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The labor standard. (Hartford, Conn.) 1908-192?, January 01, 1910, Image 10

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051523/1910-01-01/ed-1/seq-10/

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THE LA150K STANDARD, JANUARY, 1910.
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
UNION
CIGARS
HOMEMADE SPRAYER.
Serviceable Outfit That Can Be Estily
and Cheaply Made.
The spray pump herewith described
cost $11, writes a correspondent of
the Scientific American. Any ordinary
workman who is handy with tools
could put the sprayer together in a
day. It was assembled from the fol
lowing: A riding cultivator frame,
pole and wheels (old scrap iron), a
good coal oil barrel (price $1), a three
scwttm
AMERICAN HX
Ik
jT
sensitivity to red is suppressed. As
soon as his attention is called to a red
object his eye Immediately responds,
and he sees the object as it really is.
In other words, the temporary "red
blindness" disappears immediately
when he is informed that red rays are
present in the light which strikes his
eye. Scientific American.
REFRIGERATOR IN WELL
Efficient Cooling Apparatus Where Ice
Is Lacking.
A country place is not always situat
ed where ice can be procured during
the summer months, and a substitute
refrigerator must be provided. A resi
dent of a country place devised a cool
ing apparatus which he placed in his
well.
The device consisted of a box about
one foot square made of boards hav
ing a length to reach almost to the
water level a"d to extend about four
feet above tU,: platform of the well.
A short box chaining several shelves
is made to d easily into the long
one, similar a dumb waiter. This
smaller box & lowered and raised
ARRANGEMENT OF AGITATOR.
inch cylinder cast iron force pump
($6), a plain brastwo inch cylinder
and valve ($2), a piece of good three
quarter inch hose and a spraying noz
zle ($2); total cost, $11. After putting
the above material together I was able
to get easily a pressure of 150 pounds
per square inch, a very necessary pre
requisite to apply the bordeaux mix
ture with the right force.
Directions for assembling are as fol
lows: Take the valves out of the cyl
inder of any cast iron force pump.
Replace these valves with the plain
brass two inch cylinder and valves.
Cut off with a hack saw the two inch
cylinder to the right length to just
fill the cast cylinder. Fill in the space
between cast cylinder and brass cylin
der with plaster or cement, being sure
that the brass cylinder is in the exact
center of the cast cylinder. Attach
the plunger vlve of brass cylinder to
the plunger i&ton of the force pump
and couple up the piston to the handle
of the pump so as to get a full stroke.
As only a small amount of liquid is
needed in spraying, the object of this
reduction of cylinder is to lessen the
ilow and increase the pressure. The
reduction of three to two halves the
flow and doubles the pressure. Mount
the pump on the barrel and the barrel
on the riding cultivator frame. Make
an agitator as follows: In the barrel,
near the bottom, on the end or head
of the same, hang with a T hinge a
board made of oak 1 by 6 by 2 feet
to swing up and down. Connect the
board with the pump plunger by a
steel rod so that it will swing up and
down with the stroke. The steel rod
should enter the barrel through an
opening made to pour in the liquid.
THE WEM REFRIGERATOR.
with an old fashioned windlass. The
smaller box containing the shelves is
filled with things to be kept cool and
the box then lowered to the bottom of
the long box, or near the water in the
well. The rope holds the box in this
position until the food is wanted,
when a few turns of the crank will
bring the box and its contents to the
top within easy reach from the out
side. Popular Mechanics.
TV AmhTn? Th fciffarTSJkers- International Unn of America.
fllittf (ftafifirt Thrttfefturtewumd Inthii b row md willSHiUa rCTOTlJ
m-ihop COOUttflSON.oc FILTHY IHftMENl-HOUSE VWRKMANSHU'- xIl!owra,o",
UsMCioits lo ill am throughout thtworli.
' All MmmihnU upon this Utol wUI b purtlwd am to law.
Jr. fll fttadent,
efAimm'et
"STAMP.
See that the BLUE LABEL is on the Box
WM. MULLER'S CIGARS
I Oc - MZAIRT -1 Oc-
RENO 5
Perfecto and Panetela Shapes.
C. HANDMADE C. E I? l O
Broad Leaf Wrapper ! I VJ W
HAVANA
FILLER
BROADLtAF
WRAPPCR
AD LEY'S
SPECIA-
Lyman R. Bradley-maker
GO TO THE
BIG CIGAR STORE
FOR YOUR
CIGARS, TOBOCCO AND PIPES
FRANK H. CRYGIER
248 Asylum St.
SMOKE "CROWN JEWELS"
Wholesale and Retail.
SMOKE THE
Lilley's 'City Life'
5c CIGARS 5c
B. BROOK, Mfgr.
Telephone 2111
53 MORGAN ST., HARTFORD, CT.
For a Satisfying,
High Grade Smoke
try a
Blue Belle
10 Cent
Cigar
697 Main St.
COX'S
CIGAR
Hartford, Conn.
Hartford Leader
and
Morrocco
5 CENT UNION MADE CIGARS
Try Them
Curious Defect of Vision.
A curious defect in color sense is re
corded by Mr. C. R. Gibson in the
"Transactions of the Royal Philosoph
ical Society of Glasgow." The case in
question is that of Mr. Gibson himself.
His color vision is perfectly normal,
with the exception that at times his
A Waterproof Cement.
Experiments made by the officers of
an English railroad seem to demon
strate that a waterproof cement may
be made from a mixture of cement
and clay. The best results were ob
tained with cement mixed with clay
in proportions of one of clay to seven
of cement and the mixture then used
as the cement in a 1.3 sand mortar.
Blocks of this mortar over eight inches
thick were impermeable. Specimens
six inches thick containing the same
materials, but mixed with 5 per cent
alum solution, were also impermeable
when subjected to a forty pound water
pressure.
Smoke the
Royal Standard
10 CENT CIGAR
MANUFACTURED BY
C. FRANTZ
8 NEW PARK AVE. (Near Park St.)
D. BOGIN
107 Windsor Street, Hartford
T H E
Bronson & Robinson Co.
CIGAR BOX LABELS
CIGAR BOXES
See that this Label is
Imprinted on Your Boxes
EVERYTHING
USED BY
CIGARMAKERS
HARTFORD, CONN.
AT "THE LABOR STANDARD" OFFICE.

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