OCR Interpretation


The Connecticut labor press. (New Haven, Conn.) 191?-1921, January 14, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051282/1921-01-14/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE CONNECTICUT LABOR PRESS
IN WOMAN'S REALM
Bits of Interesting Things for the Housewife
and the Home of the Wage-Earner Contri
buted by the Ladies Into Whose Homes The
Connecticut Labor Press is a Welcome Visitor
VELVET IN FAVOR,
Soft Fabric Invades the Realm
of Evening Gowns.
Lovely Creations Evolved Indicate the
Material Will Hold Sway
Indefinitely.
Velvet has Invaded the realm of
evening gowns, and judging from the
way it has been received and from
some of the lovely creations evolved,
it will remain a favored medium. "for
some time.
One gown is of a delicate shade ol
French blue panne velvet with touch
es of gold for trimming. The bodice
is made on classic lines and is cot
so that the wide shoulder straps are
included, and there are no seams.
Gold ribbon bands circle the arm be
low the shoulders, the ribbon ends
being attached to the top of the
bodice. The three-piece skirt has a
velvet foundation partially covered by
a tunic of heavy mesh gold filet lace,
over which is a second tunic of vel
vet. This is quite short and has a
narrow heading at the top and a
wider gathered flounce at its lower
edge. A narrow gold ribbon ties
. around it to define the slightly raised
waist line, and just below the rib
bon is a delicate flower wreath which
encircles the gown.
Another velvet evening creation
would be suitable for a woman of
more matronly years. The colot
scheme is silver and black, worked
out with metal lace and black panne.
The bodice which is of velvet, Is cut
In surplice effect, one side of it drap-!
ing across the other to fasten at the
side. The neck is in the shape of a
rounded "V,", both front and back.
Diminutive sleeves of silver lace are
attached to a foundation under the
velvet. The velvet skirt is draped in
a few graceful folds at one side, but
Evening Frock of French Blue Panne
Velvet, With Gold Lace Tunic.
hangs comparatively straight on the
other. A tunic of silver lace appears
from beneath the draped bodice and
hangs obliquely, so that its lower
edge is above the velvet drapery on
one side of the skirt, but slants down
almost to the hem of the undraped
side.
SUITS FOR WEAR IN COUNTRY
Homespuns and Tweeds in Attractive
Colorings Make Good-Looking Out
fits for General Use.
Homespuns and tweeds in the love
liest of colorings make some extremely
good-looking suits for winter sports or
Just general country wear. They will
give a warm dash of color to the land
'scape on days when the ground is cov
ered with snow and the air is chilly.
The knickerbocker suit has evidently
come to stay. It grows in popularity
continually. All the warm red shades
and beautiful rose hues are seen in
these knickerbocker costumes quite a
departure from the tans and browns
of the old-fashioned, substantial-looking
tweeds. The trousers usually are
made of the checked material, while
the coat is of plain color. There may
be a hat and scarf to match the jacket.
CREPE DE CHINE IS LIKED
Fabric Retains Prominence In Frocks
Most of Which Have Plaitings
in Grand Array.
It Is not easy to find a frock that
Is not built of crepe de chine. Even
at night crepe predominates. All
these frocks have plaitings used In
a bewildering mixture of lines and
scallops. You can distinguish the
American from the French woman
by the tying of the slender girdle.
The former lets it slip carelessly
down over the figure to preserve the
straight line; the latter gives it a
smart pull in at the waist, quite
plainly defining it.
If the crepe de chine Is not black,
which it is eight times out of ten, it
Is white, yellow or mauve. The pres
ence of the queen of Jtoumania in
Paris at, the presentation of her
play, "The Lily of Life," and her
constant wearing of white and
mauve started all Paris coward both
colors.
VEILS IN DEMAND
Decoration for Milady's Hat at
Height of Popularity.
Countless Ways of Draping and Each
One Is Very Much in
the Mode.
The enthusiasm over veils continues
unabated. It has reached the point
where it might also be termed a fren
zy. Women have taken veils so serf
ously that they spend hours adjust
ing them.
Never in the history of the world
has the veil been in such high favor.
The matter of draping it has come
to be an art. There are countless
ways and each one very much in the
mode. This is one part of dress in
which women may be individual. The
more so. the better. Just as no two
people draw alike, no two do any
piece of drapery in the same way,
and this applies to veils.
The day when the veil was worn
just as its name implies, as some
thing to shadow the faces and flatter
the wearer by concealing any trace?
of weariness or-to soften the eft'ecl
of rouge and powder, has passed
While it is still worn for these pur
poses, its principal role today is that
of a graceful piece of drapery.
It would never be possibfe to put
one's personality into the wearing of
a hat or dress as into the wearing
of a veil. Every woman has a deft
little way of her own in its arrange
ment. In this the greatest originality
prevails.
The flowing veil may be of almost
any length. Some veils hang almost
to the bottom of the skirt and many
well down around the hips. At the
front they may merely conceal the
orbs, come just over the nose, or fall to
the knees.
Hats of bright colors or beautiful
light shades of brown are shadowed
by huge black chantilly lace veils.
Embroidered tulle takes its place
with the laces and the nets of hexa
gon mesh. The color of the veil is
a matter to be given consideration.
Black is the favorite. Then come
browns and the shade known as
blond. Very little white is used.
When it appears at all it is among
the novelties. Women have been
known, in their devotion to this
fashion, to appear in white veils that
reach to their knees.
CHIC CHAPEAU WINS FAVOR
Those who know assert this hat is
one of the prettiest to make its ap
pearance. It is not lavish but it is
neat. It Is black satin and is trimmed
with downward pointing black wings.
FASHION NOTES
Paris uses velvet profusely.
Tailored suits have wide cuffs.
Brilliant colors prevail in wraps.
Lingerie makes much use of ribbons.
Gray will be a favorite color for
spring.
Costumes are flat and tight at the
back.
Evening headdresses have disap
peared. Paisley effects in trimming are re
turning.
New fur coats are cut on redingote,
lines.
Scarlet enamel buttons appear on a
gray coat.
White pelican is a smart trimming
for hats.
Many coats are a combination of fur
and velvet.
Tailored blouses are made of crepe
de chine.
The bodice of crepe molds snugly to
the figure.
Novel dresses in stiff moire nave ap
peared in Paris.
A combination of gray and green is
favored in suits.
White blouses have collars and cuffs
of solid color.
Multicolored striped taffeta trims a
serge dress.
Round and scarf veils are replacing
the square veils.
The long-waisted bodice may give
the tunic effect.
An imitation leather fabric is used
i to line topcoats.
Black lace over taffeta is a favored
combination.
Triangular-shaped panels are a new
whim of fashion.
j P'ur-faced and cut brims are smart
millinery notes.
Black serge Is embroidered in white
porcelain beads.
Imported fabrics are in bold and ec
centric design.
-v & jrNTTi
FILET-IRISH AND CUT WORK
To fit the fashionable neck line
stores are showing this exquisite col
lar of FiLet-lrish and cutwork embroid
ery that fastens, oddly enough, at the
back.
STOCKINGS TO MATCH SHOES
Knitted Hosiery of Heavy Silk Much in
Demand for Wear With
Sports Clothes.
Stockings this year are being worn
to match the shoes or the dress," but
more frequently the shoes. The taupe
color which was worn so much in
Paris last season, has not attained the
same popularity here, and today the
popular fancy is either for black or
for brown, fawn, gray or tete de negre.
Of these negre is undoubtedly the most
popular.
With sports clothes knitted stock
ings of heavy silk are much in demand,
and these are invariably ribbed. Cash
mere hose in heather mixture in the
one-and-one rib are much liked, but
the brightly colored fleecy hose are
only a passing craze in some quarters
and will certainly not be universally
adopted.
That sports shoes this coming spring
will match in color the sweaters worn
with them is a prediction recently
made by some of the leading shoe
houses, but there are occasions of
course for which they cannot be worn.
Among the afternoon slippers one
notices a great many bronze ones, ei
ther strapped or with colonial tongues,
finished off with ribbon bows or beaded
bronze buckles.
TO WASH DELICATE FABRICS
Soapbark, Starch Water or Bran Wa
ter Advised by Government Home
Economics Specialists.
When the action of soap is likely to
injure a delicate color, use soapbark,
starch water, or bran water, advise
home economics specialists of the
United States Department of Agricul
ture. Soapbark, although not a soap, when
heated in water will form suds. To
prepare it for use, boil for ten min
utes a cup of the bark with 1 quart
of water; then cool and strain the
liquid. The "soapy" water may be
used full strength for the sponging, or
diluted for washing ; . half of this
amount is enough for tub of water.
Since the liquid is brownish, it should
be used only on dark colored goods.
Starch water is especially good for
cleaning delicate cotton fabrics. This
Is usually made by adding thin starch
paste to the wash water. Water in
which rice has been boiled, if it is not
discolored, may be used instead. If it
is not desirable to have the material
starched slightly, it must be rinsed
in salt water.
Bran water, made in the same way
as soapbark solution, is useful with
colors that are likely to fade. It does
not give suds, but cleans like starch
water.
PLUSH USED INSTEAD OF FUR
Material Affords Most Unusual Effects
in Trimming for Suits,
Dresses, Skirts. "
In trimmings we have as great a
latitude as in materials. Plush-like
fabrics are profusely used in lieu of
fur. Most unusual are the effects ob
tained "by the application of huge plush
flowers to suits and dresses. They may
cover an entire suit skirt and reappear
on the jacket at the hips, collar ari
cuffs. Enormous puffs of plush are
used to form large collars as well as
to edge the bottoms of coats.
In contrast to these heavy trimmings
are the airy French flower girdles that
young girls are wearing on their party
frocks. They are seen on silver or
delicately tinted ribbons, and the most
exquisite color effects are obtained
through their use. The flowers may
be strewn along the edge of a ribbon
girdle which is little more than a
thread of color. Small, dainty flowers
such as moss rose buds and margue
rites are chosen for these girdles. The
silver ribbons with picot edges in color
make attractive girdles of this sort.
The color of the edice is brought out
again in the flowers scattered over
the ribbon.
Golden Brown Oxfords.
A golden brown is the preferred
shade for street oxfords.
WOULD BAR STRIKES.
Denver, Jan. 14. Employers in this
tate will ask the legislature to pass a
'can't-strike" law along the lines of
the Kansas act. The position of these
Colorado employers is logical. First
thev demanded legislation that would
prohibit strikes until a state commis
sion investigated. 1 he result is the
present law.
But this has not stopped strikes', and
now they are forced to reveal their real
purpose in their demand that strikes be
prohibited.
BROTHERHOOD OF
LOCOMOTIVE MEN
IS 47 YEARS OLD
Born at Port Jervis With 11
Members Now Totals
Thousands.
Members of the Brotherhood of
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen
have been celebrating the 47th anniver
sary of the organization. On Decem
ber 1, 1873, 11 firemen of the old Erie
road met at Port Jervis, N. Y., and.
organized the Brotherhood of Locomo
tive Firemen now the Brotherhood of
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen.
From that small beginning the brother
hood has steadily advanced until it has
become one of the strongest and most
progressive labor organizations in the
world.
In writing under the title of "Our
Brotherhood" in the last issue of the
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen's
Magazine, Editor John F. McNamee
tells of the militant spirit which has
made the brotherhood's wonderful pro
gress possible. He says :
"The brotherhood has not always been
a. 'labor' organization. The great strike
of 1877, which no organization insti
tuted, involved large numbers of our
members. As a result of that unauth
orized strike our brotherhood lost a
great portion of its membership. Out
of that situation came a severe per
secution of our members, which resulted
in the temporary discontinuance of our I
brotherhood as a labor organization, and
from 1880 to 1885 it was purely an in
surance organization. At the conven
tion held in Philadelphia in September,
1885, however, the brotherhood again
became a Labor organization in the
nroner sense of the term.
"One of the most trying ordeals '
through which our brotherhood has had I
to pass was that of the great strike on j
the C, B. & Q. R. R. during the year j
1888. Notwithstanding the brotherhood
was not directly victorious in that
struggle, the upbuilding of the order
proceeded thereafter with greater
strides than ever before in its history.
Again, in 1894, came the strike of the
American Railway Union against the
Pulknan Company, in which a large
number of our members became in
volved. However, notwithstanding the
abor
Business Concerns sWho Are
Trades Council's Co
In Accordance with the Policy Adopted by i he New Haven Trades Council it is Our Duty to Co
operate with Those who Co-operate with Us. Consult this List Carefully before Makinsr
any Purchases. Every Concern Represented Here Wants Your Trade Enough
to Bid for It Directly Through Our Own Labor Newspaper.
AUTOMOBILES
The Howard Company, 228-260 Boule
vard, near Kimberly Ave.
The White Motors Co., 266 Crown St.
AUTOMOBILE GARAGE
The Howard Company, 228-260 Boule
vard, near Kimberly Ave.
AUTOMOBILE SUPPLIED
The White Motors Co.. 266 Crown St.
AUTOMOBILE TIRES & TUBES
A. E. Ailing Rubber Co., 7-9-13
Church St.
Orange & Elm Tire Co., 53 Elm St.
Save 40 to 50. Central Automo
bile Tire Co., Cor. College and Crown
Sts.
BAKERIES
Chamberlain, "The Cruller Man," 147
Temple St.
Morv's (Barker System) Bakery, 392
State St.
BANKS
Connecticut Savings Bank, corner
Church and Crown Sts.
First National Bank, 40-42 Church St.
Mechanics Bak, The, Church and
Center Sts.
Merchants National Bank, State corner
Chapel.
National Savings Bank, 145 Orange St.
New Haven Savings Bank, Orange cor
ner Court St.
Union & New Haven Trust Co., The,
57 Church St.
BOOTS AND SHOES
Besse-Richey Co., 784 Chapel St.
Cummings & Frawley, Boston Branch
citino Store. 845 Chanel M.
Sorosis Shoe Co., 814 Chapel St.
BUILDERS SUPPLD3S
New York Plumbing & Masons Sup
ply Co., 43 DixwellAye.
CAMERAS
City Hall Pharmacy Co., The, 159
Church bt, next to t-ityjn.au
CARPETS AND RUGS
Bullard's, 91-97 Orange St.
W. B. Hall, 458 to 470 State, near Elm
St.
Window Shade Co., 75-81 Orange St.
"C. E-Z" GAS LIGHTS
Gas Co.'s Appliance Dept., 70 Crown St.
CHECKING ACCOUNTS
First Natioanl Bank, 40-42 Church St.
Mechanics Bank, The, Church and
Center Sts.
Merchants National Bank, State cor
ner Chapel.
Union & New Haven Trust Co., I he,
57 Church St.
CIGARS
The Gillespie Drug Co., 2 stores, 744
Chapel St., and bS Chapel St.
Cleaners and dyers
West Haven Tailoring Co., 499 Camp
bell Ave., and 25 Grove St
CLOTHIERS
Besse-Richey Co., 784 Chapel St.
Hyman's, Inc., 18 Churdi St
J. Johnson & Sons, "The Live Store,
85-89 Church St.
COAL
The Howard Company, 228-260 Boule
vard, near Kimberly Ave.
CONFECTIONERY
The House of Hasselbach, the home of
home made candy and ice cream.
Under new management, J. A.
DeBowes, Mgr.
CRULLERS
Chamberlain, "The Cruller Man," 147
Temple St.
DIAMONDS
The Bijou Jewelers, The Store of
Quality, 32 Church St.
DRAPERIES
Window Snade Co., 75-81 Orange St.
loss in membership and charters of
lodges as a result thereof, our brother
hood'' came safely through it all and
again entered on an era of progress
and prosperity.
"Regardless of how severely she may
have been buffeted by hostile waves
thrown up by the storms that have be
set her progress the good ship Tried
and True is today riding gloriously and
serenely upon a placid sea, more formid
able and grander than ever in solidar
ity, efficiency and strength of construc
tion, and destined to accomplish in the
fullest measure the great purpose of
her existence the uniting of the men
of our craft in fraternal bonds of fel
lowship, the elevation of their social,
moral and intellectual standing, the pro
tection of their interests and the pro
motion of their general welfare."
THE USUAL STORY.
Boston, Jan. 14. Policemen who re
placed striking policemen have estab
lished unenviable records, according to
the annual report of Police Commis
sioner Curtis. This official was most
active in opposing the recent effort of
policemen to improve conditions. He
disbanded their frateranl organization,
and when they affiliated with the A. F.
of L. he discharged many patrolmen.
As a last resort the police struck.
Now Police Commissioner Curtis
ricknowledges that eight times more
property was reported stolen last year
than in 1916. During the year 73 po
licemen were found guilty of various
charges and dismissed and 231 resigned.
Of the latter number 5F quit while j
charges were pending against them.
TRADE UNION WORK SHOPS.
Brussels, Belgium, Jan. 14. To check
high prices the government asked for
estimates for the making of national
costumes, and trade unions sent in an
order to prevent the work falling into
the hands of exploiters. The govern
.ment gave the unionists a preliminary
order for 6,000 costumes. The unions
will maintain their working conditions
and also reduce the number of unem
ployed. ADOPT EIGHT-HOUR DAY.
Birmingham, Ala., Jan. 14. Despite
kstorms of protest by manufacturing in
terests, the city commissioners have
voted hereafter eight hours shall be the
basic work day for municipal employes.
Read The Labor Freer-Labor's paper.
DRUGGISTS
The City . Hall Pahrmacy Co., 159
Church St., next to City Hall.
The Gillespie Drug Co., 2 stores, 744
Chapel St. and 63 Chapel St
DRY GOODS
Sugenheimer & Sons, 15-19 Church St.
EDISON PHONOGRAPHS
The Edison Shop, The Pardee-Ellen-berger
Co.. Props., 964 Chapel St.
ELECTRIC LIGHT
The United Illuminating Co., 128
Temple St.
ELECTRIC POWER
The United Illuminating Co., 128
Temple St.
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
New Haven Electric Co., Wholesale and
Contracting, 50 Crown St. Retail
Store, 940 Chapel St.
EXPRESS
Connecticut Co., Express Dept., Com
merce St.. New Haven.
EYEGLASSES
Fahy, Optician, 148 Temple St., Liberty
Bldg., Next Olympia Theatre.
FIRE BRICK MFRS.
The Howard Company, Manufacturers.
228-260 Boulevard, near Kimberly
Ave.
FLOOR COVERINGS
Bullard's, 91-97 Orange St.
Window Shade Co., 75-81 Orange St.
Boston Furniture Co., 821 and 823
Grand Ave.
FLORISTS '
John J. McQuiggan, 123 Church St.
(opposite the Green).
S. H. Moore Co., 1054 Chapel St.,
Phone Liberty 3740 and 3741.
The Myers Flower Shop, 936 Chapel t
FLOWERS BY TELEGRAPH
Delivered anywhere S. H. Moore Co.
1054 Chapel St.. Phone Liberty 3740
and 3741.
FURNISHINGS
Besse-Richey Co., 784 Chapel St.
J. Johnson & Sons, "The Live Store,"
85-89 Church St.
Pager's, 6-8 Congress Ave., and 741
Grand Ave.
FURNITURE
Bullard's. 91-97 Orange St.
W. B. Hall, 458 to 470 State, near Elm
St.
S. Stein, 57 Broadway.
Boston Furniture Co., 821 and 823
Grand Ave.
FURS AND FUR WORK
The Friend E. Brooks Co., 125 Church
St.
GAS HEATERS AND RANGES
Gas Co.'s Appliance Dept., 70 Crown St.
GROCERIES
E. Schoenberger & Sons, 615 Howard
Ave., 339 Grand Ave., 360 State St,
11 Shelton Ave.. 151 Dixwell Ave.,
and 28 Congress Ave.
GAS WATER HEATERS
Gas Co.'s Salesroom, 70 Crown St.
Send for Booklet.
HABERDASHERS
Dan Carroll. 172 Temple St.
HARDWARE
N. T. Bushnell Co., 289-295 State St.
HATS
Besse-Richev Co., 784 Chapel St.
Hardy Hat Co.. 216 Meadow St.
J. Johnson & Sons, "The Live Store," i
85-89 Church St.
Pager's 6-8 Congress Ave. and 741
Gran dAve.
CHARGES BALFOUR
DECEIVED U. S. ON
SECRET TREATIES
Kept Quiet About Them Until
' Great Britain Loan Was
Raised Here.
Washington, Jan. 14. William Den
man of San Francisco, first chairman
of the Shipping Board, declares in an
open letter to members of Congress,
that the reason Arthur J. Balfour, form
er British secretary of state for foreign
affairs, failed to disclose to American
government officials the existence of the
secret treaties between Great Britain
and Japan- required "no further ex
planation than his quest for the four
billions of dollars," which the United
States loaned Great Britain early in the
war.
Mr. Denman said Mr. Balfour ar
ranged "for these moneys" in May, 1917,
when he was in this country as head of
the British war mission.
"His protestations of deep friendship
for the interest of the United States,"
wrote Mr. Denman, "filled our press
and warmed his auditors in the halls of
Congress and at the tables where our
hospitality was extended to him.
"While he was making them the ink
was scarcely dry on the last of the
'secret Shantung treaties.' which, from
a naval standpoint destroyed the Island
of Guam, probably our most valuable
naval base in the Pacific .
"japan, our rival in the Pacific, was
by agreement with Great Britain, con
firmed in the possession of the Mar
ianne group of islands, which placed an
unsurmountable barrier between us and
the North Asiatic coast and the Japan
ese islands.
"Great Britain's price for this was the
British control of the islands of the
South Pacific group, which in the event
of hostilities to which such diplomacy
inevitablv tends, isolated Guam from
the Philippines.
"It is obvious that Mr. Balfour owed
to us the disclosure of the existence of
these agreements. Why he did not re
quires no further explanation than his
quest of the four billions of" dollaVs.
"It Will help liberal England to under
stand the growing mistrust of America
toward her to know that there was
Members
- Operative
HEATING APPARATUS
PIPELESS FURNACES
Caloric Furnace Co., 67 Elm St., New
Haven.
HOME MADE ICE CREAM
The House of Hasselbach, the home of
home made candy and ice cream.
Under new management, J. A.
DeBowes, Mgr.
HOT BREAD HOURLY
Mory"s (Barker System) Bakery, 392
State St.
ICE CREAM
The House of HASSELBACH, 796
Chapel St.
JEWELERS
The Bijou Jewelers, The Store of
Quality, 32 Church St.
Samuel H. Kirby & Sons, Inc., 822
Chapel St.
LADIES' BOOTS AND SHOES
Cummings & Frawley, Boston Branch
Shoe Store, 845 Chapel St.
Sorosis Shoe Co., 814 Chapel St.
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
Braus Cloak & Suit Co., 813-817 Chapel
St.
Hyman's, Inc., 18 Church St
LAUNDRIES SHIRTS AND
COLLARS
The Nonpareil Laundry Co., 271 Blatch
ley Ave.
MACARONI MFRS.
New England Macaroni Co., 445 Chapel
St.
MASONS SUPPLIES
The Howard Company, 228-260 Boule
vard, near Kimberly Ave.
MEATS
E. S hoenberger & Sons, 615 Howard
Ave.. 339 Grand Ave., 360 State St.
11 Shelton Ave., 151 Dixwell Ave.,
and 28 Congress Ave.
"meats and vegetables
Rowland Bros., 475 Campbell Ave.,
West Haven.
MECHANICS' TOOLS
The John E. Bassett & Co., 754 Chapel
St. and 214 State St.
N. T. Bushnell Co., 289-295 State St
The C. S. Mersick & Co.. 290 State St.
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
Hyman's, Inc., 18 Church St.
MEN'S OUTFITTERS
Besse-Richey Co., 784 Chapel St.
MILLINERY
Sugenheimer& Soi 15-19 Church St
MISSES' ANE 'CHILDREN'S
SHW.S
Sorosis Shoe Co.. 114 Chapel St
MOTOR ITrCLES
Indian Motorcycle 1 s;cncy, 102 Ken-
sington St.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
The Edison Shop: 'llie Pardee-EUen-
berger Co.. Prop; , '164 Chapel St.
Roy J. Ward, 176 '!mple St
PAINTS OILS' VARNISHES
The Booth & Law Co., 35 Crown St.
H. M. Hodges & Bro., 2 stores, 952
Chapel St., and 2?0-292 York St
PAINTERS SUPPLIES
The Booth & Law Co., 35 Crown St.
The F. E. Spencet Co., 237-239 State
St.
PAPER HANG) IRS' SUPPLIES
New Haven Wall I'aprr Co., 33 Crown
St.
PHONOGRAPHS And RECORDS
The Edison Shop, The Pardee-Ellen-
berger Co.. Props.. 964 Chapel St
Roy J. Ward, 176 Temple St
active deception in addition to suppres
sion of the facts, at the time the loan
was negotiated." '
Air. Denman then charges that at a
conference between the Balfour mission
and himself and Secretary Lansing and
Assistant Secretary Polk of the State
Department, Mr. Balfour stated that
"all the agreements between the allies,
affecting the interests of the United
States and general world shipping con
ditions" would be "fully disclosed to the
American conferees," but that he had
never "redeemed his promise."
DAILY PRESS DISTORTS.
Cincinnati, Jan. 14. "It should be, and
probably is. unnecessary to advise trade
unionists to look with suspicion upon
statements relative to trade union activ
ities, which are published in the daily
press," writes John P. Frey, editor of
the International Molders' Journal.
The labor editor cites incidents of
complete misrepresentation and de
clares that "it is to be regretted that
the public press is not the reliable source
of information concerning trade union
activities which it should be, for a cor
rectly informed public opinion would
long ago have prevented many of the
most unfair and un-American conditions
which have developed in industry."
MAYOR MEDIATES.
San Francisco, Jan.14. Mayor Rolph
is acting as mediator in the case of
ferry boat workers and several railroad
companies who are resisting wage de
mands of the vessel men.
TO FIGHT REACTION.
Springfield, 111., Jan. 14. The coming
session of the state legislature will be
marked by attempts of reaction to se
cure the passage of anti-labor laws,
which include the cossack system. La
bor will resist this plan and will also
submit a series of constructive propo
sals. Seattle, Jan. 14. Representatives of
employers and employed formed a com
mittee in this city to recommend
changes in the state industrial insurance
act to the state legislature. President
Short of the State Federation of Labor
headed the workers' delegation. Mem
bers of the state industrial commission
assisted the conferees.
The union label makes woman the
strongest as well as the gentlest of
God's creatr-"s.
of the New Haven
Campaign
PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLD3S
The City Hall Pharmacy Co.. 159
Church St.. next to Citv Hall
j Fahy, Optician, 148 Temple St., Liberty
piug., xexi iympianeatre.
PICTURES AND FRAICES
H. M. Hodges & Bro, 952 Chapel St
PLUMBING AND HEATDSG
Wm. Keane & Son, 31 Broadway.
PRESCRIPTIONS
The Gillespie Drug Co., 2 stores. 741
Chapel St., and 63 Chapel St
RECREATION.
Inquire Connecticut Co., Trolley Trips
Savin Rock, Lighthouse, Momauguin.
RUBBER BOOTS AND SHOES
Ailing Rubber Co., 7-9-13 Church St
New Haven Rubber Store. 819 Chapel
St
Youlhart Rubber Co., 4 Washington
Ave.
RUBBER CLOTHING
Ailing Rubber Co, 7-9-13 Church St
New Haven Rubber Store, 819 Chapel
RUBBER & OILED CLOTIHNG
Youlhart Rubber Co., 4 Washington
Ave.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
First National Bank, 40-42 Church St
Merchants National Bank, State, cor-
Chapel St
Second National Bank, 135 Church St,
opposite The Green.
SAVINGS BANKS
Connecticut Saving;? Bank, Corner
Church and Crown Sts.
First National Bank, 40-42 Church St
Merchants National Bank, The, State
corner Chapel Sts.
National Savings Bank, 145 Orange St
New Haven Savings Bank. Orange
corner Court St
Union & New Haven Trust Co, 57
Church St.
SPORTING GOODS
Ailing Rubber Co., 7-9-13 Church St
New Haven Rubber Store, 819 Chapel
St
STOVES AND RANGES
Boston Furniture Co., 821 and 823
Grand Ave.
Bullard's. 91-97 Orange St
W. B. Hall, 458- to 470 State, near Elm
St.
Wm. Keane & Son, 31 Broadway.
TELEPHONE LOCAL AND
LONG DISTANCE
The Southern New England Teleohone
Co., General Offices, Telephone Build
ing 114-126 Court St.. New Haven,
Conn.
THEATRES
Poli's Bijou.
Poli's Hyperion.
Poli's Palace.
TIRES AND TUBES
Ailing Rubber Co., 7-9-13 Church St
New Haven Rubber Store, 819 Chapel
St.
TRUNKS AND BAGS
John Brown, Inc., 153-157 George St,
corner Church St
WALL PAPER
H. M. Hodges & Bro., 2 stores, 952
Chapel St., and 290-292 York St
New Haven Wall Paper Co., 33 Crown
St.
WATCHES
The Bijou Jewelers, The Store of
Quality, 32 Church St.
Samuel H. Kirby & Sons, Inc. 822
Chapel St

xml | txt