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The Bridgeport times and evening farmer. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1918-1924, July 13, 1921, Image 8

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051227/1921-07-13/ed-1/seq-8/

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Thumbnail for Page Eight

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, - , Page Eight . ,-,,,i .
AMUSEMENT ' -., PAGE ' - - zummull: , - 3veaues. ,"Y, JlaY 434921 I -, '., .
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-
N . - rel ,
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A . . -
H o 1 ds World's , Championship filariet Saves 1 . ,
.. - .
Wit
-----' en ir ,.
,
Burial Record ' .
. . . -
, ,,
Couple Of Lives! I
m ,
ci rries .
ts,. , . .
, , -SatturdaYsafternom on 'rod ',rasa Iburied" ,, - I -.
I By,ANN - . .
T7S-"' - 1 Famous Movie Director ari.,,,
.... tedadtIe entire gcompany for -vie-- A True Story ., - -1------ ---:;:t!ze7, ... 4,--4---, l',
14, J Buried Alive in 1lany luting the Sabbath, made them . ' .4., X
-'7' -f."-- -,4-,!.. - ------7------ -s.- ---n,' --:' 4 z . ,
., -
.,,,-:--7-.-.7r.-4:- - , .s. lk:'--..',-.-..:,, I - E
fund the receipts of the previous day .
.f. . ---.... e- , '
Page Eight
IMIOM
'N
:Mien A Girl
Marries
By,ANN Ta'nrAv',
i
' (Continued) ' '
, ,
.
CHAPTER CCCIOCII.
- The message from Uncle Ned didn't
come until I had finished 1:117 solitary
meal. and then it was not directly
, from him. but a second-hand affair
from someone who reported over the
wire. -
"Mr. Pettingill says he will call Mr.
;Harrison first thing in the-morning
-and wards him to be ready."
''. ' "Read 3r for what?" I asked vrith
- metrical curiosity. -
' , "Can't sal'. ma'am.," was the laconic
' .repl3r. "That's all -Mr. Pettingill said
!That he 'wanted Mr. Harrison. to be
ireapdy."
' Again came the consciousness that
I was---in the very nature of things
-' i --abut out from most of Jimat bus
Iltrs life. It made me realize how.
dittle aim needed me in comparison
'to mY growing need of him
"A woman's only in the way- half
the time" I said to myaelf sadly.
7 "'Virhen it comes to settling things
- with Pat. Jiro can do better without
: 7116- Even his homely secretary,
L Miseohlevirus, is in his confidence on
a lot of raatters he wouldn't dream
- of talking over with me And now
I bees drifting into iome aort of inti
' 'Mae"' Verb Uncle Ned in which I can't
, :share.." -
An I was wondering if in all the
',world there WOO another woman. who
' qelt as useless and as left out in the
.cold Hedwig came to announce that
Miss-Phoebe-,and Mr. Neal had run in
,
itor a. minute.
"My blessed Neal!" I said to my
self, happy at. this interruntion of my
iclull everting. And I hurried. out to
.greet 7113, guests. ,
.- ParobablY tliere was - a. shade more
- wazinth in t32e hug I gave my be
loved brother than in the kiss I bad
:for Phoebe- I hadn't forgotten the
' ltroch al Val's from which I was
cardtted, and t suppose I vras just as
. muchrtiffed at-Phoebe for going wttlt--
, ma ma as I was at Val for failing
to ask,me. Anyway, Neal must have
.osertnecl-tbe shades and degrees hi, m3"
traanner, for he promptly flung a. pro
' ' tecttve etrnaabout Phoebe ag ite. cried
wills boybh pride:
"Doman my . Phrtebekins look
;great. Anne? Weve got a new way
- tat wearing our hair. we have,. And
i it,7rtotoil. a large-sized hit at the partY
'Vaasa. Take off your hat, honey-girl
, and show Arnie."
Phoebe gtggled and removed her
' !lad. -displaying hair drawn back from
- bar forehead and scalloped out over
ther cheeks in a mode I detest, but
(which certairpla beep:tines Phoebe and
'intakes-her pansy-face look mcpre like
, a baby'a than ever.
"If you aren't cunning!" I ex
; claimed. forcing- myself to add. "I'll
tbet you were the chief charmer of
i 'the luncheon. Who Wag, there. dear?"
, "Just Mrs. Cosby and two ador
able girls named Willoughby. They
I are twins, daughters of someone she
, knew out at home. 'Thera COnle Ork
! to tr3r for-a. place on the -concert stage
! and Mrs. Pettingill, whom Mrs. Cosby
sa3rs you know very vrell is chaperon
ing them."
"Wasn't Aunt Molly Pettingill
there?" I asked
"No. Mrs. Cosby- said it was a 'kid
party,' and that she herself didn't
belong.'" giggled Phoebe.
I felt greatly relieved. . ,
"We came in to see about another
., party," broke in Neal. "ancathen well
have to rim along. Got tickets for
one of the Smart:ter shows."
--- N -"Does Virgrinia. know you're outr'
I asked. '
, "She's almost decent about Neal,"
replied Phoebe bitterly. "At least
. she bids him the time -of day when
she passes hira in the apartment
. Ever Sine that dreadful night here
she seems aware that Neal's a per
sonI auppose it was because he
made me go, hornet with her and treat
t ed her ea politely aa if she weren't
t behaving- like a fiend."
"A. fieral' I broke in- "jim calls
! her- -that. too."
, "'A ,fiencl," repeated Neal hnpa
' tient13C. "Can't any of you see she's
eatingher heart out? She looks more
like ea..ghost. But down. to business,
ladies. Tomorrow-a-light's a very lin
portantaoccaosion. 'Docrtorrow being
- though atou pay -so little attention to
tt, Mrs. Harrisonmy dear sister
Bahl:mien birthday. So- Miss- Phoebe
and I here invite you to the swellest
, the town affords. Everting
toga toad. eile.nd attervrards a. look
, be mt. any-tallow you -want to -see- May-weed
better-oonsalt aim about that
. es differ, You know."
' I "How darling -of you."' Marled. "
. akin'. think a soul but Jim would
my birthdayand he gave
- inesny-aprosent weeks ago.but I've not
- it mrtiltorright. the eve of my
. , "
,
, I heklaant-the tranclatm which my
laang nestled. and I got enough
' praise and admiration to suit me
latrt, then Neal insisted on consulting
.Threttboutrwhat show-we'd wee, and so
- I hail to aaratwer -the question I was
trying :to evade, though I hardly
r
knew attar"He's-
oupbon business,' I said.
' frhoebeabossed her head. Almost it
seemed that I'd areticipated her do
: tins tads-and -had been trying- to save
- Yvan from it. And when she
'-. li, staoke. I fancied Td known all along
l whatahe-was- going to say:
"Out on business! My Neal isn't
' going to leave me all alone even
ings while he transacts horrid old
- tpusineas. For if he has to work
Ian goirtga to share, aren't I, Nea
"Jerk , "Surest-Patting- you know, leaving me
-. i feeling. more alone than ever. As
I I set about trying to read or sew
.. 14 or- do something to pa-ss -the hours,
--,. a a. thought invaded my mind It
. i seemed 'to come from nowhere, but
. ! it 'wouldn't go back there again. What
1 Iota become of the blue crepe de
1 chine dress Daisy brought back to
' me when she restored the ring? I
, i was sure- she hadn't carried it away
, with her. Rut I badat seen it since.
, Where could Ot be?
. - - (To Be Continued).
SUMMer Recipes
Cocoanut Sandwiches.
One cupful cocoanut (freshly
grated-)
Ono-balf cupful nuts (ground fine.)
Crne teaspoonful lemon juice.
Two teaspoonfuls powdered sugar
Three tablespoonsful thick cream
mla all together Into 13- smooth
paste. Spread this between wafers
or between bread and butter.
Norma Talmadge, upon the com
i wiletion of her vacation this rnorrth,
will return to the studio and start
work on "Stralln"rhrough." Miss
Talmadge will be seen in the part
!played by Jane Cowl in the stage ver--
erton. last year. Herbert Brencrn
, be the director.
TOMOR.ROW -
SCATTEIRED IAMTERS- rnxzn
, WENNER
WHATJ 13E ANNOUNCED'
' , -mins PAGIal
'
, - ,
, 40em.
1,- - M
ik
1
, (Continued) TOWnS 66 Down I and, adding insult to injury, tined I
Ðsswitimmextare----- Ill ,
- 48-19'
tk, 1 eal,m, ...gym 4 Iva vnavt Vagawria i
CHAPTER. COMOCEL
I get-refit '9 -- ---.- 1
I possessed- The manager of the I . ,
t" 1 11
A 4 :. ,2,....'7,;14:..;,:11.):1,1:11,11111.- '-' ' . - :I
' The message from Uncle Ned Manx 11,--7,. troupe protested and the officials per- ,.,,i4aVi.Z'i;'',,?:tg,,Wtql1
..,.:, - , ,
, . come until I had finished Illy' solitax-y ...---- milted the Sunday performance to À1,:014044.$0.,iiigk34'.1.-:--,. fr. . ,,'.
. . . .
- meal. and then it was not directly proceedfor a time. . ,-
' , from him, but a second-hand affair - -- ,,,.-;vprf'2,,t1444,..,,Nt.,,,,tvg-.
:-,...,5 1P, -
,-;. , - .0 While the manager Wee making his . 11.:.; .11-1,.:;:-::::'''.-7.:-. Ns ' k -
- , .....,-, ,
frora someone who reported over the "spiel" preparatory to opening the JZ:M;7n-''.;.! k444,' . '''s.W2:'.',0":": 1: ! . - - - - .' ' -Xs - ""; ' 1r .:-:
.', ',44,-(&-'
.1 ,
.,. s, , ,
wire. - ,,-44"-C4-'- coffin, one of the policemen found a - - -'
, ,-,
' - "Mr. Pettingill mays be will call Mr. "rita;;-34' series of air apertures in the side of 4,:r:?:'4:,,:-:',, , . - . - . , .
- ,--W,,,-.- silk .::: ,.:
, ;Harrison first thing in the-morning , :,,,,,i: Browning's coffin. Further investi- -4'.,: , , ,,-,,,i,:.,:. Fra.: , -.1:,,, or , -
and wants him to be ready." r gation revealed a box containing fs.-:',,!:,'''''- '-,':'--.E::: ---141:i5,-'4"741 ; , - ' ,1- t
, er - '- - ' - -
' ' "Read3r for what?" I asked with. ,.4e , .7.:r.,..,-.7V,- --.,,,,;:kA,, malted milk tziblets, Tod's diet clur- . .
:. ,e- .:.-:-:,' -- Ç., ':-,,,4;.---4:t-1 ' , . - ' - ' ..,o, 4 . - , --i
-' i ,',,,,iiii - -,.44,,,,,,. . - , ..,-- .
' . mistural curiosity- - 0.-'!,' -',,i .'--.::,-,4',..7.. ,.--EVi-:' ing the performance, concealed in the
coffin. :.
,. . - .,
,,,r-, ; ,- - , 4
, "Oelet say ma'am." was the htoonic - - ' i k-- . '
' .repl3r. "'lliars all Mr. Pettingill said. : ' .-,1-r,:i;44'02;'.''''',,,r-:;-;':',5. Browning still points vvith a par- '':---e-- ' " - ...".,A;S::::' As , -",--a- . r:WM411 dlliergi- i
I)"
iThat he wanted Mr. Harrison. to be , .;;: ,,,,,,,:;,-,4,,,,,,:..,?.,, ..,-,.,,t-,,ir:,,,,,,.,,,,., - donable pride to bts forty-eight hour ,,,titA ,. :;:, ,- -:s4.--k:,-. , , --...z..,--.-43, . .
.),.... ikv a. . .
-.-.. -
r ., , --- - - L.-.------1,.!pt,f,,, I -
. ,
,...121...- .:;:f.:.-,-,:,r,--;,,,:7-, interment"the world's champion- '...". ,...., --....,
,t, e, , ,
-1",,,,'...e.:-.4 i'..,'.:!;-!- . ship burial record." His first burial
.::...' ',:. :1tii:EatA :i?:i':':''''''''- ' - 4". '-: 11 .:
w..: .,,,,f,---sa,..,,,mo., yer -' --,',1.,
' Again came the consciousness that
..,,,, ,Ait, , .. - - ,, , ,
I wats----in the very nature of things , ll-f-ik,:T;,',- '''''''' was the most harrowing experience
,.----- --
''' I:. leso,,, i .,: . , ,
, .
,' imbut out from most of Jim's bus- -,7g-2.,..:- :',,:,-4,,,ws,-,,,,,,,,k1",' Browning ever had. When I hea,rd - - --,,, -
,,,,.Q''.........-...,7,..,:,,,,..;....,: -
litrts life. It made me realize hovr --.. ' .i," -1, ,-,44 ?4,5-, -?
''',,:"-...4,V ''',.!;..: 7:,'' ' 'V : ; !..', the earth come cra.shing down on that ,,-1:;'...-s4...1-,s'i'i.-,.:-;.:71:"7:::;-:,..:':.::::il.:::::3,1'llow:::;E::ts6'.."::!!:-:::t:::,:i..r.'''1;:;...rlirs',4:Eyi!-';::.:,-ili:sli-:-.1,:r:i...;:::.:i::.::.:.::.!;:x.1:: 1 :,.. . , , , - - . -. '." '. '' 's
ilittle..lira 'needed me in comparison ..,-,..:,;,?i,i,.. ,i,4t, f--,,,,' - coffin, I actually shivered," he aci- 'mar
.: , , ,
1
.,, -,A s.....,:r.,.- ,,,,..,, , ,..., 4, - ., ,
' 'tco my growing need of him. . ,,r,,,,-,, r.,-t,,, , . . mita :..,,:, 7 ,
:..";101""4friz. v, it -4 ,,
..--;: e .
: '''A woman's onl3r in the wear half -e 14::A-b,:.,.,,,,-.4.,::,:.,i., Muerte two years Of "river show" tife, ' ,.
- -
; ,". ', 11111,r'
- . , ! , '
the time" I said to myself sadly. 5,e4,-,....'-M4sfe,.Zt , Ito formed a partnership with Roy C. . . ..
' .111.1111k - ..,-, - -
a
,.-.,7,;,-:?.4., - -- ,,, ---- --: , ; -
, .
. "When it comes to settling things -',r,,,,,,.,,,,.,,,,$w,1,-,,.,0 atones and the two played in vraude- - . 1 ,
- -with. Pat, Jim can do better without 's,-;;;;Mf'-,-;r4r.,' ,;,-:?!':';" ville for seven years. In that time :,;:::::,!:::::.,Iii;VW3,:,::;i::. :',::i;:-'-1 ' .
they ptrt on various acts ranging front ,- 's:'....ir...7...i..:.:.:..,"'"7":.:.:::.,.'11,.....;.,",.....---:::::;:-.:.:.;:...10,.'..1i, , . . N Illit . -, ,,L ,, '. ..,,ç, ..77
' --.' ''''......;--------
- , . ::' ' -.
: me. Even his homebr secretarY, .,-44"."1,:?,r,?1,,,!!. ; - -
'N. 411114.41(ãrralas"g21"" --:'.- -' . 1 . 4
' 'Misti4Nevitus, is in his confidence on -,"?-,,,-'41,7tV;!:',r circus stunts, - side shows and duo- , - , .'.4i,i,;-.:k,Wif4ii:;:,: t,::K.-.. k:':.0 : r ' ' - -, -...:,! 4, .
. a lot of mathers be woulehft dream ;;-;,'T,,44,7, ;-',0, "--,,., logues to black-face minstrel turns, . , - -
' of talking over wit,b. me. And now buck-an-wing acts and slapstick roles , .,,,,,,k4,,,,,,z:,,,-,40.- ,4f,e::;" .
-.a:---7,-,:,::::E;;,:-.4i,E,,,,.-:::!!,,,,ft, 3:1', e .. , -
. ,, '
' ''';:iA -'4'' , in burlesques shows. They played - ,:-,,,,,n'i',.--,?,,g,,,E4-'44,-.ks:::::, ' -1
I hres drifting' into Boma sort of trill- .
1, ',.' f ,n,. , . '- '-.-
1
' 'Mee,' Verb Uncle Ned in which I can't ' . .4- ' t, nearly ever3r town in the U. S. , ::,, ,,tMnii;V::iftn'iiaig';-?-:-:' '' , i -
, ' :share" - ., 4410,::',:" Goa With Griffith :," .,,,,--tv-.-z.-,..i,,,,,,:,-,.,,i.,i:t,,,,:o ..,,, -- 40, .
. As .1 was wondering if in all the , ' : 1--A:Aii,:i.,-A,--...,1-A::.:grUgg-,:a.4:,:-':',-,; :'-:'9 ', . ,..,A--'
,-. , in 1913 Charles Mm-raY meL , -.:,,;:.0,-;-?:$,EE:4;g:,,,3::::i:,i:,:i,;:æW,5&:1 Barðsang. Service Mat ..
'world tttere Wee another woman. who -4 ,, "Mlle ,
, . Browning in New York and suggested rs-t,:,:,,-',4-,:,.-":-.,,1-:-,,,,:":-..r17::-,:-:W
.
, qelt as useless and as left out ill the . . tr. ,
oolBaowritrea: be come to the Biograph studio in the .::7.-&-1,. -...,i,p.Wii.gg;i;,:,4;i1Wik L-lt",-,, . -- - . -,,
:
.7- , ,
!cold,. Hedwig came to all1101211re that
Bronx. Murray, a former vaudeville ,, i:;k,4VZ'A,--,-::,,- .,,,,,,,,-., "....-,-.. , ,
, ,.:,,,:,:,,,::::.,..::,:,,:,,,:,::,:,,,,,,, . -.1 - , (.1 7, ..
lielissThoebe.and Mr. Neal bad run in
partner of Tod, obtained a small part ,-t:::v1-,-,:i; ,0'-si:::04-',';::::::::--:::::::,:.:,:;:x:'''":::4- -' ' .,,.:,
Bndges the ,4 ,---- -
.....:,::,::::,;,,,,,,,4, . .,
itor.rma;.thibltrtee.ed Neal, , oald to my- That he was buried alive in vir- for him in a two-reeler Griffith was , '- -:-ta:4;5;:ilii::::::-:;K:x,K,,:7:,::,N,E-,3.g,x,- -
.
,.ption oe my tually every town along the banks of filming. 13rowning made good in ..:, 1,&, .::EMi::-;E:4-:i,t51!:7;i:Mn:.:1:-',Wi.:410.D, , i
melt. happy at 'this 311'.'' ' 4 -ea. out. to the Mississippi is the boast of Tod this "bit," a few days later Murray 57, "'''':' -----w- ':-;E:..1,:tiii,,, I 1-'.- .
i, - . 6
' idull evening. And I hurri
Brovvning, chosen to direct the film said: --
1' ' .. .. ' . .,
mv guests. ,
- 'greet hade more version of Edna Ferber's "Fanny "'Grit" thinks you're great. il-re MARIE PREVOST. "THROUGH Olar aSSOCIattOnNiallrEtte. --
, PnobethlY There -was. a. s - . '-
the hug I gave my be- Herself." Browning has been news- wants you tojoin his stock company." ,
- warmth in
loved brother than in the kiss I bad boy, jockey, miastreihis most thrill- Under Grifnth. Browning gradual- The recover3r of King Baggot, t , 1 .1" prinCipattlankeanforeigneountrie4' .,
, , A
;Liar. phoebe I hadn't forgotten the ing experiences occurred as an "tin- ed from an actor to assistant direc- whose critical condition resulted from 4 1 I ,
'1'
was d ergrobundol man" in a. weekly belly- tor and was finally entrusted with the concussion received in a double res- -
' lunch at Vars from which I
hoodi um sta,ged by .8.n itinerant megaphone. Griffith left Biograph cue recently, will permit further pro WOOfferCOMPletefaCEtheStalneetiagerl. " ; - --
o and t suppose I was just as
gmug wtth me eine showbut it is as a three- and Browning later followed him to gress on his forthcoming feature, i ;
. i much ecliatPhoeotheyfoori for failing
tor .of motiop pictures that he has the Ccrast. There Tod returned to "Me Butterfly. Mr. Baggot owes 1. requirement in foreign- .,-banking Our .
, g
, to askme. An .ÿ. Neal must have attBamed particular Prominence. , activ for a year in Mutual comedies. his life to :the swimming prowess and S . ,
tuldes and degrees m my k rowning was born in Louisville, He resumed directing in 1914 leav- physical strength of Miss Marie Pre- Famign DePartmentis at3rourservico- . -,-1-:
. sensed-the 5 Ky, When sixteen, he fell in iove ing Mutual for Metro whose forces vost, Universal star, whom he has , '
. , !manner. for he promptly flung a Pro- with a dancer in a street fair playing he directed for a year. ,-
been directing in a screen version of ' . a
- 'tee:lore arm-about Phoebe Ate ile cried
there. When the show left, so did
- whit boyish pride: The next his parents heard from Bias Made Stars Percival Wilde's novel. His assis- ! We self Foreign Excbane.ancltrana&,.....u.cactykler - .
: orreozHnDineszetAimetinywe,v.Phc)6begoticktise. newlwelli ,Tthheun,9d. faihre. was a. ballyhoo artist with Metro los-t him to Universar with tant, Nat Boss, also can thank Miss ',
whom he has been for nearly three Prevost for rescuing him from what , - , draft or cable to every- COOlflitty-Werbettift-Efee . h
years. His record at Univers-al City have been a tragic end. -
: jot weaning nur hair We haVe' 'Frig infatuation for the side-sbrow . CiOrttthiplliCatiall itEttrbOeXt established - ' - . - ' ,
i hurled. a large-sized bit el the partar . has been memorable -,- his f.st Miss Prevost was in the swimming , ' - --
honey-girl queen cooled, but not the 'wander- ,
'today. Take off your hat, lust"the carnival spirit had enter- achievement was ,the making of a Pool of 'the Coffin estate at Pasadena, ' , s
, end mixers,' Anna" ed his blood. He staved with the star of Mary MacLa,ren who had hith- CaL, performing some aquatic feats 4 . ' g
Phoebe giggled and removed ber
show, "barking" for a -Wild Ma,n of erto appeared in minor roles. To him for the camera. Ross, leaning over '
, .
' ihat displaying hair drawn track from
wasBornaeo concession (the " -Id man" was entrusted the direction of Pris- the edge of the pool, fell in and -- . - r - , 1,
!her forehead arid scalloped out over
g-ro made up). After tour- Aetna. Dettnt's first. starring vehicle struck his head on the bottom Im- ': . s .
!her cheeks in a. mode I detest, but
. ing the South for a season Tod join- mong- ti s most important releases. mediately Baggot plunged in 'after ,
rwhich, cecrtainbr becomes Phoebe ana
ed. Ringling Brothers' Ci.rcus as a are: "Brazen Beauty," "Wicked Dar. him. But his head struck the side 1 t
,
ing," "Exquisite Thief." "Virgin of of the concrete pool as he came up - - -- - -- - - ' -Thy
et
'intakes-her pansy-face look more like .0wr.
, a bailie thell ever. At eighteen, Brownin . hing Stambonl," and "Outside the LOW."' and started toward Ross, who was THE BRIDGEPORT; :kiii-,. of ,----- 7 ---- 4
"If you area't cunning!" I e
- r- bass than hunddrefd-weighgt; becawelmg a a His forthcoming feature, "Fanny Her- feebl t
Y s ruggling toward the edge. ., r
; claimed, forcho,g myself to aA1,3 "I'll
jockey and ro e or Virginia. Carroll, self," from Edna. Ferber's popular Bagget again slumped under, uncon- . .
novel, is considered by many to be scions from the impact. 67- 69 STA'r6.--67 it oo. -2" ---- , 4,
thet you were the chief charmer of prominent turfman of Dixie. , -
i the -Who was there, dear?" the pinnacle of "heartstuff" motion With swift strokes, Miss Pre-vost - - . , -
, "Just Tetra Oosby and two ador- . . Played a Corpse ' picture production. swam to Baggot, forced him above e i OPPOSITE:CITY X.-TALI '
. - --
akde girls named Willoughby. 'They IIe next joined a "river show" as "There is no royal road to direc- the water and held him up until oth- -0' I 4 . ,
. .
.
, are twins, daughters of someone she an entertainer. One of his jobs was torship," according. to Browning en; pulled him over the edge. She
knew out at home. 'They've come Oil tO play the gruesome role of a. corpse movie direction depends for its mer- then devoted her energies to rescu- . t
i
, to try fors. place on the -concert stage for an entire day at a tittle. Brown- it on sincerity and belief. No direc- ing Ross, .whom she pulled to one .i-
'
,
! and Mrs- Pottingill. wholn Mrs- Coob1r ing's job was to "die" and be buried tor ean make a good pictpre unless he side of the pool,where he was taken -
. , , .
E113rg you know very well is chaperon- with much ceremony one day and, is 'sold. Ort the storY Unless he be- ou of the water safely, though ex- -,''
twenty-four hotirs later, be revived by lieves in the script and can put into hauAlect i . 4)
,- tng them." , ,--
6,1MET,.Tscp,st Annt Molly Pettingill some wonderful nostrum This ..i-e- it thsss ...miss which will sks it The dav's 'program ended there. ,
, .1-11:31X-itS i rine editor Tor the Odd Uzi rrees Deal was hut overboard- as it was assistant - 'Rev latiward VC"- ""1-" 1, i 1 1 isteacz?
: VErITAB 17m1 ANINTOrTirenn AssOciatiOn which WaS taken paar hr.' thought that was where-it heicncied. Shaughne;sy thes.ChTiril I SUMMER SESSION - I Don't Sav Saw It in the i Acid8 1138-Pd I I
- , otv PAW I vived by a witit, three-mons itindotte wisp And followeol thelhost right tetel present, Miss suorgan, organist arid . 't' v ,-;:1-17-7,-; ' - - -1-1-4241,cx- 1 1
. i daugixterr. . . . I port. 1r trIlivir a ver7.1nanigo34.pet,4 chats. direeter. raxiaarect smayer7al Boialits, , July 14 ,toepu, ,.. 1,.-imes.-- , , , . , , i - , . . .. .-,: 1,1
,
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,
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MMM CE
Holds World's
Burial
Famous Movie Directzr
Btuied Alive in Many
Tovvns "Down
South".
ToolBaowrittid:
That he was buried alive in vir
tually every town along the banks of
the Mississippi is the boast of Tod
Browning, chosen to direct the film
versAon of Edna Ferber's "Fanny
Herself." Browning has beert news
boy, jockey, minstrelhis most thrill
ing experiences occurred as an "un
derground man" in a. weekly bally
hoo burial staged by 8.n itinerant
medicine showbut it is as a direc
tor of motion pictures that he has
attained particular prominence.
Browning was born in Louisville,
Ky., When sixteen, he fell in love
with a. dancer in a street fair playing
there. When the show left, so did
Tod. 'rhe next his parents heard from
him, he was a. ballyhoo artist with
the fair.
His infatuation for the side-elrow
queen cooled, but not the "wander
lust"the carnival spirit had enter
ed his blood. He stayed with the
show, "barking" for a Wild Man of
Borneo concession (the "wild man"
was a negro made up). After tour
ing the South for a season. Tod join
ed Ringling Brothers' Circus as a
clow
At eighteen, Browning, weighing
bass than hundred-weight, became a
jockey and rode for Virginia Carroll,
prominent turfman of Dixie.
Phiyed a Corpse
fie next joined a "river show" as
art entertainer. One of his jobs was
to play the gruesome role of a, corpse
for an entire day at a, time. Bro Wn
ing's job was to "die" and be buried
with much ceremony one day and,
twenty-four both's later, be revived by
some wonderful nostrum. This "re
surrection" was staged at each town
at which the show stopped.
At Madison. Ind.. the smash came.
Who Says The Camera Never Lies?
Despite' the fact that they were all
suffering from an acute case of
chronic color-blindness, motion pic
ture cameras not only were recruited
into the -A- E. F., but acquitted them
selves honorably on every front in
the World War. 'rhe insensitiveness
of photographic negative to many
colors necessitates resorting to many
substitutions for the sake of realist:11-
Th scribbled note from the
maiden-in dis-tress that is thrown on
the screen was not written with the
black stub pencil the audience saw
her use. It was written with a red
crayon by someone in the Title De
partment of the studio, for red photo
graphs even blacker than black
A king clad in his purple corona
tion robes could never pass inspection
with a motion picture director, ac
cording to Reeves Eason, who has
produced -several artistic films for
Urdversat
"Purple photographs gray." says
Es-son, "and a rnoviewise public
knows that purple is the color sym
bolic of regal magnificence. mon
arch in gray vestments would have no
more chance with a cynical audience
than a Fiji Islander in evening
clothes."
The same 'problem in photograph
ing colors arose recently at Universal
City when the subtitles were being
prepared for a recent Eddie Polo
serial, ""Do or Die."
A telegram supposed to have been
received in England, was tct be thrown
on the screen. and the Title depart
ment was searching. for the proper
kind of blank on which to typewrite
the message. All the English tele
graphic blanks available had blue
headings. As blue photographs
white, blanks of that color would not
look genuine in a film. It Was neces
sary to hold up that particular sub
title until tbe proper form could be
urinted in different colors.
ANIUSEMENT
-
A DAILY FEATURE
POIXSVandeville headliner, "an Argentine," a novelty-singing and danc
ing act: feature picture, "Deception," the story of the -love of HenrY
the.Eighth for Anne Boleyn, and how it turned' to hatred. Feature on
at 3:30, 7:30, 10. -Orchestra, directed by Samuel Davey.
MEM:REFeature, Viola Dana in "The Off-Shore Pirate." a romance lined
with the tang of the sea. Feature on at 2:30, 4:15. 6:30, 8, 9:15. Orches
tra directed by Charles S. Ferrett.
VE-Mt3T ENDState street and Clinton avenue. Feature, Marguerite
Namara. screen as well as vocal star, in "Stolen Moments," the story
of a restless woman. Feature on at 7, roan music.
ELITEMain and Charles streets. Feattrre. Douglas MacLean in "The
Rookie's Return," the story of a boy who bad been "over there," and
what he did when he got "over here." Feature on at 7, 9. Organ music.
AMERICANEast Main and Jane streets. Feature. Dorothy Gish in "The
Ghost in the Garret," a thriller, well acted by this winsome little star.
Feature on at 7, 9. Organ music.
CAPITOLMilford. Feature, Pauline Frederick in "The Mistress of Shen
stone," in which this splendid actress almost equals her matchless work
in "Madame X." Feature on at 2:30. 7:15, 9. Organ music, Albert P.
Brown, organistS'r1FLATVOR13--Main
Street, Stratford. Feature, William S. Hart in
"O'Malley of the Mounted," absolutely the best picture that Hart has
done. It's a story of the Northwestern Mounted Police, full of ro
mance: humor and pathos. Feature on at 7, Musie directed by
H. J. O'Connell.
PLEASURE BEACIIDancing and amusements
OLD OPERATall DEAD.
Hartford, July 13 C. Irrederick
Bennett. Eor 24 years art Associated
Press telegrapher in this city, died
here yesterday at the. age uf 54 years.
He was taken to St Frerichs hospital
a few days ago. Mr. Bennett. who
was well known among' newspaper
men arid telegraphers throughout
Connecticut. came to this city trOnt
New York where he had been ma
rine edftor for the cid lint led Press
Association which was taken over by
The Associated Prams. He is sur
vived by a wide, three-mous 054- ens
daughter. ,
- - - - .-. ank " - ',TV, &Al -
1 Toe Associated Proms, Ile is atir-f LE3ut the little fellow thane etbor-ij BleStood ganratnerit were among those i DTITVATV. WARR Q-or It ;v. irs A T.T.",44- - 1 1
'411
Championship
Record
:EP
-Saturday afternoon 'rod was "buried"
....Sunday morning the authorities
arrested the entire company for vio--
lating the Sabbath, made them
fund the receipts of the previous day
and, adding insult to injury, fined
them $14.07every cent its members
possessed. The manager of the
troupe protested and !the officials per
mitted the Sunday performance to
proceedfor a time.
While the manager vras making his
"spiel" preparatory to opening the
coffin, one of the policemen found a
series of air apertures in the side of
Browning's coffin. Further investi
gation revealed a box containing
malted milk tablets, Tod's diet dur
ing the performance, concealed in the
coffin.
Browning still points with a par
donable pride to his forty-eight hour
interment"the world's champion
ship burial record." His first burial
was the most harrowing experience
Browning ever had. When I heard
the earth come crashing down on that
coffin, I actually shivered," he ad
mital. Atter two years of "river show" Me,
Bo formed a partnership with Roy C.
armies and the two played in vaude
ville for seven years. In that time
they put on various aots ranging from
circus stunts, side shows and duo
logues to black-face minstrel turns,
buck-an-wing acts and slapstick roles
in burlesques shows. They played
nearly every town in the U. S.
Got With Griffith
in 1913 Charles Murra3r met
Browning' in New York and suggested
be come to the Biograph studio in tbe
Bronx. Murray, a former vaudeville
partner of Tod, obtained a small part
for him in a two-reeler Griffith was
filming. Browning made good in
this "bit," a few days later Murray
said:
"'Grit" thinks you're grea.t. 11-fe
wants you to join his stock company."
Under Griffith. Browning graduat
ed from an actor to assistant direc
tor and was finally entrusted with the
megaphone. Griffith left Biograph
and Browning later followed him to
the Coast. There Tod returned to
activ for a year in Mutual comedies.
He resumed directing in 1914 leaving-
Mutual for Metro whose forces
he directed for a year.
Nes Made Stars
Metro lost him to Universar with
whom he has been for nearly three
years. His record at Univers-al City
has been memorable --- his f-st
achievement was the making of a
star of Mary Mac Laren who had hith
erto appealed in minor roles. To him
was entrusted the direction of Pris
cilla.. Dean's first. starring vehicle.
Among- his most important releases
are: "Brazen Beauty," "Wieked Darl
ing," "Exquisite Thief." "Virgin of
Stambotil," and "Outside the Law."
His forthcoming feature, "Fanny Her
self," from Edna. Ferber's popular
novel, is considered by many to be
the pinnacle of "heartstuff" motion
picture production.
"There is no royal road to dlrec
torship," according' to Browning.
Movie direction depends for its mer
it on sincerity and belief. No direc
tor can make a good pictere unless he
is 'sold' on the story. Unless he be
lieves in tbe script and can put into
it those qualities which will make it
sinoere and real, be might just as
well burn up tbe blank negative be
fore wasting it on a picture."
Perhaps few movie "fans" have no
ticed that almost all telegrams re
ceived in photopla3rs are sent Western
Union. This company has a mono
poly because its blanks have a black
heading while those of the Postal
Telegraph company are printed in
blue.
"Many persons have asked me whY
motion picture actors put on so much
make-up." mr,s-son continued, In dis
cussing tbe way the camera sees col
ors. "Under the herd white lights
used in the studios, if the pla3rers
were not made up properly, their
hands arid faces would appear dark.
If they did not use plenty of make
up. Southern movie patrons would
draw, in all probability. the color Line
as our stars would look like negroes."
The idiosyncracies of the photo
graphic lens also make it difficult to
have a suit of clothes- look shabby.
The hero may have slept in his clothes
the night before. but if lie is wearing
a dark suit, tt will not appear wrinkled
to the camera. A player's trousers
may be baggir at tbe knees, but the
fact is barely noticeable on the
screen. A light suit may look a lit
tle worse for wear in a film, but it
takes a close-up to reveal that dark
colored remnant needs pressing.
For the same reastm declares
Eason, a skillful scene painter can
paint a door that looks more natural
On the screen than a real door would.
Experience teaches hirn how the
lights and shadows will be picked up
by 'the camera
These are only a few instances of
why 'substitutes sometimes look more
real on the screen than the genuine
articles. And with the Increasing de
mand for realism in pictures and the
famillarky of most of the public with
the tricks of the stage and studio,
the succeful director has to be con
stantly on the alert to escape the
caustic criticism that errors in details
alwerys bring.
CALENDAR
RESCUE SEAL PROM B..GT,wsk
Prince Rupert. B. C, 1113r
baby seal, followmg its rescue from
a 'vicious attack by four eagles.
adopted Its rescuers. Ca Ptahl Mc
Gregor, V. C., and his three com
panions. 'Me seal wan Puttirkg a
plucky but losing fight against his as
sailants from the sky when the
launch party tot it aboard,
On the way to Prince Rupert the
Deal was put overboard. as it was
thought that was where it belowie&
But the little fellow thought other,
whip 'end folkowed the-daoat right Jab"-
port. It teretsfer wow luditlgschPato,
filarie Sues A
Couide Of Lives!
A True Story
MARIE PREVOST.
The recovery of King Baggot,
whose critical condition resulted from
concussion received in a double res
cue recently, will permit further pro
gress on his forthcoming feature,
"The Butterfly. Mr. Baggot owes
his life to :the swimming prowess and
physical strength of Miss Marie Pre
vost, 'Universal star, whom he has
been directing in a screen version of
Percival Wilde's novel. His assis
tant, Nat Ross, also can thank Miss
Prevost for rescuing him from what
have been a tragic end.
Miss Prevost was in the swimming
pool of 'the Coffin estate at Pasadena,
CaL, performing some aquatic feats
for the camera. Ross, leaning over
the edge of the pool, fell in and
struck his head on the bottom. Im
mediately Baggot plunged in after
him. But his head struck the side
of the concrete pool as he came up
and started toward Ross, who was
feebly struggling toward the edge.
Bagget again slumped under, uncon
scious from the impact.
With swift strokes, Miss Prevost
swam to Baggot, forced him above
the water and held him up until oth
ers pulled him over the edge- She
then devoted her energies to rescu
ing Ross, whom she pulled to one
side of the pool where he was taken
ou of the water safely, though ex
hauS.ed. The day's program ended there.
Miss Prevost, a. Canadian girl, un
til recently WEIS featured in bathing
girl scenes that gave, abundant dis
play to her attractive form ctnd na
tatorial prowess. She was reeenttly
given a. starring' contract with Uni
versal to permit her co engage in
more serious forms of screen drama
and seek fame through the worth of
her acting rather than on tthe renown
of her limbs
In The Theatres
POLTS.
The crowds oontinue lo flock to see
"Deception,' which .closes a four-day
engagemen,t today at Poll's.
The continents on this great produc
tion heard all over the cit3r are high
ly oomplimentary, as indeed, they
should be when the matchless art and
the deep appeal of this' master pic
ture are considered. With its cast
of 7,000, its magmificent scenic effects
and the absorbing fact theme upon
which it is founded, "Deception," has
proven to be the most notable film
offering so far exhibited in Bridge
port Poli's vaudeville is of the highest
standard today. Eddie Foyer, the
man of a thousand poems, is creating
a riotous impression. The production
act: "in Argentina," is a real
Spanish offering thalt registers well.
There are comedy and singing' and
dancing of a high order in this unique
adt. The other acts on the bill are
all good.
Tomorrow, the next day and Sat
urday, Jack Norworth, in yperson, will
make his debut before a Bridgeport
audience at Poll's. Everybody knows
Norporth as one of America's really
successful light comedians. He is
a former 'partner of Nora Bayes. He
has bushels of talent and will create
a furore during his local engage
ment. An added attraction will be
Janet Adair, one of Broadway's shin
ing artistic lights and a feature at
the Winter Garden. Miss Adair
sings song recitations, an extremely
ineredting and entertaining sort of
offering.
T'riday niglit will be Amateur
night with a lot of fun and a few
agreeable surprises in store for every.
body.
MSEETRE.
Well! Viola Dana, sbe of the
buoyant personality and adorable
ways, put another feather in her cap
by her peerless acting of the stellar
role in "The Offsh9re Pirate," the
Metrd special production which bad
its showing yesterday at the Empire
theatre.
The captivating little actress gave
an interpretation satist5ring perfect
This epithet describes ber perform
ance and the picture itself. As Ardita
Farnam, ttte young heiress whom
friends have had captured by a pi
rate so as to save 'her from the plat
ting cif a sinister scheming handsome
foreigner, she conveys glamor, femi
nine charm. and sparkle. Virhat more
can one want?
WEST "'NTD.
Marguerite Namara. the famous
and brilliant young American beaut3r
who has won fame and fortune in
two worlde by the voice and dranut
tic ability, has forsaken the operatic
stage to conquer the world of the mo
vies. Miss Namara will be seen at the
Virest End theatre in her big produc
tion, "Stolen Momenta.. tonight The
management of the Weet End thee.-
tre. after much negotiation, secured
this famous 'picture. fresh from its
Broadway showing, for a limited en
gagement, and consider it one of the
events et the season.
ThIrtY-five guests attended the an
nual Outing ef the choir of St Pat
rieles ehurch at the Inn at Pleasure
Beach last night, Bev, J. C. 1-,ÿrtell
pastor, Rev; mho...4 J Irbon.p.on,
assistant pastor, And limy. Edward
Shaughnessy of the Church of the
Blessed. iacratnerit were among those
present, Miss suilition, organist said
chola director, rendered asterer:al sogAta
-
I ft
.
-;:rf- -
THE BRIDGEPORT-'rE
167' 69 STA'r,S-STI
OPPOSITE -crix HAT:ao
Hodge .Podge
Rudolph Valentino, famed for his
work in "The Pour Horsemen of the
Apocalypse," and in "The Conquering
Power," has been engaged by George
Melford to play the title role in "The
Sheik."
Virginia Faire has been engaged
for the leading' feminine role opposite
Guy Bates Post in the acreen version
of "Omar the Tentmaker," to be pro
duced by Richard Walton Tully for
First Nationals. Lawson Butt and
Otto Matieson will also be seen in
important roles, James Young will
direct.
Disraeli is being done In pictures,
vrith the distinguished George Ar
lies in the title role, in which he
starred on the stage. Mrs. Arliss will
be seen as Lady Beaconsfield.
Florence Reed's next picture Will
be called "Indiscretion." Lione 11 At
will and -Gareth Hughes are seen in
suanort of Mign need.
Wheeler Oa liznan had some eiicit
ing moments attempting to solve the
intricacies of chauffing a wheel chair
and act before the camera at the
sarne time in the title role of "Slippy
McGee," which is bebag picturized at
Natchez, laiM.
a -
Anna Q. Nilsson, who recently
went to Sweden. bas had an offer to
play in a. Swedish tam entitled
"Varmlanmingarria," an old Swedish
legend famous in song and story and
for Ynnny years a popular theme on
the Swedish. stage. It has not how
ever, as yet been filmed.
Bayard Vet ller is to direct Bert
Lytell in his next Metro picture,
"Lady Eingers," an adaptation b7
Lenore Coffey of a story by Jackson
Gregory. Prodtmtion vrill start as
soon aa "Junk," the picture on which
Mr. Lytell.is ,120Clit working,. is com
pleted. 4
...m
WHIDE LONDON FIGHTS POG
LASKY STUDIO MAKES rr
The chief foe of motion picture
production. in England is the fog that
beclouds the atmosphere ' and pre
vents clear photography- To guard
against this a. system of cold water
pipes bas been installed in the rare
mount studio in the Islington section
of London which Is proving effective.
Atmospheric condittons in New
York ;were so unlike London that
when a London atmosphere was
needed recently Arthur Miller, the
camera. man who is photographing
"Peter Ibbetson" in the Paramount
Earner. studio, went to much effort
to get the fog they are righting in
shooting scenes of the New
gate jail courtyard Miller directed
the' property men to light several
smoke torches, which were waved
about until clouds of pale blue smoke
hung over the set in front of the
camera. Previously the stones of the
courtyard and jail set had been daub
ed with particles of tar. which took
Oil the appearance of glistening mois
ture under the .lights- Shooting
through this smoke screen Midler ob
tained a perfect fog effect, and, Inci
dentally, one of the most beautiful
effects in this ezceptional picture
A very important meeting will be
held this Friday everting at the Hi
bernian Home. 161 Washington ave
nue, by-the Mac Swiney Council, A.
R. L Et- The council meetings will in
'future be held the first ,and third Fri
days of each month at Hibernian
Home
14 . ..
THE AINIVERSIT
S Horn,
OL8161rear Begins4tSept. 21st
SUMMER SESSION
PRIVATE WORK.
July 12 to-Sept; 2-
t
4
,..
nking Ser;vioe Tb2rt
Bridges the Sea
PTAHROUGH our associatiort:virit
principal banksin foreigrcounhies,
we offercccmplete facalitiestomeetemery
requirement in foreign banking Our
Foreign Departmentis atyourservico
We sell Pore:Igo Eltehane.anclizanaÆ,L
draft or cabk, to every- coantry-worbere.este,
consazgatostioll beebeeis established -
-
ELITE
Main & Chas. Sts. Tel- N. 1092
7 :00 9:00
DOUGLAS MACLEAN
With Doris May
In Their Eatst
"The Rookie's Return"
WEST END
Tel. Bar. 7773.
TONIGHT
The Famous International Dram
atic Opera Celebrity
Marguerite Namara,
"Stolen Moments"
I. 6 ACTS
Ls a woman justified in keeping
her innermost secrets from her
trusting. arid loving husband? See
the ariswer. '
,-.. 9
DANCE TONIGHT
AND EVERY WEDNESDAY
LORDSHIP BEACH
Cars leave Mohican corner direct
to the beach at 8-8:30 and 9
o'clock. Car fare from Hollister
and Stratford avenues. 8c.
ADMISSitON lERHE.
9
,IniOnW
P. G. GILLETTE
OPTICIAN
20 P. O. ARCADE
lei
IT IS BEST
that your Fur Garments are
thoroughly cleaned before stored
awayThereby re:moving any for
eign matter that may be harmful
to them. -
it. JP
0
g
p
293
State
0-0' Phallic
Bar.
4785
Established 1897
CERILNE:RS AND DYETtS
The Stratfield
CAFETERIA
OPMN DAILY 6 A. M. TO MID
NIGHT Ist This new mad popular departure
we have embodied all- of the su
perior features of Stratlield service
at its best
STRATFIELD HÔTEL
F. A. CANTWELL, Mgr.
v
- - - ittict"
-
-
145 Stratford Aye
3
' Genuine Panarnas
t'Ill 11 4-ag. :0 - Directl from Sic
,
al,4633
- o -A , madeeloto your 01
" Judi and Men's
D11111. alt5 DE;51-
IDon't Say "I Saw It In the
paper." Say, "I Saw It in The
Times." - - , - ,
,
.. :111, .71 0111W ' i.,
COOL ANTIOILIPOIITABILE i
LAST-MIES
,,
DECEpuoN
t
The- peopin-arer-liocking- -to see , t
this great picture- Nothing half
so absorbing' has ever before
been shown in this city. t
,
SUPREME VAUDEVILLE .
A
"IN ARGENTINA" -
A real Spanish act and. ,,a. gen
uine noveltl
ADDED ATTRACTION .
EDDIE FOYER
A tremendous hit. Other ex
llant acts and PATILE NEWS.
Tomorrow, Next Day d Sat.
,
II N Jack hs
orwort
TNT PERSON
The great musical comedy stay9s
first appearance in Bridgeport.
ADDED ATTRACTION
JANET ADAIR
, The Broadway favorite and
Winter Garden Feature Artist
in song recitations.
-,,, FRIDAY Amateur Night
L
COMA 410:100111FORTABILM
LAST-TINEES
DECEPTION
Jack
Norworths
ADDED ATT:RACTION
JANET ADAIR
The Broadway favorite and
Winter Garden Feature Artist
in song recitations.
FRIDAY Amateur Night
ii,,,;
0,,,,,...14,,,..ko
gE m P I RE
Si Continuous 1:30 to 10:30
0
Today Last Day Showing d
0
Today Last Day Showing of
THE IRRESISTIBLE
VIOLA DANA ))
CD
The Off-Shore Pirate
ý The Off-Shore Pirate a(
Comedyrnlversal News 11.1
ONSOMIkONCOSikt:Plelakeit
gpleeaascurhe
Daily
Ferries Prom Stratford Bridge'
Dock S A. M. to 12 P. 31.
MEATH
HATTER
145 Stratford Ave.Just Over the
Bridge
Genuine Panamas in the rough.
Directl from South America--
made nto your OWn style. - -
and Men's Old Pangolins
B1 rd Natural Process. No
Acids Used. - -
A Hatter
TH
'ER -
3r the
'ough.
VICS--
No
et f
ir
S
A
1
it
i
4
A
is.
$
I
t
d
If
At
w

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