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The Connecticut labor press. (New Haven, Conn.) 191?-1921, January 14, 1921, Image 8

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THE CONNECTICUT LABOR PRESS
SHOWS DP WHERE
NATION'S WEALTH
IS HELD BY FEW
Farmers' Council Head Also
- Points Out Where Just
Tax Is Due.
Asserting that a Federal tax upon
estates, that is, upon the capital value
of property is essential to enable the
government promptly to compel the
wealthiest classes who have profited
most from the war to pay their share
of the costs of the war, George P.
Hampton, managing director of the
- Farmers National Council, in a state
ment on how to pay the cost of the war
and current expenses of the govern
ment, says that 33 people own nearly
two per cent, of the national wealth.
u "In 1918," Mr. Hampton states,
"22,696 millionaires were estimated by
the eminent publicist, Mr. Richard Spil
lane, to over 27.2 per cent, of the na
tional wealth or dver $68,000,000,000,
while the 33 richest Americans owned
property worth about $4,837,000,000, or
roughly two per cent, of the national
wealth. In . 1918 the national wealth
was estimated to be $250,000,000,000. It
is now estimated to be $500,000,000,000.
Our ' 23,000 millionaires are probably
worth now about $136,000,000,000, and
the 33 richest Americans about $9,675,
000,000. "If we estimate the net return on this
property at only five per cent, the aver
age income of these 23,000 millionaires
is nearly $300,000. Of course many of
them have invested largely in tax ex
empt bonds and own a considerable
proportion of the forty billion dollars
of such tax exempt bonds. While a
constitutional amendment would enable
the m government to tax the incomes of
these individuals, it will take some time
to adopt such an amendment. A direct
tax, however, could be levied upon cap
ital values, and should be promptly
levied by Congress instead of seeking
some method of placing additional bur
dens of taxation through a retail sales
tax, a general sales tax, and other con
sumption taxes upon the hundreds of
' thousands of families who today are re
ceiving several hundreds of dollars less
than they need to maintain the Amer
ican standard of living.
"It will be noted," Mr. Hampton com
ments, "that the 23,000 millionaires are
worth nearly 10 times as much as our
total national debt, exclusive of Ujans
to the nations with which we were
associated during the war."
Discussing the causes and results of
this" tremendous and dangerous concen
tration of wealth, Mr. Hampton says:
"America financed the war largely by
discounting the future, and the concen
trated wealth of the country is now
making a concerted effort to evade its
financial responsibilities, and to make
the workers pay most of the war costs
through a retail sales tax and other
sales taxes, and similar consumption
taxes.
"A retail sales tax and other sales
taxes and all similar taxes on food,
clothing and shelter called consumption
taxes, must be paid chiefly by the work
ers on the farm, in factories, mines and
transportation, millions of whom are
getting less than the minimum wage
necessary to maintain a family on a
decent American standard."
Mr. Hampton concludes: "The full
money cost of the war must be paid by
taxes on incomes, corporation profits,
estates and privilege. Such taxes will
yield $7,000,000,000 to $8,000,000,000 a
year for many years without imposing
any hardships upon anyone. American
farmers who this year have lost mil
lions through the slump in farm prices
will fight to the end the plan of the
selfish privileged interests to saddle the
huge war debt upon our people for
years, and insist upon prompt ayment
of that debt by those who profited so
hugely by the war and by the monopo
lies built up in this country before and
during the war.
TELEPHONE CO. MAKES
A NEW HIGH RECORD
At End of 1920 Had 176,424
Phones Working in
Connecticut.
A new high record Tor telephone
development in this state was estab
lished in 1920. A period of extreme
business activity and unprecedented de
mand for telephone service for social
uses, is forcefully indicated by a net
gain of 16,596 telephone in this state in
the year just closed. On December 31st,
last, there were 176,424 telephones in
use in Connecticut.
This is the largest growth the South
ern New England Telephone Company
has had in .any year m its history and
oresent indications forecast a continua
tion of this remarkable expansion of its
business.
The figures showing the gain in each
of the five districts into which the state
is. divided by the telephone company,
to better facilitate its business, follow:
Hartford district, 4,845; New Haven
district. 4.659: Bridgeport district,
,836; Waterbury district, 1,806, and
,Tew London district, 1,448. New Ha
vpn district's e-ain is more than double
the gain of 1919. Hartford nearly
doubled its 1919 increase; Bridgeport
gained about 75 per cent, over its de
velonment of 1919 and Waterbury dis
trict's gain over the same year was about
M) per cent. The New London district
in 1919 suffered a severe setback, tele
phonewLe. by the withdrawal of the
great wartime business activity there
and showed only a small gain in that
year. The increase for this district in
1920 is nine times the gain for 1919
and is based on permanent business
development in that section.
MILLIONS VOTED TO
ENFORCE PROHIBITION
Washington, Jan. 14. The House
went up and down the ladder in voting
on appropriations for enforcement of
the prohibition law. First rejecting an
amendment to the pending appropria
tion measure under which the bureau
of internal revenue would be given
$100,000,000 to break up outlaw liquor
traffic, the House adopted, 86 to 48, an
amendment by Representative Volstead
of Minneapolis, father of the law, in
creasing the total from $6,500,000 to
$7,100,000. Before this vote was taken
the House, jumping from one extreme
to the other, defeated without count an
amendment limiting the amount to
$100,000,000, and another one cutting
the appropriation to $1,000,000.
There was a tinge of -old-time pro
hibition bitterness in the half -hour de
bate preceding the final clearing away
of the whole question as to how far
Congress should go in making the
country "bone dry."
WANT TO BORROW
$100,000 TO COVER
OPEN SHOP FAILURE
Hartford Building- Blowup Once
More Before the
Courts.
Hartford, Jan. 14. Charles C. Cook,
receiver of the Hartford Home Building
association, inc., yesterday filed with the
clerk of the superior court, the formal
orders Judge Maltbie will be asked to
approve in the session of the court to
day to straighten out the tangle due to
the failure of the "open shop" rnethods
used in the building.
He will ask for authority to borrow
$100,000, to be secured by receiver's
certificates and he also asks that he be
allowed to sell the certificates, which
will bear interest at 6 per cent., at 98
cents on the dollar. The certificates to
run for one year from the date of their
issue.
The receiver will also ask for an
order that he be permitted to pay Wil
liam H. Scoville and Clinton L. Cole
for services as appraisers. The ap
praisers have presented a bill for
$2,450 for services and disbursements,
the same to be equally divided between
them. The bondholders' committee, now
furnishing the money to the receiver,
regards the bill as reasonable, Mr. Cook
says.
Mr. Cook, as receiver, make a finan
cial statement, showing as receiver he
has received a total of $103,346.51, and
that to January 10, he had $27,774.60,
on deposit in bank, he having expended
$75,571.91. "
The other matter Mr. Cook will call
to the attention of the judge, is for
an order to sell certain personal prop
erty, in the way of temporary build
ings, equipment, tools, automobiles and
automobile trucks, he having no further
use for this personal property in con
nection with the construction.
SENATE 'STALLS'
ON IMMIGRATION
RESTRICTION BILL
Despite Emergency Will Hold Up
Any Legislation for Present
Term.
Washington, Jan. 14. Despite the
general desire of the country, the Sen
ate, as was anticipated after the "in
terests" got busy, is apparently going to
stall on the immigration restriction bill
that was passed by the House and will
continue stalling until the present ses
sion of Congress is adjourned, in March,
and meantime the flood of European un
desirables will continue to pour into the
United States. Hearings on the pro
posed restriction bill were held by the
Senate committee this week and were
purly bluff, members of the committee
asserting after that there was little
likelihood of such a law being passed
this session. After that the emergency
due to the unemployment will probably
be lifted and the committee - can get
away with it.
Oneof the members of the immigra
tion committee predicted inasmuch as
the Johnson bill admittedly was an
emergency measure designed to meet a
temporary need that of checking the
alleged flood it probably would be side-
tracKed until such time as the emer
gency could be proven. Other commit
tee members expressed similar opinions,
saying that the present immigration
laws would remain unchanged for the
present or until the committee was able
to draft permanent immigration legis
lation.
Protection for, the American laborers
from foreign "imports" on an equality
with the protection accorded American
products by tariff laws was asked of
the senate committee during the week
by Frank Morrison, secretary of the
American Federation of Labor. Mr.
Morrison said the position of the fed
eration was that of straight-cut pro
tection without any reservation, for a
period of two years, from alien labor.
"We object," he said, "to throwing
the doors wide open, flooding the Amer
ican labor market with cheap European
labor and denying the American work
er the same protection you give his pro
ducts under the tariff laws."
The federation secretary told the
committee that reports just received
from labor officials in 141 cities showed
the total number of unemployed in
those places to be 1,819,272, and said he
would not "dare estimate what the total
of all cities would show."
"It is a high crime," he continued,
"for any man, in the face of these
figures, to advocate the bringing of
millions of men from Europe and add
them to the number of unemployed al
ready here. The flood is ready to
come."
Mr. Morrison declared the American
workman was entitled to "sustaining
employment," and that he could not get
this as long as the doors were open to
the Europeans.
Secretary Morrison was preceded on
the stand by a delegation of business
men representing construction industries
and manufacturers throughout the
country. John R. Wiggins of Pennsyl
vania, leader of the delegation, oppoed
the Johnson bill and declared arguments
that a "flood of Europeans was immi
nent" were "absolutely fallacious." He
asked for modification or elimination
of literacy tests and contract restric
tion laws.
ACTORS .THREATEN TO
CALL STRIKE AGAIN
New York, J. H: r -? -t:i . of
the nation-wide t--.? -Vl"
may resu', from tbt. ,"i,;,''!' Na
tions betw,- he Acm' fp'y asso
ciation and the Proc.cim iiai. gets
association, which was pivCJtated hers
yesterday.
The rupture was caused by the . de
mand of the Actors' Equity association
that Lee & J. J. Shubert be expelled
from the Producing Managers' associa
tion for the illegal violations of their
agreement with the Equity and discrim
inatory treatment against Equity actors.
The exact status of the dispute,
which created intense excitement in the
theatrical district, -will not be publicly
announced until tomorrow, when the
Pr-oHurincr Manatrprn' asnsciation meets
1 to consider the complaints lodged
against the bhuberts.
Lee Shubert characterized the com
plaint against the Shubert interests "as
silly, and based on six dinky chorus
girls."
The Shuberts .employ more than
1,000 actors, controlling virtually 75
per cent, of the New York playhouses,
and a like percentage throughout the
country.
LITTLE FOR LABOR
(Continued from Page' 1.)
ford; Foote, Colchester; Fitts, Hamp
ton ; Downs, Bethany.
Insurance Senator Goodwin, ch. ;
Senator Butler; Fuller, Tolland; Brig
ham, Granby; Meech, West Hartford;
Stocker, Beacon Falls; Middlebrook,
Sharon ; Cutler, Colchester ; Butler,
Roxbury; Veitch, Manchester; Spauld
ing, Brooklyn; Sanford, East Haddam;
Fillow, Danbury.
Judiciary Senator De Laney, ch. ;
Senator Brown ; Buckley, Union ; Wil
liamson, Darien ; Sherwood, Westport;
Perry, New Haven ; Hall, Orange ;
Campbell, Enfield ; Nickerson, Corn
wall ; Wall, Torrington ; Barry, Gris
wold ; Storrs, Ansonia ; Darby, Killing
ly. Public Health and Safety Senator
Emerey, chairman ; Senator Bake
well ; Higgins, Coventry, Thompson,
Norwich; Hagstrom, Thompson; Kel
ley, Windsor Locks; Bristol, jr., Can
ton; Hasen, Redding; Frink, (Mrs.),
Canterbury; Brace, Ellington; Lincoln,
Middletown; Moser, Rocky Hill.
Roads, Bridges and Rivers Senator
Archibald MacDonald, 28th District,
chairman ; Senator J. H. MacDonald,
Ninth District; Covert, New Britain;
Brainard, Branford; Reel, North Han
aan ; Pierpont, Ridgefield ; Ryan,
Thompson; Hanson, Plainville; Rowe,
Simsbury; Briggs, Lebanon; Hutchins,
Columbia; Mascotti, Harwinton; Arri
goni, Durham.
Cities and Boroughs Senator Bow
ers, ch. ; Senator Drew; Ford, New
Haven ; Smith, Manchester ; Pendleton,
Norwich ; Willis, Greenwich ; Ruther
ford, New Britain; Curtis, ' Newton ;
Beach, New Milford; Klatte, Seymour;
Smith, Windham; Comer, East Had
dam ; Randell, Vernon.
Education Senator Bakewell, ch. ;
Senator Challenger ; Lacey, Fairfield ;
Phillips, Shelton ; Ripley, Manchester ;
Persiani, Southington ; Selden, Had
dam ; Noble, Suffield; Hooker (Mrs.),
Hartford ; Kendall, Lisbon ; Greene,
Middlebury; Flynn, Bethlehem; Jewett
(Mrs.), Tolland.
Excise Senator Furcolo, ch. ; Sena
tor Bowers ; Dunn, Hartford ; Parker,
Mansfield ; Church, Barkhamstead ;
Hayes, Plymouth ; Warner, Hamden ;
Johnson, Canterbury ; Hart, Farming
ton ; Leete, Guilford ; Harrison, North
, Branford; Andrews, Danbury; Cahill,
East Windsor.
Executive Nominations (Senate)
Senator Hall, ch. ; Sen. Trumbull.
Federal Relations Sen. Clark, ch. ;
Senator Hall ; Nickerson, Cornwall ;
Smith, Groton ; Watkins, Norwalk ;
Brown (Miss), Naugatuck ; Smith,
Colebrook ; Alderman, Burlington ;
Tripp, Eastf ord ; Brown, Ashton ; Ar
rigoni, Durham ; Stark, Lyme ; Alcott,
Avon.
Appropriations Senator Hall, ch. ;
Senator Clark ; Eaton, North Haven ;
Morgan, Fairfield ; Osborn, Branford ;
French, Thompson ; Dunham, Weth
ersfield ; Keith, Putnam ; Brackett,
Wellington ; Wadsworth, Farmington;
Rogers, New London ; Williams, Win
chester; Molloy, Derby.
Congressional and Senatorial Dis
tricts Senator Potter, ch. ; Senator
Pickett; Hill, Shelton; Campbell, En
field; Chidsey, East Haven; Piatt,
Newton ; Duvert, Putnam ; Pobuda,
Willington; Gibbs, Norfolk; Rizner,
Union ; Lincoln, Middletown ; Middle
brook, Sharon ; Porsiani, Southington.
Constitutional Amendments (joint)
Senator Goodwin, ch. ; Senator Treat ;
Bell, Salisbury; Wells, Bristol; Alder
man, Burlington ; Downs, Bethany ; Pin
ley, Bolton; Sweet, Lyme; Kingsley,
Salem; Treadwell, New Fairfield;
Morse, Woodstock-; Leach, Plymouth;
Hale, Portland.
Constitutional Amendments (House)
Hickey, East Hartford; Watkins,
Norwalk; Hooker (Mrs), Hartford;
Palombo, Waterbury; Schofield, Nau
gatuck; Skilton. Morris; Butler, Rox
bury; Lewis. Chester; Hodge, East
Hampton; Fillow, Danbury; Dennis,
Stafford.
MACHINISTS ASK
(Continued from First Page.)
earnings, are assigning their repair
work on locomotives and freight cars
to private companies which they are
diligently fostering as heavy money
makers. Since the public ultimately
pays the bill for the transportation in
dustry, he points out, this practice means
that the public is being looted so that
profitable returns may be realized for
certain equipment companies which are
controlled by the same financial inter
ests which control the railroads.
The cost of locomotive repair work
when done in these outside shops, the
petition recites, costs the railroads on
an average of four times as much as ti
costs in their own shops. Repair work
on locomotives, which under ordinary
circumstances could be done in railroad
shops at a cost of from four to five
thousand dollars, amounts to approxi
mately twenty thousand when done by
these private concerns. Since locomo
tive work of the entire transportation
system of the country amounts annual
ly to between $500,000,000 and $600,
000,000, the effect would be to burden
the general public with an excess and
unwarranted charge of at least half a
billion dollars a year.
The same condition, it is alleged, ex
ists with respect to freight car repair
work. More than $50,000,000 freight
cars of various types already have been
assigned for repair. The excess paid
by the railroads for the repair of these
cars by private companies amounts at
least to $600 a car. If the Class 1
carriers aione would have their repairs
done by outside companies on this basis
of extortionate charges, then the com
panies' bill for repair of freight cars
alone would be increased a quarter of a
billion a year.
Although conceding that the Inter
state Commerce Commission has no
jurisdiction in a labor case, the petition
sets forth that an investigation is im
perative to prevent railroad companies
from taking funds paid by the public
r- effective transportation machinery
and u '-ns them illegitimately and inde
fensibly tor the purpose of disrupting
organization of railway employes vrluc.4
received goverr t . .gl sanction and
COliirii ."J JafK-r; -i nnt ; ;t war."
Asking for ar. hmr.t;Uotr- investiga
tion and hearing. Mach.iusi.; v-lare
they arc ready to submit furth- -:i-..s
of these abuse? and sugg'ft rei.-ies
for their cessauon. In general, .t is
recommended that the commission pro
hibit railroad companies frm assigning
repair work to outside companies under
specific permission of the commission.
NEW BRITAIN SHOP
ON 24-HOUR WEEK
New Britain, Jan. 14. Practically the
entire plant of the New Britain Ma
chine company went on a 24-hour week
ly schedule yesterday.
Announcement has been made at
Landers, Frary & Clark's plant, of a
10 per cent, reduction in wages.
Don't wait for others to boost the
union label, card and button. Do this
yourself.
i
UNION THEATRES
Houses Entitled to Oar
First Preference in Patronage
THE HYPERION.
When George Broadhurst, who has
written a score of successes for the
stage, wrote "Bought and Paid For"
he wrote a domestic drama that took
New York by storm, playing at one
theater there to capacity for two years
'with Julia Dean in the leading role and
for five years the play was a tremend
ous success on the road. More than
all else to show theatergoers of today
what fine drama they used to write in
the days a few years back, "Bought
and Paid For" will be the offering next
week by the Hyperion Players and
from the standpoint of production,
mounting, artistic work and all else the
coming production will be every bit
equal to any that has ever played be
fore. Virginia Blaine is the central figure
in the drama. Her charms attract
Robert Stafford, a wealthy railroad
magnate, and he marries her because he
really loves her. But Stafford is ad
dicted to drink and other vices and his
conduct becomes unbearable so much
so that his wife decides to leave home
and as she goes she hears ringing in
her ears the threat he makes that "she
will come back because she is his,
bought and paid for." To reveal the
whole story would mar the enjoyment
of those who intend seeing the play, but
it is not amiss to state that Ninita Bris
tow in the role of "Virginia Blaine" is
called upon to do the most exacting
work of her stage career.
Malcolm Fassett, who seems destined
to have difficult- roles to portray but
always portrays them well, will be seen
as "Robert Stafford," and he has some
big scenes during the play. Eric Dress
ier as "Jimmy" Gilly has a whale of a
role for he is the dove of peace that
settles over the household. Rhea Dive
ly and the other favorites are happily
cast and Director Arthur Holman is in
his element in staging this play.
Viewed from any angle "Bought and
Paid For" is the punchiest play of the
season at the Hyperion. Seats for the
entire week are now on sale at the box
office. Announcement is made that the
following production will be a musical
comedy none other than the tuneful
exhilarating and certainly new hit
"The Little Whopper," last seen here
at top prices with Vivienne Siegel in
the leading role.
"the bijou.
Seldom has a feature picture been
offered to the patrons of New Haven
that has the universal appeal of "The
Race of the Age," which is being shown
at the Bijou theater Sunday evening.
Every newspaper in New York city de
clared the picture one of the most
thrilling ever screened, and the news
papermen of New Haven were equally
enthusiastic after a special showing of
the picture a few days ago. "The Race
of the Age," however, is only one part
of the Sunday night show at the Bijou.
"The Race of the Age" is a truly re
markable picture as it shows practically
every step of the wonderful race be
tween Man o' War and Sir Barton, the
two greatest horses in the world today,
at the Kenilworth track for a purse of
$75,000 and a $5,000 gold cup. Fourteen
moving picture cameras placed at equal
distances about the track recorded this
greatest event in the history of the
racing world for future generations to
see, and it is this picture that will be
shown the patrons of the Bijou theater
Sunday night. Details for the prepara
tions for the race are shown, along wtih
Hnswins of the two thor
oughbreds, arid practically all of those
associated with the race as owners,
jockeys, trainers, jucrges and track
workers are shown.
Here is what the New York Times
had to say in part when it reviewed the
picture during its New York showing:
"The high exciting moment of the pic
ture comes when the two horses are
shown making the complete circuit of
the course. The cameras within the
circle followed them around, so that
one may see them as they pull apart and
draw together in their dash for the
finih linp. And the oictures are so
Hi'ctinrt that tht movements of their
legs, their rhythmically yet rapidly
cnangmg positions, anu uic nguics ji
th inrkpvs nil their backs are at all
times clearly visible. It is this scene
that makes the Kace ot tne Age a
masterpiece of motion picture work. It
fhat filler! the Strand
with shouts yesterday afternoon and
gave everyone tne impulse to leap to
his feet."
This would make it appear that the
picture is dne that every lover of red
blooded sport snould witness, cesiaes
all this several bits of slow motion are
shown which bring out the smoothness
and grace of the racers and countless
details of their movements missed by
the unaided eye. Remember Sunday
night only. Don't miss it.
The Connecticut Labor Press is and
has been for some time conducted as a
44-hour a week shop. It will continue
to be so conducted in the future.
490 STATE STREET NEAR ELM.
879 WHALLEY AVE., WESTVILLE.
COR. CONGRESS AVE. And CEDAR ST.
397 GRAND AVE., FAIR HAVEN.
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THE PALACE.
Containing the biggest "punch" of
any of the elaborately staged screen
melodramas, "While New York Sleeps,"
the picture that has been a tingling
sensation wherever it has played, will
be presented at the Palace on Sunday,
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of
next week. "While New York Sleeps"
is a film searchlight throwing its pene
trating, ravs into the depths and dregs
of life at one moment and into the
whirl of high life at another. Fifth
avenue, Broadway, the Tenderloin and
the great city's darkest byways are all
brought into high relief during the
action of this electrifying, tingling and
sensational melodrama. Three separate
and distinct stories, each bearing on life
in the metropolis, are told. The first
depicts an enthralling incident which
takes place in the palatial suburban
home of a millionaire. The second por
tion of the picture is undoubtedly one
of the most gorgeously invented scenes
that the eye of the motion picture
camera has registered as a part of a
big production. The scene shows an
entire dancing number in Ziegfield's
Midnight Frolic renowned for its bril
liancy, beautiful women and wonderful
costumes. The third and final chapter
of "While New York Sleeps" depicts a
tragedy of the East Side in which the
tense and d3Tiamic action hinges about
a tigerish shop girl, a dumb paralytic,
his gentle, tender-heartid son and the
leader of a gang of river thieves.
When one has witnessed the picture
heis sure to feel that melodrama of the
most active, gripping and sensational
caliber has been seen.
The Sunday evening program also
presents the special added feature which
is H. B. Warner in "Uncharted Chan
nals." "Where Did He Get It," scream
ingly funny comedy; the always wel
come Selznick News Weekly and the
usual artistically rendered concert pro
gram by the Palace orchestra and or
gan are also features of the Sunday
evening bill.
Two acts on the Palace vaudeville bill
beginning Monday are of the class
known to variety followers the country
over. One of these acts is the comedy
offering of Clark and Verdi ; the other
is "The Luck of the Totem," a worthy
and ambitious production which takes
the form of a musical drama with its
scenes laid in the northwest. Clark and
Verdi are two of the cleverest expon
ents of the Italian characters on the
stage. "The Luck of the Totem" is an
unusually well told dramatic story. Sup
porting these two big attractions are
Archer and Belford in a bubbling com
edy act, "The New Janitor" ; Loney
Nace, a pretty singing comedian in a
novel arrangement of song entitled
"Ask Lou" ; and the Mabel Fonda Trip
known as the Superlative Manipulators
in Juggling Craft.
The very fine bill booked for the last
three days of the week is headed by the
famous Kilties Band of 25 pieces, one
of the best known organizations in the
world
PEEVED PORKER
FACING SLAUGHTER,
TREES ITS OWNERS
Atlantic City, N. J., Jan. 14.
A 500-pound porker, slated to be
slaughtered, refused to become
the object of sacrifice, Monday,
on the farm of Dr. William
Raith, a dentist, at Farmington,
and compelled the doctor, his
father-in-law, Stanley Grove, and
other members of the family to
take to trees to escape its fury.
They were compelled t o re
main in the trees half an hour.
Finally neighbors, attracted to the
scene, obtained shotguns and
brought down the maddened ani
mal. Washington, Jan. 14. Labors' answer
to recent legal and legislative setbacks
mav be to fight capital with capital it
self. An experiment, now called "the
Norfolk idea," conducted by the Inter
national Association of, Machinists, is
being much discussed and, it is said,
is about to be repeated on the Pacific
coast. In brief, the Norfolk idea is
the use of capital assets and credit of
organized labor in the fight to force
employers to meet its demands.
PETE HERMAN WINS
OVER JIMMIE WILDE
London, Jan. 14. Pete Herman of
New Orleans, former bantamweight
champion of the world, last night, in
Albert hill decisively defeated Jimmie
Wilde, long the British idol.
The end came in the 17th round,
when the referee interf erred and
stopped the bout to save the little
Welchman ffom the humiliation of a
knockout.
IRISH
POTATOES
Peck
35c
WILSON
SLICE
BACON
49c
1 Pound Carton
FANCY BLUE
ROSE RICE
Pound
8c
62 l-2c
I
THOMAS PLEADS
FOR THE CONSUMER
BEFORE SENATE
Washington, Jan. 14. A plea for con
sideration for the ultimate consumer
was made by Senator Thomas, demo
crat, Colorado, before the Senate Fi
nance Committee, which is holding
hearings on the House Emergency Tar
iff bill designed to protect the farmers.
"It strikes me," said Senator Thom
as, "that some consideration ought to be
given the consumer. Everybody comes
here. appealing for help. Everybody is
in a bad fix. But the result is always
the same stick the consumer."
K. D. Loos, appearing on behalf of
California lemon growers, had asked
for a tariff of two cents a pound on
lemons. The present rate is A cents.
Senator Thomas inquired whether, if
this rate was fixed, the growers would
not develop a monopoly as a result of
barring out Italian lemons. The wit
ness insisted no such effect could be
expected, explaining that more lemons
were now stored here, than at any time
in 10 years.
"That may be true," said the senator,
"but that is a fine example of what is
being asked of Congress everybody
who has something to sell is seeking to
exploit those who have to buy. Some
may need relief, but so does the con
sumer. If the relief you ask is grant
ed and this applies not only to the
lemon industry but to all industries
the pecuniary relief comes, out of the
consumer.
"Why, the only things the consumer
can buy cheaply now are corkscrews
and postage stamps, and he has no need
for corkscrews."
The witness said the tariff sought
was intended only to carry the lemon
producers over the emergency.
Amendments proposing to add can
ned salmon, herring, cherries and apples
to tne emergency tarm diu were intro
duced by Senator Jones, republican,
Washington.
WEEK OF JANUARY
AT
HIYPERIO
A Brilliant Revival of the Punchiest American Drama
Ever Written,
'BOUGHT and PAID
Written by George Broadhurst
And Played Two Solid Years In New York.
NINITA BRISTOW as "VIRGINIA BLADXE."
MALCOLM FASSETT as "ROBERT STAFFORD."
ERIC DRESSLER as '0"
You See The Hyperion Players at Their Best.
Seats For The Week Selling
Coming The Little Whopper'
SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY
'DRAG HARLAN'
THE SORT OF PICTURE THAT MADE FARNUM FAMOUS.
A MINSTREL THAT IS DIFFERENT.
ALL STAR VAUDEVILLE "
5 BIG ACTS 5
-THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
EILEEN PERCY m The Husband Hunter'
0 H T H A T MELODY!
OTHER BIG FEATURES.
PAL
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
THE CLIMAX OF SCREEN MELODRAMA
WHILE NEW YORK
OI r,TT,riC,JA SERIES OF MELODRAMATIC
oLttl J PUNCHES, TENSE, THRILLING
KSto 4E 4M am. KmS AND SENSATIONAL.
3 GREAT DRAMAS MADE INTO ONE.
SPECIAL FEATURE SUNDAY ONLY
W. H. WARNER in cIfiD
VAUDEVILLE MONDAY,
CLARK &
VERDI
. Kings of Italian
Character
Comedians.
IRISH MASS MEETING AT
MUSIC HALL, JAN. 16TH
There will be a mass meeting at
Music Hall, on Sunday afternoon,
January 16, at 2 o'clock in behalf of a
new Iri sh labor paper, called "The Irish
People," which is to be published by
the James Connelly Literary Society of
New York City, on January 22, the an
niversary of the opening of Dail
Erreann, the Irish parliament.
The Irish people will give to the Irish
and other workers in the United States
the details of the fight in Ireland, as
conducted by organized Irish labor.
The speakers of this mass meeting
will be Emmett O'Reilly, of the Actors'
Equity association and a native of
California; and Thomas O'Flaherty,
president of the James Connelly Liter
ary Society of New York, and a native
of Galway, Ireland.
Mr. O'Reilly is a graduate of the
Leland Stanford University and well
known in labor circles in New York
City. He was prominent in the Celtic
players during their appearance in the
Metropolis last spring.
Thomas O'Flaherty is a well known
gaelic speaker. He received prizes for
proficiency in gaelic from the late
Roger Casement. He was for many
years president and secretary of the
Boston Gaelic School Society, and
identified with the Irish political move
ment. These speakers have a message from
the Irish workers that all interested in
the welfare of Irland should hear.. Ad
mission will be free.
LABOR FEDERATION
IN FRANCE DISSOLVED
Paris, Jan. 14. Dissolution of the
General Federation of Labor was order
ed today by the court which has been
hearing the case against Leon Jouhaux,
president of the federation, and other
of its officers, on charges of infringe
ment of the law governing unions.
Fines of 100 francs each were imposed
upon Jouhaux and four other federa
tion officials.
17TH MATINEE DAILY
THE
NUM i
ACE
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY
' The Luck of Totem
A Brilliant Musical Drama of the
Northwest. Cast of 10 People. -
ARCHER & I MABEL I LONEY
BELFORD J FONDA 3 NACE

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