body, for
while in Naples she specialized in con
cert pieces and operatic roles,- learn
ing thoroughly ten operas, which she
can sing- in Italian, English, Spanish
or French. Her instructor, the great
Ferdinand De Lucia, whose tenor
records are such favorites on Ameri
can. phonographs, promises great
L things for her
. Miss Scala's head bets not -been
turned however, -by all her good for
, tune. She is loyal to Bridgeport and
straight line from a piece stretched
across the shouMers.
The new fashion is well illustrated
by the beach cape shcrwn in the cen
ter by 'Helen Ray, playing the role of
"Intoxication" in "F.,xperience." 'rhe
cape, which is really only a. deep
purple cord tring-e, is a misleading
article of apparel, for it is little else
than ornament. the bathing suit be
ing visible beneath. The only sub
stantial element Is the darker hued
satin hood trimmed with exquisitely
desig-ned "worsted trimming ina Per
sian shades.
On Miss Ray's right is a. sketch of
a bathing- costume worn by Miss 'Ala
Lee, Paramount leading woman- The
write me: glow can you. endure the
quiet life of a. small town?'
"I not only endure it, I enjoy it
Tha,t life includes all the ;things that
are essential to my happiness.
"Ithaca is a town beautifully sit
uated. My love of beauty is fed by
the hils and woods about it Our
home is exactly -what I would have
chosen. It is a simple enough home
at Cayuga Heights, but it has one tre
mendously large room It was a lec
ture room. for the former owner. It
is sixty feet long We use it for a
living room, but it serves for dances
we want to give or for any sort of
assemblage we want to arrange in
our home.
"Of course Corneil College is at
Ithaca. 'That adds interest to tbe life
"For the first time in my life I
have ail the animals I want - I have
twelve dogs and four horses and a
village of birds.
"Friends ask rne what I do. am
busy all claY. There are irny house
hold dutie, and the care of the ani
mals. and am teaching dancIng to
one hundred and eight children in
Ithaca- They are children. -whose
parents cannot afford to send them
to dancing school. I teach them
twice a week.
"You remember the first time we
met? told you that as soon as the
dancing craze was over I wanted to
live in a small town and have chil
dren and have all the animal pets I
wanted? .1 am .realizing that ambi
tion. 'rhe children haven't come, but
there are the home and the small
town and the animals."
MEATH I
HATTER
14 -coftet..,..
ON Pi Llt
,outer piece of black taffeta might be
a.n apron instead of a saut7 beach
suit The slit over the 471 Do would
delight Miss Sixteen's heart, as the
ruffled bloomers and cap 8.re of bright
o-range -vrith huge stenciled circles
nr 'trimming.
Rivalling these is tbe suit sketched
on the left, another worn by Miss
Lee. This is of deep orange edged
with black. The bloomers are worn
to shcrw- The cap is black with art
.orange whirled ribbon. In this
Sketch -Miss Lee also wears a, cap of
thin, sea green rubberised- material.
This may be procured in lovely
shades ekt turguois, rose. blue and
jade moire.
LVCREASE IMPORTATIONS.
Paris, July 12.--Amt increase in the
exportations of wines and liquors
from France in the first quarter of
ads year as compared with-the same
period of 1913 is a surprising discov
ery. the meantime France has
lo-st two of her biggest customers for
wines and brandies. Itav,sia and the
-United States.
Of -the -brandies and liquors Ger
many took a:bout half. Arg-entina,
Turkey and England followed in that
order.
"Who Am I?" Is a title that indi
cates the confused state of the movie
mind
Elaine Hammerstein is announced
to appear in "When Youth Rebels."
she knows how to wield the slip
per there may tle one photoplay with
out the, flourish of an automatic.
--
"After Midnight" suggests the ad
vent of all-night moviesfrom which
deliver us.
THE trNiv-E-RsErf
SCHOOL -
- 8$ 6 VADIPIEW AVENUE
30th Year Begins- SepL 2Ist
...SUMMER SESSION
PRWATE WORK.
July 12 to SepL 2.
The Stratfield
CAFETERIA
OPEN DAILY 6 A- M.TO MID
NIGHT In This new and pgpular departure
we have embodied all of the su
perior features of &rat:field service
at its best
STRATFIELD HOTEL
P. A. CANTWELL; Mgr.
ZN
v
How "Art Titles" Are Made
.
"Prom sncrw-capped . Mountain 'ro getter "get over" the idea of clos-41.
peaks that pierce the clouds an ing time he might include in his lratt-1
opalescent -streazn of water tumbled orama, the plume of steam that leaps I
noisily into the valley like a bridal from the whistle when it shrieks the t
veil.'" . day's end.
, That-might be the opening- title of' No matter hcrw artistie an art titlel
a- photodrama flashed upon the -it must not be, allowed to violate or
encroach upon the sacred precinct of ,
screen in - conventional type. The
poetic description itself might please
you but let us visualize the letters the director. It must. never be more I
than. a misty background for the 1,.
gradually fading out on the eéreen printed word of the tile; yet in a flash, ,
and blending almost imperceptibly
into a. magnificent view of the verY
mountain peak as it sends forth a it must prepare the spectator for the I,
action that is to follow, give him a I
swiring torrent to baptize the multi- clearer understanding of the title 1
which may berso "gummed up" ovith t
colored peaks. How much more cf-. poetry as to be obscure., and Put him I
fective Is the title! - in complete psychological sympa,thy I
, -.vim -..-.., ni-i-1.,. iv..ntiv At,-,-,-pr whom he I
Making -titles which describe pic
torially the words, is the function of
the Art Title department at any large
studio---just one of the departments
which-contribute so much to the ar
tistry of a production.
- Let tis assume that a sequence of
photodrama deals with the teeming
rush of a. great city at night-fall.
The title, as projected on the screen,
might read:
"Among those thousands who wear
ily take their homeward way when
the factories pour forth their human
cogs was Sally Simper."
It would be obviously wrong to
show a peaceful valley or our-waterfall
for that title!
Instead, Elmer E. Sheeley, head of
the Art Title department at Univer
sal Chy, would take a. cameraman to
the industrial district and record,
vrith soft focus and the romantic dif
fusion of modern photography, the
gaunt skyline of the factory belt;
shadowy stacks standing out bleakly
against a cold gry sky: a wisp of
!moketrailing sullenly over the city.
AMUSEMENT CALENDAR
A DAILY FEATURE
POETSVaudeville headliner, "In Argentina,' a novelt3r singing and dame
ing act; feature picture, "Decepti on," the story of the love of Henry
the Eighth for Anne Boleyn, and how it turned to hatred. Feature on
- at 3:30, 7:30, 10. Orchestra. dir ected by Samuel Davey.
EMPIREFeature, Viola Dana in "The Off-Shore Pirate," a romance filled -
with the tang of the sea. Feature on at 2:30, 4:15, 6:30, 8, 9:15- Orches
tra. directed by Charles S. Fcrrett.
WEST END--State street and Clinton avenue. Featm-e, Emily Stevens
and Montagu I,ove in the "The Place of -Honeymoons," airomance with
a thrill in it Feature on at 7, 9. Organ music.
ELITEMain and Charles streets. Feature, Priscilla, Dean In "'Reputa
tion," in which this matchless star takes a.dual role splendidly. Fea
ture on at 7, 9. Organ music.
AMERICANEast Main and Jane streets. All-star cast in-"To Please One
Woman," andit is interesting to watch how it is done. Feature on at
7, 9. Organ -music.
CAPITODMilford. Feature, Otis Skinner in '"Kismet," a Story that brings
the Arabian Nights to the screen. Feature on at 2:30, 7:15, 1. Organ
music, Albert F. Brown, organist. Solo every night by Arther Lavas
seur, tenor.
ATLAS TURKISH BATHSLadies' Day today. Swirmating and massage.
PICEASITRE BEACHDancing and amusements. , t,
FAIRFIELD BEACHDancing at the Pavilion.
le----r
tell. The Wo..rld
If ,you ghave a complaint or a.
grievance or a criticism, let's hear
it! Get it off your chest and
you'll feel better!
If Alice Brady wears an even
ing gown when she should have
donned' a sports shirt tell us
about it If Bill Hart wears a
sherifrs shield over his right ,
breast in one scene and in the
next over his heart and you
have noticed it, tell the world, -
through us.
If the hero climbs a soety
chimney, only to emerge spotless
at the top, tell us about it.
A section of this column will
be devoted to YOU! Who knows?
Perhaps the producers will hear
your wails and resolve to do bet
ter. Your's for film perfection,
THE EDITOR.
In the play "Passion," which played
here recently, Pala Negri starts from,
the millinery shop with a hat-hpx
covered with diamond-shaped figures,
yet when she arrives. at the buyer's
house the diamonds have changed to,
stars. Some magic!
krri-Len, WILD,
Kossuth street.
EMPIRE.
Ilrnished to the last tolrell, asprkle
with brilliant character play, uproari
ous with funsuch are the , slight
adumbrations to describe one's im
pression of Viola. Dana in "The Off
shore Pirate," the Metro special pro
duction which had its first shownag
yesterday at the Empire theatre
Everÿone who came to the picture
knew they were going to ba 'treated
to something exCeptional, for Viola
Dana, the irrepressible, lovely actress,
is supreme in artistry
Photoplay News Briefs
Anetha Getwell is a screen queen
and not a case of illness.
Ralph Ince -will direct William Fa
versham in Galsworthy's "Justice.",
"Shadows of tbe Sea." will soon
cast Conway 'rearle's shadow On the
screen. -
Even "Fatty" Arbuckle hesitates.
His next picture asks "Should a Man
Marry?"
'Eugene O'Brien has Winifred West
over to help him decide "Is Life
Worth Living?"
0,0,...4,0,...140
gE M P I RE(
ii Continuous 1:30 to 10:30 ,
0
TODAY AND WED.
0 Tlik; ranEsisTEREE
it VIOLA DANA
VIOLA DANA
d VIOLA DANA P'
The Off-Shore Pirate
0 ComedyUniversal News U,
ONCIPNONCE5gRak Naignik41
Dancing Tonight
Fairfield Beach -
Pavilion
Every Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday.
, D. C. Quilty, Manager
2-4-6 tf
DancinaPleasure
5 Beach Daily
Ferries From i Stratford Bridge
Dock A- 31L to 12 P. AL
ELITE
Main & Chas. Sts.
Tel. N. 1092
7 :00 TONIGHT 9:00
PRISCILLA DEAlst
- in. Reputation
Stuart Paton's tremendous drama.
of woman against woman..
ing -time he-might include in his Pare'l
orama the plume of steam that leaps
from the whistle when it shrieks the t
day's end.
No matter hcrw artistie an art titlel
it must not be, allowed to violate or -
encroach upon the sacred precinct of ,
the direetor. It must. never be more
than. a misty background for the 1,.
printed word of the tile; yet in a flash, ,
it must prepare the spectator for the I,
action that is to follow, give him a
clearer understanding of the title
which may berso "gummed up" ovith t'
poetry as to be obscure., and Put him I
in complete psychological sympathy I
with poor little Sally Simper whom he I
will next see leaving the unsaver! I
factory.
One might xeasonably ask:
If Sheeley uses his film photograrth.1
ing the factory, how is he going to,
get the printed words into the same
picture?
That is one of the things that any-.
one conoerned thb making of rao
tion pictures ca,n explain in eight or
ten thousartd words most of which
cannot even be proncrunced.
Actually Archer makes the photo-,-
graph of the factory ort all of the t
film except a little rectartgle In the '
exact center. That is covered with a l
small mask. Before he develops the -
picture- of the factory he will photo
IgraPh a card upon which the title is
printed and the letters will just ex- ,
actly occupy the space left 'vacant for
the purpose by the mask
Of course there are variations of -
this such as double and triple expos
ures and fades and dissolves and irises
and all the other tricks known to aril
mated photography, but the usual -
way Is described above.
ITEM COMEDIAN LEAILNS
PrtoirrBrrioN- METHOD
OF 13-1MIOVENTG srEav
Hughie Cameron, who in real life
is the personification of Murphy. the
role he interprets in Thomas Mei
ghan's latest Paramount piActure,
"Cappy nicks," has gained a. reputa
tion for wit But he met his match
the otber night Freddie Howard, a.
comedian.-
Cameron had barked his shin, and
to protect the broken skin ha,d cov
ered the bruise with a thin -plaster.
The injury had healed, but the plas
ter, after the manner of its kind.
clung- to him like a. brother. It was EL
hot night and the shin covering was
uncomfortable.
"Freddie," asked Ca,maron of his
friend, "I've got a plaster on my shin;
I can't buy alcohol to soak it off; how
lad 11 I remove it?"
"Raffle it off!" flashed- back Freddie.
TOMORROW
ILF.AD ABOUT
CAME-BA THAT raus:
ON THIS PAG!
COOL AND COMPORTApLE
Last Night Another Packed
House
COMB EARLY
NOW PLAYING
DECEPTION
A Veritable Triumph
SEE
The cast of 7,000.
SE:E
King Henry, the Eighth of
England, "the world's worst
husband." ,,,
SEE
Beautiful Anne Boleyn
who won a. crown and lost
her' head.
SEE
Archbishop Crammer who
gxanted Henry the Eighth
the first divorce in England,
a. decree that has rever
berated throug-h the cen
turies. SEE
Cardinal Woolsey who re:
fused Henry a divorce.
SE:E
Cathedrals, Abbeys, t h e
streets of merliaeval London
and the quaint customs of
that ,strange historical
period. ,
SEE
-Spectacles. Tournaments,
Festivals that beggar description.
See This gaet-Pioture arid
You'll Never Forget It!
The Mridgeport 'Telegram Sa3rs:
AS an historical. contribution,
if for no other reason. "De
ception" holds high place among
screen offerings but there are
many, many other reasons why
it will prove an extraordinary
popular success.
Supreme Vaudeville
"IN ARGENTINA"
A Spanish Musical offering, a.
real and costly "act different"
with beautiful and genuine
senoritas, syncopated. melody
and colorful scenic effects.
ADDED ATTRACTION
EDDIE FOYER
The Ilan of .1,000 Poems
News--Other Good Acts
1 RSDAY, FRIDAY,
SA'rITRDAY
JACK NORWORTH
rN PERSON -
The Fatuous Musical Comedy
Star will head Poll's Vaudeville
Rill. ,
,
ti
4.-
k
- b
it..
,
EMPIRE, I
t cue Iowa running with the other wraorsmpnee portraytel. The Pilgrim
In oth cia the h eft ht I' f et h d
er ys seas ore was a ale- me rom a elece str c e -outer Diego of black taffeta might be
acyrobsse nth , COOL ANTS COMFORTABLE,
'74-thing would mark her all the more tilers themselves then appear-, at
ThDu on'? wbirtibiliafnutn charcanctearreVatyllemprsonagrnt . ,, 1 Ilocuse. Ly .
houMers en apron instead of a sauc7 beach
: terriblyheel sae that all right But Scroo,by, planning their migration ato Place where people went to swine.
i etnbleettohleerralannedes.anadndbolsnatietrabetyn.joying
e - rth tomorrow to look after some Next comes the departure from the beach b b o as much a tbeyn tbhye beeunh
a sf hien is well ilu ated t. The slit over the eri would
Reweave psibaczn in ethneniceeno-f nduel,igebdt blLss eSbars aenedn'esaphaeraertotabsrigthbet wl
lextished to the laet touch, asprkle 4 least Night Another Packed
Pe a
Those days apparently are past, for
41,1'-vett eyoenne kpenosselaL iulanynieuf Nkeedepninggoihinmg
.
,,-.' that I'm sure adjoins Pat's Delftehaven for the New World, fol- fashion parade ground as Fifth ave- "Intoxication" in elexperience." 'The orange, -with huge stenciled circles adumbrations to describe one's im
- - teesropeae pression of Viola. Dana- in "The Off- , NOW PLAYING
Fholdings. AnYwaY theY can travel lowed by the signing' of the Compact nue. cape, which is really only a. deep fer trimming.
And in the cabin of the MaYflower, the Beach carpes, mucth in vogue this purple cord tringe, is a misleading Rivalling these is the suit sketched ehore Pirate." the Metro special pro- '
etogether for about 12 hours.
ductiort which had its first showing
I., husky old guy-would be a tonic landing of Provincetown, on the ties season. are one of the things that article of apparel, for it is little else on the left, another worn by Miss
,iierend a-saving grace fpor tit:Lyon Hell of Crepe Cod on November 25, 1620, have brought a change to bathing than ornament. the bathing suit be- Lee. This is of deep orange edged yesterday at the Empire theatre. li
-cture DEcEpTioN .
ri,--see to the fin 1 I .cl t Plymouth, the acenery. They may be had in many ing visible beneath The only sub- with black. The bloomers are worn Everÿone who came to the pi
' -1;look out for -your a a an mg a . a 'treated -
dealings with the Indians hardships desig-ns and materials, taffeta with stantial element is the darker hued to shcrw- The cap is black with art knew they were going- to b
r that2.h, X ."' I sighed comlfortabbe of the first winter and the. return of gay design, soft woolly caeae of knit satin hood trimmed with exquisitely orange whirled ribbon. In this to something exeeptional, for Viola .
materials, in seil -white or in black designed worsted trimming in. Per- s'ketch 'Miss Lee also wears a, cap of Dana, the irrepressible, lovely actress, . , A Veritable Triumph
' eteel feel so much better already. I the Mayflower, leaving behind the
better than and white and lined with American sian shades. thin, sea green rubberized- material. is supreme in artistry. e
like masculine brains remnants of the little Pilgrim band. e SEE , ,
' erninin youe's better than mine. Two more scenes of Pilgrim life in
f
Lyra
y. Prom this day on Pert going eT
vmcruth and in one Governor Brad- beauty or ja,de green rubberized silk. On Miss Ray's right is a. sketch of This may be procured in lovely
Then, too, there are capes suggestive a bathing- costtrme worn by Miss 'Ala shades at turquois. rose. blue and Phatoplay News Briefs e
:);"
-- SE:E
The cast of 7,000.
of ancient China. which hang in a Lee, Paramount leading woman. The jade moire. Anetha Getwell is a screen queen ,
to cut out trYing to run things and ford is seen writing his chronicles. King Henry, the Eighth of
-- 4-let Jim do, it. I amI swear itt I The other lights se higher and in t and not a case of illness. England, "the world's worst
e LaCILEASE EIEPOILTATIONS.
almost erazy with fear a,bout Pat. swifter succe ssion are revealed . Ralph Ince -will direct William Fa- .,,e, husband." e
,
And novr Ten all reassured. I like Washington, Lincoln and Roosevelt ow To Be Happy, Though rilarned Paris, July 12.Au increase in the
exportations of wines and liquors versham in Galsworthy's "Justice.", , . 411'
"Shadows of tbe Sea." will soon -- SEE
peening ore you." , A warlike clash in the orchestra and
l , "I like having you lean on me,' the rulers of modern Germany, Tur- from France in the ftrst quarter of cast Conway Tearle's shadow on the (e Beautiful Anne Boleyn
i
this year as compared with-the same who won a. crown and lost k
screen. .
, esaid Jim, suiting action to word. T
"-'m key, Austria and Bulgaria. cross the (By Irene. Castle - Treman) period. of 1913 is a surprising discov- Even "Fatty" Arbuckle hesitates. ' her' head
- e-darn glad TUnCIO Ned be,uled me out stage. Out in the harbor a. light '
of the office and then let me come
glows on the Mayflower. Convoyed
lo-st two of her biggest cuetomers for maya,
Some lessons in 'How to be Hap-write me: 'How can you. endure the wines and brandies. Rneeie and the 'Eugene O'Brien has Winifred West' -
ery. In the meantime France has sEE '
- borne early. He's going to 'phone me by the Pilgrims and the Dutch, the His itext picture asks "Should a Man
, Archbishop Crammer who
tat dinner time on a matter" forty-eireit state flags are brought in granted Henry the -Eighth '
-United States.
might he oe,.. quiet life of a. small town?' over to help him decide "Is Life Nil
' , Jim's voice- became remote and view. -The voice from the rock py Though Married" the first divorce in England,
- -Irebusiness" came glowering into the cries,. eatned from a story in a recest iseue "I not only endure it, I enjoy it Olt -the -brandies and liqmors Ger- worth living?"
- I, a. decree that has rever
t room to shut zne -out and to give me "The path of the Mayflower must of Photoplay Magazine, in which Irene That life includes all the ;things that many took a:bout hale Arg-entina,
. -, berated throug-h the ceri
, again the queer feeling of jealousy I be keet open!" Castle, now Mrs. Robert Tiernan, sets are essential to my happiness. Turkey and England followed in that 0 ovesakoNisontko
turies.
eiad knovin a little while before.
One final chorus, with pageant forth her views on the subject "Ithaca. is a town beautifully sit- order.
-
''
- , SEE
uated. My love of beauty is fed by
- Then Jim continued. ground and harbor ablaze with light, through Ade. Patterson, the noted
. e "Just to ease both. our minds, then the stage darkens. Only the magazine wrtter. the hils and woods about it- Our "Who Ani I?" is a. title that indi- PE m p 1 RE ,
home is exactly -what I would have cates the confused state of the movie 0 Cardinal Woolsey who re:
fused Henry a divorce. '
, tekowever, Pm going to ca-II Pat and light On the Mayflower remains. From "To be happily married," says Miss
chosen. It is a simple enough home mind.
, t en-range to see lain this evening-- '''', SEE
the rock come the immortal words of Castle, "at least one of the parties
at Ca,yuga Heights, but it has one tre- , Continuous 1:30 to 10:30
, t.rnight even bave dinner with him ----- -
Lincoln, combined from separate ut- to the marriage must have a. beeutiful -4
0 Cathedrals, Abbeys, t h e
mendously large room. It was a lec- Elaine Hammerstein is announced .
' 'tits darn lonely and morbid eating teraeces: disposition. My husband has. In,
tusee room. for the former owner- It to appear in "When Youth Rebels." streets of meeiaeval London I
, , k alone all the eime." The latter part . and the quaint customs of
-with malice tcrward none and consequence, we are supremely bap- TODAY AND WED. --
is sixty feet lona We use it for a ef she knows how to wield the sliP
,of Isis' sentemce Jim said almost to charity for all, it is for us to resolve eV" t h a t -strange bistorical
1:himself as if coming to a decision, he that this nation under God shall have "'Fancy a man being so unselresh living room, but it serves for dances per there may be one photoplay with- 0
we want to give or for any sort of out the, ilourish of an automatic. Ttial IRRESISTIBLE , period.
et-urned to me: a, new birth of freedom." -.... . that when he knows his wife is going - '
assemblage we want to arrange in ---- s SEE
:ea- -"Tell 'you what Prn going to do, to dine that evening with another VIOLA. DANA
our home. , -Spectacles, Tournaments,
"After Midnighte suggeste the a,d
Vent of all-night movies--trom which
0 , Festivals that beggar des
?little lady. Ill date Pat up for a mart he sends bey a big bunch of or..
' I stag dinner tonight if he's free. You ONEIDA INDIANS EN
--
chids to wear. and a bottle of chant- "Of eourse Cornell College is at
deliver us.
P cription.
-, i know bow it - is--men cart talk so PLAN CELEBRATION pagne to add sparkle to the dinner! Ithaca. That adds interest to the life The Off-Shore Pirate ( -,-
- t,enuch more frankly when there's no That Is what zny husband does. "For the first time in my life I e See This Fema-Picture and
- third party-around." eThere is his latest letter. X have have a,U the anlinfiLIS I want - I have ,- TELE UNIVERS .- 0 CsmedYUniversal News
-- :' "At th-at eehird party" I had a bad Green Bay, Wise July 12Oneida been away from home tbree days, and twelve dogs and four horses and a ' - You'll Never Forget It!
titime tok-eep from wincing or crying indians elan a centennial homecom- I have had six letters and telegrams, village of birds. . SCHOOL ' ONCIPElikeNCOSSPie 1; Nizeinkola
The Bridgeport Telegram Satrsie
, (0042t a proteet. Nor did it please me ing celebration here in August to aed orchids every day. yancy a. man eyriends ask rne what I do. I am ' 836 lb-AraprEaza AvENtrz
' ip-to amve Jim forget - that if it was mark the hundredth anniversary of who, when some little disturbing in- busy all deers There are eny house- 30th Year B .ns Se
egl , pL 2Ist Dancirtg Tonight AS an historicaL contribution,
' 1.1ortely eating a. solitary meal, I the coming of the Oneida Indtans to cident occurs says to his wife: 'Don't hold dutie, and the care of tbe ani- if for no other reason. "ate
tewouldret faztcy being doomed te that Wisconsin after they bad been crowd- be excited about it, dearest It will mala and I am teaching dancing to SUMMER SESSION Fairfield Beach ception" holds high place among '
. estate. I choked down etre Petty feel- ed out of their hunting and fishing make you ill and unhappy.' Tha-t is one htmdred and eight children In PRIVATE WORK. - screen offerings but there are
' . ings, since all that counted wa-s saving grounds in New York state. what my husband does. Ithaca- They are children. -whose July 12 to SepL 2. . Pavilion maxty, many other reasons why
1 Pat. When they settled here in the 'fall "No woman can se-old such a man. parents cannot afford to send them el it will prove an extraordinary
Arter a. few minutes' low-voiced of 1821 this part of the country was No woman can quarrel with a man to dancing scheol. I teach them - Every Tuesday Thursday 0. popular success-
who just looks adoringly at her and twies a week. 4 :z f 131
' ecorrversatien ever the eeleehone Jim a. vast wilderness with few white set
',turned to me with a complacent: tlerS. smiles whatever she says. That is "You remember the first time we
what my husband does. Me Stratfield and Saturday. e' , Supreme Vaudeville
"Now it's all fixed. You needn't Several thousand Indians are ex- met? e told you that as soon as the , D. C. Quilts', Manager
'4-worry about Pat any longer. I'll pected for the celebration which Fancy a man who, when his wife dancing craze was over I wanted to . 2-4-6 tf . ?swl
. 6 tIN ARGENTINA',
t shave and clean trp a birt, and if the takes place Aug. 1 to 5. The Meno- grows restless and wants to go away live in a small town and have chil
for a while says: 'Very well, clear.' dren and have all the animal pets I .
1,xitessage from. Uncle Ned -hasn't conae minees, Chippewas, Stockbridges,
Even though business keeps him at wanted? A ,.. -;
, ; by the 'time I leave, I'll trust you
I e A Spanish Musical offering, a .
Munsees, Brothertowns, Pottawata
a eto take it- Only be sure to get it I am realizing that ambi
home. That is what my husband tion. The children haven't come, but Pleasure n 1 real and costly -act different"
mies and Canaeian Oneidas I
are eke
I 'l etraight" does. OPENDAILY 6 A- el.TO MID. re with beautiful and genuine
ed for in great number. there are the home and the small
- - (To Be- Continued) "When the bead of the Castle town and the a-rarnals." - NIGHT Beach II
ally ,, senoritas, syncopated. melody
- Old Indian customs will be observ-
, ' and colorful scenic effects.
- - ed. Indian gaixtes will be played and Schoo of Da
I tieing came back f om
London, she told me how interestr ect en-, . , ,
In This new and popular departure Dancing
t . , ILNVE2eTS NEW PLAN-E.. Ferries From i Stratford Bridge ,e, ;
an Indian council will be held. we have embodied aU of the sia.
. England is in the dance, that it is
rif .--- ---- MEATH perior features of Stratfield service Dock 8 A., lIL to 12 P. 211. ' ADDED ATTRACTION - ;
, PI 1
Itorae. July 12.An airplane cape- This centennial celebration may be as deeply interested as this untry
the Oneida-s' first and last to be held, was seven years ago, and told me that at its best
;- eble of landing 'without the need of a
as the Indians are rapidly forgetting London wanted very te--------e-y-s--ee, i,,,e. EDDIE FOYER - -
L Vaarge,eviation 1301d, able to rise with- much to see me 4'--- ....,,'--- -----esa-----AA TIM ' STRATFIELD HOTEL la Thelelan of .1.000 Poems $
( tout a long run heforehmed, able to their old ways and are entering- com- dance. I was interested. I had not , e e -e,leeee4ee,e're
mercial and business life of every intended to dance again, but I had - -- - ------e------ , .
- rel. more than 30 miles an hour HATTER 1. P' A' CANTWELL; Mgr. T E . ; Pethe News--Other Good Acts
f' A .
, WWI, ir necessary, to meamier along coramunitY. not anticipated this. It would only ,
I t
at but a few Millen Arl hoar, Is an- Personal invitations will be extend- be for eight weeks. The amount of
t teesmeee ,ae the invention of een Rat- ed by the Indians to President Hard- fered for the engagement was fleeter
., -Oran engineer, Eparainonda Berticei, of Mg, Commissioner of Indian Affairs ing. I talked to Captain Treman
e says: 'Of course I shall
145 Stratford Ave.Just Over the- -
Bridge 7 E La I
Main & Chas. Sta. Tel. N. 1092 s
,, ' THURSDAY, FRIDAY, :
, - SATURDAY ,
1
Genuine Panamas in the rough.
I- i Ramie Burke and Governor Blaine of Wis- about it H DO", ' 11 tt b 51 7:00 es,
., TONIGHT 9:00 -: JACK NORWORTH
t :,-.. Therinveritorynacleber3tes that ate already consin. miss you terribly, but if it will make Direct from South America-- '
t.
on. asexual scale you happy I vrant you to go!" made into your OWn style. - PRISCILLA DEAN -
1
I lend regards his first exPerierients as "Take It or Leave It" is a film-title "Haw can a woman feel toward uch Ladies and Metes Old Pennines D A II . 4 Eli
mi , s ,,, . . -
t
t , indica-lave of the-success of the inven- that gives the efans" id
w e latitude a man?. Grateful. s- - , - The Famous Musical CoinetlY , 0
f - tion- The new machine. primarily is for freedom eteection. - adorixtg! And no znatter what her --Acids Used" .- - - m Reputation Star will head Pell's Vaudeville
i eintendedeemeaseriat warechasing and - temptations, save would never be
of course. and Blescbed Natural PrOCeSS No
- Vela ' fit, AV t416 a !i;e4 e'llt Stuart Paton's tremendotia-drarna. Bin - e ' ' , '
I laaars bearterterie -11,1f1Pwa..tatnmohinctftarnds. A , 11,-0,14-1,,P,a .,..4......4-...-....,-...s - 111v . A TInftpr - , ...- 41410 ,
, T tat dinner time on a matter-- forty-ele,ht state flags are brought in '13Int3 lessmis in l'It'W 1" .nt' j'Ia.1" " I "" III. r-IL'IV- C.
' 2, Jim's voice- became remote and view. -The voice from the rock py Though Married" might be ob quiet life of a. sn
- le"business" came glowering into the cries,. 'Mined from a story in a recest issue "I not only enc
Tha,t life includes
t roora to shut me out and to give me "The path of 4he Mayflower must of Photoplay Magazine, in which Irene
set, are essential to m7.
again the queer feeling of jealousy I be keot open!" Castle, now Mrs. Robert Treman,
, "Ithaca. is a to
ibad knovin a little while before. One final chorus, with pageant forth her views on the subject
tinted.. My love c
- Then Jim continued. ground and harbor ablaze with light, through Ada. Patterson, the noted
the hills and woo
' "Just to ease both. our minds, then the stage darkens. Only the magazine writer.
home is exactly N
, ribowever, Pm going to call Pat and light On the Mayflower remains. From "To be happily married," says Miss
chosen. It is a si
. f terrange to see him. this evening-- the rock come the immortal words of Castle, "at least one of the parties
at Cayuga Heights,
- t, 'night even have dinner with him Lincoln, combined from separate ut- to the marriage must have a. beautiful
mendously large r4
' ' Irs darn iorvely 8.nd morbid eating
t terances: disposition. My husband has. In
ture room. for the
k alone all the time." The latter part "-with
malice tcrward none and consequence, we are supremely I.Lap
' ,of Ids' sentemee Jim said almost to charity for all, it is for us to resolve PY" is sixty feet long.
living room, but i
!,Iiimself as if coming to a decision, he that this nation under God shall have "Fancy a man being so unselruh
we want to give
'turned to me: a, new birth of freedom." '
-,, that when he knows his wife is going
assemblage we tv
:4,-,- -"Tell 'you what Pm going to do, to dine that evening with another
our home.
?little lady. I'll date Pat up for a
ONEIDA INDIANS man he sends bey a big bunch of or,.
' I stag- dinner tonight if he's free. You chids to wear. and a bottle of chain- "Of eolirse Corr
- i know bow it is--men cart talk so PLAN CELEBRATION pagne to add sparkle to the dinner! Ithaca. That addv
-- ranch more frankly when there's no 'That is what zny husband does. "For the first
- third party-around." "There is his latest letter. I have have all the antm
- :' "At th-at -"third party"' I bad a bad Green Bay, Wis., July 12Oneida been away from home three days, and twelve dogs and
titirne to.k-eep from wincing or crying inaians plan a centennial homecom- I have had six letters and telegratris, village of birds.
100.1:rt a protest- Nor did it please me ing celebration here in August to arid orchids every day. Varicy a. man "Friends ask In f
: IP' tO azave Jim forget that if it was mark the hundredth anniversary of who, when some little disturbing in- busy 8.11 clay. Tb
Vortely eating a. solitary meal, I the coming of the Oneida Indians to cident occurs says to his wife: "Don't hold dutie, and t
- -.wouldn't fancy being doomed to, that Wisconsin after they had been crowd- be excited about it, dearest It will mals. and I am t
. estate. I choked clown rue Petty feel- ed out of their hunting and fishing make you ill and unhappy.' That is one btmdred and
' 1, Irma, since all that counted was saving grounds in New York state. what my husband does. Ithaca They art
i Pat. When they settled here in the 'fall "No woman can scold such a man. parents cannot af
Arter a. few minutes' low-voiced of 1821 this part of the country was No woman can quarrel with a man to dancing' school.
who just looks adoringly at her and twicw a week.
' 'reorrversation over the telePhere Jim a. vast wilderness with few white set
1 turned to me with a complacent: tlerS. smiles whatever she says. That is . "You remember
what my husband does.
l "Now it's all fixed. You needn't Several thousand Indians are ex- met? I told you
, worry about Pat any longer. I'll pected for the celebration which Fancy a man who, when his wife dancing craze wat
grows restless and wants to go away live in a small tc
t shave and clean ma a bit. and if the takes place Aug..1. to 5. The Meno
,txnessage from. Uncle Ned -hasn't conae minees. Chippewas, Stockbridges, for a while says: 'Very well, dear.' dren and have all
1, ;by the 'time I leave, I'll trust you Even though business keeps him at wanted? I am .r
Munsees, Erothertons, Pottawata
. tto take it- OTI1Y be sure to get it home. That is what my husband eon. 'rthi childrei
mies and Cansaian Oneidas look
:"I straight" does. there are the ho
ed for in great number
- (To Re- Continued) "When the bead of the Castle town and the alai
School of Dancing e b r
Old Indian customs will be observ
, . ed. Indian games will be played and ack f om
London, she told me how interested
I -- , ENVE2CIS NE'W PLANE,
an Indian council will be held
, -, -;, . . . . England is in the dance, that it is
This centennial celebration may be as deeply interested as this. country e.......-,
t Rome. July 12.--An airplane capa- z,,
the Oneida-s' first and last to be held, was seven years ago, and told me that ff(17-----
,-- vbie of landing- 'without the need of' a
as the Indians are rapidly forgetting London wanted very much to see me
k L.4argo..aviation 1301d, able to rise with- -,-.A1.
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