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The Newtown bee. (Newtown, Conn.) 1877-current, March 26, 1897, Image 8

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051487/1897-03-26/ed-1/seq-8/

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Doesn't this Spring Weather make you think of
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We thought Qf it some time ago. Knew it would come, and when the first blue bird put in its appearance had ready to put on our counters
nnp nf the host lines of Clothine we have ever shown. The past two days have been busy ones with us getting trie goods ready to snow, anu
we are proud of them, proud of the quality and the low price we have been able to mark them at. Don't pass us by, this Spring, for we feel
we can please you better than ever before, if you want a o
W, uro rpn.lv to show vou every attention, and .would be pleased to have you come and look us over even if you don't purchase. We would
quote you some prices, but a better way is to come right to the store then you can compare the cloth with the price and satisfy yourself that our
reputation for square dealing is honestly earned. All the correct things in
CLOTHING, GENTS' FURNISHINGS, TRUNKS AND BAGS, HORSE GOODS, ETC,
FOSTER, BESSE & CO., 317 MAIN ST., BRIDGEPORT.
OPERATORS 27 STORES. STORE OPEN MONDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS.
Spring
Overcoats
are being brought cut from the camphor chests and
the question of the old or a new one is before you.
Perhaps if you came here and saw the beautiful gar
ments and learned the reasonable prices, you would
- decide on a new one. No harm to look.
Cotert cloth top coats in fight and medium shades are
all the style. We can put you into a corert top
coat with strap seams, farmer satin lining, and
modish shape for $10. Three other and better
grades at $15. $18 and $20. Prices for every con
dition of purse. "Conservative shades in cheviot and
mixed all wool goods, $6 and $7.50. Boys' sizes. 4
to 16; $5. sizes 14 to 19. $7 JO, $9 and $12.
Scotch plaids are the thing in neckwear and we have
all the clannish combinations. Puffs, 4-tn-hands,
Imperials, Club Ties and Band Bows, 50c
BRIDGEPORT. CONN.
Open Monday, Friday and Saturday Evenings.
!
s
THE NEWTOWN BEE.
NEWTOWN, FBIDA.Y, MAR. 26.
were shown the president's, pew which
will be filled by McKinley during his
stay in Washington. Here was a coun
cil convened to discuss reforms needed
in the District. Bishop Satterlee,Episco-
coin. This is to meet the demands of
the district of Columbia. The law re
quires the Treasury to have In reserve
$100,000,000 to sustain the country's
credit. At every political change the,
CIRCULATION:
JAJUAET 1.1888,
LAST WKEK.
000
8100
The HomeCirde.
BDILDIHQ MONUMESTS.
Through 'He we build our monuments
Ol honor, and perhaps, ol lame;
The little and the great events
Are block! o glory or ot shame.
The modent, humble, and obscure,
1-lvlng unnoticed and unknown,
May raise a shalt that will endure
Longer than pyiamlds ol stone.
The carveu statue turns to dust,
And marble obelisks decay,
But deeds of pity, laith and trust
No storms ol late can sweep away.
Their base stands on the rock ot right;
Their apex reaches to the skies ;
They grow with the lncreaslrg light
Of all the encircling centuries.
Our building must.be good or bad ;
In words we speak, in deeds we do;
On sand or granite must be laid
The shalt that shows us falBe or true.
How do we build what can we show
Tor hours, and days, and years ol toll
Is the loundatlon flrjo below
Is It on rook or sandy soil?
The hand that llita the lallen up,
That heals a heart or binds a wound,
That gives the needed crust and cup,
Is building upon solid ground.
Is there a block ot stainless white
Within the monumental wall
On which the sculptured skill can write
'He bullded well, o should we all?"
pal, spoke on the Sabbath question. The j Treasurer's the money has to be counted.
thought is to do away with Sunday mails, I When Morgan succeeded Nebeker he
papers and needless traffic that "the gave Ja receipt for $740,801,419 8, a
man servant and maid servant" may be count that required three months to.com-
included in the Sabbath rest. Dr Crafts, plete. It was the largest note that ever
who is r.hp Wrtinc unirit in "Twentieth passed from one administration to the
Century Reforms" told how to get the I treasurer under another
matter before Congress. The President I Some of the best work In the treasury
of the W. C. T. U. urged that .the Little I is done by women who have become very
bill be strengthened, excluding the sale I expert in detecting counterfeit money, in
of intoxicants from the Capitol building I estimating values of burned and mutilat-
nnil ornnnHfl a measure which hssledmonev. and as counters. The mas.
document. The first draft by Jefferson
is shown, also the desk whereon it was
written. Here aie
ONE OF WASHINGTON 8 FAMOUS FOUR
SWOBDS,
since passed the Senate. Mrs H.U18
most eloquently pleaded for a law raising
the age oTthe protection of girls to 18.
In the evening we went to the First Pres
byterian church
TO HEAR TALMAGE.
siveness of the vaults, the severe system
in every detail impress the visitor with
the diznitv of our government and its
solid financial basis.
The Washington monument is an obe
lisk 555 feet In altitude, the highest work
of masonrv in the world. It is built of
We were impressed with the number of P"e wnite maryiana marnie, us gieam-
r hnnr looting neonle. who need- "g top may be seen ior many mues
j r - - - it - -
ed to have the mind of the Master made around. We went up in the elevator and
tried to enjoy the peerless view, but un
fortunately one of the highest winds
known on the coast waa raging, so our
glimpse of the city, the heights and
Georgetown had to be hastily taken, and
A Visit To Washington.
IN .LOVE WITH THE CAPITAL CITY.
very clear.
Our first visit on Monday was made at
the Bureau of Engraving, a branch build
ing of the Treasury. Here are printed
government bonds,the National currency,
nnatacp and revenue stamps, etc. The
plates, we are told, are carefully guard
ed. The original plate Is never printed
from but a replica is made for actual use
so that government may not be its own
counterfeiter. Our guide told us to ex
amine the engraving on a United States
bill. It is the most beautiful money in
the world. The bills are printed upon a
specially prepared, silk-fibred paper, the
process beinn a trade secret. The print
ing is accomplished wl-h the greatest
accuracy, for if more than two sheets are
in the least Imperfect (each sheets makes
four notes) the labor is deducted from
the operator's wages. Thirty days are
consumed in the successive processes to
Dear Editor ot The Bee : Again we
are on the train, flying toward home. As
it will be several hours before we arrive I wj,ich each piece of currency is subject
In New York, I will Just fetch my I ed m tne bureau, from the time it comes
fountain pen and pad forth from my 1 1 8nk-flbered paper, until ready for
"grip sack," and tell you about my 'lBlt delivery. Each piece; ofj work passes
to Washington while my enthusiasm is I tnrougri the bands of 30 different people
hot. The three hour ride from Phlla-1 We counted 10 different processes
that at the risk of losing all our head
gear. We walked down, that we might
see the tablets presented by 40 states, 16
cities and 37 fraternities and societies
We were filled with indignation to find
that some execrable vandals had mutil
ated the designs, carrying off spokes to
wheels and even the entire busts of fig
ures in a sitting posture. Among the
historic stones are contributions from the
ruins of Carthage, Vesuvius, the Alexan
drine Library and the Tomb of Napoleon
at St Helena. Greece sends a marble
from the Parthenon. China, Japan, Si
am and the Cherokee nation are repre
sented. The tip of the monument is an
aluminum plate on which is inscribed
"Laus Deo."
At 1 o'clock we presented ourselves at
the White House, supposing the president
received on this day for an hour. We
found however that he had discontinued
this little courtesy since his summer va
delphia U.full of intere.st,affording charm- Lvery m0TulDg at 9 o'clock, a million catl0D' 80 we had t0 content selves
Ing glimpses of the Delaware river and I a0iiarg i8 brought over to the Treasury
bay. We could not fall to see tba.t tna waKOn , made of steel, attended by a
Wilmington Is a breezy and beautiful I force oI nardg. Here the sheets receive
City. At Havre de Grace we crossed the I tne red geai and the flnai count.
mouth of the Susquehanna. We rode I Tne gy8tem of rapid counting by
over two expanses of tide water, which I WOmen,experts is quite wonderful to the
we were told are "Bushy" and "Gun-I nitlated. With lightning speed they
powder" riven. They are bits of the I count and examine, noting the red seal
Chespeake. I must not omit to tell yon I and blue numbers at the same time.
bow Intently we looked at Baltimore. I Eacn expMt mU8t count 32,000 notes a
That it Is an imposing clty.with myriads I day Finally the money Is packed In a
of churches and stately public buildings, I pIajn brown paper, sealed with long
Is very evident. It is a city of homes too 1 8tiCKa f sealing wax and made ready
' as the multitudes of little brick bouses I for tne national banks. A large amount
. attest. We were eagerly surveying tho I ot tne money Issued is UBed to redeem
bridges and regular, wide streets, when 1 0id money. .Wornout bills are made Into
we entered a tunnel, both long and ag-1 piles, secured with bands of paper, then
gravatlng, for we knew the things we I taKen to the canceling machine where
wanted to see were existing calmly .over j tney receive four unmistabable, iquare
our head. All signs of snow here disap-1 COrnered holes through them. After
peared. It was like finding' earliest I Demg cut into halves, they are ready for
spring in January. We were very com-1 tne raacerator, a huge, spherical machine
fortably entertained at "La Fetras," a I fitted with closely-set knives.
tnmnarannA rinnan. rnamf And homelike.
- ' , I a uiT t low nm.i.ARft
with promenading through the vestibule
with its fine screen of Tiffany glass, and
the sumptuous East .Room, furnished in
soft brown colors. It is lighted by three
immense chandeliers glistening with pen
dants of cut glass. There are life size
portraits of Jefferson, Lincoln and Mar
tha and General Washington. The guard
even left his post to hurriedly tell us
that the last canvass was cat from the
frame in 1814, and carried by Dollie Mad
ison across tli e Potomac ; by her thought
fulness saving this and the precious doc
ument of Independence when the British
Admiral Cockburn burned the Capitol
and President's house.
The four-storied granite structure of
the State, War and Navy Departments,
ranks as the largest and most magnificent
office building in the world. It has 000
rooms and two miles of marble halls.
The entire structure is fireproof, for the
records deposited here are priceless. Wax
figures in glass cases exhibit army and
navy uniforms from Colonial times to the
In the corridors are models of
our war vessels and firearms of every de-
and some volumes of his diaries, Frank
lin's staff, a wax replica of the great seal
of the United States, a silver set present
ed by citizenB of Philadelphia to Capt
Hull, commander of the Constitution, to
commemorate his victory in 1812 oyer the
British man-of-war, Guerriere, and the
latest insertion, a long roll of yellow pa
per, mysteriously inscribed, and an ele
gantly embroidered yellow sash, the cre
dentials of LI Hung Chang.
We next took a walk over to the
Smithsonian Institute. Here are tens of
thous mds of birds, fishes, reptiles, lnver
tibrates, sponges and corals, besides the
wonderful Yucatan and Mexie wrought
stones. We wandered about this vast
collection which Illustrates Dr G. Brown
Goode's definition ot a really educational
museum "a collection of instructive la
bels, each Illustrated by a well-selected
specimen," until our heads could not
hold one bug or bird more. For a rest,
went over to the capitol. I wondered, Mr
Editor, if we would fall upon the stones
and kiss them devoutly, but when the
moment came, sentiment gave place to
New England hardihood, and we strode
up the flight of granite steps with the
pride of a man sent to the lower bouse.
The mammoth building (was astir with
life. We repaired at once to the Senate
Chamber. The vice president was perch
ed up on high while Senator Vilas pre
sumably spokefor the United States pro
tection of the Nicaraguan canal. We ex
pected to find all the desks occupied with
attentive listeners, and were dismayed to
learn that many prominent speeches
have a comparatively small hearing. The
most dignified body is the (Supreme
Court. The robed justices sit In front of
a raised gallery, supported by Ionic col
umns, the chief justice being in the cen
ter. On the floor are desks for the conn
cil. The case of the Union Pacific road
was being presented with gravity becom
ing the occasion. The Hall of Repre
sentatives, so full of buzz and stir, seem
ed like another life in spite of the awe
inspiring mace and the dignity of the
Sergeant-at-arms. Speaker Keed, a mag
nificently imposing man, read a resolu
tion favoring a scheme to promote the
commerce of the United States and Can
ada by means of a canal, in tones loud
enough to be heard up to the state cf
Maine, but each representative bustled as
if he had the entire responsibility
of all govermental affairs upon
his shoulders and to attend to
at that particular moment ot time.
the pages hied hither and thither, and
there was as much noiee as in a mission
Sunday school. How any business ia
ever properly transacted, In the midst
of so much disorder, ia unintelligible to
-the unltiated.
ot the "whiBpering gallery" where the
softest whisper can be distinctly heard
at a distance of fifty feet. The columns '
of the Senate chamber are topped wib
Latrobes' tobacco capitals. At the foot
of the east stairway are the cornstalk
columns. These have been jocosely
called the American order of architec
ture. I consider, Mr Editor, that it is
every American's duty to go to Wash
ington and study the Capitol. The build
ing is replete with historical paintings,
frescoes, carving, bronzes and statuary,
and nail down the floor to be in readi
ness." And just here, Mr Editor, our time
was up, and so much mofe to be seen.
We reluctantly hurried to the train. We
had been told that a week would be re
quired to see Washington. We are sure
that
A SEASON WOULD BE TOO SHOKT.
We endeavored to work systematically
and see all we could in the secular day
and a half which was ours. We noted
the buildings that we had not time to
while the wilderness of departmental enter) a8 the Court House, the Postofflce
rooms is both imposing and confusing, department, Ford's theatre, now the
It is satisfying to our pride to know that Lincoln Museum, and others. We were
for majesty, elegant symmetry and adap- charmed with the wide and ample
tedness to Its purpose, the capital build- beauty of the city and its perfect pav
ing is unsurpassed by that of any na inj9. We hope there will be, if there is
tion. It was getting late so we took a not already, a suitable statue erected to
ride around by the White House and out t .'infant, who laid out uDon so eenerous
Connecticut avenue, where we could a plan our National capital. Our glimpse
see the groups of carriages and of darkey life, especially about the
the pretty ladies who were at- trrp&t market, was amusing. We were
tending the afternoon receptions, nained to see so many white negroes
A ride past the Zoo and out to Cherry with pretty faces and gentle manners.
Chase, completed the day. On Tuesday The negro seems to be desirous to show
morning we went directly to the Con- his equality ; especially upon street cars,
gressional building. I often wondered where he will squeeze himself in between
why my friends never attempted to de- ladies who take it mildly, as if there is
scribe it to me. As we entered the cep- no help for it. It seemed to us a para
tral marble hall and there burst upon dise for elderly people. In the depart-
us the inflnate detail of carved and mo- ment, a certain honor is attached to
sale work,Illumined with artistic touches those who ave been many years in
of gilded splendor, it was apparent at their positions. We noticed,!too,a prom
once that all description would be futile, inence given to the older men in the
In the ceiing, in finest mosaic, amidst a churches.
most graceful tracery of leaf and flower I am sure, Mr Editor you will see that
are the names of nearly every one who j ain jn i0ve with Wabhington and am
has done something significant for the 80rry I am on the train rushing for New
world, as if the "white stone" bearing England. The climate is an attraction.
the "new name" had been anticipated. we feel very comfortable however. We
The tympanums are filled with exquis- know we ought to have gone, every one
ite frescoes of the Muses, and represen- told us so, and we see now how much
tations of Progress painted in colors of WP would have lost if we had staid at
exquisite delicacy. We read on a mural home and plodded for our daily bread-
block, written in mosaic, this sentence, with the wish that all the readers of
lOn the bleak Atlantic coast, shall the xhe Bee may visit our Capital, I am
geuius of Athenian art liye again ?" The Li. aincerelv. ("H. ft. Munson.
myriads of reproductions in ceiling, and
wall and floor, give an emphatic answer.
The majestic reading room with its col
umns of etherial pink and yellow marbles
DEATW00D OH TUBERCULOSIS.
Dear Friends : You all know that this
fatal disease, tuberculosis, has during
the last few months created a great deal
tolb nd feelinflr. It is only within
well provisioned and reasonable, a quiet
place to spend the Sabbath. We awoke lata time is thus placed In the presence present.
th nnxt mnrnlni? to find the dav verv I nf the Treasurer, the Secretary and the
rainy, but we set forth to go to church Comptroller of the Currency, who con- scription. Fifty thousand books are co!-
.reform,! ourselves at Vernon Place .tltnta the destruction committee. The leciea m xub
t. af, to. ..i.L.., kI ia Ith water which ness attaches to this room tor here the
ftl MLHUmBh VUU1VU MUUVHi ivi ivv i jiuiu UCLVUiQD uiiavu vr v -
is severely simple, but fervent. After j binds it together so that it Is rolled out original paper of the Declaration of In
the silent prayer that closes tbe order of I into bookbinder's board, or made into I dependence is sealed in a steel safe. It
worship, a number of people approached souvenirs. The bond vault of the j geem8 that Jn 1818 it waB iDtrasted to B.
us and greeted us very cordially, asking treasury is Jshown to visitors. The
us of it we knew where we crossed the Clerk holds up a package worth
lino. Tn th Afternoon we attended the ftl 000.000. which be allows us to touch
beautiful Metropolitan Methodist through the grating. No. 2, besides half Pess that caused the signatures
church, where Gen Grant attended. We 1 as much Bilver, holds 3,000,000 Jn gol!to fade and nearly destroyed the entire
G. Tyler, a teacher of penmanship, to
make a fac-simile. He subjected it to
WE WERE HUSHED TO SILENCE IN THE
Rotunda, as we gazed up at the beauti
ful ceiling, representing tbe Apotheosis'
of Washington, painted in soft, dlapan
ous colors. Statuary Hall pleased us
beyond any part of tbe Capitol. The
circle of columns made of maible taken
from beneath the Potomac river, as the
guide said, is unique and presents some
grotesque faces as one looks at them.
We met a delightfully social young lady
from South Carolina, who was spending
her 'second season In Washington with
her father. She had studied the
"points" ot Capitol, and amused us by
awakening sundry echoes, from behind
pillars from stones in the floor and mak
ing voices come out of tbe historic clock,
besides the well known mystery
1 y :
SEEMS LIKE A VISION OF THE CITY,
one of whose foundations is onyx. High
up in the dome above the lantern is a
gilded finial representing the Torch of
Science ever burning. The exquisite
representation of Science ana the effect
of the torch, like the blaze of a ruby,
will ever be one of the most enchanting
of memories. The building will hold
4,500.000 books, 2 000 000 more than the
largest existing library in Paris. There
is a map room, and a space devoted to
graphic art. It requires no Imagination
to belieye that the foliations of leaves,
the flutter of daintiest petals, the deli
cacy of myriad feathers, and the gilding
of gold dust, have been wind-tossed and
arranged by fairies in easy grace and
suddenly transmitted into stone.
We hastened through the botanical recent years that the medical and yeter
I . ... . . A. - J
gardens, the Medical Museum with its inary profession nave come vu rcKiu
horrible revelation of human suff erimr,' milk as an Important Item In the etiology
but showing the means of relief, and the of this disease. Dr Sternberg says
fisheries. The National Museum again more common mode of infection, es
detained us. ft was very refresing to peclally In children, is probably by way
sit beside a fountain surrounded by of intestinal glands from ingestion of
palms and study the model of the beau- milk from tuberculosis cows. Infection
tiful Statue of Freedom on the summit from this source has been proved and
of the Capitol. We took our lunch here the "Bacilli" found in milk by such
that we might nave time to examine the careful experimenters as Dr Bollinger m
relics, the symbols of the religions and Germany ; also by Dr Ernst in Boston
races, and only left because of limited This revelation of Bacilli of tubercul
time: We went over and examined the osis in the milk of cows is of recent
avatam for keeDlnir records in the Pen- dates. Formerly when the disease was
sion Bureau. "This is the hall where considered purely hereditary. It was
the Inauguration ball will take place," visitation ot God when "Bacilli Tuber
we said to an old soldier J "Yes," he ans- cle" was discovered and the diagnostic
. ni.,, - t,,nn.a fternnt tuberculin. Now since we can
demonstrate that one source of danger
is in tuberculosis cows, it is self evi
dent that this source of contagion
should be stamped out by destroying
those cows that tbe tuberculin test show
are contaminated.
Dr Shakespeare of Philadelphia states
that fully one-fifth of all the deaths of
infants and children feeding on ordinary
milk are due to tuberculosis, commenc
ing in some part of the digestive track.
Dr Hamaker of Meadville, Pa., states
that since tuberculous cows have been
eliminated from the herds supplying the
city with milk there is a great deal less
disturbance of the digestion of children
than formerly.
A great many farmers and cattle
dealers during the last year or two have
been condemning this tuberculosis law,
which they ought not to do for the State
has only wished to lend a helping hand
to the farmers in their struggle for
freedom from this evil. Some of the
farmers bave attained .a correct under
standing of this disease, and have been
willing to make a little sacrifice in order
to win greater success. And when we
too to think of it we should not think
more of our cows than we do ol our
own flesh and blood. Should you see
some of your dear friends die with con-
umption you will feel very different in
regard to this disease. Therefore my
friends think of this matter seriously
and act wisely. Dr F. G. Atwood,
Minortown, Conn.
THE BRIDGEPORT SICSIC STORE.
The largest assortment of sheet music
music folios and instruction books in the
state can be found at 63 Fairfield avenue,
Bridgeport. They sell the best music for
10 cents a copy. There you wlU also
find all kinds of musical Instruments at
the lowest prices. They frame pictures
to order and carry an immense stock of
framed and unframed pictures of all
kinds. They buy, sell and exchange sec
ond hand school books and carry a fine
line of blank books and stationery. They
sell day books and ledgers containing 600
pages for the small sum of SI. If you
wish any visiting cards they will furnish
an engraved plate with 50 cards for fl.
If you have a plate they will furnish and
print 50 cards for 50c. Work and stock
guaranteed first class, and all The Bee's
readers are invited to call and examine
samples. Wedding invitations, announce
ments on cards, etc., can be ordered of
The Northrop Publishing Co., 63 Fair
field avenue, Bridgeport, at prices that
will surprise you. '
town, S. C. Bull, Sandy Hook, W.
Hurd, Stepney Depot.
N.
Den't allow the lungs to be impaired
by the continuous irritation of a cough.
It is easier to prevent consumption itua
to cure it. Oue minute cough cure taken
early will ward ofl any fatal lung trouble.
E. F. Hawley, Newtown; S. C. Buli,
Sandy Hook; A. B. Blakeman, Botsford;
B. Hawley & Co., Stepney.
Spring humors, eruptions, hives, boils,
pimples, sores, are perfectly and per
manently cured by Hoou's sarsaparilla.
the best spring medicine ana one true-
blood purifier.
Torturing, itching, scaly skin erup
tions, burns and scalds are soothed at
once and promptly healed by DeWitt's
wiich hazel salve, tbe best known cure
for piles. E. F. Hawley, Newtown; S.
C. Bull, Sandy Hook; A. B. Blakeman,
Botsford; B. Hawley &. Co., Stepney.
Hood's pills act easily
on the liver and bowels,
ache.
and promptly
Cure sick hes.d-
It is surprising what a "we bit of a
thing" can accomplish. Sick headache,
constipation, dyspepsia, sour stomach,
dizziness, are quickly banished by
DeWitt's little early risers. . Safe pill.
Best pill. E. F. Hawley, Newtown; S.
C. Bull, Sandy Hook; A. B. Bake man,
Botsford ; B. Hawley & Co., Stepney.
The base of Ayer's hair vigor is a re
fined and delicate fluid, which does not
soil or become rancid by exposure to the
air and which is as perfect a substitute
for tbe oil supplied by nature in youth
and health, ai modern chemistry can
produce.
They are so small that tbe most aensi-
! tive person takes them, they are so ef
fective that the most obstinate cases ot
constipation, headache and torpid liver
yield to them. That U why DeWitt's
little early risers are known as the
famous little pills. E. F. Hawley, New
town ; S. C. Bull, Sandy Hook ; A. B.
Blakeman, Botsford ; B. Hawley & Co.,
Stepney.
'''Success Is the reward of merit" not
ot assumption. Popular appreciation is
what tells in the long run. For fifty
years, people bave been using Ayer's
sarsaparilla, and to day it Is tbe blood
purifier most in favor with the public.
Ayer's sarsaparilla cures.
DANGERS OF THE GRIP.
The greatest daDger from LaGrlppe is
of its resulting in pneumonia. If rea
sonable care is used, however, and
Chamberlain's cough remedy taken, all
danger will be avoided. Among the
tens of thousands who. have used this
remedy for lagnppe, we have yet to
learn ot a single case haying resulted in
pneumonia, which shows conclusively
that this remedy is a certain preventive
of that dread disease. It will effect a
permanent cure in less time than any
other treatment.' The 25 and 50 cent
sizes for sale 'by E. F. Hawley, New-
Many cases of "Grippe" bave lately
been cared by Ooe Minute cough cure.
This preparation seems especially adapted
to the cure of this disease. It acts quick
ly thus preventing serious complications
and bad effects in which this disease
often leaves the patient. E. F. Hawley
Newtown; S. C. Bull, Sandy Hook; A.
B. Blakeman, Botsford; B. Hawley &
Co-, Stepney.
" A person is prematurely old when
Saltiness occurs before tbe forty-fifth
year. - Use Hall's hair renewer to keep
the scalp healthy and prevent baldness.
Wholesalers and Retailers,
86 WALL STBSET, BBLDGEPOET, CONN. "
Try A Bottle of Their COUGH SYRUP'" rine an(5 Tar
" For Coughs and Colds, 25c a Bottle.
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