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The Connecticut labor press. (New Haven, Conn.) 191?-1921, January 14, 1921, Image 5

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THE CONNECTICUT LABOR PRESS
STATE DEPARTMENTS ASK
DOUBLE EXPECTED INCOME
TO RUN NEXT TWO YEARS
Board of Finance Tabulation to
Legislature Shows Alarming
Condition of Affairs Leaves
Out New Projects but Still Way
Behind.
The General Assembly, which con
vened Wednesday, will be asked to
appropriate approximately $40,000,000
for maintenance of state departments
and institutions, new construction and
special welfare appropriations. This
figure was intimated by the state board
of finance, which estimated that the re
quests for legislative appropriations
would probably exceed bv 100 per cent,
the $20,781,000 which is the board's
estimate of the net revenue in sight for
the coming biennial period.
State departments and institutions
requested a total of $28,102,362.31 of
the state board of finance and the board,
according to a statement, will recom
mend to the Legislature that $25,293,
616 to be appropriated for state mainte
nance, alone. In addition to the main
tenance appropriation requests the
board was also asked for construction
appropriations aggregating $10,006,
343.63. No recommendations are made
by the board, however.
According to the board, its recom
mended budget for maintenance "does
not include any of the various new pro
jects which are being agitated through
the public press." Some of these "new
projects" as indicated by the board and
the estimated cost of each are the fol
lowing: 1. Soldiers' bonus bill, which if
passed, would entail an expenditure of
approximately $5,500,000.
2. Child Welfare program at an es
timated cost of $100,000.
3. State constabulary at an esti
mated cost of $330 000.
4. Continuation of the average at
tendance grant and increasing the grant
for each pupil from $3 to $4 at an esti
mated cost of $1,500,000.
The board's budget report, which is
now in the hands of the printer and
which will be ready for the Legislature
in about two weeks, shows that the
deficit that will be incurred during the
current biennial period which closes
June 30 is $1,756,225.86. It is possible
that the deficit, which was caused by
increased maintenance cost since the
budget was adopted in 1919. may be
met by an issue of bonds, or short term
notes, a matter has not yet been deter
mined. The board's recommendation of a
$25,293,616 maintenance budget, in its
relation to the increased activities
and high cost of maintenance, is sig
nificant when compared with the $20,
825,458.50 which the Legislature appro
priated for maintenance in 1919 for the
two years which began July 1, 1919.
The maintenance appropriation plus the
appropriation for construction work in
1919 aggregated a little more than
$32,000,000.
In view of the fact that the state
board of finance has not recommended
any construction, or new project appro
priations, it is believed that a warm
fight will be waged in the Legislature
for appropriations. The state board of
finance has been in session several
months, holding hearings on depart
mental and institutional estimates.
While the board was in session frequent
requests for additional appropriations
and transfers were made of the state
board of control by various departments
because of the inability of the current
appropriation to meet the demands of
the departments.
With only $20,781,000 in net revenue
in sight for the biennial period begin
ning July 1, the state board of finance
points out a deficit at the start of $4,
512,616. It is apparent, however, that a
determined effort is to be made to
acquaint the legislators when they con
vene of the financial conditions con
fronting the state, owing to the in
creased expenditures and it is expected
that a careful pruning of appropriations
will be undertaken by the legislative
appropriations committees.
In his annual report recently sub
mitted to the governor State Treas
urer G. Harold Gilpatric has indicated
the danger of an increased appropria
tion budget owing to the fact that the
means for increasing the revenue of the
state were few in sight. Treasurer
Gilpatric has recommended that either
expenditures be pruned or that new
forms of taxation be devised. It is
possible, he believes, th3t both measures
may have to be resorted to. As possible
ways of raising more revenue he has
suggested a tax on banks and a personal
income tax.
NOT TO ASK RAISE FOR
WORCESTER CARPENTERS
Worcester, Jan. 14. The executive
committee of the Worcester Carpenters'
District Council reported it had decided
not to ask for a raise in pay in the
agreement it will submit to the master
builders April 1.
This will be the first agreement sub
mitted since 1914 in which a demand for
a raise was not made. The carpenters
are now getting $1 an hour.
A mass meeting of all the wood
workers in Worcester is to be called
to consider the report of the committee.
WAGE CUT IN STAMFORD.
Stamford, Jan. 14. Wage cut of 20
per cent, including salaries from the
president down, was announced at the
Yale & Jowne Manufacturing company,
effective January 17. One thousand
employes will be temporarily laid off,
bringing the force down to 3,000.
CLOTHING MAKERS RENEW
WORKERS' AGREEMENT
Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 14. The
Michaels, Stern & Co. have renewed
their agreement with the United Gar
ment Workers of America and declare
it their belief that it is "for the best
interests of the workers and of the in
dustry itself that the relations between
the firm and the union be continued."
"To that end," say these employers,
"we encourage and advise our employes
to join the union, and we urge all mem
bers to be prompt in the payment of
their dues and attend all the meetings
of the union and to take an active part
in its proceedings, in order that the
union may truly represent the general
attitude of the majority of our em
ployes. "We are confident that a representa
tive organization of employes in which
the great majority take an active in
terest, and through which their pur
poses and desires may be fairly ascer
tained and expressed will be helpful in
continuing the good will and co-operation
now existing between the firm and
our employes, to the well-being of all
concerned."
MINORITY TO FIGHT
INCREASE IN CONGRESS
Connecticut Will Lose Addition
if Contest Is Carried to
Success.
Washington, Jan. 14. A minority re
port opposing the Siegel bill, under
which the House membership would be
increased to 483 based on the last cen
sus, has been filed by six members of
the House Census Committee.
The minority, three republicans and
three democrats, announced that they
would fight the measure on the floor
of the House, in the belief that popualr
opinion and a majority of the members
of the House were opposed to further
increase in the present size 435."
The proposal, agreed to by the ma
jority, that the membership of the
House be limited to 500 by a Constitu
tional amendment, also was attacked.
Addition of 48 members, as proposed in
the Siegel bill, would cost the government-more
than $1, (XX). 000 annualy, the
minoritv declared.
CARPENTERS PAY REDUCED
Danielson, Jan. 14. Journeymen
carpenters fin this seqtion are being
offered 75 cents an hour, a reduction
of 2y2 cents, an hour. Bricklayers and
stone masons expect that the new rate
which will be offered them will be 872
cents an hour instead of $1 an hour.
SHOE CUTTERS TO RESIST
ANY WAGE REDUCTION
Newburyport, Jan. 14. A meeting of
the Eastern Division of the National
Mutual Cutters' Association was held
this Aveek, 24 delegates being present
and representing the Allied Shoe Work- j
ers, the United Shoe Workers of Amer- j
ica and the Boot and Shoe Workers' i
Protective Union. !
The gathering was presided over bv
James Colman of Lvnn. It was voted
to resist any attempt to reduce wages.
Committees were named to push plans
for organizing the non-union workers
of this section.
WISE PLAY GAVE JOHN EVERS HIS
FIRST START WITH CHICAGO CUBS
jpSj
John Evers In Street Attire
"Off again ! On again ! Flnnegin !"
That was perhaps the dispatch that
President Veeek of the Cubs received
from Johnny Evers when the latter
sent word all the way from Havana
that he was willing to accept the man
agement of the Chicago Cubs for next
year.
Evers has been on and off with the
Cubs for many a year. He came to
them first from the Troy club of the
New York State league in 1902. Then
for 12 years he was the king-pin sec
ond baseman of the Cubs and there
was not a livelier, more willing or
brainier player in the big show, writes
Al Spink, in Chicago Post.
In 1913 Evers was made manager of
the Cubs, but he had played with the
other members of the team too long to
be able to boss them. So before the
season ended he was given his release
and in 1914 he Joined the Boston Na
tional league team.
j New York Uniform.
When Evers first appeared as lead
ing coach of the New York Giants in
Chicago last summer he received
many congratulations and many wel
comes back to the old Chicago field
Which knew and thought so well of
him in those days of "Tinker to Evers
to Chance."
"There was never a greater infield
than that, Johnny," said an old friend
to Evers then, and he responded, "I
don't think so, really I don't, although
of course, I should not say it."
"You were a little fellow when you
joined the Cubs, Johnny," said an
other, "and a lot of people thought
you would not make good, all right."
"Yes, I was a little fellow then,"
MIDDIES TO PLAY HARVARD
Annapolis, Md., Jan. 14. The mid
shipmen's lacrosse team will play seven
-games next spring, according to the
schedule which was announced today.
Harvard will be played April 20.
REFUSE WAGE REDUCTION.
Peabody, Mass., Jan. 14. By a 10 to
one vote. Local No. 1 of the United
Leather Workers of America at a meet
ing this week refused to accept a wage
reduction announced a few days ago,
in leather plants in this vicinity.
PLASTERERS GAIN.
Harrisburg, Pa., Jan. 14. Through
arbitration organized plasterers raised
wages 12J2 cents an hour.
The Connecticut Labor Press is and
has been for some time conducted as a
44-hour a week shop. It will continue
to be so conducted in the future.
FIRE DESTROYS OLD
RECORDS OF CENSUS
Data From 1790 to 1910 Lost or
Badly Damaged in
Blaze.
Washington. Jan. 14. Priceless cen
sus records dating back to 1790. when
the first enumeration of the United
States was taken, were destroyed Mon
day night in a fire of undetermined or
igin at the department of commerce
The records include figures from every
census up to the present one and offi
cials said that it would be days before
even an estimate of the damage could
be given.
The blaze originated in the basement
of the commerce building and five
alarms quickly brought everv piece of
apparatus in down town Washington to
the scene and more than 20 lines of hose
completed the damage done to the rec
ords by pouring tons of water through
windows into vaults where the records
were kept.
According to T. J. Fitzgerald, chief
clerk of the census bureau, records of
the census of 1890 were kept stacked
outside the vaults and these were de
stroyed by both fire and water. In the
vaults were stacked aisle after aisle of
records dating back to 1700 and ar
ranged according to vears up to 1910.
The 1920 records were kept on an up
per floor and were not damaged.
Mr. Fitzgerald said that the actual
fire loss was very slight but the records
destroyed could not be replaced if we
had the entire wealth of the united
states at our disposal. l here are no
duplicates."
ZINC COMPANY TO RETURN
TO FULL TIME, WAGES CUT
Allentown, Penn., Jan. 14. The New
Jersey Zinc company at Palmerton an
nounce a 10 per cent, cut in wages and
the elimination of an eight per cent.
bonus system, effective January 15. The
plant will return to full operatom.
Fall River Building
Laborers to Stay at Work
Fall River, Jan. 14. Following a
meeting of the Buildiner Laborers'
Union, this week, to act on the proposed
reduction of wages from 624 cents per
hour to 50 cents, the members voted to
report for work Monday pending a pos-
sible conference with the master build
ers.
Mayor James H. Kay met the mast
ers for the purpose of arranging a con
ference to settle the wage question, but
the builders -would not consent.
and Dressed for Playing.
said Johnny. "When I first went to
the Cubs I weighed 105 pounds. Some
of the baseball writers called me a
consumptive and intimated it was a
shame that I should be allowed to
play. They looked for me to last one
or two years at the most. Well, I'm
still here and pretty tough yet. When
I was playing the best ball that I ever
played, I never weighed more than 135
pounds.
"I started playing with the Cubs
back in 1902. We had been in Pitts
burg and jumped back into Chicago to
play a Sunday game. We lost our
first baseman and Manager Selee took
Chance from behind the bat and pui
him on first, much against Frank's
wishes.
Got His Chance.
"Then our catcher was hurt and
Chance was sent back to his old place
behind the bat. Bobby Lowe was
moved to first, and as I was the only
utility infielder available, they put me
on second.
"Philllpi was pitching against us
that day and I made three hits off him
and drove in a couple of runs.
"WThat attracted attention to me
was that with Wagner on first a man
hit a ball toward second base. I had
to come in for It and as Wagner went
behind me I sawT I had no chance to
get him.
"The man going to first was also a
fast runner, as most Pittsburgh play
ers were in those days, so I bluffed a
throw to first and took a chance that
Wagner would try for third. He did
and I got him ten feet off the bag.
"The papers made something of that
incident, and It gave me my start."
TO AID LOCKED OUT
W. VA. MINE WORKERS
Indianapolis, Jan. 14. To carry to a
finish the strike of the union coal
miners in Alabama and the fight against
what is termed "the lockout" in Mingo
county, West Virginia, the United Mine
Workers of America has sent letters to
the 4.000 local unions in the country,
levying an assessment of $1 a month for
two months on the entire membership,
numbering 553,000 persons in the two
fields are being supported by the in
ternational union, which, up to January
4, had expended $1,345,000 out of its:
treasury for this purpose.
Harsh criticism of our associates
for failure to do their full duty to
ward the union label, card and button
does not always bring the desired re
sult, but setting a good example
usually does.
Play fair spend union-earned money
for union-labeled products.
GOVERNMENT WILL
AID NEW HAVEN
IN HARBOR PLANS
Experts Said to Have Agreed
Expenditure of Four Millions
Proper.
After months of study in an effort
to define plans for the development of
New Haven harbor so that not only
New Haven, but other cities in Con
necticut, might be benefitted by the
improvements, government experts and
others, called in by New Haven, have
arrived at a general outline of methods
which may be adopted. The proposed
developments, which have been the
subject of much study by the war de
partment and engineering experts, are
intended to meet the needs of modern
shipping. Thy would eventually cost
about $4,000,000 but can be begun at
an initial outlay of $200,000. The gov
ernment, it is understood, will be ready
to aid when the city provides its share
of the cost. Due greatly to the poof
harbor facilities, it is said, but three
ships Hying a foreign flag have put into
New Haven during the past year."
I he original surveys were made by
Major Robbins, district engineer of the
Bureau of Harbors and Rivers of the
war department. Following his report
that the government would require aid
from the city. McL. Harding, a noted
harbor engineer of New York, was en
gaged to come to New Haven and out
line a plan.
According to tne pian the develop
ment would be done in units of con
struction. The first unit, which would
require an expenditure of about $200,
000, provides for the erection of a huge
steel and concrete pier and warehouse
at that part of the harbor known as
Waterisde Park. It could be a covered
pier, on the roof of which would be
a public promenade, affording a splen
did view of the harbor. rThe approach
is planned through Chestnut street,
making the pier easy of access for
heavy trucking.
the other units would be similar
piers, which would not only help to
develop the harbor from a commercial
but- also from an artistic viewpoint.
It has been stated that the government
is readv to start as soon as New Haven
announces its readiness, and it is ex
pected that the work will -begin next
"spring.
1 he first step to make the piers avail
able to foreign trade, will be a great
amount of dredging, which must be
done, before the piers can be erected.
This will be taken up, it is stated, when
New Haven comes forward with her
guarantee that she will do her part in
standing the expense. Mayor David E.
FitzGerald has been an energetic work
er for the project which now has the
backing of many of the most promin
ent and influential citizens.
BIG CUT IN PRICES OF
OVERALLS IS PROMISED
New York. Tan. 14. Overall denim
prices were revised by one of the
largest manufacturers to a basis of 17
cents for 2.20 indigos. The top price
in the open market last year in second
hand trading was 55 cents and the
highest price named by agents was 44
cents.
The new nrices will mean that whole-
of overalls will be able to sell on
a basis permitting retailing at $1.50, in
stead of $4.0 and upward. ine new
price is more than 50 per cent, below
ili- ornvprntnptit nricp fixed at the in
ception of the war and is probably low
er than most mills can meet.
Get the habit of asking for the
union label, card and button.
11
PRINTING
PR
li innn i rinrnc
LflDUfl LLHUEIU
PROTEST THREATS
ON SONTHEIMER
Gompers, Perkins and Others
Demand Florida Governor
Protect Local Man.
The following telegrams from Presi
dent Gompers of the "American Federa
tion of Labor and G. W. Perkins, presi
dent of the Cigar Makers' International
Union to Governor Catts, protesting
against the Tampa citizens committee
in ordering out of that city Sol Son
theimer, a representative of the cigar
makers union are reproduced. A repre
sentative ot the governor is now in
Tampa investigating the condition :
"Protests have reached me against
ordering out of the City of Tampa a
law-abiding citizen, bol bontheimer,
representative of the American Feder
ation of Labor, by a vigilente composed
of bankers and merchants and their
agents. I am also informed that a com
mittee of the striking cigarmakers of
Tampa and residents of that city have
been threatened with deportation from
Tampa. 1 appeal to you in the name
of American citizenship and justice that
you take every action possible to pre
vent so gross and violent a denial of
American citizens' right.
"Samuel Gompers,
"President A. F. of L."
"The Cigar Makers' International
Union asks protection to its representa
tive, Sol Sontheimer, from threats made
against him by the Tampa citizens com
mittee, and protests against any such
un-American action.
"G. W. Perkins, Pres."
The following unions of Jacksonville,
have forwarded telegrams to Governor
Catts protesting against the actions of
the Tampa citizens committee in tak
ing the law into their own hands, ignor
ing the constitution of the United
States and the state of Florida : Plumb
ers No. 234, Sheet Metal Workers No..
377, Brick Masons and Plasterers No.
11, Typographical No. 162, Machinists
No. 257, and the Central Trades and
Labor Council.
The "citizens' committee" has been
attempting to intimidate cigar makers
who were forced to strike because of
union affiliation. This committee has
committed acts of violence against
workers in previous strikes. In the
present instance the local press sug
gested that officers of the cigar makers
be told to "get out of town."
This gang of business men recently
called on Sol Sontheimer of Connecti
cut, representative of the International
Cigar Makers' Union, and notified him
that he would be held responsible for
any disorders in connection with the
strike. The unionists asked for proof
of disorders, but this was not forth
coming. A short time ago strikebreak
ers were arrested for disorderly conduct
and the business men's gang attended
the trial, which resulted in the thugs'
acquittal.
FIFTY WORCESTER
TAILORS STRIKE
Worcester, Jan. 14. Fifty members
of the Worcester Journeymen Tailors'
Union, employed in four shops, struck
this week against a return to piece
work pay from a regular wage scale.
The strikers are considering a plan
for opening an independent tailor shop
in Worcester. The shops affected are
the Ware-Pratt company, MacUller Son
& Park company, Freeman & Lindgren
and W. A. Garbutt company.
Patronize The Labor Press advertisers.
The Ornhurn Press, Inc.
FORMERLY CONNECTICUT LABOR PRESS
286-288 YORK STREET
TWO DOORS NORTH OF ELM STREET
IN TING
EMPLOYES RETURN
TO TEXTILE PLANTS
Plainfield, Jan. 14.-Additional em-
ployes went into the textile plants in
this section this week, indicating that
conditions in the cotton industry are
slowly on the upgrade.
For Twenty Years we have
issued this Union Stamp for
use under our
VOLUNTARY
Arbitration Contract
-OUR STAMP INSURES:
Peaceful Collective Bargaining
Forbids Both Strikes and Lock
outs Disputes settled by Arbitration
'Steady Employment and Skilled
Workman sh ip
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers
and public
Peace and Success to Workers
and Employers
Prosperity of Shoe Making Com
munities WORKERS UNION
Factory
As loyal union men and women,
we ask you to demand shoes
bearing the above Union Stamp
on Sole, Insole or Lining.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union
246 Summer Street
BOSTON, MASS.
COLLIS LOVELY, General Pres.
CHARLES L. BAINE, General
Secretary-Treasurer.
FURNITURE
and Mechanical Tools
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Bargains Always on Hand
FREE DELIVERY.
S. STEIN
S7 B R OADWAY
Near the Broadway Bank.
UNIONWTAMP
JOSEPH E. AHERN
Decorations for Balls and Celebrations
FLAGS, ARTIFICIAL FLOjWERS And
" LATTICE DECORATIONS.
Telephone Liberty 3005-5.
Rear 100 Water St.,
PRINTING
PRINTING
Patronize The Labor Press advertisers.
I rtrviTlTni r yt swvvrmnt mm
UUflflfcLLl dKUIHlKj UAKAlifc
TnJc T rw,n.11v f-
. '
Automobiles, iSought, bold and
Exchanged
Storage, Renting, Repairing, Supplies.
Also Motorcycles.
1005 MORRIS AVENUE
Near East 165th Street,
NEW YORK CITY.
THE COLLEGIATE
PREPARATORY SCHOOL
212 YORK ST.
New Haven, Conn.
Conducts evening and day
classes in all High School
subjects preparing young
men and women for admis
sion into standard colleges
of Pharmacy, Optometry,
Dentistry, Law, Medicine,
Engineering, Academic, etc.
Students successfully complet
ing ourcourse of studies will be
admitted into many colleges and
Universities upon our certificate
of graduation.
New Term Commences,
Monday, January 10th
Our office is open for enroll
ments from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.
Enroll now.
Phone Lib. 44S1 Wholesale & Retail
We Specialize in Odd Size Tires
ORANGE & ELM TIRE CO.
"First in Quality and Last in Price"
Popular Standard Makes
Auto Tires and Tubes
At Bargain Prices
S3 Elm Street, New Haven, Conn.
MILLER CORDS Fully Guaranteed
New Haven, Conn.
is

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