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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, May 11, 1894, Image 8

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NEWTOWN, CONN, BEE
FK1DAI.MAI 11. 18B4.
CIRCULATION:
lAKDABT 1,1882,
(.AST WEEK.
6101
3400
bear tell of a purchaser wanting
to buy an imitation? Why do
men who try to sell such, articles'
speak of the act as "working
them off? Simply because peo
ple want the best, and it takes
work and likewise deception to
sell them the worst. This un
pleasant experience may befall the
housekeeper who determines to
the new vegetable shortening.
The healthfulness, flavor, and
economy of this wonderful cook
ing product has won for it the
widest popularity, which in turn
has attracted the attention of
1 msiness parasites who are ' ' work-
ing otT imitations and coun
terfeits. Forewarned is fore
armed. Tie sure you get the only
genuine vegetable shortening
COTTOLENE.
Holal In 3 ami 8 jo.md pall.
Matlo only by
K.FAIRBANK&CO.,
CHICAGO, (no
rrodnce Exchange, New York
224 State St.. Boiton." ,
lirA(.ON.-i, CARRIAGES, SLEIGHS Anyone
Y wlxhlnK to mirrliiiNfl any kluil ot a Ve.
nlele will ilo well to mill on us ami t?ot low
wt in K'i. Headquarter tor TopH, Cushions,
Hiu'Vm, etc., tttu. I. G. BEERS A CO., New
town, Conn.
Litchfield County News.
WASHINGTON.
GOOD KOADS AND HOW TO GET THEM.
The following interesting and able
miner bv II. O. Averill. Worthy Master
of Washington Grange, recently read be
fore tii.it U range, is published in full at
the solicitation of The hditor. lt ia as
follows :
Some writer has very truly said tnat
ia iii iving over the roads in the country
districts he could form a very true con-
crption lot the t niigntenment, culture
and rertuement of the inhabitants of each
town throuch which he passed by a
casual notice of the condition of the pub
lic roul. If this writer should choose,
as did our wortny lecturer neariy iwu
yearn ago, tlie pleasant season of the
year lor tim trip across tne country 10
lUMk-liir1 hill?, the teason when JNature
has filled ,tie trees with fruit and paint
ed the le;ive of t he forest with beautiful
autumnal tint", if he is driving a sure
footed horse that is accustomed to steep
hilK made Mill steeper by a plentiful
u p!y of huge "ciadle knolls," if he is
accompanied by a companion whose fair
face and swett voice ate a
NEVER FAILING SOURCE OF HAPPINESS
I JtTlwfil 9 N
WW
THE BEST PLACE TO GET
YOUR JOB PRINTING DONE
IS BT
BUCKINGHAM & BREWER
90 Middle St., Bridgeport.
llolh proprietor are practical printers ot
M'vrtal yeart' ex pi'iienco anil nive their per
gonal alKMition to all tut) work.
XTOTICK Ti) TAXI'M EliS llavlnt? Ixmmi ap
i pulnleil id NiKTceil the late Gt-orn II. Itot
lord iimTiix Collector for the town ol Newtown
1 lierehv itlvu notice, that 1 am prepared to re
celveall unpaid Taxes now due and 1 will nice
all persons at tlie brick lmllilintf every Sutur
ilay Iroin I to 3 o'clock p. to. until April 1, INK
to reef I vi) the same.
All Taxes remaining unpaid atler that date
will positively he collected hy law with
Charges. KOISKliT A. CI. A UK, Collector.
Newtown, .lauuary 1, is'.fl.
DAVENPORT ii O'HAEA, Attorneys and Couo
aellora at Law- State street. Bridgeport.
COUGH LI N lillON.,
Itridgoport.
DEALERS IN FINE GOLD WALL PAPEE3,
OIL TINTS, FRESCO BORDERS, DECORA
TIONS. WINDOW SHADES, FIXTURES, ETC
and soluce to him, if the trip is made un
der such favr . hie circumstances when
our country ronoN re all in their best
condition, the conclusions us to our
civilization might not be entirely un
favotable to us.
Hut if on the oilier hand, the trip were
atteini ted during ihe -caon of the year
when by mud our roads are not passable,
"Not even Jack-ass-able," we would be
.written down as brutal, ignorant anu
barbarous.
Taking our common roads then as a
true index of our civilization, how will
this country compare with foreign coun
tries? I will quote from the report of the
United Statt s Department of Agriculture
in the year 1SSS. The commissioner
says: "While our railway system has be
come the most perfect in the world the
common roads of the United States have
been neglected and are inferior to those
of any other civilized country in the
world." Patrons, we are privileged, in
being permitted to live in a country
where liberty and freedom are the
birthright of all, in a country whose
material growth and prosperity is the
wonder of the world. We are proud of
our free schools and richly endowed
universities and we are glad that our
great railway system is the most perfect
in the world, but to realize that
OI K COMMON KOA 1)3 AUK INFERIOR
lacs
GO TO-
Blackman's New Studio
For Tour
PHOTOGRAPHS.
Special Inducements to out-ot-town patrons.
42 Main St.. - DANBUR7, CONN.
INSURANCE !
Send ma a postal
I will be pleased to call.
FIRE, ACCIDENT
LIFE.
to those of any civilized country in the
world should till us with shame and
mortification.
We look around us and note the great
advance made during recent years in all
lines of private and carporate business.
Agriculture is coming to be studied as a
science. Farmers are learning to know
more of the nature of their farms, what
elements are removed by their crops and
what must be returned to keep their
land fertile and make it more productive.
They are learning that the use of im
proved machinery reduces the cost of
production and renders them better able
to meet sharp competition. Railway
officials have made an even closer study
of their business and no outlay of money
has -been .too great for then to make in
their efforts to decrease the cost of carry
ing freight and passengers. The results
of. their study and experience are seen
in grades reduced, curves straightened,
iron rails replaced with steel, broken
stone taking the place of rand as a bal
last for their road beds and in improved
rolling stock.
That the improvement in the system
of making and repairing our common
roads has not kept pace with advances
made In nearly every other line must be
acknowledged by all.
IT IS TKt'E
that improved machinery has been in
vented and is being generally adopted,
which lessens the labor formerly expend
ed in plowing and scraping, but it can
hardly be said that the principle or sys
tem has undergone any radical change.
We have just as much mud, just as many
ruts, just as steep hills and just as hard
hubs as we ever had.
The true principle of road making is
just the same, whether the motive power
is to be that wonderful invention the
steam engine or that long suffering and
abused animal,the noble horse. This be
Ing the case we can safely look to the
railroad track as the nearest approach to
a perfect pattern for a road bed that the
skill of man has yet devised. The ideal
road then should have a hard and perfect
ly smooth surface with no grades or
short curves. To have such roads is, of
course from the nature of things, out of
the question, but we can at least approxi
mately make them hard and smooth.
Water is the greatest destroyer of roads,
therefore no pains should be spared to
keep it out by sluices, ditches and drains.
Next to water nothing so damages a
good earth road as heavily loaded wagons
passing over them with narrow tires and
with the hind wheels following the track
made by those in front.
GIVE US A LAW
requiring all tliea on four wheeled vehi
cles to be one inch wide for every 500
pounds of load,including weight of vehi
cle and making it a misdemeanor to use
wagons for carrying loads above "1000
Every dollars .worth Kole TCI C?"m
mediately oe sucn an improvement in
our roads as will astonish the natives.
Ruts and hubs would soon cease to an
noy us as every loaded wagon would act
as a roller and make a smooth surface
from which water would soon pass off
without damage, leaving the roads dry
and hard. I do not hesitate to say that
the cost pf repairing roads under such
usage would be reduced at least one half
what it is now.
1 desire to call your attention for a
moment to the subject "How to obtain
good roads during the season of the year
tney are oiocKaaea witn nuge
has an INDEMNITY FUND Of drifts Of the beautiful enow." In years
7nn nnn n n j gone by when nearry every farmer own-
$100,000. Sold, in denomma- ed two or more yoke of oxen it was the
;AfinnJ nn. ;,i0,0. custom for all to turn outT with men aDd
lions 01 0IUU ana tOUU, interest, teams after every winter storm and break
and principal payable in gold, out the roads without expense to the
my, ni. j: v.i j--e,4.iv. towns but duriDg the past few years the
rne most desirable investment ., rPnnrt.aZt the Reiect.menofonr
town through which it passes. These
toads are used by residents of outlying
I towns to reach tb.8 city markets or rail
way communications and the nature oi
the traflic is such that the
EXPENSE OF KEEPING THEM IN GOOD
repair ia necessarily very large. IIow
shall this expense be equitably propor
tioned ? Can the tax payers in the town
through which it is located be justly
aiked to pay It all? Most certainly not.
It should fall upon those who are bene
fitted by the traffic. It is a maxim in
the business world that bothor all par
ties in a legitimate and honest transac
tion are equally benefitted thereby.
The city resident then who consumes
the farmers produce is as truly benefit
ted by these roads as the man who owns
the team that travels it and so is every
merchant and corporation he deals with.
Directly or indirectly the railroad com
panies are undoubtedly benefitted most
of all, but as they pay only a state tax
nothing can be expected from them.
Taking all these things into considera
tion is it not right that such main roads
should be maintained at the expense of
the state i
I believe if the laws of our state relat
ing to taxation were so changed that
every dollar in the state, whether invested
in real estate or in bonds or stock, should
be located and made to pay its just pro
portion of the public expense, such
roads as I have described could be ma
cadamized and
KEPT IN FIRST CLASS KEPAIR
by the state without any additional bur
den in the way of an increased tax rate.
The only objection 1 have ever heard
offered by the state's building and main
taining such improved roads is that it will
build ud tne cities at tne expense oi tne
country towns. Now I do not look at it
in this light at all. I believe they would
be of mutual benefit. They would with
out question greatly enhance tne mar
ket value of all real estate near them
throughout this entire length. They
would enable the farmer to carry his
farm products to market at least en
pense, secure his supplies and thereby
save the commission of the middlemen
This is according to Grange doctrine and
it is a good business policy.
European countries are practically
unanimous in their policy of placing im
portant roads under the direct manage
ment of the general government and of
paving the expense of construction and
maintenance out of the general funds of
the state. France, which is only about
four times the size of New York, pays
annually about 20,000,000 from its
national treasury for public .roads. I
have nl ways had a great deal of sympathy
with the complaint that labor unions
have made against the practice of utiliz
ing penal labor in the manufacture of
staple goods that are placed on the mar
ket in compction with paid labor. That
all convicts, whether serving their sen
tence of 20 days in the county jail or 20
years in the state prison, should De re
quired to labor sufficiently to reimburse
the state for the expense of guarding
them, clothing them and feeding them, i3
admitted by all. Would it not be to the
advantage of all concerned if a steam
stone crushing plant should be estab
lished at the jails in the several counties
and at the state prison, the statf to trans
port the broken stone and furnish it free
to towns that will use it in the construc
tion of macadam roads?
We all know that our very lives de
pend upon the free circulation of blood
through our veins and arteries. When
we call a physician the first thing he
does is to feel our pulse and if he finds
it the least irregular he at once knows
that there is trouble somewhere. "The
common roads of the country are the
veins and arteries through which flow
the agricultural productions and the
commercial supplies, which are the
life blood of the nation."
I appreciated and it is hoped that it was
the earnest of a more plentiful shower, i
WOODBURY.
THE OLDEST HOUSE IN TOWN.
The Quaker Sherman house on North
Main street is the oldest house in town.
It was built soon after 1700.'
FOB A PATRIOTIC CELEBRATION.
It suggested that we have a real old,
patriotic celebration on the approaching
4th of July. We second tne motion.
There is home talent enough to make it
a success, as Woodbury always does on
sucn occasions. -
DEATH OF MRS LUCRETIA M SHERMAN.
Mrs Lucretia M. Sherman, widow of the
late Joseph li. Sherman (son of "Quak
er" IsaacSherman), died at her home east
o
ou Want Fine Furniture !
We keep it for Careful and Fastidious Buyers, and if you've an eye for the beautiful, if you've a mind for economy, you eannot fail to be pleased with our furniture- We hate it ia all etjlaa.
the Hewest and Most Artistio of modern makes. Each pattern is tasteful, whethor plainly finished or ornate and elaborate in design. The designs axe original. They will please Ihe most -tidio
us tastes . The Prices are Exceptionally Low. Just think, a S piece Antique Oik Chamber Suit, delivered and set up in your home, for only $20. This suit is swell made ud high Ij pol
sihed. Also a Hiuisome 4t-inch French Bevel Plate Antique Oak Suit, $55, Hall Trees at $7, Writing Desks $6.50. Extension Tables $8.ParIor Suits. Sideboards, Chiffioners. PiUar Extern
al on Tables, Bible Stands. Center Tables, Wardrobes, Hall Mirrors, Hat Sacks, Book Cases, Paper Racks, Work Baskets. Pictures. Easles, Plush Bockers. Easy Chairs, Seed and Kattaa Back
ers, Sofas and Lounges, Carpets, Bugs, Pill.ws, Mattress Springs, Woven Wire Cots, CradUs, Children's High Chairs. Express Wagons. Wheel Barrows, Baby Carriages and Boekisg Horsea.
-Mattresses Renovated. Upholstering and Caning done at Short Votice-
-Cash or Credit.-
TAYL0R& MC'GMN,
123. JhJlX ItJS
-Goods Delivered and Set Up Free Of Cost.-'
Branclies
SANDY HOOK.
day morning, that the following persons
had on protession of faith, expressed 'a
of Orenaug Rocksi'uesday night, May Ldesire to unite with the church, next
1. It is not known at what hour, as she
lived alone. She had not been consid
ered seriously ill. Her age" was 78. She
leaves many friends to mourn her loss..
PATRONS, THE CIRCULATION OK THE LIFE
BLOOD
of the nation is irregular, it ia impeded,
J. W. BRASIE,
Washington Depot, Ct.
Charles Crane,
The Bethlehem Dry Goods Man,
Bethlehem, Conn.
Spring kooiIs now ready. Now Satlnes,
(liiiKliaiim, Cambrics, ISatiste, Etc. New
Wool (loodit In luti'Ht HprinK Hliailes. Jackets
ami CnpuH. tifivt's Suits at lownst pri;t'H.
S-i)i'op mu a poHtal card If in need ot spe
cial kooiU.
SVeterinary Surgeon,
HEW.MILF0SD, .... C0SN
Telephone, L. N. Jennings'.
At Grand Central Hotel, Newtown, every
Tuesday.
FOR THE NEXT 60 DAYS
JAMES SEXTON & SON.,
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
Will sell out their entire stock of
MONUMENTS AND HEADSTONES
AtcoHt. The reason tor this sacrifice sale
is the change the railroad will make In Bridge
port, going through their present yard.
' INVESTMENTS.
of the 8 per cent stock
of the
CUMBERLAND
-BUILDING-LOAN
- ASSOCIATION,
is secured by $4 worth of im
proved city real estate, and also when
it IS sometimes almost stopped, but we
are intelligent citizens and diagnose the
case. We know that heroic treatment is
necessary. A surgical operation must
be performed. But the knive is in our
hands and we know hosv to use it. Will
we do it V
ONE FARMERS' METHODS
Ileuben Edwards of Tainter Hill is en
caged iust now in laving 125 rods of
ditch in a nine-acre pasture he is reclaim
ing for meadow purposes. Mr Edwards
believes in improvements and has spent
many hundreds of dollars in this class of
work. He has laid over 700 rods ot wall
on his place and fully 700 of ditch. Dur
ing tnis last year Mr n,awaras nas mar
keted in Aneonia fully 1250 bushels of
potatoes. Mr Edwards does not sell his
milk, but raises calves. MrEdward3be'
lieves there is money in farming, and that
there was never a better opportunity for
young men to engage in farming, when
good farms are as cheap as they are to
day. Speaking of improvements, Mr Ed
wards is about to build 100 rods of barb
ed wire fence. Mr Edwards says he
doesn't sell milk or raise tobacco. He
practices old-fashioned farming, and is
satisfied with the results.
THE LARGEST LANDHOLDER IN LITCH
FIELD COUNTY.
Washington has undoubtedly the larg
est landholder in this county, Benjamin
Seeley, who owns from 1300 to 1700 acres
of land in this and adjoining towns. He
has recently bought a strip of land of
James Bunnell. Mr See'ey has a fine
farm on Good Hill, Koxbury, another
farm in the south part of Washington
where he resides, and another farm on
Carmel Hill. Not many men are capable
of looking after so much real estate, but
Mr Seeley seems to enjoy it.
A FINE GRADE OF WORK.
H. W. Woodruff has recently' sold a
fine fancy carriage to Dr Ford and a
spindle to George Buckingham of Kox
bury. . He has recently shipped two bug
gies to New Jersey and one to Bowling
Green. Dwight Wilson of Washing
ton nas recently oougnt a farm wagon
of Mr Woodruff. The Norfolk Cream
ery Co., has in use a large wagon for
gathering cream, made by Mr Woodruff,
who turns out a tine grade of carriage
and wagon "work. "
A BAD ACCIDENT.
Fred Eckman, who isfemployed by II.
W. Woodruff, met with quite a bad ac
cident, recently. Aliea'vy box of axles
rolled on to his leg. No bones were
broken, but it lamed Mr Eckman so bad
ly that he was obliged to give np work
lor a week.
R. W. Squires was laid up for a week
with the measles. Coming as this sick
ness did in the midst of planting time, it
was not welcomed by Mr Squires... His
Horace O. Curtiss still continues to
improve in health. His many friends
hope for a full recovery.
Dr David it. Jiodger has been elected a
member of the county and also of the
state medical society.
The gospel temperance meetiug in the
Town hall, last week, was conducted by
Kev Joseph A. Freeman of the First
church. .
Bridget Skelley, sister of M. F. Skelley
of this town, died at Chippewa Falls,
Wis., April 29. .
Fred Wheeler lost a toe, last week, by
being caught between a wagon wheel
and a spring.
A. r . Mitcneii and ramuy arrived in
town, last week. His residence, the
Minor cottage, is advertised for sale.
Miss Carrie Bowles arrived home, last
week, from her trip to New 1 ark.
Mr and Mrs William Dawson and Mrs
George Terrill are convalescing.
Mrs Gillian wneeier or riartiord is vis
iting at Kev J. L. K. WychofTs,
N . M. Strong Is on the sick list. J
W. Nichols cares for his store.
Henry P. Strong and wife of New
Britain visited at the old homestead, last
week.
Dr D.R.Rodger is health officer of the
town under the new law.
HOTCnKISSVILLE AND VICINITY.
George F. Morris, the enterprising cash
merchant, is offering bargains, this week,
in opaque snades.
The Hotchkissville baseball club de
feated the Gunnery team of Washington
after a lively contest by a score of 9 to
10, on the Gunnery grounds, Wednes
day, May 2. The next game will be
played on tne liotcnkissvule grounds,
May 12, by the above teams. A close
game is expected.
The second nine ot the Uunnery defeat
the second nine of Hotchkissville, (The
Never Sneaks) on Saturday, the 5th, by a
score of 18 to 2b on the home grounds
J .' ice JJlark, who has been visiting at
G. F. Morris' for the past two weeks, re
turned to JNew Haven, on Monday last.
William Draper has moved hi3 family
to Naugatuck.
Samuel Kussell will move into the
house with Joseph Hague.
t red Smith met with a serious acci
dent on the ball ground, last Saturday
Charles B. Smith showed the finest
catch of trout that has been seen, this
season, 14 weighing 9 1-2 poi nds.
Miss Clydia Kusell has returned from
her vibit to New ork. -
PAINTER HILL.
G. S. Clarke furnished the 40 foot pole
for the school nag and his men raised it
Arbor day, Master Ernest having previ
ously prepared the ground. Trees were
also planted.
Mrs Seward at the Station was a visitor
at J. II. Leavenworth's, last week
C. T. Browne of J. rovidence was re
cently entertained at Edwin Leaven
worth s.
J. ii. and ti. f. Lieavenworth are im
proving the looks of their farm with new
fences.
Mrs Coyle i3 visiting friends in Water-
bury.
Miss Mary O'Brien is staying a few
days at Mrs George Clarke's.
Mrs Murphy has gone to New Haven
to spend some time with her granddaughter.
Sunday morning: Mrs -B. J. Haynes,
Miss Louise Haynes, Mrs Frank S.
Brown, Miss Lottie Brown, Misses Edith
and Fannie Meeker, Miss Bessie Taylor
and Edward li. Griswold. -
Mrs B. Gri.-wnld is again able to walk
a short distance from her home on pleas
ant day.". -
The ladies' sewing society will meet
on Friday afternoon and evening of this
week, at Mrs Charles Carter's.
Kenney & llosford became permanent
ly located jn their new otlice, last week,
and closed the place occupied by them
as such during the past year.
As usual each year, J. D. Cramsey
has a garden in which is planted the
greatest variety of vegetables of any in
this place.
An open Grange at Washington Depot,
last Friday evening, drew two or three
good loads of visitors and members from
this village.
J. B. Stillson now has a line assort
ment of tine apples in the windows of
his market. 1'hoso also constantly on ice,
which is the finest summer drink, is
kept there.
T. C. Black's team is on tne roaa aai-
ly, conveying grain to his mill for his
immense custom traae.
E. B. Wheeler drove to his former
home in Easton, Ct., on Friday last, and
returned on Saturday leading a tine
horse he had purchased while away.
John Ludgate and t rederick caoie, are
engaged in sorting ti. U. Averiu stooac-co.
J. G. Hatch, representing N. F. Wood
ward, manufacturers of Kemp's balsam,
headache capsules, Lane's medicines,
corn cure, etc., was the guest of K. H.
Beardsley, over last Sunday and ap
pointed Mr Beardsley as agent ot the
above named remedies, for this place.
Miss Fanny Renfrew h better.
Miss Abbie Beeman arrived home
again from Bridgeport, last Saturday
evening.
Joe" Titus, as he is popularly called.
is hustling along the Mead cottage. This
is located on the shore of Lake Wara
maug, on the side h'.ll, south of Mrs
Charles Beeman. The style of archi
tecture is colonial. Among those who
are assisting Mr Titus are George Ferris,
Rollen Bunnell, E. D. Howland of South
Kent and Mr Logan of New Milford.
E N. AY RES,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
381 MAIN ST., BSIDGEPOST, CONN.
$2.50.
A Ladies' Dongola Welt Button,
every pair warranted, all styles of toe;
a saving to you of $1.00 a pair.
BANTAM."
.REMINISCENSES OF OLD DAYS
Thomas K. Goslee was in Waterbury,
last week, with a load of produce. Mr
Goslee sDoke of the changes in that
place since his younger days. He visit
ed Waterbury when a young man, when
it was but a small village, with a rew
stores. Mr Goslee was at Mew Miltord,
with his father, Chester C. Goslee, when
the first train arrived over the iiousa-
tonic road. It was a great sight and
hundreds of people had gathered from
the surrounding towns to see it. In Mr
Goslee's section of Litchfield there was
more population in his younger days
than there is to-day.
Mrs Charles Flynii visited her daugh
Mrs Barker, in Waterbury. last week.
Charles Flynn, of the firm of Flynu &
Doyle, was in New York, last week, and
set up a surrey his firm built wi'h ball
bearing axles, something new. He had
a ride in a buggy, fitted with pneumatic
tires. Mr Flynn believes pneumatic
tires are going to have a great run.
E. N. Moore passed bunuay witn
Bridgeport friends.
$2.65.
Men's Fine Calf Balmoral Goodyear
Welt. These goods are worth $3.25,
we have cut the price to $2.65.
' A FEW REMARKS.
We have not got the "largest
stock of monuments and head
stones in New England.'We
are not selling our stock at a
'-tremendous sacrifice." Neither
are we giving away monuments
and headstones. Our pile is hard
ly large enough yet to stand
that. But we are selling a first
clas3 article at as small a mar
gin of profit as is possible. The
railroad improvement at Strat
ford destroyed our turn out and
made it impossible to receive
any stock there by rail and we
were obliged to remove our en
tire plant to Bridgeport. We
shall continue to keep up the
high standard of excellence the
old Stratford Granite and Mar
ble works have attained during
the past 10 years. We have no
inferior stock on hand and we
will sell it at a fair price. Our
draughtsman will furnish you
special designs and, as we cut
our work here, you can watch
ils construction in every detail,
if you choose to do so Come
and see us and be convinced that
we are telling you the truth-
CHARLES J. HUGHES,
1 Lyon street, opposite R. R
station, Bridgeport, Conn.
Represented by John J. Northrop
for Newtown and.vicinity.
Floyd B. Bouton,
UNDERTAKER & EMBALM ER
GEORGETOWN. CONS-
Special attentioa girt U utof-to or
ders.
TeiepfcoB Call 85.
PELNDLE & MORRIS,
UNDERTAKERS AND
EMBALMERS,
Are prepared to do anything
in their line at shortest notice.
A share of public patronage
solicited.
W. H. PR1NDLE. L. C. MORRIS.
Calls aciwered if left at V B- Priadla'a Hoase; L.
Morris's Boose. Telephone at Laoaard's Hotel
97 CENTS.
A Ladies' Kid Button, Patent Leath
er Tip, Opera Toe, a $1.50 shoe lor 97
cents-
IIAWLEY, WILMOT
& REYNOLDS,
U NDERTAKERS,
NO. 98 STATE STREET,
BRIDGEPORT, COSH. TELEPHONE 291.
GEORGE B. HA WLET. - - II Chapel Strut;
CHARLES E. WILMOT, - 407 Cliatoa Arcaur,
I0EU B. RE7H0I.ES. - 192 Fairfield Avaau
65 CENTS.
A. Child's Kid, Patent Tip, Spring
Heel, Button Shoe, sizes 6 to 11, as
good as others sell at Si-
Handsomest Tea Store in the
State.
THE BELKANP TEA CO,,
488 Main St., BRIDGEPORT.
Are giving away thousands of handsome, ait
well as unelul, presents with Teas, Cotlees or
linking Powder. For particulars send 2c
stamp for catalogue.
THE BELKNAP TEA CO.,
488 Main Street, Bridgeport.
LAWRENCE GILL & C0.. Proprietor.
L. E. PRATT,
The Reliable Carriage and Wapon Builders.
Write tor terms. Best work at lowest
prtces.
NEW MILFORD, CONN.
MINOHTOWN DISTRICT.
The flag rope at the school house ha
been repaired. Selectman Horace Minor
adjusted it, Wednesday.
Mrs C. M. Goodsell is building a new
hennery.
Mrs Louise At wood's granddaughter,
Eva, has been visiting her the past
we k.
A fine maple tree was set out in the
school yard by teacher and scholars, Ar
bor day, with the assistance of D. S.
Mansfield.
A large number of men with the road
machine have repaired the roads in this
Vicinity, in a very creditable manner.
Dr D. K. Kodger has purchased a two-
seated carriage of Frank G. Atwood.
l'reston Atwood and son are building
a -long 1 ne of , divit-ion fence, on the
northwestern boundary of their farm.
itiarly gardening is quite an iDdustrv
here. A number have early vegetables
in quite an advanced state of growth.
n . li. Atwooa nas recently set quite a
number of peach and apple trees.
on the market.
eisewnere can or
information.
father, G. , w . squires, one or the sue
pessfnl farmers of the Merrvall district.
Before investing" several towns Indicate that there is an was over and assisted him a day last
WAlvw 1U1 Ananlnnr thA rnarla nr. r,nhlii PTnonan
Which ia the proper course to pursue.?
HENRY D.. WHITNEY,
General Agent for Connecticut,
fi P. 0. ARCADE. BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
W. W. WALKER & SON
Witt SELL TOD FINE WALL PAPER AT 4c
PER ROLL. WHITE LEAD, TINTED LEAD,
MIXED PAINTS, OIL, GLAS3.BRUSHES.
ETC, AT HARD TIME PRICES
IP yoil WANT TO BUT PAPER OS PAINT CALL
AND GET PRICES AT
600 Main Street Bridgeport, Conn.
Yarrington & Watson,
KKAI, ESTATE. r
S Warner 15Tg-, 61 yaiifiold Ave, BrlOgeport,
THE NEWTOWN LIBRARY:
Will be opon fordrawtnir Books every Tne.
day 1 to 8 p m nnil 7 toft in the evening ;8ftt;ur
dny troi I p m to 9 In tun eveulug.
. WE CAN ALL SEE
the injustice of certain farmers spending!
bours ana days or vaiuaDie time in open
ing roads In their districts and at the
same time bear their proportionate share
of the expense incurred in otner districts.
It Is therefore plain to be seen that eith
er all the roads should be opened for
public travel by volunteers or that all
should be opened at public expense.
The Intention of the law is or should be
to so distribute all the public expenses
that the burden shall be equitably pro
portioned among the tax payers, it is
evident that public conveniences and
necessity as truly demand that the roads
should be made passable in the winter
time as that they should be repaired in
the summer time. If this is true, and I
think we must all agree that It is, then it
is uniust to ask the farmers to open tne
roads for the purpose of gohig'to the
store, the mill or blacksmith shop and
let the merchant, the miller and tfce
smith receive the pecuniary benefit of his i
trip and not share the burden.
There is through many of our towns a
main road that U used as much or more
by non-residents a by taxpayers of the
Mrs Susan Hungerford of Sherman,
who is 82 years old, was the guest, last
week, at the home of K. W. squires. .
A. L. Flower is quite busy at carriage
painting in Mr Colea" shop. He has a
good deal of work on hand and a pros
pect for a steady run. . . .
H. W. Woodruff of Washington Depot
has about completed an attractive cot
tage on his land near the New Preston
station. It is already enjoyed by a ten
ant. : . '
WARREN.
The week has given us June weather
The rapid development of nature indicat
ed at once the power or. the sun. Kain
up to Friday noon was longed for by
many and doubtless their longing ex
pressed in a good degree the actual want
Arbor day did not create as much enthu
siasm as in former years, though not for
gotten.
The sky was overcast, Friday after
noon, and a dark cloud with heavy thun
der threatened abundance of rain, but
the appearance exceeded the reality, as
only a very little rain fell. The little was.
NEW PRESTON
ORDINATION OF KEV MK EVANS.
We were interested in the ordaining
council wnicn met at JNew Jreston on
Wednesday, May 2, to ordain Mr Evans
to tne gospel ministry, we had a part
in tne same, rne day was delightful
and an tmnes were accomplished in a
pleasant way, and to the apparent satis
faction of all concerned. Kev Charles
Symington qf Litchfield was chosen
moderator. Th sermon was preached
by Kev F. A. Johnson of New Milford
from the text, "A sower went forth to
sow," and "The seed was the word,"
irom Mattnew ana xuke. These two
texts furnished the two-fold division of
the sermon. The ordaining prayer was
by Kev A. Gardner of Warren, the
charge to the candidate by Kev B. M
Wright of Kent, and the" right hand of
fellowship by Rev H. C. McKnight of
Sherman. The other parts by Rev E
ts. fike of Morris and the new pastor at
Koxbury. The singing by the choir was
good and inspiring, notwithstanding the
heat was rather oppressive. The ladies
furnished a magnificent collation, which
was servea ac me parsonage. A. u. u
who sat at my right, from New York
City, regarded it as grand. Everything
about it was first class. - One very no
ticeable feature of the morning gather
ing was the large attendance ; of spectt-
tors at toe council, it was a good let
ture. The people should not leave tl e
matter to the council to do it all. The
people should see and hear. There is no
better school to which one should be
long, occasionally Mr Ivans' paper
was not Jong, neither was the question
ing or tne candidate as prolonged as is
sometimes the case. The council by it
sen reacnea an unusual unammitb. so
that Brother Evans enters the ranks of the
ministry with flying colors, and we wish
mm an manner oi success. ; we are ia
lormea tnat ne is soon to make a jour
ney over sea, to nis native land, Wales
to be , absent perhaps two or three
months. May he be an honored success
or of his namesake, Christmas Evans
who when he came to die, said he had
never preached" without blood iu the
basin. By which he meant that he had
ever made prominent Christ and bim
crucified. A. G. -
DEATH OF MRS SARAH BEARDSLEY.
In the death of Mrs Sarah Beardsley
widow of Stephen Beardsley, in Kent
Hollow, last Saturday evening. Messrs
Harvey and s Seth Couch of Woodville
lost an only sister, and the district in
which she lived will long miss a kind
neighbor and estimable woman.
AT THE VILLAGE CHTJRCH.
Rev Mr Svans announced from the
pulpit of the Village church,' last Sun
MARBLEDALE-
George II. Wheaton is now fttled on
the farm of his late mother, Mrs Julia
Wheaton.
TIRKU, WEAK, NEKVOUS,
Means impure blood, and overwork or
too much strain on brain and body.
The only way to cure ia to feed the
nerves on pure blood. Thousands of
people certify that the he?t blood puri
fier, the best nerve tonic and strength
bu'lder is Hood's Sarsaparilla. What it
hs done for others it will also do for
you Hood's Cures.
Nervousness, loss or sleep, loss or ap
petite and general debility all disappear
when Wood s sarsapariua is persistently
takeD, and strong nerves, sweet slfep,
strong body, sharp appetite, and in a
word, health and happiness toilow tne
usf of Hood's Sarsaparilla.
The strong point about Hood s sarsa
parilla is that they.are permanent, be
fore thev start from thd solid foundation
of purified, vitalized and enriched hlnnrl.
3 fffi.
... v r iTi r v
I D
No Woman Can Be Happy
and light-hearted when pain
ful female complaints crush
out her life.
If she is melancholy, excit
able, nervous, dizzy, or trou
bled with
sleepless
. ness or
fainting
spells, they
are symp
toms of
serious fe
male weak
ness. A leaf out
of the expe
rience of Mrs. Anna Miller,
rrho lives at Duhring', Pa.,
shows that Lydia E, Pink
hams Vegetable --Compor.vd
wilj.:. cure .'.that terrible weak
ness arid bearing-down pain in
the abdomen; the dizziness "in
the head, the feeling of irrita
bility, and loss of appetite.
" I can highly recommend
your Vegetable Compound,"
she writes, " for all female com
plaints. Ithas cured many cases
where the bcst.doctors failed.".
Call at our store
our stock-
and look through
No trouble to show goods.
The prices quoted above
a sample of the reduction
made on all or our stock.
are
we
only
have
There is no old stock, but Fresh New
Goods which we are daily receiving
for the Spring and Summer trade.
Our terms are
GASH.
If you want anything in our line,
try us.
We think we can suit you on price
and quality.
William Dakin& Co.,
HOTCH KISS VI LLE, CONN.,
i the place to buy Carriages, Buggies, Spin
.lle.s, ConvorilH, Adjusting Pole Tongues
Headquarters lor Milburn Lumber Wagons,
Halters, lifilit ami heavy Harness, DlanKets.
Robes, second hand Carriages and liuggies.
Have you seen our spring back Concord. It Is
abeaiitv. Knipire Washers, r our Houses lor
sale in Hotchkissville. All of the above will
be sold very cheap. Get prices betore buying
elsewhere.
v: w. bates,
OF
N 0 R W A L K , CONN.,
Has the largest and finest as
sortment of finished Monuments
and Headstones of any establish
ment in the State.
DEALER IN EVERYTHING IN
THE STONE LINE.
MARBLE AND GRANITE
WORKS.
Jtfonuments, Head Stone in Vubl or Granita
Write for design and pneea.
W. STEVENS,
NORWALTT.
M. G. KEANE'S
MONUMENTAL WORKS,
Honsatonic Avenne. Bridgeport.
THK
JJerliii Jroa fridge Qo.
OI HAST I! KK LIN, CONN., -
good ironTsteelroof
JtAi pcrsqr. loot.
Write theiu lor particular.
Th'.' Tnivolcr's Guide.
if lDDLKSKX BANKING CO. Subscribed
ill capital, $;tU0,0UU. Paid in, iVK. Issues
6 ner cent Debenture Bonds of $HI0,'200, i50
too, $1,0 W ami tft.oiW, wlr'.'j are by statut
lawful investments tor 'iioat Funds in the
naU. C. I- SAXFORn. Aent. 17 Bishop
I'.loch, Brldeeport, Conn.
I I B M I I I
IX IK 1 w WM wrfSSr
H. AYEES,
BOOTS AND SnOES,
381 MAIN ST-, BRIDGEPORT, CT.
Absolutely Pure
WILL NOT INJURE
THE MOST DELICATE
FABRICS
PRESENTS
GIVEN FOR ThadeMafiks
SOLD BY ALL ERDCEfiS cts.acake1
What is the Use
of suffering, vlie.i "i ce.its
will buy a b-ttle of
Renne's
PAIN-KlLLmG
'Magic Oil.
"It Works like a Charm"
for Sore Throat, Cramps, Chol
era Morbus, Rheumatism, Neu
ralgia, and Pains of all kinds.
SOLD EVERYYtfHERE.
vnv MAt KN ANU HAKTFOUD
KAU.ROAD.
BKRHKHIRK OIV1SIOW.
NovemiH-j M.
lxft.
in., 4 JiS
m
Domestic Animals need
HARVELtL'S CONDITION POWDERS.
20
J n the General Hardware and Agriculture
Implement business and a larger and better
elected stock at the present time than ever
, before al the same season ot year.
I have a limited number of my ISiS catalogues that I Bhonld lie
pleased to mail to any wholiave not received them. It will on "
ly cost you a postal card with your address. 94 pages ot Valua
ble Information. ' " ..' "
I dely competition,
I admire opposition,
And under NO condition
Will I budge rrom my position.
D. B.
13, 17 and
WATERBURY,
19
As the largest hardware store.
With any number on the door,
' Prices rrom Dasement to top floor
. . - ' ' -WiJl be in future, as betore:
One Octa?a Below.
WILSON,;
East Main Street,
CONN.
TU:M..
TVES
JL i I I I
flOMPANY
J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
NEW IIAVKN North, 5M2
South, li-S p. in.
SH fcXTtiN Nurlli. 10.10 a. nu -M P- m. South,
li.ict, 7-3i p. in.
3TKVKNSON North, 10.23 a, rn, 5.07 p. in.
South, U-Vi a. in., 7. IS p.m.
MoNKoE North U'.i a. m, f5.ll p. m.
South, fll- a. T7.12 p. in.
BOTSEOIII North, 7-Ki. lufc-a. m, 120, S.r
7jM p. ui Sun. lay, s lo a. in. Soulii, U.at
a. in., 7-i'T p. in.
SEWTOWS North. 7 It, Ht.47 a. m I4A 5Ti,
7.12 p. ux. Sun. lay, s.l a. in. foulii,
7jcj, a-47, 11-7 a in., 4 a. L57 p. in.
Sun. lay, 6.13 p. ui.
HAWLKYVIM.K North, 7-'.2, 10.56 a. in,
HJS&, 5.42, 7.20 p. m. Mimlay, 8.27 a. m.
South, 7.01, ll.l'.t a. in., 4.21, ti-M, 6.4S
p. ui. Sunday, S-V7 p. m.
BKK.KrlEM JUNCTION Korth. XB, 11.10
a. in., 1.20, 5S 7 2:t p. m. Sunday, ISJSA
a. m. South, b-, s-tu. 11.10 a. in, 4.12.
5i5, fi.40 p. ui. Sunday A.43 p. m.
BUOOKEIEI.D North, S.os , 11.15 a. tn-, lJt2,
1I.U3, 7-tt p. in. Sunday, S 41. South, .47i.iu,
II a. in , 5 6-10 p. in. Sunday, 5i7 p. in.
LANESV1LLE and STILL'KIV El-Nortb, B.15
a. ui., 1.45, u oy p. m. South, 6 io, 8.10 a. in,
.1G, 6-23 p. tn. Sunday, north, ts.47 a. ra
south, f5.2ti p. ui.
NEW SI 1LEOUD North, 8.22, 11.27 a.m., 2.15.
6.20, p. iii. Sunday, ti-' a. in. South,
.05, 10.48 a.m., 353, 510, 6. IS p. i.
Sunday. 5.20.
M E KW 1'NSV I L LE North, 8 JSC,, ll-T.i a. m.,2.45,
6.32 p. in. Sunday ,. a.m. South, lu.35a.ui..
4.34, 6.U5 p. in. Sunday, 4.57 p. in.
KENT North, 8.4s, 11.51 a. m, S.2. 6.45 p.
Sunday ,:i.21 a. in. South, 10 23 a. ui, 3.2s, 4.14,
5JW p. m. -Smiday,47 p. in.
COKNWALL liHIlHiE North, 9M a m, 12.04,
4.30. 7 p.m. Sundays-til a-in. South, 10.15
a. in., 3.1H, 3 50, 5J16 p. m. Sunday ,4.14 p. in.
WEST CORNWALL North, .13 a. in, li.Ii,
4 .50, 7.00 p. in. Sunday ,9.47 a. in. South, 10.03
a. ni, 3.US, 3.33, 5.27 p. in. Sunday ,4.01 p. m.
BO TS FORD TO BKIUOEPOaT. -
BOTSFORU -North, 7-S, 16.3a a. in 12.20, 5.23,
7 04 p.m. Sunday, S. 10 a. m. South, 7.17,
8.55, 11.40 a.m., 4.37, 7-07 p.m. Sunday, 6-2C
p. in.
STEI'NEY North, 7.2S, 10.24 a. ui, 12.05. 5.09.
6.55 p. in. Sunday, 8 a. in South, 7.2S, tuct,
11.40 a. in., 4.45, 7.16 p. m. Sunday, 6.38 p. in.
LONG UILL North, 7 22, 10.1s, U.4 a. m., 5.U3,
6.49 p. in. Sunday, 7-4 p. m. South, 7-34,
f9.00, 11-54 a. in, 4 -VI, 7.21 p. m Sunday 6.43
p. m.
TRUMBULL North, 7.16, 10.12, 11 JtS a. in,
4.57, 6.43 p. in. Sunday, 7.47 a- in. South,
7.39, 9.14 a. in, 1I.5M, 4.57, 7.26 p. m. Sunday.
16.50 p. m.
BRllXiEPORT North. 7.05, 10, 11.15 a. m, 4.45,
6.30 p. in. Sunday, 735 a, in. A rrive. 7-51,
9.25 a. ni, 12.10, 5.10, 7 .41 p. in. Sunday 7-U5
p. in.
DAHBFKT HIVISKIN. -DANBCRT
Arrive 7-42, VJA. 10.55 a. m, S.16,
5.37,6-27,6.52 p.m. Sunday, 10.23 a. Ill S.2 7 p.m.
Leave 6.15, 635, 7-3, 8.35 a. m.; 4.25, 6JU, S-J,
1 1.40 p. ni. Sunday. 8.U5 a in., 5.05 p. in.
BETHEL North, 6.43, 7.36. 10.40 a. in,
2.04, 5 31, 6.20, 6.46 p. m. Sunday, 10.17 a. in,
8.20 p. in. South, 6-22, 6.42, 736 a. tn, 431.
' 6.16,7.03,11.47 p.m. Sunday A12 aju, 5.12 D in.
DL'IlIUVl' V.. tl. Oi. ... . I -...
V L.I. I Aa 111, ( U3, O-W
pm. Sunday, 10.11 a. m, 8.13 p.m. South,
6.29 . a. in, 7.10, 11.54 p. ui. Sunday, B.18
a. in , 5as p. in. -
SHEPACG RAILROAD.
November 19, lsa.
BETHEL Leave 737, a. in, 835
Sum' ay 8.11 a. m. Arrive 8-55
p.m. sun.lay .IS p. in. .
U A W LE Y V I L LE North, 8-45 a. m, SM p.n.
Sunday, 835 a. in- Leave tor Bethel HM a.
m, 4 -kip. ui. Sunday, 6 p.m.
S11EPAUG North, t9.u2 a. m, tj02 p. la.
Sunday, tS-48 a.m. South. f5 -m,;3-5L P-
m. Sunday, 536 p. m.
OXBURY ""ALLS North. .15 a. m, MUO
pan. Sunday, f8J7 a m. Soaln.f8.17 a.m, f339
p. in. "Sunday, f5-26 p. m.
BOX BURY North, 9.50 au in, 6.18 p. tn. San.
day, 9.10 a. m. South. 8.06 a. m, 3.26 p. ni.
Sunday, 5 15 p. m.
JUDD'S BRIDGE North, f 10.00 am, fJ4 p.
m. Sunday, f9.17 a. in. South, fs.02 a- lu,
t2.57 p. tn. Sunday, M p. m.
WASHINGTON North, 10.45 a. m, 636 p. m.
Sunday, 3i a. m. miuui, ijjti am, Ai p.
, ISALJTN STREET,
And examine their Block and price of
FURNITURE, CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES, OIL CLOTHS
DRAPERY, CURTAINS, LAHPS, CROCKERY,
STOVES, RANGES AND HOUSE FUR-
IinSHHIG GOODS.
Freight paid or goods delivered frco to ITcTTtctrn end vicinity.
p. m.
t.4
. -40 p.
a, 23up
p.iu.
m. Sunday. 4.51 n. m.
REW PRESTON North, 10.55 aum, C-40
Sunday, 9.43 a. m. boutli, 7.46 a. m-
Sunday, 438 p. m.
ROM rXjRl North, 11 10 a.m, J6.49 p.m. 8nn
day, 9JM a. m. soutn, f737 aw m, f2ju4 p. in.
Sunday, 426 p. m.
, iviv. nur.u, ii-zu, T"- p. rfl. 9UJD.
day, 10.02 a. m. South. f732 a. m, i 34 p. m
Sunday, 4.18 p. m.
BANTA51 North, 11.45,a.m,7JM p. n. Sunday.
iw.w -1. oviuo, t.o m m MJiw d. m. sub.
a. ru.
. i ,
LAKE North, til .50 p.m.. tlJCn p.m. Sondav
1 10.24 a. m. South, f7.20 a. m, f L22 pjn. Sun
day, S 56 p. rn. "
LITCHFIELD Arrive lLVSa.m,7;12 p.m. San
day, 1030 a. in. South, 715 a- in, 1.1 p. ia.
Sunday, S-50 p. m.
. NEW TORK A NEW ENGLAND R.R.
January 7, 1804.
HAWLEYY1LLE East UJO, 7JJ p. m.
West 9 a. ra, S p. m.
NEWTOWN East 17.20 p. m. Wett flUS
a-m, ti.Si p. m.
8 ANDY HOOK East 11.12, 72 p. m.
W.Mt f 1 a m 4 n. m
SOUTIi &UaT East 12-M, ISi p. Ba. Wc t
ii a-m; t3t p. m.
tinuM;aa('rHllai7,

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