OCR Interpretation


The labor standard. (Hartford, Conn.) 1908-192?, January 01, 1910, Image 6

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92051523/1910-01-01/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

1
THE LABOR STANDARD, JANUARY, 1010.
ANBURY i: L, II
IN FRONT RANK
Extends Hearty Co-Operation
in Upbuilding of " The
Labor Standard."
Tlio following communications are
self-explanatory and the co-operation
greatly appreciated by the promotorsol
The Laisok Standard.
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
TREASURER. Dan bury, Conn., Nov. 1, 1909.
It. E. Pyne, Mgr.
The Lahor Standard.
Dear Sir
I enclose copy of communication that
I have mailed to the Affiliated Unions
to be presented at their regular meet
ings which are to be held during this
month, also a list of the secretaries
with their addresses so you can mail a
copy of The Standard at your earliest
convenience to the secretary of each
Union.
Yours fraternally,
E. Daniels, Secy.
CENTRAL LABOR UNION OF
DANBURY AND VICINITY.
Office of Secretary-Treasurer,
136 South Street.
Danbury, Conn., Nov. 1, 1909.
To the OP.icers and Members of the
Affiliated Unions :
Greeting : At the last regular meet-
E. Pyne, a member of the Typograph
ical Union, also a delegate of the Cen
tral Body at Hartford, attended the
meeting for the purpose of obtaining
the assistance of members of Organized
Labor to endorse the publication of The
Labor Standard of Hartford. Said
paper is owned and controlled by mem
bers of Organized Labor and has been
published for over a year and is now
considered an established Labor journal.
The founders of said paper will, at all
times, fearlessly advocate the cause of
t lie workingraan and. uphold the princi
ples and justice of their cause. It is
now issued monthly and mailed to sub
scribers at 50c. a year.
The managers of The Labor Stand
ard, having now obtained a foothold,
are endeavoring to increase the circu
lation of the paper throughout the
state, and have already received the
endorsement of the Connecticut Feder
ation of Labor, Central Bodies, and
Local Unions generally.
As the circulation increases, and the
interest taken creates the demand, it
will be issued weekly There will be a
correspondent selected in each city
where a Central Body is located for the
transmission of authentic Labor news.
The manager of The Labor Standard
will mail a copy to the secretaries of
the Affiliated Unions for inspection and
approval of their members.
The wage-earners have long desired
and keenly felt the necessity of obtain
ing a paper that would advocate and
promote their cause in this community.
Therefore it was unanimously
VOTED, That we endorse The Labor
Standard, published at Hartford, and
that the Secretary be instructed to
notify the Affiliated Unions of said
endorsement by the Central Body; also
to request that each Union subscribe
$Wrl Cr f ffe 1 ' -'
REVOLUTIONARY HOUSE Gen. Taylor's Headquarters DANBURY, CT.
for a number of copies for the benefit of
their members, which will be mailed to
their address from the office of publica
tion. Hoping your members will take due
consideration on this matter, and that
favorable action maybe taken, I remain,
Yours fraternally,
E. Daniels, Secy.
"THE TELLER" CHANGES HANDS.
The January number of "The Tell
er" has just been issued under new
management, and will hereafter be
published monthly from No. 37 Wall
street by The Teller Publishing Com
pany. This handy little reference
book, which contains up-to-date rail
road time tables, steamship sailings,
locations of all private and public
buildings in New York City, hotels,
clubs, theatres, banks, and much other
useful information, has been made
more replete than ever.
JUST DON'T.
Do you feel you'd like to quit? Don't!
Get to feelin you don't fit? Don't!
Do you want to yell "All in"?
'Cause your wind's a little thin
And you think you'll never win?
Don't!
There's a kick you want to make?
Don't!
There's a head you want to break?
Don't!
Do you feel you want to whine
Like a genuine canine
And send blue streaks down the line?
Well, Don't!
When you see a chance to duck, don't!
When you want to chuck your luck,
don't!
Keep right on without a stop
And you'll sure show up on top,
If, just when you want to flop,
You Don't.
C. L. Armstrong in Houston Chronicle.
SOUVENIRS OF THE QEAT CELEBRATION.
BADGES MADE
IN
ENGLAND
POST CARDS
MADE
IN GERMANY
LABORERS MADE IN ITALY
FIRE WORKS MADE IN CHINA.
PRETTY GIRLS
MADE
IN NORWICH
POLITICIANS MADE IN H
FAC-SIMILE OF SOUVENIR POST CARD ISSUED AFTER NORWICH
CELEBRATION IN JULY, 1909.
MTK IBeer That's rar&k"
Nothing can be more healthful and refreshing: than a glass of pure, sparkling
"PALLIDA" LAGER OR "ALPHA" ALE
These Beers are scientifically brewed by skilled brewers and are
guaranteed to equal any Beer made in the United States. ''The
Beer That's Drank" can be found on draught in the leading Cafes
and is also finely bottled for table use.
THE HELLMANM BREWING CO.
BREWERS OF LAGER BEER, ALES AND PORTER
WATER B VR Y - - CONN.
ADMINISTERING MEDICINE.
How to Make Children Realize That
They Must Swallow It.
Giving medicine to children is one
of the most difficult problems that
young mothers have to cope with, for
some little ones have such a horror of
a dose that they work themselves into
a condition of nervous illness before
the medicine gets into their stomachs,
and so it frequently nauseates them,
thus making successive doses harder
to give.
There is no question but that if a
child shows a disposition to rebel
against swallowing medicine the men
tal tussle must be gone through with
and settled first. That is, there is no
use in trying to give the dose while
administering admonitions. The lit
tle one's stomach must be quiet, and
this cannot be if he is in tears or is
screaming.
So when the child refuses it is es
sential to put the medicine aside and
to make him understand that the cure
must be takeu. He must not for au
instant be permitted to think that he
has gained his point and need not
take it. To the contrary, he is given
to understand that lie is obliged to and
that the sooner he is quiet the better.
Precisely how this is to be accomplish
ed depends upon individual tempera
ment and the way each parent handles
the babe. Sometimes when the argu
ment Is prolonged a spanking may be
required. One small girl had three
doses of this maternal discipline be
fore she became quiet and swallowed
her medicine. There was never any
trouble with her afterward, for she
had been made to accept the fact that
medicine when it was brought her
was to be taken and to fuss only made
the condition worse. Coaxing works
with some little ones; with others pun
ishment is required. Each parent
must decide this for herself.
During the time that this matter of
will contest is in progress tlke nwt- )
cine is not administered. When the
child has been conquered he must be
given a few minutes to quiet sobs or
temper, and then the dose must be
given.
If the sick child thinks' he cannot
swallow medicine, no matter how
much he may want to, he must be
broken of this idea. He is apt to
change his idea rather quickly, too,
if he finds that each time he ejects
the medicine a fresh dose is given.
It takes a clever child only a few
moments to realize that he is simply
prolonging the agony.
The notion some have that they can
not swallow pills is likely to be im
agination, which it is not always well
to give in to. If there is a reason for
paying heed to it an easy way of ob
viating it is to give liquid instead,
for there are few prescriptions that
cannot be administered in this form.
The old way of giving pills In jelly
does not commend Itself to present
ideas. The sweet, combined with
medicine, is apt to upset the stomach,
causing nausea.
To deceive a child about medicine
and tell him it is good is a great mis
take. This may work once, but he
will be suspicious ever after. He
should be made to understand that
medicine is not a joke, but that it is
less disagreeable than to be ill, and
that whether he wishes it or not he
must take it.
Canada's New Labor Bill.
A bill has been introduced in the Ca
nadian parliament providing for an
eight hour workday and also calling
for a mimimum rate of 25 cents an
hour. The act does not apply to do
mestic or farm laborers or when per
sons employed are members of the em
ployer's family. A provision annuls
any agreement for a lower rate be
tween the employee and employer.
The act is attracting unusual attention
throughout the Dominion.

xml | txt