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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, January 24, 1896, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051487/1896-01-24/ed-1/seq-8/

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FOSTER, BESSE & CO.
317 MAIN STREET,
Just to Think That For
$5.50
You
AND
r75f
GMSTIST
No wonder people point to us
we lave money to our purchasers
our i
SQUARE DEALING ! j
And we now want to tell you about our re cent purchase of goods, j
We purchased these goods at a great bargain, and as is our
custom, when we get a good thing we share it with our customers
These suits are marvels, good stylish Suits and Overcoats, hand
comely lined and thoroughly well made throughout; they are reg-
$10 GOODS FOR $5.50!
For $10 i3 what they are sold at everywhere. Come early and get
your pick, and you will never regret that you accepted our invita
tion. Our reputation is worih something and we wouldn't sell
these goods unless we knew them to be right.
Come and see us for we are offering bargains in every department.
FOSTER, BESSE & CO.,
Combination Clothiers
317 MAIN STREET,
has just received new and elegant backgrounds and accessories
from new designs especially adapted to ihe latest style of pictures.
-ALL w ;K OF THE HIGHEST GRADE OF EXCELLENCE.-
N. T. Morse, 224 Main St., Derby, Conn.
Olarcdon
LEWIS B. SILL1MAH, Proprietor.
Manufacturer. Iroducr aod WhoIeia
OIli and GRELflLSj
PETEOLEOU PRODUCTS, AH1MAL AND VEGETABLE OILS.
886 to 372 Water Street.
THE W. P. SWORDS LUMBER COMPANY,
Uriel s:oro:irt, conn.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers m
MICHIGAN PINE LUMBER, SIDING, SHINGLES, SPEUCE
Timber, Lath, Sash, Doors & Blinds, Carrings, Mouldings, Mantles & Hud
Wood, Trim, etc North Carolina Yellow Pine Lumber a Specialty.
W-InilATI rURJflSHKD PROMTTIT.
SOLE AGENTS TOE THE FAMOUS FROST SHINGLES.
WITHOUT HESITATION
We asaert.tbat no finer exhibit of
3EEO2TJ30 OOOas 1
la to be lound In the Mute than Is shown here. In Ilarneas we carry nearly every
JOEC1NT 3. ATCISLIINa-jS03Nr,
42 Pairfleld Ave-, 78 Middle St., Bridgeport, Conn.
Henry 33- lEtolxoxi.,
DEALER IN
Iron andlSteel,iBlacksmith and Carriage Manu
facturers' Supplies.
438i 440 Water.Streot, Bridgeport, Conn
We Are Headqnattera For
PIANOS, ORGANS, SHEET MUSIC and MUSICAL MERCHAN
DISE OF EVERI DISCRIPTION. .
Iont purchase until you Have consulted us. N. B. Teaching a specialty, yrs experience
3Ecysrt,& No-w
. m, m MAIN STREI r.
DO TOO WANT A
FARM WAGON,
CARRIAGE OR
BUSINESS WAGON?
DO YOU WANT
REPAIR WORK DONE?
It will be tor your benefit to Correspond
with
II. W. WOODRUFF,
Washington Eepot, Conn.
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
Can Bay Such Nobby
OVERCOATS!
witn pride as their clothiers for
right along, and are known for
and Men's Furnishers. Operators of 27
stores.
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
Portrait
Photographer,
Oil Works!
Dealer in Lubricating and Illuminance
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
2yLixjsno store,
DAN BUB Y, CONN.
THE X-
jerlin Jron fridge Qo.,
OJP EAST.BEKLIN, CONN.,
Can Sell Yon A
GOOD IKON 2 STEEL K00F
KaT-AijM o-ic per sqr. loot.
W rite tnem lor particulars.
MRS W. O. TRASK,
Manufacturer ol
and Ladies' Hair Work.
Combings straightened, roots all one way,
specially.
lOTDLEBDET, C0H5.
Write i it information ; enolose stamp.
How to amuse the soil o it will
laugn with. abundance
use Plumb & Win ton Go's
. . BONE :: FERTILIZER.
ifannfacturtvl at BrxSj-sjiarV, Ccsa.
THE NEWTOWN BEE.
F1I3AT, J4N.24.T8B6.
lAHt'iKt :vm
LAST WEEK,
. MO
ilOO
Around the Fireside.
SO SHALL THEIB FUTURE BE.
As men In life perlorm their partH,
So shall their future be :
They cliange their skies, but not their hearts,
Who pass beyond the sea.
to. Ely, in Springfield Republican.
A SERMON BY BISHOP BROOKS-
from the churchman of march 8,
1800
When a company of men change their
scenery within a few momenta, as we
have changed ours, and come into the
midst of surroundings entirely different
from those which were encompassing
them a few moments back, it is good for
them to take account of what difference
the change has made in them, or what it
means to them to have come into these
different conditions.
Every man changes with his circum
stances ; he is so full of the susceptibility
and of the readiness with which the
human mind responds to the thirjgs with
which it has to deal. And yet at the
same time every man carries within him
self such an identity, tuch continuous
life, that he remains the same in spite of
the circumstances by which he is sur
rounded. It is little for us to come herp, my
friends, to spend our hours together, if
we leave ourselves outbide when we come
in and leave the church inside when we
go away. How we keep our religion
apart from our iife! How we do cur
work upon the shore, and it, seems to us
as i there were inlands i ff there in the
stream, and once in a while we get into our
boiit- and pull away and cross the water,
and these do our worship, at;d think our
better thoughts upon these islands in the
stream, and then pull back ugaiu to the
shore which is all secular. Sometimes
we cast, our eye teros the water and
think it good that we should be there.
L5ut we d i not bind the two together.
The two must cmie together. There is
but one man. There Is but ont life for
each of us, and no man gains the blessing
of the sacred associations unless they
come to be as the interpretation of ail the
life that he is living, and make known to
him tfie man that he is, even when he
seems to be most separated from the
deepest things.
I think, when a man comes to realize
that
BEING A CUlilSTIAN IS NOTUING ON EARTH
EXCEPT BKINUA MAN:
that the Chiiatian life is notbin
in the
world except the fulfilment of the human
life; that every Christian institution is
but the setting forth, in type aDd pat
tern, of that which, when the w orld shall
come to its completenese, ehall be the en
tire life of all mankind ; then there comes
a wonderful freshness and reality into
those thoughts which very often have be
come so dim and dull in regard to it. I
would submit to you all that. I would
tell you that when a man becomes a
Christian he becomes a man ; that just so
far as a man falls short of the Christian
type and character, he falls short of his
humanity ; that being a Christian is not
going aside from our human life, putting
oil' into some strange region and there
dwelling apart from all humanity. It is
entering inlo the depths of our humanity
and beiDg thoroughly a man. My friend
says to me on the street, "What U it to
be a Christian?"' It is to be the fulfilled
man. What is the Christian Church
It is the fulfilled human society.
Man, when he enters upon the higher
life of God, is never to be anything but
man. I love this dear humanity in which
we live, with all its faults and failures,
with all its sins and sorrows. It is a
dear thing, from which o.an would not
be separated. As man loves the human
life into which God has sent him this
special, personal human life, 30 human
ity loves its bumanness. And no religion
shall ever lay hold upon ihe human soul.
that says to mac "You shall become
something else than man; you shall be
come some Btrange, saintly, angelic being,
different from manhood"; -but only that
which, touching the deepest desires of
our human nature, says "L.et me do your
work for you, and you shall be truly
man." It seems to us at first that we
must drag down our highest influences,
that we must bring heaven down to earth,
in order that the two may meet. Not so
We must bring human life up to heaven,
and realize its divine capacity.
The great truth with regard to the Gos
pels is that
JESUS IS FIRST OF ALL A KEVEALEK
Before He does one special work for
man, before tie lays His hand to the
great burden of human sin, He first pours
down His light and shows man what
man is. His first deed to you, my friend,
must be in giving you more lofty and
celestial and divine thoughts of what you
are. Tbe Incarnation means that God
saw in human life such wonderful capaci
ty, such glor.ous capability, that He
could pour His own life in that human
life and make the divine-human existence
which we call tbe Christ. It was because
of the infinite value that He saw in human
life that Jesus died upon the cross. Thus
at tbe two ends of Jesus' life in His In
carnation, in His entrance upon our ex
perience, and in His departure from our
human experience, in His Cruc'fixion,
there is this splendid testimony to the
gloriousness of human life.
Now, my friends, when In the face of
all that I bear tbe talk that is current
among men to-day, when I read the
cheap talk that Is in papers and books,
when I bear the cheap discourse that
falls from men's lips ; when I hear a
young man daring to say thai: life is not
worth living, that human life is not a
glorious thing; when I hear the insignifi
cant and contemptible little cynic, who
grows more and more common in our i
artificial and fantastic civilization, and
Bet him by tbe side of Jesus Christ
it is almost impossible to let one's
pity overcome one's contempt.
What does that young fellow know
about human life? How has be gone
down to tbe depths of this marvel
lous nature? How has be, flogflriog up-
on the outside ot this world, got to the
deep knowledge of what It i for a man
to deal with the tternal issues of this
great globe of God? It is only ODe's
pity that can overcome one's Indignation
and scorn of the man who U a cynic in
the face of Jesus Christ. In that calm
face there is no cynicism, no contempt.
In that calm face we see infinite com
miseration for the lot of man. There U
the profound sense that human nature ia
a beautiful and glorious thing.
IF YOU WANT TO BE LIKE JESUS CHRIST,
be simply full of admiration and delight
in life, not simply because this wind
blows pleasantly, and that son (bines
bright; not simply because that friend
speaks smoothly, and this fortune rolls
in at your open door. To live the very
being alive that was the thing that was
glorious to Jesuo. And so, in spite of
everything, He stood by His post ; He
accepted the privilege and the duty of
life both together. There was no possi
bility in Jesus of the cowardice that
makes a man run a ay from his life the
moment it grows distressing and dread
ful in its circumstances. The cowardice
of suicide the infinite cowardice of sui
cide was not for Jesus. We ourselves
know how cowardly it Is, because we
never dare say of any f rierjd of ours that
in clear possession of his senses he took
hia own life. We know what a coward'
ly thing that would be; and so we cover
it with what veil of "disturbed condi
5ions"' we can imagine or know for him.
But to stand at one's post and -live till
God shall call us, to recognize the glory
and the duty of standing therp, and then
to go from life to life, fulfilling this
with that which lies beyond that is the
glory of the man who lives in the spirit
of Jesus.
Vouog men, keep out of your souls
the taint of cynicism, and de?pie the so
ciety and the tone of life that makes
cynicism and pessimism and the con
tempt of life seem for a moment a glori
ous thing.
As we see life becoming every day
more expeditious and comfortable, we
are in danger of forgetting that it is in
the inward life that the real vitality of
the world abides. And so it is
ONLY BY THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL
of man that the progress of the race is
measured. We a.k ourselves some
times, almost with sinking hearts, how
is it that, while man thus conquers na
ture, no man is conquering himself?
The real question of human progress,
when you get to its spiritual leaning, is
not how fast a man can talk from Cal
cutta to New York, nor how fast a mas
can travel to San Francisco, but what
messages he is sending, what errands
are carrying him across the continent?
Are they the errands of a diviner hu
manity? Are they the messages of no
bler ministries of human life of a deep
er integrity and a higher aspiration?
You remember how the poet, musing,
years ago, on feeing return in the skies
the combination of the planets which
naa not been tnere ror years, pierces
the whole question with his great in
s quiry, sent forth into the midnight
heavens :
What dost thou see, bright star, so pure and
wise,
More than in other times? Christ's human
story,
Which makes our hearts more apt to sympa
thize
With heaven, our souls more fit for future
glory,
When earth shall vanish from our fading
eyea,
When we lie down in our last dormitory.
vvonaertui ana Deautuui to me ap
pears this everlasting protest of the hu
man soul against materialism. In every
birth, in every death, in every moving
of love in a young man's heart, in every
moving of indignation against any
wrong by which a man is surrounded, in
every lifting up of tbe nature with any
great spiritual impulse, this materialism
i3 thrust into its place, and is once more
the servant and not the master. Noth'
ing short of character can be the real
glory of humanity. And so nothing
short of progress in character can mark
the progress of our human life. You
cannot dream of your surgeon becom
ing so skilful wilh his knife, your law
yer becoming so subtle with his argu
ment, your minister becoming so ripe in
his theology and so accurate in his per
formance of ceremonies, that after all
you ehall not demand that behind and
within each there shall be tbe man
MAX NEVER SHALL OUTGROW THE GREAT
DEMAND FOR CHARACTER.
And that is the universal and perpetual
testimony, that it is in the lifting up of
human character, and tbe realization of
its capacities, that man shall come to be
religious-and enter into the understand
ing of Christ, and know God.
We are sometimes told that we are to
be this and that, and are sometimes puz
zled when Christian courses are indica
ted to us. What are those Christian
course? My friends, they are nothing
in the world except the fulfilment of the
human character by tbe grace of God
There may be wondrous qualities In God
which our limited human nature never
has been able to perceive. There may
be depths of the divine life, which have
never opened themselves to us, eyen in
mmd. Kut we must believe, we must
remember, that those qualities in the
divine nature which have been opened to
us, and which bear tbe names with
which we are familiar, are the same in
God that they are in us. Justice in God
is exactly what it- Is between you and
your fellow merchant, Infinitely re
fined, made infinitely loftier; and higher
in the things with which it Seals, but
the same simple, glorious fundamental
virtue, between you and the Divine Life,
that it is between you and the brother
with whom you dwell. Love, when
God stoops and with the band of the
Christhood takes up coy life out of the
ruins, is the same thing, so much richer.
so much fuller, and, because richer and
fuller, all ;the more the same, with the
love with which I kneel down and pick
op the poor beggar, the crushed life, out
of the dust. Theology becomes fantas
ticreligion all becomes fantastic un
less you know that the qualities of Gd
are truly the same things with the . qual
ities of man.J be eon of God ; that man is
made in God's image, and that when
God oids yotr to be just and pure and
holy, He is asking you to ; .. .
LET HIM FILL YOUR HUMAN LIVE
with the great radiance of His divinity,
aud make it all the more truly human.
There is a real, tree, rational and natur
al theology. Every superstition comes j r the &rBt time we have found our la
in whea wo think that the religious vir-1 capacity 5 It is tbe glorious moment of
tues are difi"jrenfc in kind from the hu- ' a mortal's life. A prospect opens before
ALONE!
So Child to Call Her "Mother."
SPECIAL TO OUB LADY HEADERS.
ETow desolate is the marriage state
without children !
How unnatural!
The law of nature is the perpetuation
or Iile by repro
duction, and ap
rjliea to both anl.
f.-f Die hie. JNature
at JT&V makes but few
l5f "J1 !A mistaken, anrl
'
where her great
law is not carried
out, the cause is
not a natural, but
an unnatural,
one.
Two loving be
ings have joined
hands, a loving
wife and husband.
Years pass by,
and still there are
but two. The
sound of little footsteps never patters in
their ears, and no hild's voice calls that
loving woman " Mother.
They have wealth, positioi
all that heart could wish fo
but the greatest
of all blessings
is denied them,
a child.
Stprilit v is rnr-
-,.t; " " ... Vj
aim; in j. iiiu imi.
of ten cases. Every
received by Mrs. l'mk
hain brings letters from
women on this subject;
and success follows her
advice. Write her at
Lynn, Mass., and bring
happiness to your home.
Lydia E. Pink ham' a
Vecetable Compound re-
restores the latent organs to a normal
action, and also removes all weaknesses,
aches, pains, and irregularities,
man virtues, and that God's holiness is
different in its sort from the character
which we reverence and adore in our
fellowmen. I do not obey God's com
mands merely because I look to a divine
authority held over my bead, or for fear
of punishment. I do not merely look to
a greater reward which is to come if
fulfil tbe commandment, iiut I find in
my own heart, written by the same band
of God, spoken by His ycice, the fulfil
ment of that command which he has
given, by the deeper, aroused instincis
of my own nature. Shall man go to
heaven or go to hell when this life is
over? Certainly he will. But it shall
be by no arbitrary judgment. The soul
that gO'es to heaven shall go bet ause it
could go nowhere else. The soul that
goes to punishment shall go because it
could go nowhere else.
I shadder when I think what a sign of
men's degradation, of the life that they
are living, that they should so easily
accept the lower conditions into which
they fall as habitual, and as likely to
repeat themselves, and how unprepared
they are to accept the loftier conditions.
There are two days in your remem
brance, my friends, one when you lay
in the gutter and the other when you
stood upon tbe mountain top. There
was one day when you disgraced your
self and lived like a beast, and you hate
to think of it. There was another day
when you thought yourself almost an
gelic, when an inmost nature burned out
when you lifted up your soul with an
exaltation that took you absolutely by
surprise.
THOSE TWO DAYS.
live in your remembrance, one down in
the depths of the mire, and the other up
in the glory of the sun. Which is tbe
day that you most remember and most
think may be repeated? Do you not
stand in awful terror when you think of
that day of your wallowing degrad
ation, and do you not look upon tbe
other as though it were some strange
and distant being that stood there?
There is no sign of a man's spiritual
growth, I think, so true as that be
counts the highest thing that he has
ever done the most natural thing ; that
be knows that the deepest hour be ever
lived was bis truest hour, and so looks
for the renewal of that hour. If Christ's
minister blames me for not living the
Christian life, and I say "What is the
Christian life? Where is it?" And he
says "Off there in the distance, on the
other side of a broad sea" ; I say
am not to blame : I have lived my hu
man life." That is what multitudes of
sonls are saying. But if then Christ
looks into the depths of my soul and
says "You have not lived your human
life. Your human life was obedience to
holiness. Yonr human life was pure
Your human life was this" and holds
out his wondrous human life, then my
whole soul goes down in penitence.
Y ou must know that you
OUGHT TO HAVE BEEN THE BETTER MAN.
or you never can repent of not having
been; and you must know that you
could have been tbe better man, or you
never will know that you ought to have
been. And when you know these things
there will come, first penitence, and then
the reaching up after tbe new chance
wnicn never dies away in tuis world or
in any world, may we not believe, where
the soul, knowing God and needing God
shall find the God who at last bas been
revealed to its recognition and its need?
There is the great truth about it all,
my friends : You never will find God
till you need Him; and therefore tbe
way to find Him is to put yourself where
you will need Him. What but tbe grow
ing needs of men turned barbarism into
civilization? Man must need a thing
before It really can come to him. Only
by putting ' ourselves - where we shall
need God can we find Him to do things
which we cannot do without Him. Ah!
we cannot do anything without Him,
yon say. Yes, but there a host of things
which you think you can do without
Him. There are your bargainings and
your sellings, that you think your acute
brain and your ready hands are all fit
for. If you think that yon can do those
things without God, then try something
else. Try to corquer your passions, try
to refrain from tbe sin that you have
habituated yourself to for years. Try
to go outside" of your selfishness and
help tbe poor. Try to tackle tbe prob
lems of your brother's life. Try to
enter into the deep mysterious world of
some poor creature's prt blems. Try to
make your boy a better man than yon
are, a better man you have ever dreamed
of being. Then your weakness shows
Itself, and then yon drop your bands in
Impotence, and then you bend yonr
knees in prayer. Ab, tbe first prayer f
That means tbe first real sense of need,
tbe first going to God, which proves bow
A
IGANTIC
ur
MARK
DOWN
SALE!
Of BOOTS, SHOES and SLIP-
PEES. Tho greatest mark
down Sale in the history of
the Shoe Business in Bridge
port. ..
PRICES TELL!
What we ask for the different
lines of goods no newspaper
description can give you an
idea of the value of them.
Gome and sea some
e I
01 tUe :
greatest bargains ever offer
ed. Men's New London Rubber Boota worth 2.30
1.75.
Child's Rubber Boots sizes 6 to S, worth 1.25.
75 CENTS.
Boys' Gray Corduroy Legging worth 1.25
50 CENTS.
Men's $5 and J6 Call Favorite Bals.
$1 A PAIR.
Men's $1 and 75c Slippers
50 CENTS.
Men's Velvet and Goat Slippers worth 1 25
75 CENTS.
Ladies' Kid Button riiiin Opera Toe, sizes
1 1-2, 3 and 3 1-2 all widths. Regular price
from $4 up, now
197.
75 Pair Ladies' St Goat Button, regular price
at to $5
$1.67 A PAIR.
s Misses' Kid and Goat Butte
is 11 to 1, regular price 2 50.
63
$1 A PAIR.
Eyery pair Boots and Shoes
now in tbe store must go at some
price. This is your opportunity.
Buy now. From now until the
close of this sale, the busiest
store in town, will be at
H. N. AYRES',
381 Main St-, Bridgeport
n
Wholesalers and Retailers.
CITY Kja-nMAO,
36 WALL STREET,BRIDGEPORT, CONN
A Large Line of Perfumes and Toilet Water. The finest in the
City. Lowest Prices.
him indefinitely. It is only for that to
become universal, and the world be
comes God's world.
HENCEFORTH MAN KNOWS HIS HUNGER,
AND WILL FEED ON GOD.
What ia the meaning of the Christian
sacrament? It is the great food festi
val. It is the great n?urance of man's
hunger and man's helplessness forever
supplied by God.
Friends, you are not to live your lives
and God cannot live sour lives for you
But there is another unity which
neither God nor you, but which is you
filled with God. God fillinz you. I look
into the life which I atn to lead, and
say to myself, powerleas to live it "O
Door human soul!" And I look up to
God and say '-God Himself, even, can
not live it unless the human soul open.
itself to Him." Then the unit etand3,
the unit that was revealed to me by the
mvsteiious union of divinity and human
ity which are in Jesus; and 1 say
"God and I will live this life." Eernem
ber, there Is no evil that God and you
can do. there is no good that God and
you cannot do,when you have entered in
to the rich, mysterious union which has
been made known and made possible to
us by Jesus Christ, consecration, con
secration. and the union of your life
with His.
LINCOLN PILOTS A STEAMPOAT OS A GEEAT
OCCASION.
momr r'hen Lincoln an-
ONE OF THK EARLIER PORTRAITS OF
LINCOLN,
nounced himself as a candidate for the
Legislature, in 1832 the whole popula
At that
The weather has been wai-m. There ha9
been no pressing need for heavy clothing so
i jar. uur gtocic is large anu we propose to re
! rtuce it by reduction of prices, nn all of our
Winter goods. Overcoats and Ulst'TS are cut
1 25 per cent. Suits and Separate I'antRloons
i come in for a like reduction. Our prices
! were low enoneh before, but now thev will
be down to the giving away point. No cards
tor Gold Watches will lie given out alter Jan
uary si, isjf: uou't miss this opportunity.
AVA
429AAINST
MARTIFS
BUSINESS SCHOOL,
BUSINESS GOUESE.
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Commercial
Arithemetic, Spellins, Business
Correspondence, Grammar.
PHORTHAKD CODESE.
Shorthand Graham's, Typewriting, Spelling
Penmanship, Punctuat'on, Paragraphing,
Business Correspondence, Grammar,
W.J. MARTIN, Principal and Proprietor.
403 Main St., Saoford Building, Bridgeport, Ct
MECHANICS' AND FARMERS'
SAVINGS BANK,
3ITT BAHK BTJILDISG, TAIL ST., B'POET
Deposits,
Intsreit and Surplus,
1,402,114 4S.
45,178.32.
81,447,203-77.
Deposits of SI to S10C0 received tad interest
redited from the first of each month, payable is
January and July of each year.Iooorporated 1S7
D. H. 1IOEGAN, Presideat.
ti. S, CATLIE, Seoratarr and Trtucrir.
Tl VTkWILL not injure
I
-4THFiinsTnniCATE
33 FABRICS
- 1 mZJ V!"'1 r""
GisSSGiVEN FDR Trademarks
iSOLBByALL 0R0CESSa"5cts acake!
IT
tion of Sangamon was in a state of wild
expectation. Some six weeks before
Lincoln's circular apprared. a citizen of
Springfield had advertised that as soon
as the ic went off the river he wou'd
bring up a steamer, the "Talisman, ''
from Cincinnati, and prove the Sanga
mon ravigable. The announcement had
aroused the entire country, speeches
were made, and subscriptions taken.
The merchants announced goods direct
per steamship "Talisman" the country
over, and every village from Bekrdtown
to Springfield was laid off in tow lots.
The "Talisman'' actually came up the
river; scores of men went to Beards
town to meet her, among them Lincoln,
of course; and to him was given the
honor of piloting ;her an hi,nor which
made him remembered by many a man
who saw hioi that day for the first time.
Tbe trip was made with all the wild de
monstrations which always attended the
first steamboat. On either bank a long
procession of men and boys on foot or
horse accompanied the beat. Cannons
and volleys of musketry were fired
settlements were passed At every stop
speeches were made, congratulations
offered, toasts drunk, flowers presented.
It was one long hurrah from Beards-
town to Springfield, and foremost in the
jubilation was Lincoln, the pilot. The
"Talisman" went as near Springfield as
tbe river did, and there tied up for a
Coughing.
4F" or all the ailments of Throat
and Lungs there is no cure so
quick and permanent as Scott's
Emulsion of Cod-liver Oil. It is
palatable, easy on the most deli
cate stomach and effective.
5cott,s
Emulsion
Stimulates the appetite, aids the
digestion of other foods, cures
Coughs and Colds, Sore Throat,
Bronchitis, and gives vital
strength besides. It has no equal
as nourishment for Babies and
Children who do not thrive, tnd
Overcomes
Any Condition of Wasting.
8iU6owb K. t. 4UDtgf)ltt. luc.aMft,
"MERRILL"
When you see that think where yon wUl
aend your boy to prepare for
business.
Patented Actual Business From the
Start.
GRAHAM'S SHORTHAND, -
MODERN BANKING,
OFFICE PRACTICE,
MATHEMATICS,
ENGLISH BRANCHES,
MODERN LANGUAGES,
GRADUATES ASSISTED TO POSITIONS-
Tuition rates reasonable. Scholars t'ek
ets secured. You can enter any day with
out loss of time. Write for application
blanks.
MERRILL COLLEGE,
STAMFORD, CONN.
The Travelers' Guide.
EW YORK, NEW I! ATTN AS1 KARTFOBD
OAULUOAU.
BERKSHIRE DIYISIOM.
NEW HAVEN Nortn, .0
m., 4.20 p.
Sontli. 11a. m.. 7.50 p. m.
SH ELTON North, lu.10 a. m 4.45 p. m. South,
10.S5a. m.. 7.24 d. m.
STEVENSON North, 10.33 a. m, 4.57 p. m.
souin, iu5 a. in., i.ll p.m.
MONROE Nortii, W.-2U a. tn-, 15.02 p. m.
soutn, tiu-i a. m., itao p. m.
BOTSFORD North, 7.36, 10A a. m, 1.40, 4.59,
5.08, )-xh p.m. Sunday, 8.10 a. m. South, 10 Jl
a. m., 7.17 p. m.
SEW TOWS North, 7.44, 10.46 a. mM 2.00, 6.07
5.1S, i.Wi p. m. bumlay, S.ls a. m. South,
7.oi, 8.47, 10.O2, 11.27 a. in., 4.24, 6.25, 651 p. m.
Sunday, 6.1.1 p. m.
HA WLEYVILLE North, 7JS2, 10.55 a. m.
2.30, 5.16, 5.26, 7.14 p. m. Sunday, 8.27 a. m.
Souttt, 7.01, S.J't, 9.54, ll.lt a. 4.16, 6.10, 6.44
p. m. Suuday, 5-S7 p. in.
BROOKF1ELD JUNCTION North, S.OS, 11X
a. m., 3.00, 5 3o, 5.40, 7.23 p. ra. Sunday, 8.36
a.m. South, 6.52, 8.3o, 9.45, 11.10 a. in., 4.05,
5.50, 6-35 p. m. Sunday 5.43 p. m.
BUOOKF1ELD North, e.0B , 11.16 a. SJ2,
5.45, 7.2s p. m. Sunday, 8.41. South, 6.47,8.20,
ii a. m., o.so, oj p. in. ouminy, o-it p.m.
LANESV1LLE and STILL Rl V Kit North, 8J5
a. iu., 3.15, oJi p. m. iwutu, 6.44J, 6.10 a. m.,
5.11, 6.14 p. m. Sunday, north, t6-4J a. m.,
south, tn.26 n. m.
NEW MILFOKO North, 8.12, 11.27 a. m., 4.2(1,
5.52, 6.02, p. m. auuday, 86 a. m. bouui.
6A, HAS, y.2i, 10.48 a. in., 8.46, 5 65, 6.20 p. m.
Sunday. 5.20.
M ERW 1NSV1 L LK North, 8.35, 11 .42 a. m., 5.00,
6.i p.m. Sunday ,9.oMa.m. oouth, 10-35 a.m
4.26, 5.48 p. m. Sunday. 4.57 p. m.
KENT North, s.49, 11.54 a. mM 5J6, 62 p. m.
Sunday,;, M a. m. South, 10 23 a. in, 3.23, 4.06,
5.3 r. ra. Sunday .4.37 p. ni.
CORNWALL UR1DGE North, 9.05 a. m., 12.07,
6.5, 6.48 p. m. Sunday, 9.39 a.m. stoulh, 10.11
a. m., 3.11, 3.42, 5.41 p. m. Sunday ,4.14 p. m.
ffEST CORNWALL North, 9.14 a. m, 12.15,
7.11, 6.57 p. ui. Sunday ,9.47 a. m. South, lO.liS
a. ru., 3.63, 3.-J. 5.1a p. in. Sunday ,4.01 p. m.
BOT8FOBD TO BRIDGEPORT.
BOTSFORD North, 7-46, 10.38 a. m 1.40, 4.59,
d.i.18. 6.5 p. m. Sunday, 6.10 a. m. South, 7J7,
S.ao, 11.36 &.H1-, 4.32, 7-00 p.m. Sunday, 6.26
p. m.
SXEI'NEY North ,7.28,10.23 a.m.. 1.20 ro., 4.50,
6.4 p. m. Sunda,Ba.in South, 7.28, 9.03,
11.45 a. m., 4.4n, 7.9 p. m. Sunday, 6.38 p.m.
LONli Hi IX North, 7.22, 10.17, 1.11 a. m., 4.4-1,
6.43 p. m. Sunday, 7.54 p. m. South, 7J4,
9.09,11.49 a. in., 4.46, 7.14 p. m Sunday 6.43
p. m.
TRUMBULL North. 7.16, 10.11, 12.58 a. m.,
4.37, 6.37 P- m- Sunday, 7.47 a. m. South
7.3'.', 9.14 11.54, a. m., 4.53, 7.19 p. m. Sunday
t6.50 p. m.
BRLDGEl'ORT North, 7.05, 10, 12.40 a. m, 4.25,
6.25 p. in. Suuday, 7.35 a. m. Arrive, 7.50,
9.25 a. m., 12.U5, 5.i5, 7 JO p. m. Sunday 7 -OS
p. in.
DAKBURT DIVISION.
DANBURY North, 6.40, 7.45, 8.20, 9.20, 10.50, a.
in., 3.50, 5.18, 6.55, 6.10 p. m. South, 6.00, 7.36,
9.57 a. in., 11.40, 4-23, 7.02 p. ui. Sunday, S.o5 a.
m. ,5.05 p.m.
BETHEL North, 6.4S, 7.37, IC.43 a. n.,
2.34, 5.08, 5.4, 6.J3 p. in. Sunday, 10.17 a m.a
S.2op. m. South, 6.06, 7.37 10.05, a. m., 11.47,
4.29, 7.08, p. ui. Sunday, 6.12 a. m, 5.12 pun.
BEDDING North. 7Jo a. m, 2.2s, 6.37
p. m. Sunday, 10.11 a. in., 8.13 p. m. Soutn,
6.12 a. in., 11.54 5.26, p. m. Sunday, 8-18
a. m.. 5.18 p. m.
SANFOkD North. 7.22 a. ru., 2.24, 6.33 p. m.
Sunday, 10.OH a. m., 6.U9 p. m. South, 6-16 a.
zn., 11.59, 5.31 p. in. Sunday, a.22 a. m-,5.22 p.
m.
B RANCH V ILL E North , 7.14, 10-31 o. m., 2.17,
5.37, 6.27 p. ui. Sunday, 10 a. m ?.02 p. tn.
South, ti.il, 7.53, 10.18 a. in., 12.05,4.41. i 24p.m.
Sunday, 8.28 a. m., 5.28 p. m.
GEORGETOWN North, 7.09 a. m.,SJS, 2t p.
m. Sunday, 9.57 a. in., 7.58 p. m. South, c f 5
p. m., 12.09, 6.43 p. m. Sunday, SJ31 a. 5J1
p. in.
SI1EPAUG RAILROAD.
November 19, 1S9S.
BETHEL Leave 7J7 a 5.13 p. m.
Sunday .12 a. m. Arrive 9.57 a. 4.40,
p. in. Sunday 6.15 p. m.
Q.AWLEY V1LLE North,"9.00 a. m 5.30 p. m.
Sunday, s.3o a. in. Leave tor Betiiel 9.42 a.
na., 4.25 p.m. Sunday, 6 p.m.
SHEPAUG North, t'J 18 a. m, f5.42 p. m.
Sunday, ts-4? a.m. South, t9.28 ajn-,f S.51 p.
m. Sunday, 5.36 p. m.
SOXBURY FALLS North, U1.30 a. m, t5J2
p.m. Sunday, fS-57 a-m. South, f9.20 a.m., SM
p. m. Sunday, t5.26 p. m.
ROXBURY North, 10.10 a. m., 5.58 p. m. Sun
day, 9.10 a. in. South, 9.11 a. mn 3.26 p. m.
Sunday, 5.15 p. m.
JUDO'S BRIIKiE North, tlO.20 a. m, t6.04 p.
m. Sunday, t9.17 a. m. south, fy.u5 a. m-,
2.53 p. m. Sunday, f5.08 p. m.
WASHINGTON North, 11.00 a. m, 6J5 p. m.
Sunday, 9.37 a. m. South, 6.53 a. m-, 2.40 p.
m. Sunday, 4.51 p. m.
VEW PRESTON -North, 11.10 a. m., 6.M p. m.
Sunday, 9.43 a. in. South, 8.49 a. mn 3.19 p.m.
Snnday, 4.38 p. m.
ROMFORD North, 11.25 a.m., f6.08 pan. Sun-
day, 9.54 a. in. South, fo.40 a. Hi., f2.uSp.ni.
Sunday, 4.26 p. m.
MORRJs North, 11.35, 633 p. m. Sun.
day, 10.02 a. m. South, fS-35 a. in., tl.53 p. m.
Sunday, 4.18 p. m.
BANTAJd North, 12.00,pjn.,6.45 p. m. Sunday,
10.20 a. ra. South, 8.27 a. m.t 1.S9 p. m. Sun
day, 4.07 a. ro.
LAKE North, J12.04 p.m., fS-45 p. m. Send a v,
110.24 a. m. South, ib.25 a. m., 1.23 p.m. Sah-
day, s M p. m.
LITCHFIELD Arrive 12.10 p. m, 60p. nr..
Sunday, 10.30 a. m. South, 8.20 a. m, 1 15 p.
in. Sunday, 30 p. m
THE NEW ENGLAND R- R.
HAWLEY V1JULE East 7.4 12.02, a-m .7.15 p. m.
West 9 on a. in, 3,6.42 p. m.
NEWTOWN East 7.34 a.m 17.20 p.m. West f82
a. m, r2.53, !6.36,p. m.
SANDY HOOK East 7 40, 12.12, a.m. 7.27 p. m.
West 8.48 a. in. 2.48. 6J50. D. m.
SOUTHBURY East 7.50, 12j
2.21, 7-37 p m.Wett
b-33 a. m . 6 20 p. m.
tTrains stop when signaled only
Bridgeport Steamboat
Company.
STEAMER NUTMEG STATE.
Leaves Bridgeport every night (except
Sunday) 12 u'ci k, lrom toot oi south avenue.
Leaves Nw York ev.ry day (except Sun
day) 11 a. m., lrom Pier S, East River.
STEAMER ROSEDALK.
Leaves Bridgeport at 7-30 a. m. Returning
leaves New York Pier 39, East River, toot ot
Catherine street, at 3 p. ro., loot ol ast Slat
street. East River, at 3.15 p. m.
On Saturday, PieT 39, 2 p. m.. East Slat street
2.15.
FARE 60 cents
EXCURSION TICKET 75 ceo
(Good Until Used.) I
Boat connects with the Berkshire dlvtsio-.
train leaving Bridgeport at 6.24 on Saturday
evenings only.
Western and Southern Treight taken from
Bridgeport at New York rates, and bills lad
ing given.
S.K. WEDGE, r. H. CONXELLV,
Agt. Supt.
week. When she went back Lincoln
again had a conspicuous position as
pilot. The notoriety this gave him was
quite aa valuable politically, probably,
as was the forty dollars he received for
hla service financially. McClurt'a for
January.
Soientifio AmB-'.oan
Agency for
1 11 7 u y
For information and trr Hantlhuuk writ tn
Mli.NN & Oj., 06 1 rtROADWAT, .Viw Yah it.
Oiuest bnrpim for serunup patents in Azntpnr.
Every -patent takes out by us U hrouaht tef(r
tiie public hf a ootKw given tree orciitr ia tiia
- I-arjrfst ctrmlft?Tnn of rat stifntif!r prr fn the
Y-uruL 4-i..len'Udlv illustrated. K- in;- : i"n.
Ea fiVmlct without iu We-fcfv tKi
yar; (i.vslimomris. AHirw, iit:vs , &
t'L'turtHKBA, 3G4 liKmdwy, JStiW Vort Ot,
A
CAVEAT.
V-' OESICN PATENTS, I
xiur i r j m k saA.

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