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Connecticut workman. (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1901-190?, October 24, 1901, Image 8

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8
STEEL JSTRIKE.
President Gornpers' An
swer to Mr. Shaffer's
Accusations
A REVIEW 01
TriE SITUATION.
Hr. Gompsrs Proves Correspjn
ence Between Leaders Exonerates
Him. Something the Public
Knew Nothing About.
By Samuel Gornpers,
President American Federation of
Labor.
To the Trade Unionists of America:
It has always been my purpose to
keep the colunins of the American Fed
erationist free from any controversial
matter between oi ganizations and in
dividuals; particularly those organiza
tions affiliated with the American Fed
eration of Labor. But inasmuch as
Mr. T. J. Shaffer, President of the
Amalgamated Association of Iron and
Steel Workers, has seen fit to attack
the .American Federation of Labor,
I.Ir. John; Mitchell, President of the
United Mine Workers of America (vice
President of the American Federation
of Labor), and myself r and these at
tacks have been published by him in
an official circular as well as in the
public press; the interests of the la
bor movement demand-that full and
comprehensive presentation of the
facts should now be made.
I shall show that there is not one
scintilla of truth in. .Mr. Shaffer's ac
i cusations and insinuations against the
""Ameiican Federation of Labor, Presi
dent Mitchell and myself.
Further, I propose to lay before the
workers the unwritten history of the
means by which the strike was brought
about, it3 management, and its termin
ation upon conditions much less favor
able than could have been secured by
the efforts of my colleagues and my
self., Mr. Shaffer says that he ESPECI
ALLY RELIED UPON THE AMERI
CAN FEDERATION OF LABOR FOR
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. I assert
that HE NEVER ASKED FOR ANY.
During the conference on August b
and i, at Pitts auig, between Piiduu
Shaffer, Secretary Williams, and otii- r
membeis of the Executive Boa:d oi. th.v
Amalgamated Association, tuui Sec.
tary Morrison, of tue Ain&ricau ii del
ation of-'LaLor, and myself, i atu-d
v President Shadier whether iia reqii.ixu
any financial assistance trom .r.t
American-. .edeiaU'oaof i.!ai:-Oi .Ay-
minding hint that if'.ha did. it vould.
be necessary, as he'; knew, for h.in to
mate the formal appiicat.cn hs re
quired by our constitution; arid thai
I would submit such application o
the Executive Council by mail; cr, .i
he deemed it more' advisable, by tele
graph. NO REQUEST, EITII2R W'tiTT'.JS;.
TELEGRAPHIC, CR VERBAL, WAS
EVER RECEIVED DURING TiiE
STRTKE AT THE OFFICE OF THE
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LA
BOR FROM MR. SHAFFER, CR
FROM ANY OTHER REFRESENTA
. TIVE OF TIx .v. . o AS
SOCIATION, ASKING FOR FINAN
CIAL ASSISTANCE.
THE MORGAN INTER VIEW.
Mr. Shaffer says he arranged a meet
ing between Mr. Morgan and myself;
that Mr. Morgan gave up his vacation,
waited for me, and I failed to appear;
that I have not since explained why I
neglected the interests of the Amalga
mated Association. I might enter into
a long discussion of this assertion; but.
an answer can be best summarized in
these words:
MR. SHAFFER SAYS THAT
WHICH IS ABSOLUTELY UNTRUE,
AND HE KNOWS IT.
THE TERMS WTE SECURED. .
. :::w York, Sept. 4, :S0L.
Theodore F. Shaffer, Pittsburg, Pa.:
We L;.ve li.z.0. an extended conference
with Messrs. Schwab, Cory, Preston.
Graham and McMu.tr. of the U. S.
Steel Corporation, ad presented your
proposition for the sctSiem-nt of 'r.t
present strike. "It was rejected. We
can, however, secure settlement on the
following basis: The signinc of the
agreement for all mills which were
union last year except Old Meadow,
Saltsburg, Hyde Parle, Crescent, Iron
dale, Chester, Cambridge, Star and
Monessen. There will be no discrim
ination against the re-empioyment of
anyone by the company by reason of
his connection with the strike, and
no questions will4 be asked as to the
membership of any man in any union.
We are convinced that these are the
best conditions which can be secured
as a result of this strike; that it is the
last offer for an agreement which the
company will entertain, and that we
must be in a position to accept three
conditions to-day, or all negotiations
will be off. From the facts demonstrat
. ed to is of the present situation of the
strike that is, the mills already in
operation and several others which
will bo in operation within a day or
two we are strongly of the opinion
that the interest of your trade and
your organization demands that those
terms be accepted. We unqualifiedly
recommend their approval by you, and
at ence.
JOHN MITCHELL.
SAMUEL GOMPERS.
FRANK SARGENT,
J. W. JENKS.
HENRY WHITE.
RALFH M. EASLEY.
mi i iiimii imirwiTr iniiiiimmTiimniiiiiiii m n i mi "i i mm irfy
TIME FRITTERED AWAY.
New York, Sept. 4, 1901.
riiecdoro F. Shaffer, Pittsburg:
You should submit proposition to
.our Executive Board by wire imme
diately and have tliem wire answers
o ye'i nt Victoria Hotel, New York,
.nrt would advise you to be here in
,;:3ii
important.
JOHN MITCHELL.
SAMUtL GOMPEIcS.
RALPH M. EA3LEY.
Gr why did he not submit the prop
osition to the members of his Execu
ive Board who were then located at
Pittsburg? I rememoer distinctly that
wh'.n the arbitration proposition of his
friend, Mr. John Stevenson, was under
consideration, the members of the Ex
ecutive or Advisory Board, located at
Pittsburg, were those who decided the
question, and Mr. Shaffer then assured
me that the Executive Board, located
at Pittsburg, had been given full power
to settle the strike upon any terms
which their judgment might approve.
WHY COME TO NEW YORK?
Mr. Shaffer asks in his circular, wij
did we want him to go alone to New
ork, and get an open vote of his
Executive Board? To this I answer,
that the purpose of our telegram of
September 4, quoted above, was that
Mr. Shaffer should telegraph the prep
osition , to his Executive Board, if it
,v as necessary to consult the members
of that Board who were not at Pitts
burg, and that to expedite the result
;.hey might telegraph their answers to
him to New York. We thought it ad
visable for him to come to New York,
there to receive the votes, not the
open votes," but the telegraphic
votes of his Executive Board. It re
quires a peculiar state of mind to con
strue the language we employed in
he above telegram to make it app3ar
chat we wanted the members of his
Executive Board to send him an "open
vote."
The other reasons we had in advising
Mr. Shaffer to come to New York
were:
First; that he might have the oppor
tunity of going over the United States
Steel Company's books, and satisfying
"rimself, if there was any satisfaction
m it, as to the truth or falsity of their
.laims as to the output that was go-
.ng on in their mills since the strike
jtgan.
'Second; if the agreement was made,
hat he. as the official representative
,Z the Amalgamated Association might
nake the agreement rather than the
gentlemen to whom I have already re
e. red and myself.
Inasmuch as the limit of time expir
ed without any definite answer from
Mr. Shaffer our services could no long
er avail, and we therefore caused our
oitsbut even then indulged in no
wo d derogatory to the Amalgamated
Association or Mr. Shaffer.
It is doubtful if any one, however
.risephisticated, can be persuaded to
. oiieve with Mr. Shaffer that 'because
gnized labor, and particularly tht.se
r.:vjons having agreements with their
irployeis, did not break their coy-
octs and go on strike, insy were
hciti'ore necessarily against the
.malsamated Association. He will
five' to ive better reasons for his
.'iseomfiture than to charge that "oth
r rganiued labor bodies" ? were
against the Amalgamated Association.
Comparison is invited between the
terms which Mess, s. Mitchell, Sargent,'
knks. White, and I secured September
from the United States Steel Com
p .ry for the settlement of the strike,
,nd the terms signed by Mr. Shaffer,
'cptemLer 14.
' CONTRAST THE TWO AGREE
MENTS. TYrms Secured by Us, September 4.
No discrimination against the re
"rnployment of any one by the com
pny by reason of his connection44 with
;he strike, and no question asked as
o the member ship of any man in the
;n!on.
The signing of the agreement for all
nil Is which we- c union, last year, ex
ept OIr Meadow, Saltsburg, Hyde
"'nrlr. Crescent, Irondale, Chester,
Cambridge, Star i-nd Monessen. The
0 ANAL DOVER AND DEMML.3R
MILLS WERE TO BE SIGNED FOR
AS UNION MILLS. -
Shaffer's Agreement, September 14-.
Non-union mills shall be represented
!3 such NO ATTEMPTS MADE TO
ORGANIZE, NO CHARTERS GRANT
ED; old charters retained by men, if
hey desire.
The compary reserves the right to
''.scharge any employe who shall by
Interference, abuse, or constraint pre-'r-.nt
snotlie fvora p-eace-aly follow
ing his vocation, without reference to
connection With labo;- organizations.
CANAL DOVER, DEMMLER, Old
Meadow, Saltsburg, Hyde Park, Cres
cent, Irondale, Chester, Cambridge,
,-tar and Monessen not included as
".mon mills.
Is there another executive officer in
the American labor movement who
,vou!d sign an agreement with a com
p :ny, guaranteeing for three years that
r.o attempt shall be made to organize
nd agreeing to issue no chatters to
men who may even of their own voli
tion waftt to organize?
Following the course of some men
who can not bear the consequences of
their own lack of judgment, Mr. Shaff
er has endeavored to blame others for
the result of his own actions, the cth-
and myself.
Mr. Mitchell was in New York, ar
ranging a conference with the repre
sentatives of the coal companies, and
I was in the same, city attempting to
bring about a settlement, of the con
'rcvarsy between the Typographical
Tr?.ion and the New York Sun, when
Mr. Shaffer's circular reflecting upon
rs was published, and we jointly ad
dressed him the following letter:
Extract from letter.
Having due regard to our duty to
ward the labor movement and the in
terests committed to our cares, we
have no desire to enter into a contro
versy throi.Tgh the newspapers, and
have therefore declined to say any
thing about the matter to the repre
sentatives of the press, who have im-
portuned us to answer. But, repeat
ing that we believe it to be neeessa; y
that your charges and insinuation's
should be substantiated or tefuted, to
that end we submit the following Rep
osition to you:'
First. That a committee of three
meet either in Pittsburg, Washington,
D. C, or New York City, for the pur
pose of hearing and determining the
charges and insinuations you have
made against us. ,
Second. That if the committee find
us guilty of your charges and insinua
tions we will resien from the Pivjsi
dency of the American Federation of
Labor and the Vice-Presidency of the
Cigarmakers International Union;
from the Presidency of the United
Mine Workers of America and from
the Second Vice-Presidency of the
American Federation of Labor.
Third. That the committee shall
consist of three members of organzed
labor, to be selected by you from the
lists herein submitted.
To this letter no reply up to this
date of this writing, September 30, has
been received.
WHAT SHAFFER REALLY
WANTED.
The sum total of what Mr. Shaffer
wanted was this: He asked that I
call a meeting, of the Executive Offi
cers of all the national and interna
tional unions of the country, for the
purpose of considering ways and
means to help the steel strike, the
same, he said, as -was called in 1897,
in Wheeling, W. Va., to aid the United
Mine Workers of , America in their con
test in the bituminous coal regions.
This, I stated to him, I would not do,
and gave him my reasons.
If a conference was called, as Mr.
Shaffer requested, it would have been
looked upon by every thinking man
and narticularly the directors of- the
United States Steel Company, as the
first evidence of the Amalgamated As
sociations' weakness. . i
Such a conference would undoubted
ly create a stir of interest while it was
being held. After the adjournment,
however, a re-action would have set
in that, beyond doubt, would lave.
proven disastrous to the strike, and
also to the Amalgamated Association,
for it could not have fulfilled Mr.
Shaffer's expectations. '
I FELT CONFIDENT THAT THE
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE
TRADE UNIONS OF AMERICA
OUGHT NOT AND WOULD NOT VIO
LATE OR BREAK THEIR ' CON
TRACTS OR AGREEMENTS WITH
THEIR EMPLOYERS THROUGHOUT
THE COUNTRY. HENCE THERE
VCULD NOT AND OUGHT NOT TO
3SA WIDE-SPREAD SYMPATHET
IC STRIKE. ' . ' .
Prior tc discussing this matter with
me 'Mr. Shaffer had publicly declared!
that such a conference of officers of
national and international anions
vould be called. That I could not see
ny way clear to comply witb his re
quest forms the quintessence
'tterness and the motive of his
attacks upon me.
WITH THE FLINT GLASS WO
Tr.e members er"?ae
Hlass '.Workers' Union, ii.f
Pa., are voting on a propositi!
cxare cpen two factories or. tJ
States Glass Company. , All thi plants
of this company have been on. thenon
unioa list for a number of years, but
union men are at work in several , of
them. The Doyle and the Arms plant
-nown as Factories A and P. , on the
South Side, were started recently and
idle union men in this , district desire
to secure employment at these works.
One union has sent a requrst to the,
national headquarters that the facto
ries be declared open , to union men.
This request with the indorsement of
the national officers, has been printed
and sent to the different local unions
for a vote. The result will be known
on' Saturday, October 2(5. when the vote
will be counted.
BOOT AND SHOE MAKERS UNION.
-The Boot & Shoe Workers' Nation
al Union has decided to. form a labor
trust, and is now discussing the plans.
To form a labor trust is the easiest
thing the shoemakers can do, the offi
cers of the Boot & Shoe Workers' Na
tional Union assert. 1
There is nothing else for the shoe
makers to do than to form a Shoe
makers' Trust, says the Shoe Workers'
National Union. Local independent or
ganizations are impracticable, and deal
unjustly with manufacturers. -- .
THE NEW YORK SUN.
We wish the union men Jl over
the state to accept this notice that
the New York Sun is unfair, reports
to the contrary notwithstanding. It
is not so long ago that this vile ser
pent sent out literature purporting
to come from the Central Labor
Union that all its differences with its
men had been settled. Such reports
were untrue. Let the rest of the
state pattern after that staunch little
town, Danbury, and it will not be long
before the Sun will set. In explaining
allow us to say that not a Sun is sold
in Danbury. That's the kind of broth
erly love that is worth having.
Typographical Union, No. 6, of New
York City, is untiring in its efforts to
win out in this struggle, and we wish
to congratulate them on their suc
cess, and to assure them that victory
will surely be theirs ere long. Let us
do what we can to help them along
by not reading the unfair and despised
Sun.
JOB PRINTING.
In connection with the WORKMAN
we have established la complete job
printing plant. Everything that leaves
our shoo bears the union label, which
stands for fair wages and good work,
m f
' ' M
trtdiiteti i
We print everything, including Work- j Last May, wLen the new scale of the
ing CArds, Due Cards. Application Int.errjr.tional Machinists' Union went
Blanks, Arrearage Notices, By-Laws into effect the Roeblings signed it. The
and Constitutions, etc., etc.. in fact, ; firm has made no statement of the po
any thing that can be printed. j sition.
Our prices will be found as lowas The men have decided to strike.
consistent with good work. Send -for 1 ' :
prices on your future work. ' Advertise in the WORKMAN.
ECTICUT WORKMAN.
THE RED HOUSE.
Home of the WorkliiKinen'i Club In
London's East End.
The permanent home of the East End
Workingman's ,club and restaurant,
known as the Red House, is about
ready for occupation.
A cheerful red brick building, it gives
a pleasing dash of color to the gray of
the Commercial road.
The Rev. Harry Wilson, vicar of St.
Augustine's, who founded the Red
House, has shown an Express reporter
over it.
In a spacious restaurant on the
ground floor a good dinner will be sup
plied for the reasonable price of six
pence boiled beef, roast mutton' or
steak and kidney pudding, fourpence;
potatoes, a penny, and pastry, a penny;
rice pudding, jam tart, marmalade
turnover, and so on.
Up stairs will be a recreation room
where on ceFtaiu nights the women
workers will play the piano and sing to
the guests. Usually, however, the guests
will organize their own entertainments.
There are a number of cubicles in
tended for weekly boarders and a Bible
room. Attendance at the latter will be
voluntary.
Everything will be scrupulously neat.
A man who has just come off a scaffold
or off the dickey of a van appreciates a
neat table perhaps even more than the
man who has just left a desk.
"My mate and I used to walk a quar
ter of a mile every day " to a certain
shop because we know the tablecloth
would be clean."
So said Mr. Stediuan, the superin
tendent of the Red House, who was a
foreman in a factory for twenty years.
Ho understands w-orkingmen.
"No man is allowed to leave the Red
House hungrj',"- he said. "If he has uo
money. 1 put him in the end box and
give him two doorsteps and a large cup
of tea. If he's genuinely hungry, he
sats It; if not. we know he's a fraud."
The management make a specialty of
sending cooked dinners to people's
homes. This is a boon and a blessing
!n the east end. where a kitchen fire is
a serious item, to say nothing of the
wife having to work.
"Why cook at home," says a bill in
the window, "when you can fetch a
dinner already cooked from 99 Com
mercial road?"
The Red House takes Its name from
the fact that the little Bible room iu
Settle street, Commercial road, con
nected with St. Augustine's, Stepney,
had red blinds to its windows. When
the lamps were lit. these red blindsr
used to send a cheerful glow into the
night that attracted many a homeless
wanderer. From the little Bible room
has developed the Red House.
NEW EL DORADO.
Goltl Kind In a Colorado Town
Creates Great Exciteuicnt.
ueblo, Colo.. Oct. 23. The wildest
itement reigns in Beulah, twenty
southwest ' of here, where rich
J deposits have been found.,' There
is , genuine . and that this ylcm!
about to have a m ning boom .such as
prospectors have bvca pretlictliiir for
several years.
The town of Beulah, consisting of 200
persons, is 'frantic, and every person
strong enough to carry a pick is out in
the hills. Old inhabitants who have
seen booms before and have learned not
to get excited over a false alarm now
are as enthusiastic as any of the new
comers. . '
The strike was made in the following
way: About ten days ago C. Protester,
Who had been prospecting near Iijlah
for several months, discovered :i bv.y
of. rock on the west side of Signal
range that appeared --to carry gold. He
knocked off a piece of the rock and
sent it to a Pueblo smelter. An assay
was returned on last Saturday showing
$730 in gold to the ton. Unable, to re
strain his joy, he told the story before
he went back to the hills. Pursuing his
explorations, he came upon a decom
posed rock which crumbled to dust and
turned white when it was exposed. In
the yellowish white substance was a
dull colored dust that proved to be gold.
The assay on this returned $1G9 to the
ton.
It is estimated that Beulah's popula
tion has been increased to 2,000 or more
since the discovery.
INDIANAPOLIS LAWS.
After a trial lasting more than three
days in Indianapolis, Ind., Saturday,
Edward E. Besette, a member of the
Chicago Typographical Union, No. 16,
was fined $250 and costs in the United
States court for violating the injunc
tion issued by Federal Judge Baker
against the strikers of the W. B. Con
key 'Company at Hammond.
The court declined to receive bond.
In giving his ruling, Judge Baker said
Besette was tried on the theory that
he was a conspirator with the strikers
who violated the injunction.
STRIKE ON BROOKLYN BRIDGE.
Machinists Won't Work More Hours
for Same Pay.
Trenton, N. J., Oct. 26. A strike of
the seventy-five machinists employed
by the John A. Roebling Sons Com
pany threatens to tie up the work on
the new East River Bridge, at New
York for which the Roebling Company
has the contract. Last week the Roeb
lings posted a notice increasing the
working hours in its machine shops
from fifty-four to fifty-nine per week
without increasing pay. The Machin-
j Ists' Union
attempted to secure the
annulment of the order but failed.
I
ADVERTISEMENTS.
A Journal for Trades Union Men.
We will Try to Please You. . .
THE
NBECTICUT WORKMAN
Solicits Your
GLORIOUS
RECORD.
tat the; GigarTttakeffi
Union Accomplished
Last Year .
THE MEMBERSHIP
IS INCREASING.
President Perkins of the Cigar Mak
ers International union made his annu
el report to the membership. A refer
endum vote of the organization recent
ly postponed this year's convention for
three years, and as no report had been
made to the membership since the con
vention In Detroit in 1S0G President
Perkins' briefly summarizes the more
Important events and affairs of the In
ternational union.
Referring to the membership and
wages during the period covered by the
report, he says:
"The table showing the membership
and number of organizations shows
that avo did not lose iu membership
during the stagnation period, and sta
tistics show that we did not suffer to
any extent In the matter cf reductions
of wages. As to numbers, the member
ship practically remained stationary
during the panic period. The growth
in the membership commenced with
the revival of industry and reached its
greatest height during the year 1900.
"Cigar makers to the number of 61,
033 are employed in union towns and
cities. 15.16G find employment in juris
diction places; total. 77.101. Twenty
one thousand and thirty are reported
as hand workmen, 20.072 as mold work
ers, 8,S50 as filler breakers and rollers.
3.&50 as machine workers and 4,250 ap
prentices. .The number of nonunion-cigar
makers, as reported, is 58,583. and
3,239 females are reported as members
of the union.
"The vital statistics are perhaps the
most Instructive and important ever
compiled, showing, as they do. that, de
spite the intense struggle engendered
by the present method of production
and distribution and the tremendous
wear and tear on one's nervous and
physical resources, the average longev
ity of our members has been increased.
The figures show that in ten years the
average length cf life of members of
the union has Increased six years and
that the average length of the lives of
the wives and mothers has Increasr.d
eight years. This remarkable showing
and gratifying result is due chiefly to
two causes first, the improved condi
tion of the members, such as better
wages, improved sanitary condition.
more freedom and better isvinir.
(it
brought alKut solely ihroiifth th:
noes
union; second, the shortening of the
hours of labor. The latter l:a? a direct
bearing upon the i:Ufrf-sriii'.c ta-t tb.
the average length of tin- V.r:- cf the
wives of members h:: increased, which
i can be aecounittl lor by the si-iif-ai:
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Patronage.
Everything Pertaining to Labor.
Our Emblem: the Union Label. .
-M
0 f
fact that the househok
of the wife commene
and ends one hour
further fact that as
tion of the husband
ter wages'and
raothei
withl
Spea1
says: " Ibles ofsTrTSe
statistics ife as complete anv
henslye aV possible, giving a
history of all the trade movew
their results, cost, per cent cf gains
losses and ( where located, and. on
more demonstrate that strikes jre nd
failures. The tables furnish the gratl-i
fying information that trade dispute '
or strikes are growing fewer In number
each year despite the fact that'
membership is Increasiugr and that tl
statistics show that we nave mac!
Substantial galas In wa;rcs. I am pe?A
sr.aded that focic of the difficulties
could be avoided without a strike.; A
wise, level headed committee can da
more with an employer with calm, log
ical argument than can be accomplish
ed with threats and braggadocios
Et:T.:cs should revcr be called until "','
competent committee has exhausted
every effort to bring about a peaceful
settlement. Always be cautious aruX
uevr- overconfident."
Other salient features of the report
are: " : ; "
Unions in good standing Sept. 1. 1S9CV
G7.o. " . " '; '.
Unions in gocd standing Sept. 1, 1901,
414.
New unions orgar.!ed la last fire
yenrs, 11G. .
Membcrsliip. 1S79. 2.729. . V
Membership. 1SS). 17.555.? ; V .
Membership. 1S33. 20.788.
Memiersb:p. 19.'Ju. :r,.!)5Ti.
Number of union labels t:sed by lc,
uniens In last live years. !)lP543-400j,
C.:fh on hand in local treasuries?
00!. 030.37.
Leans outstapding to members.
0U.no. "" "y-
Benefits paid in 1900. ?410.70SOl
Grsud total of benefits paid"
vear.: 2 month?:. ? t 7;'.7.r."0 59.
:
Economy.
Airs. jnugwatei- What do yo
such cheap shirts for? They
most expensive in the end.
all worn out after you have hat
washed half a dozen times.
Mr. Chugwater1 Then they or
me sixty cents for washing.
a big saving. You go on with
canning. Yon can't teach me
about buying shirts. Chicago
Reproving a ' Fellow J
Hoax You're a fine fellow!
Joax What's the matter?
"You've given your wife i
shiliinc bonnet."
"Weil, you don't have to pay
ro; but 1 have got to pay
just like it for my wife." ;
- Dangerous,
She Didn't you say you'd
papa about our engagement co
in the car tonight?
He Yes, dear. I did. but I f
the nerve to. He was standi?
he had a strap in each ham
Statesman.
Lcokf for the Union labelJ
r
1
mor
iV Weak
i

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