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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, August 10, 1894, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051487/1894-08-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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Bric-a-Brac.
CLOCKS.
WATCH, CLOCK AND JEWELET
Ot all kinds done promptly and at reasonable prices by
EIDER, BRYANT & CO.,
JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS,
259 MAIN STREET, DANBTJBY, CONN.
DIAMONDS, OPERA GLASSES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE
FANS.
:s :: IT . TEST LOW . PRICES. :: ::
It will pay you well to lunpeot our stock before buying.
RIDER, : BIjYANL: & : CQ.,
259 Main street,- - D ANBURY.
1 ME
EW
VOLUME XVII.
NEWlOWN, CONN., FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1B91-EIGHT PAGES. !
NUMBER 32.
I t ! i
N
OWN
- n 1-1 . h .
II U II ' A II ' A
"Vvl-orL In 3Dsh3.Td-o.X3t, Call -.t
T M TVES COMPANY
O Ills JL till J I I i I i i i
257" IvtjIISr STREET,
And zamins their stock and prie.t ot
FURNITURE, CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES, OIL CLOTHS
DRAPERY, CURTAINS, LAMPS, CROCKERY, "
STOVES, RANGES AND HOUSE FUR
NISHING GOODS.
Freight paid or goods delivered free to Newtown and vicinity.
v SiswjkSwssEsvSejs
IDexTo3r, Conn.
Buckeye mowers, Wood mowers. Ballard tedders, Refrigerators,
Lawn mowers, Scythes, Harrows, Yankee horse rakes and other
makes. Freezer?, Railroad paints, John's paints and other brands.
TRY THESE SPUING PRICES.
Did you know
That Litchfield ha the
FINEST JEWELRY STORE
In Litchfield county?
This is a fact.
ERNEST L. PIIATT,
Proprietor, Litchfield, Conn.
WATCHES! CLOCKS!
Everything in the Jewelry line
Keep your eye on this space.
BARGAINS!
REFRIGERATORS,
ICE CREAM FREEZERS,
OIL AND VAPOR STOVES,
are the things we are pushing to the front just now- We don't pre
tend to have cornered the market on these goods, nor do we advertise
to sell them, as some do. at the cost of the pntty and paint used on
them, bat we have sold quite a number, so far. to people who have
looked both in and out of town and they tell us we are
Just a Little Below Our Competitors In Price.
Will you investigate this matter before you go where you are sure
to pay tha combination prices ? Just look before you leap and first try
A CARD FROM A. 0. BAKER.
Our furniture business in Hawleyville is
now so well known iar and near that we ieel
that we may sately for a time at least cat
down our advertising expenses. An 'ad
to be of value should be changed every week.
We are too busy to do it, besides we heard a
man say the other day that that furniture
man at Hawleyville who advertises so much
must be a tool (queer what big game one
runs on to sometimes when he goes out with
out a gun). Another more charitable friend
remarked to us confidentially in an oft band
way that writing "ads" out of business hours
is liable to lead to softening ot the brain,
mind you lie didn't Bay we had got it, and he
looked away over into the next county when
he said It, but. well we are not slow to take a
hint it it is a blind one. It would be perfect
ly awful if we should really get it (this soften
ing disease we mean) and have it get real
deeply seated belore we knaw it or before we
nail time to vaccinate so we are going to stop
would otherwise go into the coffers of these
9
Summer Shoes !
i
Actual Value,
Our Prices.
Improve the shining hour and buy while
the above condition of affairs exists
384 MAIN STREET, BRIDGEPORT- CONN.
riKht oft short, srive un our advertising col
umns for a while, pocket the money that
wouiu ouierwise go into tne coners 01 tnese
grasping newspaper monopolists, eat brain
hardening food and attend strictly to business
1. e., selling furniture at Hawleyville.
Now for Heaven's sake don't tell everybody
what you think, just remember how sensitive
we are to adverse criticism and tell then that
we are simply boycotting and playing Debs
with the newspapers for a while, don't tell
them we are tired or waiting for anything to
harden, be compassionate, be just, be con
siderate, be charitable, be liberal min ded one
with another and last ot all BE SURE AND
COME TO HAWLEYVILLE before you buy
your furniture. Please commit this last sen
tence to memory and then pin it in your bat.
A. G. BAKER, Furniture Warerooms,
Opposite Union Depot, Hawley
ville, Conn-
evy
Bros
We are closing out the balance of our
Suaamoi Olotla-irxg:
-AND-
t C ost
Purchase
NOW
and
Save
Money.
LEVY BEOS.
211 Uain Street,
Danbury, Conn.
THE
MOUSE!,
At Quassapaug Lake.
The time for picnic parties is at hand and
when selecting a place to spend your ontlng
don't forget the Dews House is prettily situ
ated on the shores of Lake Quassapaug and
that it is nice and cool over here. My steam
er is all that rould be desired for a trip 'round
the lake, and I run it myself so as to be sure
no accidents occur, tor I know every inch ot
) Jake and Just where the dangerous places
ire. Make your dates a little ahead of time.
There is room for all and I have good ball
grounds, good stables, good boats, good fish
bait; in tact, everything lor your comiort.
Edwin IDe-ws,
.Proprietor,
P. 0. Address, Hiddlebnry, Conn.
M. G. KEANE'S
MONUMENTAL WORKS,
Housatonic Avenue, Bridgeport.
WE8TP0RT MARBLE AND
GRANITE WORKS.
X. 3r. 3MCoZS.exxxk.ct,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
Monuments and Headstones of All
Descriptions in Marble and Granite
Never Undersold. Box 228, Westport, Conn,
R. F. FOSTER & CO.,
BOOTS AND SHOES.
ICE CREAM!
n prepared to serve refreshments, ice
i, temperance arinKS, inncneons, ain
I am
cream.
ners 01 suppers to order, at short notice, at
my home, situated about one-quarter mile
west of Redding Center, and solicit the pat
ronage ot the public I thoroughly under
stand catering in all Its branches and will
furnish parties, weddings, or picnics, large
or small, with refreshments if desired. Ice
cream, all flavors, delivered in quantity at
reasonable rates.
E. H. Ryckman, Eeddinsrcctenter'
On The Rise.
-""1,166 tbe son at early merrn ra"tparlty
is constantly on the rise. And who will won
der tnat this is so when it is remembered
that we carry the largest and best line of fine
boots, shoes add rubbers at lowest prices.
R. F. FOSTER & CO.,
Successors to Avres & Fostsr,
246 MAIN ST.
X) ANBURY. CT.
Branch Store, 6 Elm St., Bethel.
DONT PAY RENT.
Architect and Builder,
765 North Ave., Bridgeport, Ct.
Attractive Dwellings for sale on Monthly Pay-
menti- Call or write for particulars
NOTICE.
I have for sale a pair of good work Horses,
black, weigh about 1200 each, are well matched
and will be sold cheap. - Warren H- Lamson.
VPEWTOWH SAVINGS BASK Newtown,
i.1 jonn. incorporated iboo.
PHILO CLARKE, President: C. H. NORTH-
ROP, Treasurer. HOURS 9 a. m. to 8 p. m
Mondays, 7 to 9 p. m.
EDWARDS M. SMITH, M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND BTJEGEOIT
Office and Residence Newtown Street-.
Telephone Connection. .
D. P. EICHAEDSON, M. I).
Physician and Surgeon.
Office and Residence, Sandv Hook.
Telephone connection.
THE ALBANY DENTISTS,
388 MAIN STREET,
lOpp. Cannon St., Bridgeport
PAINLESS
DENTISTRY
AT MODERATE
PRICES.
in
w
CELEST A. BENEDICT, M. D
T hysioiaa tad Surgeon,
842 8Ute St, Bridgeport.
Ileetneity one of tha therapeutic agent. Of.
8m aonri fron 10 a. u, U 18 U 4 p. m.
REPRESENTED BY JOHN J.
FOB NEWTOWN AND VICINITY.
HORTHEOP
IF THERE IS A PERSON
Who reads this advertisement that has a dol
lar to spend for clothing, we're after that per
son loaded with bargains. If we can make
that dollar go as far as two, you are after us.
"" Where crowds continually assemble some
thing must be in the wind. That is a wind
that blows everybody good, you can judge by
the satisfied, smiling faces. Go to the store
of FOSTER: BESSE & CO., andffet a breeze of
it.
A SPECIAL LOW PRICE ON EVERYTHING.
MEN'S SUITS, reduced from $8-50 to $6 50, $10 and $12 suits to 8.50, $13,
$14 and $15 suits to $10 and 12.
YOUTH SUITS, 14 to 19 years, reduced from 8-50 to 6-50, 10 and $12 suits
to 8.50 to $10, $14 and $15 suits reduced to $10 and $12
BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S SUITS, 4 to 14 years, reduced from 2.50 to 1.98,
$3 suits to 2.48, 3.50 suits to $3. $4 and 4 50 suits to 3 50, $5 to
3.50 and 9 4-
MEN'S ODD PANTS, reduced from $2 to 1-59, 2.50 to f 2, $3 Pants to 2-50
3.50, Pants to $3, $4 and 4.50 to 3 50, $5 and 5.50 pants to $4.
YOUTH ODD PANTS, reduced from 1-25 to SI, 150 pants to 125, $2 pants
to 1 50, 2 50 pants to $2, $3 pants to 2.25 and 2.50, 3.50 pants to
2 75 and $3, $ 4 pants to 3-50, 5 pants to $4.
BOYS' KNEE PANTS, sizes 4 to 15 years, 48c, 75c and 98-
CH ILDREN'S W AIS TS, 25 c, 35c, 47c, 69c and 75c-
CHILDREN'S WASHABLE SUITS, 1-19 and 1.25.
MEN'S AND YOUNG MEN'S WHITE VESTS, 91, $1 25, 150 and 2, White
Duck pants, I 25 and 1.50.
MEN'S NEGLIGEE SHIRTS with STARCH COLLARS and CUFFS. 49c, 67c,
75c 97c and 1.25-
MEN'S WHITE LAUNDERED SHIRTS, 48c, 75c, $1 and 1-25.
MEN'S NECKWEAR, latest styles 5c or 6 for 25c, 2c or 12 for 20c, tecks and
four-in-hands 23c and 48c.
MEN'S SILK WORKED SUSPENDERS, 23c and 48c-
MEN'S UNDERSHIRTS AND PANTS 25c and 47c a suit.
MEN'S FINE COTTON HOSE, assorted colors, seamless, 3 pairs for 25c,
finer grades of imported ones in guaranteed fast black and tan
colors, 2 pairs for 25c; also a finer grade, worth 50 for 25c.
UMBRELLAS a special bargain at 90c really worth 125, better-grades at
1 50, 2 75, $3,and 3.50.
HORSE BLANKETS 75c, 91, 1.25, 1-50, $2. ROBES, 50c, 75e and up
wards, carriage mats, 1.50, Whips, 25c, 50c, 75 and 91.
HAMMOCKS, 75c, 1.25 and 2.50.
TRUNKS, 1 50, 175, $2, 2-25, 2 50, 2-75, 9 3, 3.25, 3-50, $4, 4.50, 5, 5.50, $6
650.
TRAVELING BAGS, 89e4 S8c,-1.19, 1-60, 1-89, 2-25, 250, to $3. "
EXT ENSI0N CASES, 75c, 85c, 98c, and 1 -25.
Affairs About Town.
DOES IT PAY TO FAT CATTLE?
A PAPER READ BEFORE POHTATUCK
GRANGE BY WALTER H. GLOVER.
Come and be convinced that we do sell goods just as adver
tised.
FOSTER, BESSE & CO.,
Combination Clothiers and Men's Furnishers. Operators of 27 stores,
317 MAIN STREET,
BRIDGEPORT, CONN-
THE HOLDFAST TIE
ts to aitrlngor
ropo what
buckle la to a
atrap.
Users of Holdfast Corn
Binders Cannot Say
Too Much In Their
Praise and Every Far-
mer Should Write Us
For Descriptive Circu
lar and Testimonials.
LYON" &o 3-ttTJJ&JS& J 1ST,
383 Main Street, Bridgeport, Conn.
cannot afford to raise
CORN without using tne
HOLDFAST
CORN BINDER
Bend 5 eenta for Samples and .
Circulars to the
T 1 33 OO,
UnadUla, N. Y.
WHEN IN DANBURY
GO TO
C. E. HAVILAM) & CO.
FOR-
HATS, FURNISHINGS, TRUNKS AND BAGS
-AT THE-
LOWEST CASH PRICES FOE RELIABLE GOODS.
THE BUSINESS SUITS FROM $6.50 TO $12 AND $15 SPEAK FOR
EABTWELL'S OLD
ST0S.
THEMSELVES.
199 Main St., Danbury.
- WILKINSON& MAWAK, -
WE HEAR LOTS
About cool headed people, but
very little about cool footed folks
You wouldn't wear a fur cap
now but you don't hesitate to
crowd your much-abused feet
into clumsy, ill-fitting winter
shoes. Very little money is
needed; $189 is the amount
that you will have to pay for a
russet -calf. Blucher, provided
vou trade at Standish's, 402
Main street.
Boys' rubber sole tennis
shoes, 41c.
Ladies' fine Oxfords, 2 1-2, 3 and
3 1-2 in size, at the low price of
79c.
W. A. 8TANDISH,
SUCCESSOR TO -
BALDWII ft STAHDISH.
402 Main Street,
-AGENTS F0R-
COLUMBIA,
STEARNS,
LEAGUE,
HICKORY
HARTFORD
'CRESCENT,
Every Wheel Fully Guaranteed from Tire to Handle 3ax. Sales cash or on
the installment plan. Purchasers of wheels taught to ride free of expense.
. ; in',..
The Largest and Best Equipped Repair Shop in New England
Catalogues Free. -Y.
M. C A. BUILDING, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
BOSTOlsT
IDDSIT.Xi CO.
420 Main St., BRIDGEPORT.
Aluronium Sets of Teeth which have all the
advantages of gold but are much lighter and eas
ier to wear, and cost nearly the same as rubber
plates, a specialy, Solid. Gold Crowns for teeth
made and fitted while you wait, at half the usual
prices, gold, silver and porcelain fillings painless
extracting and all other branches of dentistry at
lowest prices quality of work warranted first-class, if you think ot having a plate, dont fail
to call and see our alumnium plates. B0S70H DBXTAIi CO- Dr Edward S- Warnei, Itanagw, ;
BBIDQBFOBT.
CONN.
The subject in hand is, is the fattening
of cattle for market profitable in this lo
cality as against dairying? As you all
know, I am not a professor from Yale
college, and you need not expect any
high flown language. I suppose our
worthy lecturer expects me to discuss
the fattening of cattle, as I am green at
dairying. At the present time I am
afraid it will be like the cow against 100
hens, on the wrong aide (I was for the
cow), but my motto is, "have good pluck
and never say die." The only way I
can discuss the subject to make it profit
able, is to give you my experiense for
the last 20 years, and average it. I will
not go back to war times, only for one
gale. I remember buying a pair of stags
In the spring of the year, said to be 21
years old, for $75, and sold them in the
fall for $300. What I propose to give is
my own experience without stretching
the truth. Twenty years ag6 I com
menced fattening cattle on my own hook.
I used to go to Buffalo in March or April
and get a car load of cattle, 24 head, and
sell them in October or November, and
make from $30 to $35 a head. I kept
that up for five years. Then cattle com
menced to come high in the spring, and
I concluded to buy in the fall and winter
them. I used to generally buy in Octo
ber and keep them about one year. It
would not be any trouble at all to make
$50 per head at that time. That lasted
about five years. That brings it down
to the last 10 years. If I could leave
tbat out I think I could balance with the
dairying business. But fattening cattle
for profit has been on the decline for the
last 10 years. If you buy your cattle in
the spring of the year now, you must be
shrewd and smart to get $10 a head prof
it, but by buyiDg in the fall, and winter
ing them, and, selling in July or August,
you can make from $25 to $30 a head.
Why this decline? I suppose it could be
answered in a few word?, the big fishes
eat up the little ones. Yet, there are
several reasons for this decline. We
might say that cattle cost more to ' start
with. Or they do not do as well as they
used to on account of feed. The Texan
fly, which we have not had till the last
three or four years, and several other
excuses. But my theory is, we do not
or cannot keep our cattle long enough,
or till they are ripe, to make up for this
decline. Some will say, why not keep
them? Now I will have to go back 10
years. Then we used to get as much per
pound for beef in Newtown any time of
the year. Ten years ago this fall one of
the oldest refrigerator beef companies
told me that Newtown people might
well give up fattening: cattle and go into
the milk business or something else.
asked, wh j ? I was told, because this
Chicago dressed beef is going to run you
all out. I said I guess not as long as the
grass grows. I have fatted cattle since
and got a living. I don't know how long
it will last. As a general theory we
Eastern people cannot fatten cattle on
grain to compete with the West, with
grain here worth double what it is there,
and consequently do not get our cattle
prime till fall. Now the Eastern refrig
erator companies know what time we are
ready to sell our cattle and they notify
the Western refrigerator companies, and
they propose to let the Eastern compa
nies sell the beef at cost through the
months ot October and November, to
discourage fattening cattle in the East.
I can prove this assertion by one of the
oldest companies in Bridgeport. Last
November they told me they bad sold
Chicago dressed beef for the last two
months tbat did not make the company
a cent. And consequently for the last
few years we have had to sell our cattle
in July or August, when "they weigh
light. Then we have to compete with
Chicago dressed beef. What is Chicago
dressed beef composed of in our Eastern
markets. It is composed of anything in
the shape of beef, old cows, stags, dis
eased cattle, with their heads and legs
off, embalmed and whitened up to look
nice, and kept three weeks to make them
tender. Perhaps you may think I am
stretching the truth when I say this. But
it is a fact. I have been told by persons
who have seen it embalmed. And for
another instance. Take a quarter of our
home dressed beef and hang it by the side
of Chicago dressed beef. Chicago dress
ed beef will look one-third larger than
home dressed beef, and yet it will not
weigh as much. Their embalming pro
cess whitens and makes it spongy and
when exposed to the air it turns blacky
And in conclusion, what is the remedy
for the decline in our Eastern beef mar
ket? Why it is simply this. That all
the farmers and grangers go on a strike
and do not eat any more Chicago dressed
beef.
-THE-
Only Store In Town
That makes a business of Shoes
only is the
Guarantee Shoe Store,
Where everybody will get suited in
style, wear and repairing.
Augur's Building,
. Opposite Xiantie Hills,
Sandy Hook, Conn.
P. J. Lynch. Prop'r.
Stagg & Beardsley,
C0HTEACT0ES
BUILDERS.
. Work Done at Short Hotiee.
P.O. Address. Box 133. Stratford. Conn.
attacked the tree under the bark. In "
the case of beetles it would have to give
a very strong flavor to the leaves of the
plm tree to drive these ravenous fellows
off. I do not say it will not help, and at
this time where prompt action and se
vere must be resorted to, I say try
everything that reason and the advise of
well posted tree lovers recommend.
One thing. Don't scrape the trees. It
does no good, as I have so often said.
and during this hot dry spell, let the old
bark keep all the moisture It will around
the body or trunk, and don't expose the
bare trunk to the sun. The same ap-'
plies to winter. An early thaw and
warm spell that we often have, followed
by a sharp freeze, will split the bark and
injure more than we think. There is
nothing for and so many reasons against
tree scraping." It is like cropping a
horse's tail, fashion is the only excuse.
A hoe or spade will take off all the loose
pieces under which insects may hide,
but a good bath is better. W. S. Dul
lard, Bridgeport.
A KAILSOAD ACCIDENT AT STEP5ET DEPOT.
TWO ENGINES TEY TO PASS OX ONE TRACK.
Last week Friday morning, Stepney
Depot witnessed a railroad accident. It
was the same old story of two engines
trying to pass on one track, but couldn't
do it, and happened in this wise. The
morning train north and the morning
train south meet at Stepney every morn
ing and as the north-bound train has the
right of way, it is the business of the
Bouth-bouud train to run in on the siding
and let the north-bound train go by. On
last Friday morning, the north-bound
train arrived at Stepney first and stood
on the main track waiting for the south
bound train to side track as usual. Con
ductor Lane and Engineer Bowers were
in charge of the north-bound and Con
ductor Flynn and Engineer Lyman in
charge of the south-bound train. The
south-bound was perhaps a minute or
two late in leaving Dots ford but Con
ductor Flynn consulting his watch, re
marked after taking up the tickets and
when near Stepney, "we'll get there on
time," and we were moving pretty fast.
Engineer Lyman, when up in the woods
just before rounding the curve into Step
ney, applied the brakes and found they
were in working order and the train
came around the curve at a lively gait.
But he miscalculated and did not take
into account the very slippery condition
of the rails, and before any one was
aware as to what had happened, the en
gines had come together with a crash.
Fortunately Engineer Bowers saw that
Engineer Lyman could not stop in time
and had started his train backward,
which considerably lessened the force of
the blow. The passengers on the down
train were pretty well shaken up, but
were all out of the cars in short order.
The engines were badly broken, the head
of both of them being broken out and the
cowcatchers being twisted all out of
shape. The cars were only slightly
damaged. The only passenger on eith
er train to receive injury was Marcus C.
Hawley of Newtown. MrHawley, with
W. F. Hayes and several others, had just
gotten up from their seats to go out and
get their morning papers. Mr Hawley
was ahead and when the crash came he
was thrown forward and his band went
through the glass in the front window
of the car, lacerating the fingers of his
right hand quite badly. Mr Hayes lost
bis balance and fell on the floor but was
not seriously hurt. This is the first ac
cident that Mr Hawley has ever met with
in all of his 45 years of railroading. He
has been across the continent more than
80 times and has traveled almost contin
uously between New York and Newtown
but never before has he been in a smash
up or received injury in any way. His
wounds were temporarily dressed at A.
B. Curtis' home near the station and
and he gave up his trip to New York
and returned home. The engines were
too badly damaged to proceed on their
journeys and new engines were tele
graphed for. After a wait of about
two hours the 9 o'clock train south
came down and took the passengers on
to Bridgeport and a few moments later
an extra engine arrived and proceeded
northward with the north-bound train.
The blame for the accident seems to have
been with Engineer Lyman, for either
he miscalculated the distance and the
slippery condition of the rails, or else
the brakes failed to do full duty, and he
was going too fast to stop where he
should have done.
SATE TEE ELMS.
. Editor The Newtown Bee: Dear
Sir I am glad to see the interest is
being kept up in the saving of the elm
trees, from this terrible enemy, the
beetle. One point regarding the boring
the tree clear to the center or heart of
the tree. It is a well known fact that
all our large trees, of whatever kind, are
very prone to be hollow, or have some
kind of heart rot. The admission of air
or of any foreign substance will increase
this rot and the tree will all the sooner
blow over or split. A hole or better
several, at different heights and on op
posite sides, if two holes are bored,
would give free circulation four to six
inches deep. I doubt the entire efficacy
of sulphur alone, for my father, the late
A. C. Bullard, a well known landscape
architect and horticulturist, tried sulphur
for many of the enemies of deciduos
trees and often told me that there was
more theory than actual worth, except
tor some kinds of borers or insects tbat
XIAOARA TRIPS.
The personally conducted tour of four
days to Niagara Falls under the direc
tion of the Hygeia & Recreation Tourist
Co., T. E. Feck manager, will be the
event of the season in the excursion line.
The expense will be only $15, which in
cludes entertainment at good hotels, and
expense of visiting the sights at the great
falls. The train will leave Tuesday, Au
gust 14. For full information consult
ticket agent, and also secure copy of
Tourist World. Saratoga trips leave
every Monday, as usual, at 10.47.
TV C. T-Vm1i n,t ilunrAU. n XTt- TUn.
ant left on the Saratoga excursion on
Monday. After a sojourn there they will
visit Vermont and expect to be absent
several weeks.
Newtown people were pleaded to wel
come Col and Mrs Knowlton of Bridge
port to town, last week, where they will
pass the balance of the summer at their
residence at the bead of the Street.
R. S. Gardner, the newsdealer, of Bir
mingham, is a guest at Leonard's popu
lar hotel, with his wife and daughter.
They have rooms at Charles Jonas'.
' Asa H. Hawley of Hawleyville will
furnish cream to the Stepney creamery.
Mrs George Saunders and four chil
dren, of Birmingham have been spend,
ing a week with Mrs Saunders' mother,
Mrs James N. Lake.

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