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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, April 20, 1894, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051487/1894-04-20/ed-1/seq-7/

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perfect fitting as our high priced suits,
dark mixtures.
For S3, S3.50 and $4
we can show you better grades of Black
Mixed.
Our $4 50, 5, 5 50, G, 6 50,7 lines aro
in fit and finish and unequalled in variety
. city- Boys' Knoe Pant Suits with Vest, $5 to 7-
Our Odd Knee Pants at 50c we are making a leader of th t attracts the
attention of buyers by the excellent
make Better qualities 70c, $l and $1 25.
Shirt Waists, Boy's White Laundered Shirts, Collars and Cuffs, Neck
wear, Hats and Caps.
FOSTER, BESSE & CO.,
Combination Clothiors and Men's Furnishers Operators of 27 stores,-
317 MAIN STREET, BRIDGEPORT, CONN-
Good Shoes at Reasonable Prices.
ami not! 1110.
J. W. Ellsworth,
(HlloK UliTllllll'TOIt)
8 Bank Street,
NEW MILFORD, - - - CONN.
SANDERSON'S
SPECIAL FOJNZLTJI-.A
FERTZLI H. S
x TAKE THE LEAD A3 x -
CROP PRODUCERS.
Formula A, for Potatoes, Corn and Gen
eral Use.
Formula B, For Tobacco.
Formula C (Superphosphate.)
Formula E, Top Dressing and Grass.
;Send for circulars and lull information
It will save many dollars for all farmers to give these goods careful
investigation. Address
1"4 CHURCH STREET,
New Haven, - - - Conn.
Farmers ! Read This !
The King of the Cornfield Corn Planter and
Fertilizer Distributor plants corn, beans, peas,
beet and other seeds of like size. Read the fol
lowing testimonials:
T . . ...... T .. .-. 1 .1 1 Jill
Mesmra Jos. Itreck A SonH, Agents,
I-toMton, MaHS.
tientu: I pnrehaed ot you In im the first
King ot the Corn Field Corn Planter shown in
MaHaohuettn. 1 have used this machine ev
, erv Mtanon since, planting from eight to 1ft
aereH per year anil have iiever known it to
'. skip a hill. It will how fertilizers with the
, groatettt aeenraey, and, In fact, It is the beat
'. corn planter 1 have used. 1 have liad all the
iMttding inakna ot corn planters. Including the
! KcilpHe, Albany, Farmer's Friend and the 111
! IIiirm and In my opinion the King of the Corn
I Field in tar ahead ot any, as regards slmpHcl
tty, accuracy ot work ami durability.
Lancaster, Man. J.Q 1IX.
We could add a hundred more that speak in
high terms of their merit. If any farmer has an
idea of buying a planter, we would like him to
try one. Send for circular.
T. HAWLEY & CO, AGENTS,
307 TO 401 WATER STREET, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
SPEING MILLINERY.
Now on exhibition and sale. Our Spring Bonnets, Round
Hats and Toques. Also Jet Novelties, Fancy Laces, Ornaments,
; Straw Crowns an1 B-aids, Flowers, Aigrettes, Ostrich Jet Nov
, elties, together Witr a collection of
. UN "f RIMMED HATS.
437 Main liieet.
The Cheapest,
RUBBER COATS
in at
A. 11. LACEY'8
IS r)rUlil Are., '
0-CLT
Dop't
is filled to overflowing with a bound
less and unlimited stock of everything
needful for the comfort and stylish ap
pearance of our young folks.
Never before have we had such a
magnificent display of Boys' and Chil
dren's Suits.
Our Knee Pant Suits, ages 4 to 14,
be. Eg made with double seat, double
knee, patent buttons and elastic waist
bands fur line an $250 are double
breasted and are as well made and
comprising Black Cheviots, light and
Cheviots, Blue Serge, Scotch and Silk
made of the finest material, elegant
of assortment by any house in this
quality of the goods aDd the superior
We ar prepared to sav Uiat in offering our Ladies'
DoiiKOlu Kid, (intent tip ulion, lor $1.5(1, we itre (tivinif
Ki'eater value, more good wear, more style anil an all
aronnil better hIioo than lias ever lieen offered tor l r).
Shoes for men and children at equally good vuluen. Halt
Hormon, St Lawrence Co., N. Y., Oct. SI, 1802
Charles II. Chllda & Co ,
Utica, N. V.
Gentlemen : The King Corn Planter I
bought of you last spring gave perfect satis
faction ; in fact I do not see any fault in It. I
planted 20 acres of corn and put fertilizer in
lft acres of it. I also used it to plant peas In
drills with equal success. In regard to its ra
pidity of work I would say tbat I planted 110
hills of corn, and put in fertilizer; in one min
ute. Yours very respectfully,
W. W. MATTESON.
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
l'ltice to Tluy
HUIiliER STORE.
Bridgeport, Coiut,
Treat Staff,
New Milford, Conn.
ladies' Suits, Jackets, Capes.
Assortment pleasing.
Prices slightly under the city stores.
Leading store in this section for
MILLINERY-
We have been improving for 10 years
Come and see us.
TREAT & STARR,
New Milford, Conn.
In Fairfield County.
WESTPORT.
A SCCCKSSFl.'l. AND PROSPEROUS trade
ORGANIZATION THAT IS DOING MUCH
l'Olt THE TOWN.
VVestpoit is not a large town 3715 peo
ple by the last census but it . has a
board of trade worthy of a much larger
place. The name of the organization is
the Board of Trade of W'estport and
Saugatuck, and its object, as laid down
in the constitution, is to "unite tne
energies of our citizens in a common
effort to promote the material interests
of our town, by fostering and encourag
ing all necessary improvements and
industrial enterprises that shall tend to
develop the souices of wealth and
advance public prosperity."'
The president or the association is
Carl B. Dolge, an enterprising manufac
turer. He has established a prosperous
factory in Westport, manufacturing un
dertakers' goods. Mr Dolge is promi
nent in business in various cities in
this country and having been one of the
principal founders ot the United States
College of Embalming. A good portrait
of Mr Dolge appears with this article.
The vice presidents or the board are :
Franklin M. Kaymond, William J. Finch
and George A. Darrow. The secretary it
William C. Staples, and the treasurer
William Edgar Nash, while the direct
ors are Oscar Smith, Max O. Iluncke,
David A. Salmon, Uufus VVakeman and
George J. Underwood.
Any citizen of the town of Westport
is eligible to membership on payment of
yearly dues of two dollars. The consti
tution also states that, "As harmony of
purpose, unity of spirit and action shall
be the fundamental and governing
principle of this association, therefore,
it shall be the duty of each and every
member to exercise, on all occasions,
that good will, charity and forbearance
essential to the accomplishment of the
specified objects of this association ; and
in furtherance of these requirements no
nolitical or sectarian questions shall be
discussed an any meeting' of this
association."
The Westport Board of Trade has ad
dressed itself to the task of making local
improvements, such as better roads and
other questions on which the prosperity
and desirability of the town as a place
of residence depend. Naturally in a
small town considerable difficulty has
been experienced in arousing and keep
ing tip interest in the uoard, but never
theless, much good has been accomplish
ed. The best people of the town and
members have united in the good work.
A short time ago the Jioard printed
and circulated the following schedule of
its aim3 and purposes, which might well
be adopted by every board in the btate :
THE WESTPORT BOARD OF TRADE I ITS
AIMS AND PURPOSES.
It is an organization of Cosiness men,
property holders, and men interested in
the welfare or our community.
The principal aim is to improve the
condition of the town. -
To recommend such measures as will
be of benefit to all of our residents, to
as-lst and further all projects that are
imperatively demanded at the present
time ror tne improvement or tne town. ,
To induce manufacturers and business
men to locate here, and assist them as
far as lays within the power of our citi
zens.-
To keep awake, to acknowledge and
praise public spirit.
To endeavor to bring all interested
citizens together, to act for the common
ifond, for the whole or our inhabitants.
To watch and scrutinize the actions
and doings of our town olllcal?, com
mend and assist the capable and worthy
and censure the unfit ones.
To discuss audjidvlse in its meetings,
measures wnicii may oeneni our mer
chnnts -ind store keepers.
To acknowledge and praise all improve
ments made in the appearance of our
stores, buildings, lawns, sidewalks, etc
To draw the attention of persons in
terested to any unsightly or dirty stores,
sidewalks or streets aud nuisances of
any kind. '
To discourage the patronage of mer
chants not located in our town.
To see that the expenditure of all mon
eys belonging to our taxpayers is judie
ious and within the limit of the income
of the town. To oppose extravagance
or over taxation.
To weigh and study important meas
ures in the meetings of the roard of
trade, thoroughly, before presenting
them to our citizens to act upon.
We ask the support of all good citizen,"
to the above.
O. 1$. Dolge,
F. M. Kaymond,
Wm. Hearaon,
Committee.
O. I. Jones, J
As before stated, Westport is a town
3715 inhabitants, as against 3477 in '1880.
The grand list la $1,175,728, and its In
debtedness Is $73,909. The rate of taxa
tion is 10 mills. -.The village of West
port, reached by a street car: line from
the railroad station at Saugatuck and
the Saugatuck Tiver affords a water
way for small vessels. - The pricipal
industries are agriculture and the man
utacture of moroeco,cotton twine, satch
el', buttons and other articles. -
Westport has a national bank, wir.h
$200,000 capital and a surplus of $00,000,
and a pavings bank with deposits oi
about $100,000. The national bank has
paid six per cent interest and the
savings bank five per cent. The Week
ly liecord.
LYON'S PLAIN.
Mrs Oliver Perry and daughter of
Valley orge, are visiting relatives in
this place. -
Mrs Hamilton and children spent
Saturday and Sunday with her parents,
Mr aid Mrs Willan Livermor?, in Stam
ford. Mrs E. Davis visited her daughter in
Fairfield on Sunday.
After a short vacation our school re
opened on Monday of this week with
Mrs Kobert Kcholey as teacher.
Mrs John M. Collurr, who has been
sick, is able to attend to her duties
ag.in.
L. 11. Hoyt and John M. Collum have
been sorting and packing their tobacco
for the past week.
Miss Jessie Kellogg spent Sunday
night and part of Monday at the rectory.
Mrs Mary L. Fanton's not plants are
a mass of bloom, noli e it le among them
is a c lla blossom, wl 1 h stands 40
inches from the pot.
Rev Alexander Hamilton officiated at
Christ church, Tashua, on Sunday last
John Lobdell read the service and ser
mon in Emmanuel.
Miss Jennie Davis was given a sur
prise on Tuesday evening, the 17th. It
was her 17th birthday. Music and danc
ing was enjoyed by all. Each one and
all wished the j oung lady many happy
returns of the day.
MONROE.
NOTES FROM ST PETER S.
Mrs J. II. Brewster of Shelton has
kindly invited the ladies of St Peter's,
Monroe, to make cake, biscuit and rye
bread and bring it to her house to be sold,
Saturday afternoon, the 21st. Proceeds
for the benefit of St Peter's. Those
ladies who are willing to cook, but can
not take it over themselves can leave it
at Marshall Beach's or B. S. Hurd's on
Saturday morning.
CAME NEAR PERISHING IN THE BLIZZARD.
Mrs Nora Gannan came near being
lost in the late blizzard. Towards 4 p.
m., Wednesday last, she started for
home from Silas Lewis' and went across
lots, a wild stretch of country. She
managed to get about three quarters of
the way all right and then found she
was lost. She wandered around some
time in a circle as she discovered; flual
ly seeing a cedar bush she thought she
recognized, she shook the snow from it,
found she was right and then managed
to take her bearings to her house, wad-
ng through the big brock to her knees,
arriving at last safely home, feeling she
had barely escaped death and had an ex
perience she would not ca-re to repeat.
Alfred Fohrenbach has moved into
Michael Couman's house, vacated by
John Beekman, who has rented Mrs
Matt s house.
Mrs Fred Brewster Wheeler of Mount
Vernon arrived, Monday, at F. W.
Wheeler's, if . is. Wheeler has been ap
pointed receiver for the gas company of
Schenectady, N. Y.
fhe Monroe Whist club met on Friday
evening, with the Society club oi Hun
tington at the house or the Misses Cur
tiss of Sbelcon, and were delightfully
entertained.
EAST VILLAGE.
E. E. Johnson has moved from Shel
ton into the vacant rooms over O. J.
Sherwood's store.
IVf pr Frank WnnRf.fi! and Hon from TTnr-
tington have been gaests of Mrs Myron
Clarke.
Mrs Albert Stevens and daughters
have been spending two weeks in Stam
ford with her father, Kev (J. S. Dikeman.
Eddie Stevens has gone to Woodbury
as clerk in J. S. Barnes' meat market.
O. J. Sherwood has purchased two
cows.
Litchfield County News.
BRIDGEWATER.
MISS ORMOND MR WHEELER.
Daniel Wheeler and Miss Mamie Or-
mond were married in Bridgeport, her
place of residence, last week. Mr and
Mrs Wheeler are at their neat little home
west of the churches, which bis taste
and industry have made so pleasant.
We offer congratulations and best wish
es. .. '
SUDDEN DEATH OF HUGH KTLE.
The whole community was shocked at
the sudden death, Sunday morning, of
Hugh lvyle, after only a lew hours ill
ness. The deep sympathy or all is with
the family in this great a Miction.
Richard Kandall of Shelton was in
town recently.
layman Keeler has hired out to Kobert
Clark in Washington and Lonnie Strong
to Fred Richmond in Lanesville.
The place vacated by Wallace Tucker
is occupied by a Swede family, as is also
George Randall's tenement house.
James Orr, Sr., is more comfortable.
Mrs Dillon Northrop, an old resident
of the place, was brought here from
Naugatuckfor burial, last week. Mrs
Northrop was a sister of Mrs James
Thompson of this town,
Mr and Mrs Marshall Warner are to
live in the old Randall house
John Greea is quite sick, threatened
with fever.
The April storm stopped over a day
with as and fully sustained its reputa
tion as blizzard, cyclone or hurricane.
We were fully convinced that a storm
center was directly over Bridge-water,
although willing to yield the point that
there might have been another over some
other place. The drifts of snow are
many but fast disappearing.
LANESVILL1D.'
IMPROVEMENTS AT THE STATION.
The Consolidated road has mnde great
improvements on the station building at
this place in the last few months. The
store has been removed and the station
has been nicely fitted up. A station
agent has been appointed, S. C. Bird,
who gives all his time to the work. The
public appreciate the change.
Albert Johnson has taken the farm of
G. N. Crosby. He formerly worked for
t rea vvarner.
WEST MORRIS.
Mrs F. A. Powers, who has been vis
king at Mrs Davenport's in New.tlavpn,
has returned home after a term of five
months.
P. B. Wheeler of Lime Rock has
moved in his new home, which he pur
chased some three years since, which is
known as the Mary Catlin place.
John Hager of Torrington has been
visiting his mother and brother, Lewis
Hagar.
George E. Emmons raised the frame
of a model barn, and the neighbors
turned out to have a good time of "ye
old fashioned raising. A bountiful table
was spread and the enjoyment of a good
supper was appreciated.
BETHLEHEM.
THE NEW 31BTIIOIMST PASTOR.
Rev Mr Adan s preached his first ser
mon in the Methodist church on Sunday.
His
miuus are on tne way here trom
Colebrook
IEATII OF, HENRY P. JUDSON.
The news of the death of Henry P.
Judeon of Boston reached here by tele
gram, Sunday. Mr Judson was a na
tive of this place and his early manhood
was mostly spent in this place, though
he was in Central America for some
time previous to hia marriage to Wealthy,
daughter of Amos Allen. lie has buried
a number of children. A short time
since he built a nice house with an eleva
tor to accommodate his crippled condi
tion, but he lived but a short time to en
j iy it. Francis Judson, a brother of the
deceased, with his family, have recently
shared this luxuriant home and have
ministered to his sufferings.
AN ESCAPE FROM A BAD FIRE.
On Monday, Charles Lynn's house
had a narrow escape from fire. The
fire originated in a chamber from a large
wooden fire board and communicated
with a shelf and as Mr Lynn was not at
home, assistance from a few willing
hards was called in who soon extin
guished it.
Miss' Stella Johnson commenced
school on Monday in the 0th school dis
trict. Miss Ella Crane is teaching a five
weeks' term of school in the Center.
E. W. Benedict went to Waterbury on
a sled, Friday, April 13.
Many of our roads are badly blocked
with snow. The wind blew a gale dur
ing the storm but no damage is reported
from it.
On Monday, April 9, Gail, sou of Dr
J. G. Beck with, returned to Union col
lege, Schenectady. He is in his sopho
more year. His father and grandfather
were graduated from Union.
The familiar face of Miss Jennie L.
Scott was seen in her accustomed place
of worship on Sunday.
Watson M. Hurlbut of Waterbury
was in town on Sunday. He is one of
Watertmry's skilled butchers and has ac
cumulated a handsome property, through
this medium of business.
Mrs John Hull and family returned
home, Monday, April 9.
Mrs Morgan, Mrs Thomson's efficient
nurse, is away for a short time, but will
soon return to her position for the sum
mer. Mrs Charles Lynn's nurse, Mrs Slo
cum, returns on Monday.
Mrs Sarah Lyon Wells of Woodbury
has recently visited her mother.
Mrs Banks, a former resident of this
place, and wife of Rev George W. Banks
of Guilford, has recently had a hemor
rhage and Mr and Mrs Banks have both
started on a Southern tour.
William Stoughton, Jr., is working in
a brass mill in Torrington.
George Zigler has moved into Mont
ford Fogg's tenement.
Will, Zigler occupies one of the Evart
tenements and works Marvin S. Todd's
farm.
Mrs George C. Guild is in Waterbury
for a week.
Sunday, April 15, Rev D wight C.
Stone preached in the first Congregation
al church in Waterbury, in the morning,
and in the Third in the evening. He is
now visiting at his father's.
N. L. Bloss has recently purchased
for his daughter, Miss Agnes, an organ.
WEST CORNWALL.
ABOUT THE VILLAGE.
Fred Scoville is clerking for Cochrane
Brothers.
F. E. Buckley's steam saw mill is turn
ing out a large quantity of choice pine
lumber, which find3 market in Hartford
and Winsted.
Cochrane Brothers have just received
a drove of fine cattle from Massachu
setts.
Artist J. II. Moses has gone to Wash
ington, D. C, to open his spring exhibi
tion of paintings.
. Miss Lillie Scoville is spending a few
weeks in Bridgeport.
Mrs Stuart Long has again returned to
Bridgeport for medical treatment.
Mrs M. A. Seeley of Shelton has ar
rived in the village.
In Xew Haven County.
SOUTH BRITAIN.
MR MUNSON HAS AN EXPERIENCE.
Rev J. O. Munson returned from con
ference on Saturday. He is appointed
to the charge of the Methodist churches
in this town for the fourth year. He re
ports an unusually delightful session of
the conference. The business vrr dis
patched rapidly, while the sermdj' and
public addresses or isisnop Fowler wm
be long remembered for stimulating
thought, brilliant illustration and practi
cal helpfulness. At the close of the last
session on Tuesday evening, Mr Munson,
with three other members of the confer
ence, took the New Haven steamer at
Peck Slip, expecting,after a comfortable
uights' sleep, to awake in New Haven,
Wednesday morning. The pitching or
the boat somewhat disturbed their
slumbers but when they arose next morn
ing they were surprised to find the boat
slowly working her way into the harbor
at Huntington, L. I., where about 6.30
a. m., she anchored and for 24 hours
waited for the tempest to abate its fury.
It was impossible fdr the passengers to
communicate with the outside world or
to relieve the suspence of their anxious
friends. But they made the best of the
situation, formed some pleasant acquaint
ances and were well fed and politely
waited upon by the officers arid employ
ees of the steamboat company. No
special favors, however, were granted to
the ministers as the Courier erroneously
reported, nor did the v dine upon chicken.
But all had plenty of good food, well
cooked and well served. Wednesday
evening the passengers gathered while
the ministers led in the singing of fa
miliar hymns, after which recitations.
stories of travel, ad venture and anecdotes,
interspersed with songs, patriotic, senti
mental and humorous, made the waiting
hours pass pleasantly and cheered "some
drooping spirits. The Continental weigh
ed anchor about 7 30 o'clock Thursday
morning and reached Belle dock at 12 30,
A
fsr- St
of
v
'8
is
line.
full
.' M.-i t"-' "K""
VUuJ . :-s&sS',l,J'. .
DOLIBER-GOODALE
W0g&M Mil
W. Clifford Dunn
Barre Plains, Mass.
Scrofula in the Neck
A Little Life Endangered
After Cther Treatment Falls Hood's
Sarsaparllla Cures.
"C. I. flood & Co., Lowell, Mass.s
"My little boy, Clifford, five years old, had
two large scrofula bunches as large as hen's
eggs on his neck, one under each ear. Doctor
ing did no good, in fact the bunches seemed to
Crow Larger and Harder.
The family physician said the bunches would
probably remain on the neck as long as the boy
lived. "We were almost discouraged. The
child's system was all run down, he had no ap
petite and slept about one-half of the time. I
had read much about.IIood's Sarsaparllla and
decided to give it a trial. As Clifford was very
weak, we gave liim only six drops at first. In a
few days liis appetite became more keen and
we increased the dose to ten drops. In a short
time the bunches began to soften and his appe
tite continued to increase.
It Was Wonderful
to note how fast Clifford's health improved and
When he had taken one bottle the bunches had
nearly disappeared. He has now taken nearly
ures
two bottles and is enjoying the best health of
his life." J. L. Dunn, Parre Plains, Mass.
Hood's Pills cure liver ills, Jaundice, bi
iousness, sick headache and constipation. 250.
A FEW REMARKS.
We have not got the "largest
stock of monuments and head
stones in New England." We
are not selling our stock at a
"tremendous sacrifice." Neither
are we giving away monuments
and headstones. Our pile is hard
ly large enough yet to stand
that. But we are selling a first
class article at as small a mar
gin of profit as is possible. The
railroad improvement at Strat
ford destroyed our turn-out and
made it impossible to receive
any stock there by rail and we
were obliged to remove our en
tire plant to Bridgeport. We
shall continue to keep up the
high standard of excellence the
old Stratford Granite and Mar
ble works have attained during
the past 10 years. We have no
inferior stock on hand and we
will sell it at a fair price. Our
draughtsman will furnish you
special designs and, as we cut
our work here, you can watch
i?s construction in every detail,
if you choose to do so. Come
and see us and be convinced that
we are telling you the truth.
CHARLES J. HUGHES,
1 Lyon street, opposite R. R.
station, Bridgeport, Conn.
Represented by John J. Northrop
for Newtown and.vicinity.
Thursday noon, making the trip in 37
hours.
Mrs Robertson of Xew Milford and
Mrs Warrington of Watertown have been
visiting their sister, Miss Ueorgiana bee
ley, and their aged parents and on Sun
day were greeted by many old friends
at church.
Miss Charlotte Curtis has taken the
Bullett hill school for the summer term.
She drives to and from school, boardiDg
at home.
Mr Knight, who entered G. Mitchell's
tenant house, canceled . his agreement
with Mr Mitchell, and last week removed
his family to the tenement owned by
Charles Downs.
SOUTHBURY.
I. Dodd has been quite sick, but is re
ported better.
The farmers in this vicinity have com
menced planting potatoes.
John Nelson is digging a cellar for a
barn on his land in Poverty.
H. R. Stone has entertained a friend,
recently.
The center school commenced, Mon
day, with Miss Emma Curtiss of South
Britain as teacher. -
BILIOUS COLIC PREVENTED.
Persons who are subject to attacks of
bilious colic can almost invariably tell,
by their feelings when to expect an at
tack. If Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera
and Diarrhea Kemedy is taken as soon
as these symptoms appear, they can
ward off the disease. Such persons
should always keep the remedy at hand,
ready for immediate use when needed.
Two or three doses of it at the right
time will save them much suffering.
For sale by E. F. Hawley, Newtown,
and S. C. Bull, Sandy Hook.
Children Cryfor
Pitcher's Castoria.
Full Meal
For the Babyi
A meal possessing all the nutritious
orooerties of mother's milk without any
the farinaceous and injurious matter of j
which artineial food is usually composed.
Mellin's Food
bv far the best for hand-fed infants;
invaluable in cnolcra-mtantum ana icem-1
It promotes a neaitny growtn, a,
development, and a vigorous consti- ,
tution. A perfect nutrient tor invalids,
Convalescents and the Aged.
Our Hook for the Instruction of mothers.
TV. r.ia nrl VtaoAintr nt Tnfnntc
will be mailed to any address ntbn request.
CO., Boston, Mass.
E. T. TUENER
&C0.
3reis as
C3r o o L s.
This stock has double the room that
it had and the assortment is twice as
large as ever. We have now the most
complete stock of Dress Goods ever
shown in the city-
The following quotations are a few
of the great values we offer in this de
partment:
A 40-inch All-Wool Cheviot, in Stripes
and Mixtures only. Has never heen
sold better than 50c Our price is
39c.
15 pieces of a 46-inch all Wool Cheviot
in the latest shadings, in Checks
and Mixtures, at 50c.
We are showing a 50 inch all Wool
Novelty which we consider great
value, price 59c.
Our Spring French Novelties at 75 c,
$1 and $1.25, are attracting a great
deal of attention from the fact that
the usual cost of these fabrics is
fully double what we are asking for
them.
New Goods arriving daily.
We solicit your inspection.
E.T. Turner t Co.
Leaders in Low Prices,
In Drv Goods, Etc.
36, 38 and 40 Bank St.,
Waterbury, Conn
W Hie Iron and
The popularity of the archi tectum of White
mand for them. They are more in demand to-day than ever. It is not surprising-, they are so light
yet so strong; so dainty, yet so enduring-, so beautiful, yet so low priced- Cleanliness is one of
their strong points. There are no cracks or edges for dust, being made of iron they ean be washed,
and with such a small surface to cover the operation does not take five minutes. We have them
brass trimmed, with woven wire springs, for
SIO.OO.
We have just purchased 500 pairs of
PORTIERES AND
They will be found on our counters at one- alf
$2 50. 3.50 and 4. Elegant Irish Point Curtains
Tnese are not the cheap, slazy goods offered by the dry goods trade.
CARPETS.
Don't forget we lead them all on carpets, for styles and prices- (I
DOWNER & EDWARDS,
101 STATE ST.,
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
ADOPTED BY THE STATE.
The Bellinger Remedy
as used by the
GERMAN REMEDY COMPANY.
for the positiveand painless cure of
Liquor, Opium, Morphine, Chloral, Cocaine and Tobacco Habits
Has been adopted by the Soldier's Hospital Board ot Connecicnt for tbe cure of
j Veteran Soldiers and Sailors.
Absolutely the only painless cure in the world lor drag liabits.
B. S.LEWIS, M.D., President. K. M. GRISWOI.D, M. D., Superintendent.
New. Haven Office. RIVERSIDE INSTITUTE:
Room 39 Hoadley Building,
49 Church street.
The Wiard . Adjustable Weeder
is the greatest labor saving Implement used
on the farm. Come and see it; also Wiard
Chilled Plows and Steel Plows In sizes and
styles to suit si', Morgan Spading Harrowc,
Cultivators. Potato Hillera, Corn Planters.
Sprayers. Land Rollers, Eddy's Stoneboat
Fronts, ete. livery implement l eeli can do
seen in practical use on my farm.
J. Botsford Fairchild,
P 0. Address, HawlejTiUe, Com.
TOB 8ALK An easy riding road cart, in good
J condition. Inquire ot A. J. SMITH, at
TUB Bee Office, Newtown, Conn.
MS MITYRE
ScCO.,
JUST PURCHASED.
850 ZDOZIEIfcT
LADIES'
COTTON
UNDERWEAR
WHICH WILL BE PLACED
ON SALE
WEDNESDAY
MOUSING
AT ABOUT 50C ON THE
DOLLAR OF FORMER
PRICES.
EWEN M'INTYRE
&c CO.,
837 & 839;CHAPEL ST.,
NEW 1IAVEN, CONN.
Brass Bedsteads.
Iron anh Brass Bedsteads has created a neat de
LACE CURTAINS.
the usual price of these roods. Portieres for
$5, 5 50 and 6.
64 Fifth street,
Derby, Ct.
- PORTRAIT v. PHOTOGRAPHER,
224 Main street, Birmingham, Conn
Work of Superior Excellence in all brancn
of Photography.
Handsomest Tea Store in the
... State.
THE BELKANP TEA CO,,
488 Main St., BRIDGEPORT.
Are giving away Own sands of handsome, as
well as useful, presents with Teas, Coffees or
Baking Powder. For particular send Be
stamp for catalogue.
THE BELKNAP TEA CO.,
4S3 Etia Eiwst. Eriljtport.
GILL it C 0. Profriston.

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