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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, February 24, 1893, Image 5

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E5.I3. ROCEHSESO ,
183 Main street, - DANBURT, CONN
CROCKERY, LA1IPS,
Glassware, Cutlery, Wood, Tin,
Iron, Granite and Plated ware,
iiarge Assortment. Low Prices.
Newt
VOLUME XVI.
NEWTOWN, CONN., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1893.---SIX PAGES.
NUMBER 8.
" 3D. IE.. EOG-EES,
183 Main street, - - D ANBURY, CONN.
FURNITURE, CARPETS,
Rugs, Oil Cloths, Mattings,
CURTAINS, DRAPERIES, ETC.
Houses, Offices, Schools, Churches and Lodges
furnished throughout'
JLHE
OWN
IdEE.
G. W. FAIROIIILD,
JEWELER & SILVERSMITH
ALL GRADES OF WATCHES AT
GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
Diamonds of our own importation at
less than New York prices.
SILVER AND PLATED WARE
CLOCKS. FANCY GOODS.Etc.
In great variety and all goods at
the lowest possible prices.
357 MAIN STREET,
NEAR JOHN ST.,
BRIDGEPORT. CONN.
GIVEN AWAY.
Solid Silver Thimbles Warranted.
SEK SOAl" WRAl'l'Klt.
r,A CO.
How
grown and prepared
for market.
LADIES, B0Y3 AND GIRLS,
It will pay you to
GET UP A CLUB ORDER FOR US.
Send stamp for 36 page catalogue,
ust out-
The New England Tea Company,
124 Full'11i:ll Ave., lirhUfrpoit, Conn.
TAYLOR & ir'GRAN,
FUNERAL DIRECTORS,
DEALERS IN
FURNITURE, CARPETS,
ETC.
S-A.3STI"5r HOOK,
co:rN.
CHARLES OEIIMICIIEN
BAKER AND CONFECTIONER.
Fresh rolls and bread
every morning. Tarts of all flavors.
Pies, cakes and confectionery con
tantly on hand-
EAST MAIN STREET,
SQUTHPORT, CT.
W. W. WALKER & SON,
PAINTERS & DECORATORS.
Our Spring stock of Wall Papers is the mo-t
eomplet. stock we havn ever shown; at 5o. per
roll and up. Ws are selling a Purs Linseed Oil
Paint for $1 10 per Gal. Lead, Oi'.s, Glass, Var
nish and Brushes at Bottom prices-
500 Main Street Bridgeport, Conn.
W.P. J. BURKE, M. D.,
-PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Offic. opposite St John's Church, Sandy Hook.
(8 to 9 A.M.
OFFICE KOUHS, ( 1 to 3 P. M
; . ( 7 to
0 P. M.
Right calls at Office.
, FLORENCE A. SHERMAN, M- D.
' 0 State street, BUIDGEI'OItT, CONN.
HOURS-10 to 12 a-m. 2 to 4 p.m.
Diseases of Women and Nose and
Throat a specialty-
D. P. RICHARDSON, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Office and Residence, Sandv Hook.
Tal.phon. eonnection.
Headquarters
von ,
Choicest Groceries
And Fish of all Kinds, is at
E. P. HawleyX
Commences February 15. Buy your
fish supplies now- Choice boneless
and whole Codfish, smoked Halibut
and Herring, Mackerel and Herring in
. pails. Choice Bloater Mackerel, Sal
mon Trout." are fine: 12c lb. .
;'.-'
- Best line of canned Salmon, Lobster,
. Sardines, 'Vegetables, Fruits of best
quality in town.'
Dried fruits of all kinds.
Evaporated Peaches, Apricots, Ap
ples, etc- y . , .
New Prunes, 10c a pound. !
.-Try can of our. little neck Clams,
10 cents,
Try a pound of Welcome Coffee at
85 e, with a bar of Welcome Soap, the
best sold for 25c
Try our Teas and Coffees. ;. They are
the best and cheapest'
' Respectfully,"
E F. IIAWLEY.
c: mm av jt -v
For Constipation
Ayer's Pills
For Dyspepsia
Ayers PilSs
For Biliousness
Ayer's Pills
For Sick Headache
Ayer's Pills
For Liver Complaint
Ayer's Pills
For Jaundice
Ayer's Pills
For Loss of Appetite
Ayer's Pills
For Rheumatism
Ayer's Pills
For Colds
Ayer's Pills
For Fevers
Ayei
r's Pills
Prepared t.y Dr. .T. C. A yer 8t Co., Lowell, Mane.
t-Mi -I liy all JrilgKt.
Every Dose Effective
SPECIAL SALE OF
PANTALOONS.
Every season, we give the people of
this county an opportunity to buy
Trousers cheap.
We commence with Pants at $1: not
worth a great deal, but good for the
money, if you have only one dollar to
pat into Pantaloons.
Next grade at $1 25, a little better
yet.
At $2 we have the old fashioned
Satinet made in Vermont; will wear
as long as you say it ought to. We
sell hundreds of them. They are all
right.
At $2 50, thejustly popular Dundee
Cassimere, guaranteed to be strictly
all wool, genteel pattern and well
made. At $3 and $3 50, finer grades.
M buys a Sawyer's Pantaloon: noth
ing better in the market, well worth
$5 and sold in many places for $6.
Our Overcoats and heavy goods we
are anxious to sell and we will give
some very low pnces on first class
goods.
A. H. DAVIS,
429 MAIN ST. BRIDGEPORT
AIrANTEI Portion as Teamster, or other
?V work, by steady, tern nernte younsr man.
DANIEL I'LATT, Stepney, Conn.
,t)lt SALE Six tons tirnt class Timothy Pay.
' ALBERT i'UEHKENUACM, Monroe.
"IMPORTANT NOTICE C. 8. Cole ot Wash
1 inifton Ittinot will be at Lew Tyrrell's
blHckxmith Hhop at New Preston, every Wed
ni'smiv until lurtner notice.
It's foolish to pay for mud
when you buy salt. Just put a
couple of tablespoonfuls of any
salt but our's in a clear glass
half full of water, and stir it up
i:n 1 see how much mud you're
buying.
'."-."n try the same test with
Worcester
Salt
and see the difference,
Nash, Whlton & Co., New York.
bargains
n Towels
100 Extra Pine Huck Towels, j
17x34 inches at 121-2c
100 Extra fine Huck Towels,
: " i8x36.at ; , -100
Extra Fine- Huck $pwels,
19x39 at '-g5&.
He
16c.
100 Extra Fine Damask Tow
els at : . : 25c.
'These are positively the best bar-
gains ever offered.
One of the best bargains we have to
offer is one piece of Black Silk Warp
Henrietta, 48 inches wide and counts
22 tassels at $1.50 per yard.
It is 25c a yard under price-
D. 1. SALMON;
Wegtport, Conn.
Ripans Tahules move the bowels.
GEN BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BUTLER-
Benjamin F. Butler.
A REMARKABLE CAREER.
General. -Eepresentativ i to Congress. Govern
or of Massachusetts --Candidate for the Presidency-
A Noted Criminal Lawyer.
Tlie death of Benjamin Franklin But
ler removes from the stage of public life
a picturesque and peculiar, one might
almost say a unique, personality, which
has played various parts thereon for
half a century. Certain it U that his
parallel would puzzle any Plutarch to
find even in the long list of demagogs
from Cleon down the ages to his own
time of action. A man of great native
force, unbounded self-confidence, instant
readiness of action, generous impulses,
and broad humanity, he possessed no
appreciable background of principle, no
proper mental discipline and no trust
worthy moral balance or direction.
HE WAS A SMART LAWYER,
and led the criminal bar of Massachu
setts with quite as much success as Eu-
fus Choote ever did : he was an ambi
tious and unscrupulous politician; as a
legislator he was ineft'ective for the state
or the nation.
Whil'j he had abundant opportunity in
the course of the war, holding a com
mand for nearly the whole period, he
never showed military skill, but achiev
ed a rarely rivaled reputation for blun
ders; yet at the same time he did strike
the keynote of the conflict in his famous
"contraband" letter on the Peninsular;
and it fell to his lot, both at the outset
of the war in Maryland and later in Xew
Orleans, through his daring and decis
ion, to produce such impressions of the
national purpose and resolve as werecer-
taiuly necessary for effect in the South
and the North.
GEN UVTI.Elt WAS XO SOLDIEK,
but he was an administrator of a type
which has its place in the conditions of
war, and is out of order in times of
peace, as his year's work as governor of
Massachusetts showed. He was never
called a statesman save by the New
York Sun aud the greenback party, yet
be sometimes by intuition divined the
way of statesmanship, though he could
never waiK m it. it is a matter lor re
gret that so much capacity, so warm a
patriotism, so indefatigable industry, so
rare an attractiveness for his fellows,
had not been matched with that serious
honor of character which wonld have
made him one of the foremost men of
New England and the nation, and left
Massachusetts proud of him instead of,
at Dest, apologetic lor mm. There is
this to be said besides, that in ins per
sonal relations, in his home, with his
family and with his friends, Gen Butler
was not open to unfriendly criticism.
lie made inencu moreover ..without re
gard to political differences, and his
irienas were laitnrui to him, but this is
Butler's due.
Benjamin F. Butler was but little past
74 years old, having been born at Deer
field, Rockingham county, N. II., .Nov
ember 5, 1818.
HE WAS THE SON
of John and Charlotte Ellison Butler;
his father had been a captain in the sec
ond regiment of light dragoons in the
war of 1812-14, and served under Gen
Jackson at the battle . of New Orleans
His grandfather, it is said, was a Con
nectlcut captain under Wolfe at Quebec.
Mrs Butler was left a widow with two
Sons when Benjamin was but a child ; he
was taught in the public schools, enter
ed " Phillips Exeter academy when he
was nine years old, and was graduated
from the college which is now Colby
university, at Waterville, Me., in 1838,
when he was not yet in his 20th year. He
studied law in Lowell, where his mother
had made her home in 1827; was admitt
ed to the bar in ,1840, and began prac
tice in that city, where he has ever since
had his residence. In 1844 he married
Sarah Hildreth, daughter of Dr Isreal
Illldreth, who had been on the dramatic
stage for about Ave years. Mrs Butler
died in 1876,- leaving three children :
Blanche, wife of Gen Adelbert Ames,for
a term senator from Mississippi ; Paul,
who has adopted his father's profession,
and Ben Isreal, who died in 187G.
Butler, -r -
BEGAN BIS PRACTICE OF LAW
before the police court In Lowell in ad
iXt ' K
vance of his admission to the bar, by
conducting suits brou'ght by factory
girls against corporations for wages
withheld on one pretext or another. It
is related that in this period of his life
he once addressed an assemblage of
thousands of operatives, and admitting
the justice of their claims, persuaded
them to return to work and strive either
by remonstrance or appeal to the Legis
lature, or both, to secure shorter hours
and bettei pay. They took his advice,
and this aversion of a strike made sofav
orable an impression on the mill owners
that it was the cause of bringing him
considerable business later on. lie en
tered into partnership with his teacher
in law, William Smith, and soon became
famous for his prompt retorts in court.
It is he who made the savage reply to
the judge who reminded him that a wit
ness he was cross-examining was a Har
vard professor: "I know it, your honor,
we hanged one of them 'the other day.
This was just after the great
"WEIJSTEU-PARKJIAN MCKDER TRIAL,
which resulted in the hanging of Prof
Webster. Une of Mr Butler's legal suc
cesses was in the case of the annexation
of Charlestown to Boston. The act . had
been passed by the Legislature, and
both cities had voted to accept it. But
there were those in Charlestown who
did not like the union, and by advice of
Butler a majority of the aldermen of the
city refused to sign the certificate of the
vote. The question went to the supreme
court and was decided in accordance with
Butler's point, so that the annexation
was delayed for between 12 and 15 years
In 184G Butler was counsel for mill own
ers in the matter of the Cohituate lake
water, rne city or lioston had. con
structed at great expense various reser
voirs to supply as compensation to the
mill owners an amount of water equal to
the amount taken from them. Gen But
ler objected before the court that, having
taken the water, the city could not com
pensate in that way. The position was
sustained and the city later sold its cost
ly reservoirs.
There is scarcely an instance in all
Butler's legal triumphs, which were
many, where the result did not turn up
on some technicality.
HE WAS FEARED BY LAWYERS
because of his extraordinary ability to
detect petty flaws in indictments, and he
saved many a man whose guilt was un
doubted by the superiority of his techni
cal insight. Judge Josiah G. Abbott
who was alternately his political enemy
and associate, said of him a few years
ago: "In one faculty I have never known
him to be excelled by any lawyer. This
was the keeping out and getting in of ev
idence." It is therefore plain that he
did' not win his success by the
virtue of his causes, but by
the shiftiness of bis intellect and
the perception of his antagonists' weak
nesses. in fane, ce was what the suc
cessful criminal lawyer is wont to be. L
Mr Butler, while fully engaged in the
business of the law, was not oblivious of
the advantage of militia prominence in
relation to political preferment. In the
eastern part of the state the . militia 40
and 50 years ago was vastly ;mdre im
portant than it was in the rest of the
commonwealth. The Lowell lawyer en
tered the company in his turn and rose
through all the grades of the service.
being a brigadier-general when the re
bellion broke out. This had helped him
not a little in his political aspirations
He was in 1853 -
ELECTED AS A FBEE SOIL DEMOCRAT
to the Legislature and became the leader
of , his party : to him was in some meas
ure duethe reduction of the hours of la
bor in factories from 13. to 11.- The
coalition" chose him delegate to the
constitutional 'convention.4 When the
know-nothing movement swamped - the
state in 1855 he opposed it, his stout .re
sistance to Gov Gardner's order disband
ing the Irish companies , of the malitia
lost" him his commission as colonel ; but
he was restored to his rank by Gov Banks
in 1858 and made a brigadier-general
That fall he was "elected to the Senate
The places he had occupied hardly meas
ured the prominence which he had attain
ed in his party, since Massachusetts was.
pot a democratic state. - The free -soil ele
ment in the Massachusetts democracy of
that day had been as strong - as the re
form element is in the same democracy
at present, but the irrepressible1 Conflict
had been driving it out since the day
when it shared in the election of Charles
Sumner to the United "States Senate; it
departed to the ranks of the new repub
lican party, and Benjamin Butler had
not gone with it. He first
CAME INTO NATIONAL PROMINENCE
when he went as delegate to the national
democratic convention, which met at
Charleston, April 23, 18G0, and continued
in stormy session through more than a
week, precipitating the fatal split in the
party which gave the election to the re
publicans, made Abraham Lincoln pres
ident, and consequently insured the
secession of the Southern f tates and the
war for the Union. In that convention
Butlet led the anti-Douglas part of the
Massachusetts delegation, and while
ttflffs 'in accord with the representatives
or the South, he at the same time sharply
Opposed the extreme demands of that
section in respect to the platform. As a
member of the platform committee he
presented a second minority report, sim
ply reaffirming the Cincinnati platform,
with one resolution in addition in behalf
of full protection for naturalized citizens
of foreign birth ; this was defeated, 105
to 198. The ral contest between the
DOUGLAS WING AND THE SLAVEHOLDERS,
who demanded that the democratic party
should affirm that the people of a territo
ry had no authority whatever over the
question of slavery. This affirmation,
while it presented no difference of fact
from the Douglas doctrine of popular
sovereignty, was offensive as a bald re
cognition of the supreme right of the
slave power, and yet the fight was not
without meaning. The platform as
adopted was the minority report of the
committee, the Southern delegates then
seceded and organized a rival convention,
and the balloting for candidate for pres
ident was begun without them and con
tinued through 57 ballots, in which
Douglas could not gaiu the required
number of votes, and the convention ad
journed to meet in Baltimore in June,
while the seceders adjourned to meet at
Richmond on the same day. In these
57 bollot3, one vote was constantly cast
for Jefferson Davis, and it was Benjamin
F. Butler who cast it.
When the convention reassembled in
Baltimore, the seceder?, who had mean
time met in Richmond, presented them
selves as delegates but were not admit
ted. A further secession took place, and
among those who took part- in it were 16
members of the Massachusetts delega
tion of 2t, among them the president of
the convention, the old politician, Caleb
Cushing. Butler was the spokesman of
the 10, and said, "We put our with
drawal before you on the simple ground,
aniong others, that a majority of the
states haye withdrawn in whole or in
part; and further, as a reason perhaps
more personal to myself, because
I WILL NOT SIT IN A CONVENTION
waere the African slave trade, which
is piracy by the laws of my country, is
approvingly advocated." The Massa
chusetts seceders joined the other, and
took part in the nomination of Breckin
ridge and Lane, whom Butler afterward
supported. He was also the nominee of
the Breckinridge democrats for governor
of Massachusetts and received G000 votes
when Andrew had 104,000. Butler's
course at Charleston and Baltimore was
undoubtedly dictated by his apprehen
sion that the Union was in danger and
that the division of the democractic par
ty on North and South line3 would pre
cipitate its fate. Or as old Ben F. Hal-
lett said in a speech to the convention :
ueiigious associations have fallen to
pieces, tract societies have been severed,
wars and dissesions have disseminated
themselves througn domestic, literary,
political and religious circles. Parties
have fallen to pieces and gone to destruct
ion and ruin, and now the link between
the Northern and Southern democracy is
the only one thai binds this Union to
gether. If you now strike the blow that
is to sever that link, then
ONLY GOD KNOWS WHAT IS TO FOLLOW."
Brig Gen Butler of the Massachusetts
militia was a lawyer with a practice esti
mated at 25,000 a year in April, 1861,
when President Lincoln called for 75,000
troops, and he was trying a case in court
when the 6th regiment of his brigade was
ordered to muster on Boston Common.
By courtsey of opposing counsel and the
court he was allowed to stop right where
he was, and start after his soldiers. The
6th regiment, wen through Baltimore and
had the honor of giving the first loyal
blood for the Union in its streets ; the 8th
landed at Annapolis and with them Gen
Butler, who was included. After he had
organized the reception of troops at the
quiet old capital of Maryland, and
T HAD WARNED THE LEGISLATURE
not to hold its session under pain of ar
re8t,suddenly on May 5 he appeared with
a detachment of troops at the Relay bouse
on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and
shortly after captured the Winans steam
gun. and a few days later, on the 13th,
he entered Baltimore with a detachment
of troops, and occupied Federal hill.
Araopg. bis forces were a portion of the
Boston light artillery, a large part of the
Massachusetts 6J;h, under Col E. F. Jones,
and 500 men of the New York 8'h. .On
the line "of march from the train to the
hill the streets were thronged with peo
ple who greeted the soldiers with cheers,
women at the windows and doors wav
ing their handkerchiefs. The next day
GEN BUTLER ISSUED A PROCLAMATION,
announcing, "to set at rest all unfound
ed, false and seditious rumors, to relieve
all apprehen'sions if any are felt by the
well-disposed portion of the community,
and to make it thoroughly understood
by all traitors, their aiders and abettors,
that their rebellious acts must cease,"
that no loyal citizen would be disturb
ed, and no private property interf erred
with unless it were intended to help on
rebellion, in which case it would be con
fiscated. A few days later he seized a
large quantity of arms and ammunition
which the city authorities bad stored in a
warehouse, and transported it to Fort
McHenery. By such prompt and efficient
measures Baltimore speedily became a
quiet and peaceful city, and so remained,
although later it was found necessary to
arrest Chief of Police Kane and imprison
him in Fort McHenry.
Gen Butler was appointed major
general of volunteers May . 16
and ordered to Fortress Monroe in
command of the department of
eastern Virginia, ne arrived there on
the 23d, and a few days later some slaves
that had come within his lines were de
manded by their masters, but he refused
to deliver them on the ground that they
were held as property and must be re
garded as
"CONTRABAND OF WAR.''
The phrase became one of the popular
sayings of the time, and the escaped
slave went by the name of the "contra
band" thereafter. The disastrous expe
dition of Big Bethel, where the brilliant
Theodore Winthrop lost his life, was the
military operation Gen Butler ordered,
although he did not take part in it. He
was active commander of the military
force at the capture of Fort3 Hatteras
and Clark in Hatteras inlet, August 29,
and the success of this first joint naval
and military expedition caused the gov
ernment to apppint Gen Butler to organ
ize an expedition to take Ship Island in
the mouth of the Mississippi. It was
while raising troops in Massachusetts
that he came into collision with Gov An
drew, who refused to comrriission the of
ficers appointed by Butler, and the diffi
culty, which was due to the error of the
war department, aggravated by Butler's
arrogance, and his grossly unfit selection
of men, caused considerable delay.
THE TROOrS WERE LANDED
on the island in December, 1861, and Jan
uary, 1862, undjr command of Gen John
Phelps. Gen Butler himself did not ar
rive until nearly the end of March, and
on May 1, several days after Farragut
and Porter had received the surrender of
the city, Butler, ds commander of the de
partment of the Gulf, took formal pos
session of New Orleans.
His course as the master of that ram
pant rebel city has been most bitterly
criticised, but in great part it may be
satisfactorily defended. His rule was
rigorous but not relentless ; he fed the
starving people from rebel stores; he
cleaned and quarantined the city and
freed it from yellow fever for the first
time for many a year. But, when the
women of New Orleans so far forgot
themselves as to insult the soldiers in the
most vulgar fashion on the streets, Gen
Butler stopped this by his general order,
No. 28,declaring that "when any female
shsll by gesture or movement insult or
show contempt for any officers and sol
diers of the United States, she shall be
regarded aud held liable to be treated as
a woman of the town, plying her avoca
tion. For this
HE WAS SAVAGELY DENOUNCED,
not only in the city and throughout the
Confederacy, but all over the North and
in Europe as well, and the epithet "Beast
Butler" superceded his title. But as he
pointed out in answer to Mayor Monroe's
complaint, the order was well considered ;
"if obeyed, it will protect the true and
modest women from all possible insnlt.
The others will take care of themselves."
It was a rude and even brutal way of
teaching decent manners, but it had its
effect. Teie hanging of Mumford for
hauling down the stars and stripes from
the United States mint and tearing the
flag into shreds, with insulting talk in
the presence of a riotous crowd of citi
zens, caused Jeffersan Davis to proclaim
him an outlaw, and Confederate papers
t publish offers of
REWARDS FOR BUTLER'S ASSASSINATION.
But Butler's defense of the act was am
ple and satisfying. "It was not," he
said, "the fault of Mumford that New
Orleans was not laid in ashes, and the
women and children crushed beneath the
shells of the Federal fleet." The exam
ple was necessary, and this, too, pro
duced its effect there was no second
Mumford. In his seizure of coin under
the protection of foreign consulates and
other acts of similar nature. Gen Butler
made serious and embarrassing mistakes
The grave imputations upoD his personal
honesty still remain undispelled, if un
proved, but to blame him because he
made the path of rebellion hard and took
every aanantage mat me wai pnci
gave to him to weaken the Confederacy
in one of its strongholds of supply, is
most undeserved.
HE RESIGNED HIS COMMAND
to Gen N. P. Banks in December,
1862, issuing an address to the citizens of
New Orleans, which was as remarkable
a piece of rhetoric as one often finds, and
closed with an armeal to them to return
to their allegiance to the United States
and do away witl) slavery. He had es
tablished a considerable body of negro
soldiery during his command in New Or
leans. :.. - "
On his return to the North Gen Butler
was everywhere received with great hon
or. Congress presented him one of the
rnntured swords of Gen Twiggs. Balti
more gave him a great banquet. At
New York in February, 1863, he ad
dressed a large meeting in faVor of the
emancipation proclamation, for he had
grown radical n that point, not from
pbilnthropic regard for the negro, but
from observation of the evil effects of
the institution on the South. In Novem
ber, 1863, he was ; . -
PLACED IN COMMAND
of the department of Virginia and North
Carolina, his 'forces being designated as
the armv of the James. As commander
of the army of the James, he undertook
to co-operate with Gen Grant in the in
vestment of Petersburg, but chose a po
sition so peculiar that while he was per
fectly safe In it, he could not stir out of
it, owing to the disobliging action of the
Confederates, and the fact that he could
do nothing but keep his intrenchments
led to the phrase in Gen Grant's dispatch,
describing Butler as "bottled up" in
Bermuda-Hundred. This became a by
word, and Gen Butler not only never
heard the last of it. but be
DID NOT FORGIVE GEN GRANT
for it. In his memoirs Gen Grant says
the comparison originated with Gen Ber
nard, and that be used it without any in
tention of reflecting on Butler, to whose
earnestness in the suppression of the re
bellion be at the same time paid a hand
some tribute. Nevertheless, Gen Butler
was not equal to military operations, and
after the flat failure of his attempt
against Fort Fisher in December, 1874,
Gen Grant relieved him from his
command on the ground of incompeten
cy. Before this happened, a characteris
tic exhibition of Butler's srriking person
al powers was shown when, having been
sent to New York at the head of troops
to keep the criminal mob quiet during
the troublous election time of 1864, be
faced a riotously disposed assemblage,
and addressed them forcibly, in the
midst of all sort of flying missies, and
fairly captured their admiration by
CATCHING AN APPLE
which was flung at him andcooly munch
ing it as he paused a moment. The pic
ture is Butler all over.
Thus retired to civil life, the general
returned to Massachusetts and resumed
the practice of his profession, not a little
sore at the way in which his military ca
reer had ended. At the close of the war
he was mustered out of the United States
service. For some years afterward he
served in the state militia, holding the
position of major-general. He was elect
ed to Congress In 1866 from the 5th dis
trict, being the first congressman elected
in Massachusetts from a district in which
he did not reside. He had left his old
political associations behind him at the
war's opening and was in good standing
as a republican. He received a re-elec
tion for three successive terms, and
served from March 4, 1872, to March 3
1875. In the election of 1875 he was de
feated by Charles P. Thompson. In 1S76
he wa3 again elected to Congress as
republican.
DURING HIS CAREER IN CONGRESS
his most striking appearance was as one
of the managers selected by the House
of Representatives in 1868 for the im
peachment of President Andrew John
son, and not the least able of the group,
which was composed of John A. Bing
ham of Ohio, George S. Boutwellof Mas
sachusetts, James F. Wilson of Iowa
Jonn A. Logan of Illinois, Thomas Wil
liams of Pennsylvania, Benjamin F.But
ler of Massachusetts and Thaddeous Ste
vens of Pennsylvania. The trial was on
the charge that the president bad violat
ed the ten ure-of -office act in the removal
of Secretary Stanton from the war de
partment. Gen Butler prepared and
read the opening argument. When
Grant became president, no one was in
a bigger hurry than Butler to get off the
statute book the tenure-of-office law.
which had only been placed there to tie
Johnson's hands, and he introduced
bill to repeal it which was passed over
whelmingly in the House and defeated in
the Senate, after which he constructed
the amendment which left the law in its
present state. It fell to Gen Butler In
1S2 to report from the judiciary com
mittee the general act of amnesty. He
was one of the republican representa
tives who voted against declaring that
the national policy was to pay all debts
in coin, when not otherwise agreed,
AND HE WAS THE ONLY MAN
in either 'House from New Eng
land who voted for the silver
bill of 1878, creating the present
silver dollar. He served on the con
gressional committee of 11 to investigate
the canvass and return of votes in Lou
isiana and Florida, on which rested the
claim of President Hayes to a valid elect
ion. In his contests for Congress Rich
ard H. Dana and E. Rock wood Hoar were
among the opponents he defeated..
In 1S71 Gen Butler sought the republi
can nomination for governor, but was de
feated by W. B. Washburn. His next try
for the governorship was in 1878, when
he was nominated by the greenback par
ty, and captured the democratic nominat
ion also by means of the burglary of Me
chanics' hall in Worcester byjhis. adher
ents. -.,
THE RESULT OF THE ELECTION ' ''
showed, although he was defeated, that
he was really the choice of the democrat
ic party of the state, for while Thomas
Talbot, the republican candidate, receiv
ed more than 130,000 votes, Butler had
nearly 110,000, and Judge Josiah G. Ab
bott, who ran as a democrat, in. opposit
ion, had less than 10,000. , The next year
Butler, with the same nominations, was
defeated by John D, Long, John Quincy
Adams being the Faneuil ball candidate.
In 1882 the democratic party united,, in
support of Butler and he, was .elected,
having over 134,000. votes.; ;
HIS ADMINISTRATION OF THE OFFICE!
was marked by many extraordinary per
formances and sensational exposures
which nevertheless resulted in a small
measure of reform, or as some pious
bouIs remarked, were "overruled for
good." He undoubtedly struck at 'real
evilr, but so confused them with side Is
sues, personal animosities and "cranky
assaults that this could hardly, be seen at
the time. The TewksburyJ state alms
house mismanagement was brought to an
end through his investigations' amid great
scandal, whose effects are not yet dissi
pated. It seemed as though Gen Batter
regarded his New Orleans .methods as
models to " follow in Massachusetts
An incidental result was the disuse jof
the conventional custom of conferring
the honorary LL.D. .upon the governor
of the state by Harvard university at the
commencement. Gov Butler was the
first chief -magistrate passed over. lie
was renominated in 18S3 and defeated by
George D. Robinson in one of the most
INTERESTING ORATORICAL HATCHES
which ever distinguished a campaign.
The vote was exceedingly large, and But
ler had 150,000 votes, or about 10,000 less
than Gov Robinson.
Gen Butler's last political hunt was for
still higher game, for the presidency of
the United States. He was nominated by
the anti-monopoly and greenback labor
fusion, the forerunner of the populists,
in 1884, and be took the stump, traveling
over many states and making speeches
full of the wildest vagaries of statecraft
and finance. He succeeded iu drawing
audiences, for he was always a taking
speaker, and be was widely called "the
people's candidate," but notwithstanding
that, he received but 134,000 votes, and
24,000 of these came from Massachusetts
The Butler adherents in this state have
shown a remarkable attachment to
"THE OLD MAX,"
as he was fondly called, and those not
his adherents at all are said to have vot
ed for him in considerable numbers In hi
campaigns for governor, just to sees
'what the old man will do." In his cam
paign for the presidency Butler had the
dangerous assistance of the New York
Sun, which supported him out of hatred
to Cleveland, and made itself ridiculous
by prophesying his election.
After this campaign the lawyer and
business man for he had been for 40
years connected with important manu
facturing interests devoted the rest of
his life to bis practice and to the control
of his industrial and money-making en
terprises. He had been counsel in all his
public life, excepting his career in the
war, for important cases, and he appear
ed in court frequently, in Boston,
NEW YORK AND WASHINGTON,
and In fact it was in the way of legal
business that he visited the national cap
ital this fatal week. He had his diver
sions, and had a great pride in the own
ership of the famous yacht America, in
which he enjoyed many a coastwise trip.
Gen Butler was a man of large frame, not
tall, his head was massive, and his fea
tures each and all of extraordinary mold.
His beaked nose, his drooping eyes, one
of which had a very pronounced squint,
his heavy cheeks, indeed every item of
his physiognomy, attracted attention and
curious Interest. He was usually care
less about the cut of his clothes, but he
always wore on the left lapel of his coat
a flower or a little nosegay.
'VTHE PRETTY STORY
is told that this habit was in remem
brance of his wife, a most beautiful wom
an to whom he was devotedly attached,
and whose way it was to affix such an
adornment to his coat when he came to
breakfast. A man compounded of con
flicting elements, like his brethren, and
falling far short of what with his great
parts he should have been, Benjamin
Franklin Butler had in him something
that warmed men's hearts toward him,
and his strongest public opponents were
often personally on most friendly terms
with him. He had but lately published
his own autobiography, and it is his spec
ial plea and his interpretation of himself.
Springfield Republican.
PLEASANT
ffORNINQ I FFFI Rtir.UT inn
EW AND MY COMPLEXION IS BETTER.
My doetorMystt acts ffrattj- on ttMssomarh. Hi-t
and kfclrays. and U a pleasant laxattve. Tnta drink
la made from herb, and la prepared for ae atea&llr
tea. It la called
LilllE'S I3EDIGIHE
all dretrKtsta sell ItU 50s. and tlapackaira. If tw
can not get it, aeod .our addte for a tree (am
ple. Lane's Family MrlHnr raorrt tbr komrla
earn day. In order to be healthy tnia la nepcarr.
Andrea. OHATOK V. WOODWA&D, La Bor. K. fc
BEAD THIS.
Perhaps
Von need
footwear.
A real
wide shoe
or a real
narrow
shoe. I
have had
la years
ex p e r i
ence In
the busi
ness and
carry a
i&itre ana
weU se
lec t e d
stock and think I can please.
Give ns a call.
5 J. KWHEELEE,
PRINTING 1
" ' -AT TEE
BEE OFFICE? 4
Give Us a Call.
:. t -' tt-t -!- X-
Are Right In It"
05
CARPETS
. This spring; so please remember
that when you come for furniture, yon
can select your carpets also-
'HawleyvilIe,Cowi., February 15,1893.
THE
Mi
at ' 1f X VJil!

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