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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, March 29, 1895, Image 5

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VOLUME XVIII.
NEWTOWN, CONN., FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1895. EIGHT PAGES.
NUMBER 13.
W. S. DENSLOW.
Art you thinking .boat that
NEW SPRING DRESS?
SENSIBLE
WOMEY
ARE
PLENTY
The., progressive time.. Our method of do
ing a c&ih business eommerds itself to every
tub buyer. Why? Because you don't have to
pay other people', bill.. Every merchant that
do?, a "trust" business must mark hie good.
high enough to make up for hi. losses.
Our Grand Offer :
A 8TEELI50 FUNO to be gives away. Come
and ee. it and pet full particular..
We earry tbe largeat etoek of
DRESS GOODS!
FANCY SILKS !
BLACK GOODS!
TABLE DAMASK!
LINEN CRASH !
NAPKINS!
PRINTS and GINGHAMS !
TICKINGS!
BLEACHED SHEETING!
BROWN SHEETING!
HOSIERY and UNDERWEAR!
GLOVES and LACES!
RIBBONS!
CARPETS!
DRAPERIES!
WALL PAPER!
MOULDINGS !
All sold at rock-bottom cash prices.
W. S. DENSLOW,
173, 179 MAIN ST.,DERBY,CT.
CLOAKS, SUITS, GOWNS,
WAISTS, ETC.,
We will open our new Spec
ialty Cloak Store, Thursday,
March 14.
We guarantee satisfaction if
entrusted with your patronage.
Thos I. Geary Co.,
449 Main St ,
Bridgeport, Ct-
Manager.
Buy
White Jacket Flour
Beit on Earth. Fer Sale by
TEBRILL,
BETTS Sc CO.,
BANDY HOOK, CT.
THE
Only Store In Town
That makes a baiinesi of Sboei
only U the
Guarantee Shoe Store,
Where ererybody will let suited ia
style, wear and repairing;.
Augur's Building,
Oppo.it. liantla Wills,
Sandy Hook, Conn.
P. J. Lynch, Prop'r.
THE OLD RELIABLE
SAND HOOK
SHOE STORE
Dealers In .
FINE BOOTS, SH0E3 and RUBBERS.
The Largest Stock and towest Prises.
-Re pairing and making neatly done.
M. WENTSCH,PROP.,
"WELLS' B'L'D'Gr', SANDY HOOK,CT
ESTABLISHED 1780. ;
THIS IS NO WIND MILL,
NOR COFFEE MILL,
BUT A FIRST CLASS COUNTRY
GRIST MILL.
WITH ALL THE FACILITIES
FOR DOING GOOD WORK-
BROOKFIELD MILLS,
BROOKFIELD,
CONN.
NEWTOWN'fl CENTRAL MARKET.
J. H. BLACKMAS, Proprietor.
Native Bt. Newtown Street.
Pnrtnjr the Lpnten season I shall have a
frtmh Mipplv ot null at inv market. JOHN H.
BLACKMAN, Ncwwwo, Conn.
NEW HAVEN
Grand Central Shopping
EMPORIUM.
F.M.BROWN.
D. S. GAMBLE
F. M.
BROWN
& CO.
OUR
SPRING
OPENING
occurson Wednesday and
Thursday, March 27th
and 28th, when our mam
moth establishment will
be transformed into bow
ers of loveliness.
A Magnificent
Display of
Millinery!
Beautiful Wraps, Gloves,
Parasols, etc., etc.
Carnival Days in Silks and
Dress Goods !
Special low prices on every
thing. Free Fare!
30 milesfrom N.H.on pur
chases of S lO or over.
airfield County News.
MONROE.
CALIFORNIA SCENERY, CLIMATE AND
PRODUCTS.
Arriving in Sacramento, January 15,
that day was devoted to sight seeing.
wbicn was truly a dellgbc, as we were
not prepared to find sueb a semi tropic
scene in Northern California. Oranges
are raised in this section, and mature a
month earlier than In the southern part;
cause said to be warmer night? liere.
i'omological societies' meetings were
held in tbe Sacramento chamber of com
merce, January 16, 17, and 18 and were
very interesting and were attended by
all our party, which included tbe presi
dent, B. J. Berkmans of Agusta, Georgia,
B. G. bmitb, treasurer, ot Cambridge,
Mass.. Secretary Bracket of Iowa, and
Vice President Bracket of Iowa. Cali
fornia his a fashion of showing up her
products in a pleasing style. .Every city
has her chamber of commerce, to which
all visitors are escorted. Here you will
fine tastefully arranged samples of the i
country's products. These displays are
very interesting and Instructive, es
pecially to tbe tender foot. One is con
vinced that only the richest soil can pro
duce pears weighing three pounds,
peaches three pounds, grapes two
pounds to the bunch, fruit tree making
twice tbe growth ever seen in the east in
one year. Tbe largest vegetables you
ever saw.
Our meetings were attended by large
numbers of tbe prominent fruit growers
of the country and state, who as a class
we found very well satisfied with
their calling. Of croakers and
growlers we saw none, if any
such there are in California, they prob
ably are not called upon as a reception
committee on such occasions. Although
one could not subsist alone on climate
and scenery, yet they are delightful in
California in the winier. Our party were
given a reception In the capitol, by the
governor and state officers, and were also
given one In the . B. Crocker art gal
lery. This is an Institution of which
Sacramento has reason to be proud. It
was presented to tbe city by the widow
of E. B. Crocker. Situated on O street,
between Second and Third, upon terraces
that are ever green, it is surrounded by
tall palms and the rare flowers that give
to California its greatest charm. The
floors are of tile; woodwork is of carved
walnut, and California maple; gallery
contains over 700 pictures, offers a vari
ety so wide that all tastes are appealed
to. The long line of portraits of early
Calif ornians are very interesting. Min
ing cam pa. i Yosrulte, General John A.
Gutter, etc. Tlife-eception was given by
the ladies of Sacrumfinto, were entertain
ed 1th beautiful musit and stereoptic
views of the Vosemite and other Califor
nia scenery, at the conclusion of wbicb
America was thrown on the canvass,
which the whole company joined in sing.
Ing, visitors from the East, North -and'
South joining with those of tbe Fatitic
coast In singing this grand old national
song. It was an inspiration indeed. -;
The Golden Eagle hotel, which was
our headquarters here, is also headquar
ters lor the members or tne legislature.
The senatorial fight was on, which made
lively times. Our first trip was west of
Sacramento, the fruit and mining regions,
up the American river. , This is where
tbe first scenes in tbe early mining days
of '49 were enacted. The Placerville and
American river regions were also the
most productive of any in this section.
The whole country to-day presents evi
dence of an exhaustive search for tbe
shining metal. Mining is still being car
ried on here, which we saw In operation.
Is said to be profitable still, labor being
performed by Chinese. At Placerville
extensive mining operations are going
pn. The OrangevilJe Fruit and Mining
Co. have large tracts of fruit lands here
north of the American Biver. Thous
ands of acres are set to citrus and decid
uous fruits. This company's fruit land
Is beautifully located on an elevated
rolling plateau. Our drives through it
gave us the first grand view oi uanior
nia fruit culture. Oranges ripen a month
earlier here than in tbe south, on our
morning trip here we visited the Natona
Winery, which is the second largest in
tbe state, containing 700,000 gallons. The
whole countv for a long distance is occu
pied with the vine, which is set in rows
as straight as an arrow, as lar as one can
Bee. Vines are kept trimmed with two
eyes to the stump, so all one sees is tbe
stump standing two or three feet high,
which grow to one foot, or more in diam
eter. Most of the work in California is
done by Chinese. After trimming vines
are loaded onto iron wagons and burnt
tbereon as they go along through the
vineyards. Along the American west of
Sacramento and the Sacramento south of
the city all the deciduous except the ap
pie and all the citrus and semi tropical
fruits are grown to perfection.: We met
many enthusiastic growers of them. The
month earlier ripening cf the fruits gives
growers a deciden advantageover South
ern California. South of Sacramento for
40 miles in tbe rich bottom lands of Sac
ramento river, on either side as far as one
can see, is practically one vast orchard,
with a river frontage nearly the whole
distance. These are mostly deciduous
fruits. Tbe oldest orchards in the state
are mostly in hands of original owners,
or their heirs, and are not for sale. I
think, all things considered, the Oran
geralo Co. are offering the bist induce
ments to eettlers, hold tbeir citrus fruit
land two years set at $200 per acre as a
rule and in best locations appreciates in
value each year after planting to oranges
or lemons $ 100 per acre. Trees of all
kinds grow very rapidly. The wealth of
the soil is immense, some claim practi
cally inexhaustable with irrigation, as
that furnishes plant food. Soil varies
from two or three to eight and 12 feet
deep, usually six to 10 feet. Trees grow
rapidly, bear immensely. Oranges are
usually set 20 feet, making over 100 trees
to the acre. Some begin to fruit at three
years. Saw mny a three year old grove
with considerable fruit, at five years best
groves yield two boxes, six and seven
year groves are selling at 400 to $600
per acre on the trees. Most of the fruits
are sold on tbe trees, 10 and 12 year old
groves were selling at $ 1000 per acre.
Ijand upon which they are grown is all
irrigated once a month through the grow
ing season, and is usually valued accord
ing to the age of the trees from setting,
sav two years set $200 or $300, five to
eight years Pet $000 to $800 and from
that up to large figures for groves of 10
or more years setting. One can only ac
count for the great yield of all of Cali
fornia products through tbe great adapt
ability of soil and climate to their quick
est and best development. The yield of
oranges and lemons is immense. Trees
usually producing about as many boxes
ae the number of years they have been
set, after the first six or eight years,
lemons continue to bloom and ripen
during the whole year. All of Califor
nia farming is intense. Not all of her
fruit lands require irrigation, especially
the deciduous fruits. For instance those
in the American and Sacramento river
districts. Such lands are held at much
more reasonable prices, as irrigation
plants are very expensive and usually
add nearly $100 per acre to the cost of
tbe land. Sale of such carries with it a
perpetual right to necessary water, which
is expressed in inches. One can readily
see that a fruit grower on irrigated land
has about as sure thing for a crop as it is
possible, not being dependant upon rain
fall. There are irrigation dams in Cali
fornia which are said to hold a two years'
supply of water, which in all human
probability will never be called for, as
the Sierras, with their large deposits of
winter snows furnish an abundance. I
visited several of the largest irrigation
plants, of which I may meDtion later. In
some localities . tbe orange and lemon
rank first as the most profitable crop,
all things considered, in others tbe vine,
and in many the deciduous fruits. The
EDglish walnut grows to a large size, is
set about 40 feet apart but is a heavy
vielder, producing in several cases noted
as much as $20 per tree. This, the al
mond, prune, he, peach, cherry, apricot,
etc., are extensively cultivated in Ameri
can and Sacramento river districts, as
also are grapes. Tbere are fewer croak
ers in California than any place I have
seen. Many ladies are running ranches
successfully and while very few could
succeed at larm'ng nere, tne peculiar
conditions existing make it possible
there. The planting is a very simple
processes also cultivation. The irrigation
is also a simple matter. Nearly all fruit
products are sold to responsible fruit
companies and as the Chinese make the
best of help, good help is much more eas
ily obtained there than East. Tbe state's
population is nearly one quarter Chinese.
They are a quiet, law abiding people,
good laborers, but make no improve
ments anywhere and send all tbeir money
home to China, so they, while being good
workmen, are impoverishing the coun
try. Many objectj to them on that ac
count. About one third of San Francis
co's population Is Chinese. - They have
bad an unusually wet season this winter,
raining considerable for several days af
ter we arrived, but we had fine weather
after that, much of the low lands along
the river being submerged. As we pro
ceeded we found towns and villages flood
ed. A large part of the country for miles
below Sacramento was under water.
James C. Johnson.
EAST VILLAGE.
Sunday school at 2.30; preachiDg ser
vice at 1 30. This being the last Sunday
of the conference year the pastor will
have something to say regarding the
work of the year.
SHELTON.
DERBY WHISKEY MADE THE TROUBLE.
On Sunday some young men who bad
been visiting the saloons In Derby, re
turned here in the afternoon and under
the influence of intoxication were noisy
and hilarious, which ended in a fight on
the principal street. Orre of the leading
offenders, George Gould, was arrested on
Monday and fined $2 and costs, which he
paid.
keep the beer teams on your own
.- side;
At the town court, last Wednesday, the
Merstersheimer Brothers of Derby - were
"tried for selling and delivering beer in
this town and pleading guilty were fined
$p0,and costs, which they paid.
LEAVES BUSINESS FOB THE MINISTRY.
A. tT. Hubbard has sold out his boot
and shoe business to Ellsworth Straun of
Thomaston. Mr Hubbard expects to en?
ter the ministry of the Methodist Episco
pal church.
HELPED THEMSELVES TO THE CASH IN
THE DRAWER.
Some time Monday tbe ticket drawer
In the depot was robbed, the thief secur
ing nearly $16 in specie.
THE FIRST HARBINGER OF SPRING.
On Thursday of last week Capt N. A.
Hull came up the. river with two coal
barges, he being the first of the spring to
navigate tbe river.
Henry C. White of New Haven has
been appointed receiver of the Craighead
Manig. Co., which has been here ior
few months past, but owing to internal
dissentions and bad management will
probably be broken up.
On Thursday a young man from the
Trapfall district was tried before the
Town court for theft, but it was not
proven against him and he was discharg
ed. . -, : 'A -. ; . :' v
The Y. P. S. C. E. gave a musical en
tertainment at the Methodist church, last
Wednesday evening, which was well at
tended and quite a sum realized.
Mrs W. P. Arbuckle left on Wednes.
day for her home in Fredonia, Pa., where
she will in tbe future reside.
Tbe public school has a vacation, next
wees. .
Miss Annie E. Hart died of consump
tion, last Thursday.
The wife of Peter keilly died, last
week, at the Insane retreat, Middletown,
where she has been for a number of
years.
Officer Tomlinson arrested two drunks
on Sunday who came from Derby.;
The body of Frederick Minknitz, who
was drowned on the 7th inst, was; found
on Monday floating in the rivei and tak
en care of by his friends.
On Friday evening the temperance sa
loons in this . place of Thomas Finn,
Stephen Riley and James C . Kelly were
searched by officers for intoxicating liq
uor, Dut none was rouna, excepting in
Kelly's a bottle was broken and its con
tents, with that of a pitcher, were poured
down a sink. These places have been
suspected for some time as violating the
law by selling intoxicating drinks. Tbe
next day James (J. nelly was arrested
for selling iiquor, on a complaint of the
prosecuting attorney, in which there are
several counts against him. The same
Friday evening on which the search was
made the officers, Tomlinson, Burgess
and Booth, went to Matt Ward's place,
searched it for liquors, found a small
quantity and arrested Ward,his wife and
four girls for keeping and residing in a
house of ill fame.
Edward E. Johnson was arrested for
drunkenness and careless driving on Sat
urday last, ana in tne evening a friend
took him home.
EASTON.
CENTER STREET.
Mrs Eliza Davis will entertain the
Ladies' Aid society at her home, Wednes
day, March 27. If stormy, first fairday.
Mrs wakeman Williams was taken
seriously ill on Sunday morning. Dr Gor
bam was summoned and pronounced- her
sickness nervous prostration, produced
partly by tne grip. '
Jerome Abbott is suffering from the
prevaling epidemic, the grip.
Mrs William Wakeman, Mrs Aaron
Wakeman and Fred Wakeman have visit
ed their aunt, Miss Huldah Meeker of
Cross Highway. ' !
Mrs Charles Jennings and daughter
from Bridgeport spent Sunday with her
parents. s
Mrs Anna Collett has returned to New
JTork, after spending a few days with
old friends and neighbors.
Mrs Nellie Mallett and her little daugh
ter from Tasbua have been the guests of
Mrs M. J. Gould.
DEATH OF DANIEL PAKTBICK.
The death of Daniel Partrick occurred
at the home of his daughter, Mis C. L.
Booth, where he had lived for the past
three years. He was 88 years and nine
months old, The grip and old age called
him away. He died at 3 30 p. m., Fri
day, March dying very suddenly at
the end. He was about the .house till
the day of his death. Prayer was held
at tbe house of C. L. Booth, Tuesday
morning, when the remains were con
veyed to Ridgefield and laid at rest in"
the family plot. ' ; .
BAPTIST CHURCH DOINGS.
A social under the auspices of the
Baptist society will be held at the resi
dence of Mrs Botsford Sherwood, Thurs
day evening, April 4. An interesting
program, consisting of music, readings,
recitations and dialogues, is being care
fully prepared, and as it is our first we
want it a success. Come and help us in
our efforts. The admission and supper
will be 10 cents. It stormy it will be
held next night.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH NOTES.
Rev Mr Warfild preached a fine ser
mon in the Congregational church, Sun
day morning. It was also his last ser
mon in Connecticut as he leaves New
Haven, next Saturday, for his home in
Maryland.
Regular service in the Congregational
church April 7. Rev Mr Kimball of Yale
Divinity school is expected to preach. ,
. Mr and Mrs C. L. Booth have been
confined to tbe house with the grip.
- Mr and Mrs Charles Gilbert welcomed
a little daughter at their home on Sun
day, March 17.
James Tyler has visited friends .. in
Norwalk. ""'
Mrs George J. Banks, who has been
confined to the bed for three months
with a broken limb, rode out a short dis
tance for the first time on Saturday. :
Mrs Chauncey Wakeman recently
gave birth to twins ; one has since died.
Mrs G. Burr Tucker is spending a few
days with her sister, Mrs Anna Bowdy
of Danbury.
G. Burr Tucker recently visited his
sister, Mrs W. W. Hardy of New Haven.
George Kachele has built two .new
barns, this winter,and a new yard fence,
making a great improvement about his
place.
William Kachele moved his family
from Long Hill into the house with his
father, George Kachele.
Edward Hill drives a new horse bought
of Cole & O'Mara.
Edward Hill had the frame for his
new carriage house raised, Monday after
noon, Mrs Edward Hill returned, Thursday,
from a short visit with friends in Bridge
port and New York.
The third term at the Academy closes
April 11, for a vacation of one week.
Miss Gussie Marsh spends Saturday
with her friend and former scnoolmate,
Miss Hattie Perry. . .. .
The mail stage arrives at Easton Cent
er two hours later after April 1, at 5 p.
m., instead of 3 p. m. - . . ,v.-,
. PLATTSYILLE.
Mr and'Mrs Arthur Clark will move
to her mother's place, next .week, stop
ping for a month in Tashua, i .
Mr and Mrs James Drew will move
back to Bridgeport, April 1, after work
ing Mrs Betsey Seeley'a farm for a year.
Mrs Mary Eisley who has been . in
Litchfield through the winter, expects
to return to her daughter's, Mrs William
Relvea's, April 8.
Nelson E. Smith and four children,
have all been sick with the grip.
Rutherford B. Wheeler froze his feet
two weeks ago, Saturday, and the fol
lowing week Selectman Wheler took
him to tbe general hospital, where bis
feet were amputated.
Mr and Mrs B. T. Beers are taking a
A GOLD WATCH FREE !
If you want to know more
about it, look in our window
when you are in tie city; you
may be the one who will get it.
You ought to know, besides
that we carry the largest line of
Sterling Silver novelties in
Bridgeport, and have just re
a new line of Sterling belt buck
les, Czarinas, hat marks, Brace
lets, Josephines, Tuexedo hair
ornaments, Glove buttoners,
Pocket knives, Curling Irons,
Manicure articles, and a larger
variety of other styles in Ster
ling tlian you will find in no oth
er storo.
Dor't forget though that we have a
full stock of Tableware also, and a
complete line of Jewelry. Diamonds
and Watches- Bring us your Watch
and Jewelry repairing and we will do
it well for you- All goods guaranteed
and your money back for the asking.
kill Benedict
511 Main street, Bridgeport, Ct.
two weeks' trip through Newtown and
Danbury, visiting friends.
Mrs JUabaley Jennings and son. W.
M. Jennings, have been very poorly
with the grip but are improving. Her
daughters, Mrs Gould and Mrs Booth,
nave oeen witn tnem.
NICHOLS.
A CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR GATHERING.
A very pleasant evening was spent at
the Y. P. S. C. E. sociable held with
Miss Thorp, March 21, and was a suc
cess socially and financially. During the
evening Miss Edith Nichols rendered a
tine selection on tbe piano. An art ex
hibit attracted much attention, the one
guessing correctly the titles of the differ
ent works of art was awarded a prize,the
winner being Miss Judith jn tcbols. Later
a collation was served consisting of the
following menu:
Perpetual motion, One of Noah's Sons,
xne jving oi t resn w ater,
What Some People Don't Know,
Chips of the Old Block.
Ureased Stafl, A Group of Islands,
bklpper's Home, Sliced Sweetness,
No Grounds lor Complaint,
Boson's Oveithrow
Three Fourths ol tbeGlobe.
Fruit ol the Vine, Apples of Gold.
THE GRANGERS SURPRISE MR AND MRS
COOPER. '
- The members of Trumbull Grange gave
Mr and Mrs W. Cooper a surprise, last
week. Mrs Cooper was the recipient of
a handsome chair, presented by Plumb
jn icdois in Denaii oi the Grange.
George Lewis has bought Ernest
Reed's place and Mr Reed expeeta-to
move to Stratford soon.
It is understood that Mr Lindley, who
has made Nichols his residence for a
time, expects to move his family about
April 1, to Trumbull, to take charge of
Arthur Plumb's farm.
Miss Kennedy of New Haven is visit
ing at Mrs F. M. Curtis'.
BROOKFIELD.
PERSONAL GOSSIP.
After a ehort illness of pneumonia, lit
tle Walter, son of Mr and Mrs Ezra
Thompson, died last week Wednesday
night, aged 14 months. The funeral was
held from the house on Saturday and the
burial in Kent the same day. Kev K. L.
Whitcome ollieiatd and many words of
comfort were spoken for the afflicted
family in the loss of their little one.
Mrs Charles Urigge, who has been
quite sick with the grip and under the
doctor's care, we are glad to hear is
much better. Her daughter, Mrs Man-
gum, cared for her during her illness.
Mrs smith has been guest of her sister,
Mrs J. L. James.
Watson Frisbie of Woodbury has been
the guest of his brother, F. S. Frisbie.
Horace Allen and two children were
here, last Sunday.
Miss Cynthia Morgan of West Cornwall
has been at Ezra Thompson's for a few
days.
A cousin, a young lady from "Torring-
ton, has been the guest of Misses Annie
and Cora Church, the past week.
fc. is. Warner has returned from his
trip to Watertown.
The new iron bridge will soon be built
as the draft of it has been received and
the work will begin at once. :
ttdward U'Dell has purchased a horse
of Will Beers. If you don't believe he is
a fine stepper, just try to pass him on
the road.
FAIRFIELD.
HOYDEN'S HILL.
Mrs Mahala Jennings continues to im
prove.
Will Hawkins is sick with tbe grip.
Charles Jennings has purchased a
Dew horse.
Roswell Nichols is cutting cord wood
for Wilson Brothers.
Leroy Clarke has purchased a new
farm wagon.
Marcus Jennings is getting up a wood
pile for C. B. Sherwood and W. C.
Bulkley for L. A. Jennings.
BRIDGEPORT. -
FOUR THOUSAND PAIRS OF SHOES A DAY.
The famous shoe factory of Thomas G.
Plant; of Lynn, gives employment to
1,000 hands in making his celebrated fine
shoes for ladies ; he outs nothing but vici
kid and puts more value In his shoes than
any other manufacturer. - C. H. Bennett
Son keep a full line of these shoes and
as they are sold at the popular prices of
$2, $2 50 and $3 there is a large demand
for them. C H. Bennett & Son expect
their-sales will run into thousands of pairs
this coming season.
STEVENSON-
Preaching at
10.30 a. m. Sunday
school at 12 m.
E3ECULIAR in combination, pro
' portion and preuarationofiufiTedi-
ente,IIood's Sarsaparilla possesses great
curative value. You should TRY ITr
INTERESTING
ANNOUNCEMENT
-TO ALL-
BARGAIN
SEEKERS
AFTER-
FANCY DRY GOODS
-AND-
NOTIONS,
O-
The balance of the old stock of the dis
solved firm of
CURD & JONES,
-o-
MTJST BE CLOSED OUT
in the next few days regardless of all
former prices, preparatory to other
changes to be announced later.
BANKRUPT PRICES.
Could not attract more attention than
the followizg unparalleled offer which
we make for a big rush of customers
and big sales this week
-AT-
423 MAIN STREET,
1 case of 73 dozen men's seamless
socks.positively the best 10c. values
ever offered over any retail counter to
be sold at the rate of
2 Pairs for 11c
1300 pairs of men's suspenders.made
of fine elastic web, in variety of fancy
colors, retailing everywhere else at
25c;"our closing out price,
17c Per Pair-
3300 yards ef fine Hamburg Em
broidery edgings and insertions in
great variety of widths and designs to
be sold at the mark down prices of 5 c,
10c, 12c, 15c, 17c, 19c, 22c, 25c, 30c,
35c, 40c, 45c, 50c per yd-
LADIES' LATfN AITONS
in 12 different styles of trimmings
They are in full sizes, long wide
strings, some plain with deep hem,
others with Hamburg edge ana inser
tion, and wide and narrow tucks.
19c values this week at 11c each,
25c " " ".at 19c "
50c " " " at 39c "
75c " " " at 49c "
98c " " ' at 75c "
VEILING
In Plain and Chenille dots in colors
and black, 20c value at 14c each-
Our stock of Ladies'
SHIRTWAISTS
is to be closed out at 50c on the dollar-
1 lot of ladies' White Waists with
turn over collars and cuffs, plaited
front and back, ruffle embroidered
front- SI values at 50c each.
Also 1 lot of dark Satteen 'waists in
plain and iancy- SI values at 50c
each-
. And a few waists, very fine cambric
with laundered collars and cuffs were
$1-75 each, to go with the above lots
at50eeach-
1 lot of all lineniBureau Scarfs with
fringe and stamped,50c values at 35 c
1 lot of all linen Tray Cloths with
fringe and stamped, 50c values at 39c
each. -
HANDKERCHIEFS.
44 doz ladies'all linen handkerchiefs
the best 25 c values in the city. Going
in this sale at 19c each- '
Regarding the Ladies'
MUSLIN UNDERWEAR
the stock has been greatly reduced at
the unprecedented low prices; only a
few pairs more of the $1 -25 muslin
drawers are left to be sold at 79c per
pairi and the 98c drawers at 59c pair
$1 Muslin Night Robes at 75c each
3 special lots of Dress Trimmings
are to be sold at 39 per cent discount
Extraordinary chances Jthis week
in Notions, Laces, Hosiery,Underwear
and Gloves at
O
nURD&JOIlES,
BSIDGKPOET.
' This advertisement is placed among a great many others and perhaps has the same old
story t tell. But read It is a fact that every parion hksi to trade ia a Uifictorj Banner
and neaally with eeSeble persona and we are trying to attract every one who has to bay
Clothing or Gentlemen's Furnishings by our honest methods cf 'emling
This season of the year one is in need of a heary suit, overcoat or olster and wo havo a
lira assortment of aU time gooii; also Gloves, Uittens, Underwear. Hats, Caps Trunks.
Bags, Umbrellas, in fact everything which U usually found ia a well appointed clothing e
tablishment-
To say that we are selling cheaper than anyone else in Danbnry, would bo the same ol
tory again, but wo really feel that to be the fact of the ease and win bo pleased to have you
come to our store and wo have no fears hut that you win go away with the same convictions.
Remember, the place to buy reliable clothing is at
THE "GOLDEN RULE" CLOTHIERS,
C. F. IIAV1LAND &LC0.
EASTWELL'S OLD
STORE
199
Good Seeds.
SEED POTATOES
PLANET JR. HORSE HOES and SEED DRILLS, PLOWS,
HARROWS, and every kind o small tools.
SEND FOR CATALOGUE.
Hartford Agricultural Warehouse
and Seed Store,
498-500 MAIN STREET.
THE W. P. SW0KDS LUMBER COMPANY,
Bridgeport, conn.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
MICHIGAN PINE LUMBER, SIDING, SHINGLES, SPRUCE
Timber, Lathi Sash, Doors & Blinds, Carvings, Mouldings, Mantles & Hard
Wood, Trim, etc. North Carolina Yellow Pine Lumber a Swrialtv.
Kw-wwrriMTBS) rtrmatsHWD Phomftt
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE FAMOUS FROST SHINGLES.
Has it ooenrred to yon that a Mackintosh Waterproof Rubber Coat and
Boots for the young or old will make!
and that ticbest place to purchase these
-
AT -
A. R. LACEY'S
139 Fairfield Ave,
Clarendon Oil Works!
LEWIS B. SII.UMAW. Proprietor,
Manufacturer, Producer and Wholesale Dealer in Lcbrieatire; end IUcminatinr
OIIj and GREASES,
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS, AKTMAI. AND VEGETABLE OILS.
386 to 372 Water Street, - -
DIDHT
FIGURE
RIGHT
Now there is a good deal
in knowing how to figure cor
rectly. No one makes a
mistake in buying win
ter clo'hing at the "Up to
date" store, 429 Main St.,
Bridgeport. We have made
a 25 per cent discount on
Overcoats, Ulsters and Win
ter Goods. We also give a
handsome souvenir picture
with every purchase amount
ing to $3 and upwards."
eVIS&VARP
429AainStbridgeport
THE GREAT
ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC
TEAC0MPABI
To the Citizens of Fairfield and Litch
field Counties, and all our old
friends:
Call at the Great A. & P. Tea Co-, sure for
your Teas. Coffees, Baking Powder, Spiees and
Sugars, we have a fine assortment of Goods; we
want ynnr trade; we will serve too right and sell
yon goods low as the lowest.
343 Main St., between Bank
and John Streets.
m
G0TO-
Blackman's New Studio
FOR
PHOTOGRAPHS,
If von want tbe best. Special inducements
to out-of-town patrons
243 Main St.. DAHBURT, CT.
' PORTliAIT PHOTOGRAPHER. -
224 Hale Street, Birmingham, Conn.
Work oi -.uperior .Excellence in au orancn-
esoi Photography.
COUGHLIN BROS.,
Bridgeport.
DEALERS II FI3X GOLD WALL PAPERS,
3IL TIKTS, FRESCO BORDERS, DECORA.
TI0W3. WIHD0W SHADES, FIXTURES. ETC
A. W. Orgelman,
Sandy Hook,
Conn.
Mannfaetnm and dealer in Haraeis, Ssc'tiM
Bridles, Collars. Blankets, etc.
Main St., Danbury.
We sell Gardfa.
Flower. Field and
Orasa Seeds tiiat
are pure and will
grow.
grown in Maine, from pure Seed
O LOCKS.
CADWELL & JONES,
SUCCESSOttS TOR. D. HawLCT oV CO.,
HARTFORD, CONN.
a very desirable and useful gift
goods is
RUBBER STORE,
Bridgeport. Conn.
- - - BRIDGEPORT, C0NH
Downer t Edwards.
XJ
RELIABLE CARPETS.
It is conceded that no stock has ev
er been shown equal in wear and col
oring to this new spring stock ef ours,
made on a basis of low cost
Prices almost undreamed of and val
ues without exception.
TAPESTRY BRUSSELS 48c yd.
ALL WOOL EXTRA SUPERS 49c
Oar Stock of Furniture is worth an
inspection.
QORTERED ASH CHAMBER Suits
Piano polished 24x30 bevel mirrors.
OVRS0FFD PARLOR SUITS, apholssared
in best Broeatelle. 6 Pi-ees wor h $65, S92-
BABT CARklAGES, new fresh as runest aU
this season's goods at 20 per eeat less than last
year's priees.
DOWNER & EDWARDS,
101 STATE ST.,
BRIDGEPORT, CT.
PRINDLE & MORRIS,
UNDERTAKERS AND
EMBALMERS,
Are prepared to do anything
in their line at shortest notice.
A share of public patronage
solicited.
W. H. PRINDLE. L. C MORRIS.
Calls answered if left at W. B. Pnndle's House; L.
0. Morris's Home, Telephone at Leonard's Hotel
BREW & S0ANI0N,
(UNDERTAKERS,
Embalmers and General Managers f
runerals.
A FULL LINE OP CASKETS, ROBES
AND FUNERAL ETCETERAS-
Best Workmanship-Reasonable Prices
WARE ROOMS: Rear Gnat KilL
SANDY HOOK, CONN-
WM. J. BREW- I P. J. SCANL0N.
HAWLEY, WILMOT
& REYNOLDS.
UNDERTAKERS,
NO. 98 STATE STREET,
BRIDGEPORT, COHH. -TELEPHONE 891.
GEORGE B. HAWLET, - - 834 Park Arenas
uuarjles E. wTUdOT, - 407 Clinton Arenas;
J0HR B. RETI0LDS, - 9 Fremont Street.
da.a.rles T'afole,
UNDERTAKER,
Residence, King St. All orders left vita Mr 6.
B. Taeker, Easton, will reeeive prompt attention
Ofilce in Toquet Block,
WESTPORT, CONN.
"How to amuse the soil so It will
laugh with abundance
. use Plumb & Win ton Co's
BONE ::FEBTLLIZEB.
Manufactured at Bridgeport, Coam.
BOTSFORD H. PEETsilsIffi:
Horse Shoeing, Wagon Repairing, w Filr;
and Blacksmilhing ot ail kinds. KEWTOW A

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