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Connecticut chronicle. (Hartford, Conn.) 194?-194?, June 05, 1948, Image 3

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Page Three
300,000 TRUE
CONNECTICUT CHRONICLE, JUNE 5, 1948
COMICS
rails
NEWSSTAND
Urban League, Deltas, Publish
Second Issue of Negro Heroes
Responding to a nationwide de
mand, the Delta Sigma Theta Sor
ority and the National Urban Lea
gue releaesd this week 300,000
copies of NEGRO HEROES, No.
2, picture-color true stories of
Jackie Robinson, Booker T. Wash
ington, Sadie T. M. Alexander,
Toussaint L'Overture, Mabel K.
Staupers, Sugar Chile Robinson,
and the adventures of the 784th
Tank Battalion in World War II;
and short sketches of Frederick
Douglass, Katy Ferguson, Phyllis
Wheatley,. Tom Molyneaux (early
19th century boxer), and Alexan
der Pushkfn, the Russian poet.
The true stories in the 32-page
booklet meet a long-felt need for
inspiration material for young
America. They will also serve to
supplement Negro history texts
and to promote interracial under
standing. Following the publication
of the first Negro Heroes in 1947,
hundreds of enthusiastic letters
were received by the National Ur
ban League from teachers, coun
sellors, and parents, commending
the venture and urging additional
issues. Many of the letters came
also from boys and girls who list
ed the names of other Negroes
they would like to read about, sev
eral of whom are included in the
second issue.
COOPERATIVE VENTURE
The successful publication of the
second NEGRO HEROES is the
result of an unprecendented ges
ture of cooperation on the part of
Delta Sigma Theta, one of the two
oldest national sororities of Negro
college women. The sorority sel
ected the magazine to help imple
ment its national project on Job
Opportunities.
"We believe," stated Dorothy I.
Height, Delta Sigma Theta presi
dent, "that boys and girls will be
thrilled and inspired as they read
of the lives of Negro Americans
who have been successful in var
ious fields. We are very glad to
cooperate with the National Ur
ban League in presenting NEGRO
HEROES, a significant innovation
in education and race relations. We
hope to place many more issues of
NEGRO HEROES within the reach
of our youth, for we know they will
enjoy reading them. More than
that, we hope they will get some
ideas that will help them make up
their minds to show their teachers,
parents and friends that they, too,
can be among heroes in American
life.
' Plans are already in operation
for the third issue, slated for a
Fall release, and will be announced
later by Guichard Parris, National
Urban League Director of Promo
tion and Publicity.
If copies of NERGO HEROES
are not available in local communi
ties, they may be secured from
the National Urban League offices,
1133 Broadway, New York City 10.
Pollsobutylene
Polisobutylene, which is made
from gases evolved in the refining
of petroleum, ranges in consistency
from a sticky grease to a rubbery
solid. Among the many polylsobu
tylene products already patented
are, grafting wax "for splicing tree
branches, cosmetics, plastic adhe
sive tape, electrical insulation,
dripless oils for textile machines,
paints that resist corrosive chemi
cals,, and a chemical agent for im
proving the performance of diesel
engine fuel.
THE JAMAICANS AND THEIR
RULE IN CONNECTICUT
By A JAMAICAN
Jamaicans cn entering America in 1943, gazed in wide-eyed
amazement and admiration at the many things and the different
customs confronting them. They could not fathom all the ways
and the wherefores. The temperament of the American people at
that time and the extreme efforts displayed, had to be made to navi
gate the pattern cf future events, portend of economic, social and
political adjustments of far reaching effect. Informed public
opinion made individuals a thing of the past. A War was on,
everyone had to do his or her part. Social life was in chaos
There was nothing but work, pray and more work for everyone
Well, Jamaicans were caught in
the middle of all this cycle of events.
They were warmly received by some
and yet treated with suspicion by
others; some would work with them
others would not; some would so
cialise with them others would not.
This worried them a little but they
stuck to the job they came here
to do.
This un-Christian-like race pre
judice termed "Jim Crowism" was
something new to Jamaicans. Al
though some of them read about
such things the majority did not.
And, 'in fact, on the whole it was
something entirely new and em
barassing to run right smack into.
Always mindful of their childhood
teachings that "God made man in
His own image, in the image of
God created Him; male and fe
male created He them," Jamaicans
could not understand why some
men were treated as inferiors.
Many heart-sickening and revolt
ing actions were meted out to them
in the South and it is .interesting
to know that many are the times
that Jamaicans took the bull by the
horns and got in places that were
"out of bounds" for Negroes. In
these, shall we say, barrier break
ing campaigns, Jamaicans noticed
that after some of these self-stlyed
and sejf-appointed superior-race-baiters
learned that they were not
Americans but foreigners, every
thing would be alright. Where
upon, Jamaicans took this and other
opportunities to let these people
know that although we are not
Americans yet we are still Negroes
and Men.
Jamaicans of necessity worked
alongside many men and women of
different nationalities and were able
to see the many and various re
actions of people tolerating one an
other, enjoying one another, dis
trusting one another. But because
of a war which everyone was di
rectly or indirectly assisting to come
to a successful end, individual feel
ings were bottled and corked.
When the war was over they
noticed that this same 'nate bottle'
was being uncorked.
They notice now that some white
persons do not wish to work along
side a Negro, the frowning of the
whites whenever they see Negro
boys and girls playing with white
boys and girls, the changing of
seats in theatres, buses and trains
when a Negro takes a seat, the
railroading and channelling of Ne
groes in the lesser and menial jobs,
"the last hired and the first fired"
campaign against Negroes, the
polite "Sorry, the vacancy has been
filled already," the turned-up noses
and the disdainful looks given the
Negro. They too notice many other
small but deliberate and embarass
ing incidents and wonder if the
Lord's command to "Love ye one
another," has been said in vain to
mankind.
Jamaicans found some of the
colored people of America at first
unfriendly, because of the false tales
being told them by some unscrup
ulus persons ' deliberately trying to
set Negroes against Negroes. These
Smuts Replaced By Worst
Enemy Of Africans
' ' The NewesIn i
CRT EVEN'S H
P SUDTS'mS
UaardInS : .
( $5 Down $2 W y
Open Dally (Including Monday) Until
630 P. f. Friday and Saturday
Until 0x30 P. itf.
68 Village Street
STATE THEATER BUILDING
Si
m am h mta l
wicked impressions were soon found
out to be untrue and as Jamaicans
and Americans got to know one an
other in time, ideas and customs
were exchanged, whereupon, the
wrong done was not only rectified,
but a greater and warmer feeling
of brotherhood was instantly felt.
'Although their accents were
somewhat different, their aims and
objectives were the same the love
of God and the pursuit of happiness.
This mutual feeling brought about
a closer relationship to one an
other. In a strange land far from home,
when one is low in spirit and trou
bled perhaps, it gives joy and pleas
ure, to meet kind and sympathetic
persons .Jamaicans had that warm
glow in their hearts and it was
kindled by the spark of human kind
ness extended them by the Ameri
can Negroes. . This realism compels
an observation of Christian-like
hearts much to be admired. Jama
icans saw the great possibilities in
whatever field of work a man de
sires, they saw the vast expanse of
land and it thrilled them and the
many and wonderful achievements
performed by a growing Nation and
liked them.
Last but not least, they saw the
Americans and loved them.
o
r . ry : "
Crime Detection
MOTHER was trying to discover
which of her three youngsters
bad scrawled pictures on the back
of her davenport, but all she could
get were blank looks and repeated
denials.
At length father Intervened.
"Let me try," he whispered to the
litttle woman.
"You?" she hooted. "Do you think
you know more about my children
than I do?"
"Who knows?" rejoined daddy.
"At least I can try."
He examined the scrawled pictures
carefully.
"My goodness," he finally re
marked, "but these are funny look
ing pockets here."
"They're not pockets," sniffed lit
tle Margie. "They're supposed to
be buttons!"
And thus the culprit was revealed.
SEEKING PROOF
An American film producer was
selecting a chief for his scenario
staff. The producer insisted that the
successful applicant must be a col
lege graduate. He looked with favor
upon one applicant and asked if he
had a college education. The answer
was in the affirmative.
"Show me your diplomas," de
manded the producer.
The applicant tried to explain that
It was not customary for college
graduates to carry diplomas around
with them.
"Well, then," demanded the pro
ducer, "say a big word."
Prayers Needed
A visitor at the Capitol was ac
companied by his small son. The
little boy watched from the gal
lery when the house of represen
tatives came to order.
"Why did the minister pray for
all those men, Pop?"
"He didn't. He looked them
over and prayed for the country."
JOHANNESBURG, South Afri
ca Jan Christian Smuts is out as
prime minister, a post that means
chief Negro oppressor-of the Union
of South Africa, but the natives
and colored people who live and
work in a state of peonage have no
cause for celebration.
Dr. Daniel Francois Malan, 74,
whose Nationalist party won the
majority in the parliamentary
election is a greater Negro oppres
or than the 78-year old Smuts. He
won the election by claiming that
Smuts was weakening on the race
issue and promised to do a bet
ter job.
Smuts was defeated for re
election to parliment from his
home district Thursday while his
party was losing the parlimen
tary majority. Once before he
was defeated in his home district,
after serving as premier from 1919
to 1924. In the Union of South
Africa no one can be prime minis
ter unless he is a member of par
liament. Still A Factor
Smuts is not out of the pic
ture. When he was defeated in
1924, his party shifted him to
a district where the machine
controlled the vote, and re
turned him to office in a by
election. He did not return to
the prime minister's chair until
1939, however.
What approaches slave labor
has been the basis of the South
African economy. The social
structure imposes segregation on
all non-Europeans. Indians and
colored people are barred from
owning property and living in
certain districts. Native Negroes
can own nothing, and live in com
pounded called "kraals." The same
word is applied to cattle pens.
In the frontier provinces and
the mandated territory of South
west Africa, which Smuts' govern
ment took over last year in spite
of the United Nations, Natives
are forced to pay a "head tax" to
the government. A man often
works ' several years to pay the
levy on himself, each person in
his family over 18 years of age.
Cannot Leave Camps
While he is in the work camp
of some private concern, he can
not visit his family without special
permission. Then he must get a
government? pass to travel. Penal
ties for running away from the
camps are severe, and usually
must be worked out for the same
employer.
Uprising against these con
ditions have been put down by
airplane bombings in the man
dated territory, . and by machine
gun fire at plant gates, all under
the two Smuts regimes.
These are the things Smuts was
sworn to uphold, and Malan pro
mises to carry them out even further.
The whole election centered
around the color question, and the
problem of Negro oppression has
even forced a shift in foreign policy.
Defy Whole World
Formerly, South Africa was
considered the seat of the British
Enipire and since the war British
gold has been flowing there for in
vestment at a fabulous rate. When
the United Nations protested the
seizure of Southwest Africa and
India demanded that oppression of
Indian Nationals be stopped, a
strong movement to sever ties with
Britain and the rest of the world
developed.
Malan rode into office on the
strength of this movement.
The extent of which South Afri
ca will go to preserve these con
ditions .was indicated by its refusal
to answer India's charges last fall,
although directed to do so by the
UN.
o
POKER FACE
fife. ..w:
19m
Strolling through the card room
of a businessmen's club the other
night, one of the members was sur
prised to see three men and a dog
playing poker. Pausing to watch the
proceedings he commented on the
extraordinary performance of the
dog.
"He's not so smart," the dog's
owner remarked in disgust. "Every
time he gets a good hand he wags
his tail."
23 States Register
For NAACP Confab
KANSAS CITY, Mo.: Advance
registrations have been received
here from 23 states for the 39th
annual conference of the NAACP
June 22-27, inclusive. The sessions
will be held at the St. Stephen
Baptist Church, 15th Street and
the Paseo Carl 1$. Johnson is presi
dent of the Kansas City branch
which will be host to the gathering.
No More Jim Crow Rides
To Dixie Railroad Agent
Says
Human Brucellosis
Number one among bacterial di
seases that can be transmitted
from animals to men is brucellosis.
It is more common among farmers
and others who handle stock, and
is often contracted by those caring
for animals at time of parturition.
However, this disease can be
spread through raw milk. Blood
samples may be taken for diagno
si and medical (attention is very
important.
o
Anti-Knock Fuel
Blending one gallon of ethyl alco
hol and nine gallons of low grade
gasoline will make 10 gallons of
premium grade anti-knock motor
fuel oil.
Wheat Production
Wheatlands now average well
above 14 bushels per acre. There
is, therefore, a bushel of wheat an
nually for every acre of United
States farm land.
NEW YORK Homes Bannard,
general passenger agent for the
New York office of the Pennsyl
vania Railroad, has announced
that any Negro travelling South
on a reserved coach train can ride
on other than a seat in a jim-crow
car if he request it, it was reported
this week by George M. Houser,
member of the Raciallndustrial
Department of the Fellowship of
Reconciliation.
It is reported that the state
ment attributed to the railroad
official was made to Mr. Houser
and to Margaret Dukler of the
Congress of Racial Equality, dur
ing a meeting held last week with
Mr. Bannard and Otto Buerger, an
attorney for the railroad.
Complaints
Mr. Houser was acting upon com
plaints made by JsTegroes that they
were allegedly segregated into one
coach behind the engine on south
bound reserved coach trains and
upon observations which reported
ly were made of the set-up of these
trains when they left Pennsylvania
Station in New York.
Miss Dukler's observation, re
portedly has revealed that each
of the three railroads sending
these trains into the South from
Pennsylvania Station (Seaboard
Air Line, Atlantic Coast Line and
Southern Railway), allegedly is
practicing discrimination on its re
served coach trains. Responsibil
ity for this policy rests partly
with the Pennsylvania Railroad,
because its ticket sellers assign
the reservations on these trains,
it is said.
Leaflets Distributed
In connection with an Interra
cial Workshop held in New York
the week-end of May 14, leaflets
exposing the alleged practice were
distributed outside the station.
The leaflet quoted the Civil Rights
Law of New York State and the
Irene Morgan decision of the Su
preme Court as legal evidence
challenging this alleged discrim
inatory policy.
"Since the Pennsylvania Railroad
does not force the segregation pat
tern," Mr. Houser said, "Negroes
should request to be seated in oth
er than segregated cars when
traveling on a reserved train into
the South." Any Negro who has
a complaint against the Pennsyl
vania Railroad is urged to contact
the Fellowship of Reconciliation,
by writing 2929 Broadway.
Vital Statistics
With the greatest increase on
record, 1947, showed a total United
States population of 145,340,000. an
increase of 13,700,000 since 1940.
Babies born in 1947 totaled 1,908,
000. The figures also show that, oa
the average, each person ate 17 per
cent more food In 1947 than in th
1935-39 period.
G. FOX & CO. SERVING CONNECTICUT SINCE 1847 G. FOX & CO.
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