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The labor standard. (Hartford, Conn.) 1908-192?, January 01, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051523/1910-01-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE LABOU STANDAKD, JANUARY, 1910.
HARTFORD
UT
TIRE BUILDERS
Another Labor Organization Is
Added to the Many in
Hartford.
As a result of the strike at the Hart
ford Rubber Works, over 300 tire build
ers who refused to work under a new
schedule of prices that the company
desired to put into operation, have
formed a union, known as Auto Tire
Builders' Union, No. 12879 An account
of the controversy, as given by both
sides, will be found in another column.
The men were assisted in the formation
of the new organization by Sol Son
theimer and other members of the
Organization Committee of the Hartford
Central Labor Union. Mr. Sontheimer
has been made an honorary member of
e new union.
officers are: Austin R. McCarthy
t; William Kellas, vice-presi-
U T 1 X 1
statements nave ueen maae
i i i 1 1 T
rn 'v. ir i s'liri r. u r, inp
of the rubber company is
ore uie siriKe, were 111-
. A 1 J 1
now niaiving iires ana
1 . A 1
teach a few others who
r j. l j i
it is said, the cutput
practically nothing as
1 1
TIRE BUILDERS ON STRIKE.
(Continued From Page 1.)
forth Ihere is no reduction in wages,
that the employees are going to be
placed on a piece work basis, that
there Is only a readjustment of wages,
that employees will earn more under
the new schedule than formerly. He
says the company wish to point out
that the readjustment of rates referred
to is not a cut, and the principle in
volved has been entirely overlooked.
This principle is the change from an
hourly rate based on prices, however,
that would give an operator at least
the amount he has been earning be
fore with a real incentive to increase
his pay and consequent output. The
change from hourly rates to flat piece
work prices is far different from a cut
in wages, which has not and will not
be made. We, the members of the
Tire Builders' Union, desire to answer
the matter in the press of January 7,
by Mr. Anderson, and respectfully sub
mit the following facte V the public,
in which we believe ysjin show our.
position in '.his mattlvi be jjroper
and right. We wish to be fair and
honest in what we say to the public,
and do not wish to mislead any citi
zen as to the controversy between the
tire builders and the company.
Facts and figures are tiresome, and
so we find Mr. Anderson is laboring
under a misapprehension of not only
the principle but the numerical facts
involved. We may sum up the whole
matter by stating that we are cut 5
cents on 2Ji and 3-inch tires, 10 cents
on 3 14 -inch tires, 15 cents on 5-inch
tires, 30 cents on 4i-inch tires and 22
cents on 5-inch tires for the Dunlop
department. For the Clincher depart--imTt
ye. may deduct a cut of 20 cents
on 2V..vand 3-inch iAs, 17V. cents
1,-inrh tires. 15 c
7 Xui-A-lnch tivegJJr
SHARING PROSPERITY.
k Proceeding Not Relished by Sortie
Employers of Labor.
A short time ago when the employ
ees of the Westinghouse works, near
Pittsburg, were paid many envelopes
were found to contaiu from $100 to
$1,000 more than the amount due ac
cording to the timekeepers' records.
The recipients of this extra money,
about $40,000 all told, were salaried
men in the employ of the company
who suffered loss of time and earnings
when the company encountered hard
times in 1907 and had a serious slump.
More men will be remembered in like
manner during the immediate future.
An official of the company stated that
the firm did not deem it necessary to
publish the names of the employees
being benefited and added:
"The company desires to show Its ap
preciation of the men. They lost mon
ey through no fault of their own or
ours. The plant is large and has been
working double time for some time.
It is only fair that the men who stuck
to the company should benefit in the
great new rush of prosperity."
Records of such transactions and of
such declarations make pleasant read
ing for all people except a few those'
typified by John Kirby of Dayton,
president of the National Association1
of Manufacturers. As Mr. Kirby says;
the "working people depend naturally
for subsistence" upon the "employing
class" and voluntarily to increase "sub
sistence" rations above a point de
manded by law and the requirements
of keeping body and soul together
must be, according to his theory, noth
ing short of criminal. Anyhow, what
buviness has the management of a
great big employing concern like .the
Wstinghouse to prove by the "money
talks" . method that it tries to do the
vqiIi .i rjn for those who help
eVN? renn
Women Who WorV.
Hie re are (1.000.000 waee nrnintr we-
"
n in the United Suites, working not
r for less wages than men in the
ie induslries, but very frequently
work longer hours smd under less
sfactory sanitary conditions than
i. Stal istics of the bureau of la
show that, the percentage of wo
l workers is steadily growing, and
; is attributed to the increase in
t of living, which is a permanent
ditiou, as well as to the growth of
city population, women in cities
ng deprived of the opportunity to
lniry, garden and other congenial
lv. which her country sister enjoys,
-therefore forced, where she must
maintain herself or the family, to
up work that in the majority of
brings her into direct competi-
'th men, to the disadvantage of
ings Library Sent to Home.
brary left by the late Amos J.
gs K; been forwarded to the
Winters' home by his widow.
,s done in conformance to a
ade by the deceased printer,
congressman. The books
a source of great benefit
nt to the residents of the
rmiug a link in the mem-
mst.
Mr. Cunmiiugs' au-
each book, written in
t illness in anticipation
sent to the home. This
library will be a valu
when the new struc
d. the Order.
asked the waiter of
"on.
black coffee," was
ont in the order to
k "One in the dark-
is' -
i m
1 - n ft
At Present
You can get a
Suit or Overcoat
Made by Union Tailors, and
Made to Your Measure, for
$15 to $18
That has a $25.00 value.
Every Garment Bears the
Union Label.
L
I llll
UNION-MADE CLOTHING
1 4 State St.
(ONE FLIGHT UP)
J
LET US MEND 'EM
WE'LL DO IT WELL
liaif'
JOSEPH C. D'VITO
293 Franklin Avenue
(Near Leo Skating Rink)
(15 Years Service with W. G Simmons Co.)
WE PUT HEW LIFE IN OLD SHOES,
Rubber Footwear Repaired.
A Full Line of MEN'S, WOMEN'S and
CHILDREN'S SHOES and RUBBERS.
Work Called For and Delivered.
TELEPHONE 2504-6.
We're Ready
To make that Suit you have defer
red ordering so long.
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
TO YOUR MEASURE.
THE WOOLEN WORKERS
835 Main St., Hartford.
R. P. Grant, Jr., Manager.
Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed
and Repaired by
gharley
THE
TAILOR
59 Maple Avenue.
(Nar Retreat Ave.)
HERMAN
iND'EM
T WELL
hi y
u
rAsn vim
p

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