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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, January 24, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Established 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1880.
TRADER-JOURNAL
THE WEATHER.
Partly ctordy and cold
er torlght Thursday far.
VOLUME l.-KO. (.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. WEDNESDAY, JAXUAUV 21, 1017,
PKICE, TWO CENTS.
A0STA, CHOSEN BY ALLIES TO RULE GREECE,
v COUSIN OF VICTOR EMMANUEL OF ITALY
T
III BATTLES OF NORTH SEA
REE
SOU G. GEIGER, PROMINENT
MERCHANT, DIES SUDDENLY
EIGHT SHIPS 11
EKD . C0"ES :AT HOSPITAL
AFTER HURRIED PLANS
' FOR OPERATION
SHOCKS
CQMMUrilTY
"MEMBER OF SCHOOL BOARD IS
CALLED AFTER DAY'S ILLNESS
FUNERAL TO BE HELD THURS
DAY AFTERNOON AT 2:30.
Simon C. Geigcr. prominent Ottawa
business man and member of the
Board of Education, died suddenly
last evening at Ryburn Hospital, fol- r
lowing an acute attack of appendici- i
tls Early in the morning Mr. Geiger j G. VV. Chessman, pastor of the Rap
was taken sick and during the day his Bt urch. will officiate Tho bride
,i will be gowned in white tulle over
condition, Instead ot improving, be- whl(e Ba(in E()in lfjr
camo worse, until finally it became of the Kr(Mn wm bridesmaid, and
imperative that he be removed to the j will wear a gown of silved cloth trim
licpltal to undergo a hasty operation, med in lace. Lawrence Kinzer, broth
At 6 o'clock he was taken to the ' ' rlde will act as best man.
., 1 Mis Verna Kinzer, sister of the
hospital and immediate preparations ( .. wn M(,n,klHH()hn.8 WC(,.
wore mado lor the Incision. At 8:3(i tlinK mar,.n
o'clock, after his appendix had been j About fifty guests will be in ut
removed, he passej away while still : tendance at the wedding. Tho Kin
under the influence of the anaesthetic, jzer home has been artistically decor
Thc passing of Mr. Gelger has cast , atcd for the occasion, tho color
gloom Into all quarters of tho city, i scheme being pink and white.
A big, fine natured, hearty fellow, in; j The bride is one of Ottawa's most
was always a good friend and a loyal j popular young ladies and has a host
-itlzcn. His friends were numbered , 0f friends.
by legions and general mourning has: The groom is one of Ottawa's cn
resulted from his untimely passing, j terprising young business men, assela-
Attendlng him at the hospital were ; tion with his father in the wholesale
Doctors Roberts, Edgcomb and Pettit, j and retail' tobacco business as travel
skilled surgeons who decided upcm ' ing representative for the concern,
the knife after careful examination j Mr. Levy and his bride will leave
and consultation, as the last resort to,; for a wedding tour in tho east and
Eavo Mr. Gelger'g life. - j will mako their homo at 645 Second
Tho deceased was born November j avenue, whero the groom has a nice
11, 187C, lit Peru, 111., and was the ly furnished home for his bride,
second, son. of Supervisory nd Mrs.! , . ...rgr y-r- . -, ...
Simon C. Geigcr, of that city, in
190) bo camo to Ottawa to take a po
sition with the Standard Oil-Company.
In19flj h was united in marriage to
Miss Cora Formhals, daughter of Mr.'
and Mrs. Joseph Formhals. I
About nlno years ago Mr. Geigcr be-j
came a member or me nrm or noss ;
ft Gelger, and later bcamo senior
partner of the firm of Geigcr & Fow-
ier. About five years ago he pur-imitteo in .charge. Eeddicks library
chased the Interests of Mr. Fowler, j offers no place for a display such as
after which the establishment become j is promised. .
known as tho Simon C. Gelger Cater- - Cnder the direction of Mr. Selby
ing Co. many attractive houses will be made
By hard and conscientious worn j by seventh and eighth grade pupils in
and staunch integrity the dceeasei : the manual training department. Ghil
establlshod an excellent trade, His , dren of any grade may enter the con
prompt attendance to business mat-; test. There will be one or more class
tcrs mado him one of Ottawa's most es for the boys who do not take man
reliable and successful merchants. ; ual training. There will be a class
He was of a jovial disposition and at-: for girls. Thero will tie a separate
ways desired to look upon all things class for high school students. They
from an optimistic standpoint. His will probably contribute Vomc of tho j o'clock. The destruction w;is caused
sudden death has cast, a pall of sor- large pieces of tho exhibit, such as j Dy u n.r0i wnj,., started in a dog ken
row over his host, of friends i l Olta- bird baths., feeding houses, and martin I nej located at the rear of the homo.
wa and vicinity, and the sympathy or
tbe entire community is extended to .
his wife and family in their hour of '
deep 'sorrow. j
Very Prominent.
Mr. Gelger was a member
of tho
Shriners, Masons, Odd Fellows, Ki.ks.
Business Men's Association, Rotary
Club, Chamber of Commerce, and was
ft former president of tho
Master Bakers' Association.
)'"no,s ;
Mr tiOl- j
ger took a most active part as a mem
ber of tho School Hoard and was al
ways working for the betterment of
the city Institutions of learning.
Surviving he leaves his parents, Mr.
and Msr. Simon Geiger, of Peru, his
wife and two children, Louise and
Joseph, and two brothers, Harry, of
Peru, and John, of California, and otm
ntster, Lottie, of Peru.
,' The funeral services will bo held
Thursday afternoon at 2:;u o'clock
A Via lnt tmF ... 1 i 1. 1 1 1
V. umi. w.u .vev. MiBbKyt(jr Illldnil,ilt) for Indianapolis on just
umciuiuip, nvi vteeH will also rw noil!
nt the church. Interment will 'bn
made In Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.
POLICE ACTIVE;
THREE ARRESTJED
Three arrests were mado lust even
Ing. John "Doe," a plain drunk, was
taken In custody by Officer Stevenson.
Max Bloomfleld, . local junk dealer,
was arrested on a disorderly conduct
charge, preferred by Tony Tezah, Co
lumbus street saloonman. BloomfteM
was released when he furnished a $10
cash bond and will be given a hear
ing this evening.
John Anderson, of North Ottawa,
was arrestod by Officer Sheohan on a
disorderly conduct chargo preferred
by Anderson's father, Anderson came
homo Intoxicated and his parent or-
dercd him arrested, this morning An
derson, Sr., failed to appear In police
court and the chargo was dismissed.
V.",'..i . ii i i
Buoicrlbo (or tho Free Trader-Journal.
IT
WILL M
CEREMONIES WILL BE HELD FOR
MISS LURA KINZER AND AR
THUR H. LEVY REV. CHESS
MAN OFFICIATES. .
1
At eight-thirty o'clock this evening
will occur the marriage of Miss Lura
Kinzer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Kinzer, of 209 Elm Btreet, and
Harrgon , gon of Mr nnd
. .
' ' . " rprpninnv ., take
pi-e in the living room of the Kinzer
home before a bank of flowers. Rev.
CITY BIRD HOUSE
CAMPAIGN OPENED
The, work on Ottawa's second bird
house campaign begins this week. The I
cxmntt win no now niarcn zv,
land 31. Just whero the exhibit will
I be has not been decided by tho corn
houses.
l eoria is conducting a bird-house
campaign under tho direction of the
Chamber of Commerce. Their exhibit
i will be held in the Coliseum the
first week In March. They have al
i ready 1,000 houses guaranteed .
St. Paul has conducted a similar i
campaign for several years. At their j
nrst exrmiu, sixiy-nino nouses were on :
display. In comparison, Ottawa's
fi,.u rivhiMt nf Mitvpntv.Mlv linimnu
does not make ,a bad showing.
SENTIMENT SPLIT
ON BRYAN VISIT
Springfield, lit., Jan. 2 1 State lead
ers of the Democratic party from
both the "wet" and "dry" Bide:! were
speculating today after the departure
of William Jennings Tiryati shortly af-
how close the Commoner camo to ac
complishing the object of his visit
here.
Bryan camo to Springfield at the
express Intention of converting the
party In Illinois and especially the
legislators to prohibition. Both fac
tions are conlident Hint ho did or did
not, they say, just as their sympathy
run.
Hut both factions pointed out that,
with the stale-wide prohibition
amendment presented of both houses
of tho General Assembly on the very
day of Bryan's visit, his Infiueiico ov
er Illinois lenders in tho party would
ba given a test,
Bryan in tho two speeches dellveis i tor to reside with her daughter. collect money alleged to be due liiin
od here Insisted mainly on tho neces-,' She leaves surviving Mrs, Drage, j for s-ervice; rendered William Jamj
slty for a "dry" plunk in tho party i Mrs. Schendel, of Princeton, and one son. Th-- labor was performed upon
platform but also urged tho endrose- !'Sor, ChnrleH, of Ottawa. ' J the residence en west Main street now
ment of suffrage and universal peace. I Funeral arrangements have not o: upied by the Dominican Sisters.
Nature paints the best part of the.
picture, rnrvpn the best part nf the! The annual Income In the eletrb-nl
statue, builds the best pnrt of Ihn house ! Industries U oipin! to tho total annual
and speaks the best part of the oration. ! expenditures of the United States gov--Kiuotwu.
: 'irniuettt.
J n "
. 7 WSOJ ::f. A
i :m
I'hotoH )' Ain rii ;iti I'lt'na AvKnclatlon
It was reported in Rome that King
C'onstantine of Greece would be de
posed by the allies because of his so
called pro-German sympathies, anil
the I)uke of Aosta, a cousin of King
Victor Emmanuel, would be placed on
the Greek throne. This decision is
said to have been reached at the re
cent conference of the entente lead
ers in Rome. '
This action, according to report, has
the full approval of the Venizelos
faction and will be carried out under
the leadership of tho former premier.
I'letures show tho duke-.(No. 2), the
duke' an-.l .iluehe.4 (No. 1) and the
duko with .rrhnu Aia;ila 4NV)."3. "
Ei.
E
NEW FEDERAL PLATE COTTAGE
IS RAZED THIS MORNING LOSS
WILL APPROXIMATE $2,000.
The recently 'erected homo of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Bailey, west of the
Federal I'late Glass Company, one
mile from tbe city, was completely
destroyed by lire this 'morning at 11
How the
fliimr
started there U a
mystery.
The entire south end of the house
was a mass of HamoM before the tire j
was discovered. Mr. Huiloy is employ-')
ed nights at the federal Plate and j
was asleep in the house when the
hhro broke out
very little household furniluro was'
r(.Srtied from the flames, and owing
to tho f let that no proiection could j
be reached little was saved from tho J
doomed building. The local firemen j
responded, using the large chemical
tank and then spent their efforts try
ing to save adjoining bouses and to
protect the lar,!,re supply, tanks of the
Independent Oil company, which were
endangered by the conflagration.
Insurance to fsoo w.is carried on
the house and a loss of $2,0'io was
sustained. The Bailey homo was a
one-story structure
a short time ago.
and was built but
FORMER RESIDENT
DEAD AT STREATOR
RlrcBt-.il1, 111., Jan. 2 !. -IKueeial)
Mrs. .Mary Peppier, former OUawa!
woman, and aged strenior resident,'
died this morning nl 1 1 : "o o'clock at '
the home of her dauvnter, Mrs, Aug.
Drage, In this city. Her demise Is
attributed to a complication of diseased.
DESTOHYS
I 1
Mrs. Peppier was born In Germany j
May 21, 1.822. She came to Ottawa in: Judge Slough and a jury in the Cir-
and resided in that city until 1lcuit Conn today are hearing test!
j years ago, when she moved to Strea-iniony in Henry Slrohineyer's suit to
'been made.
mhf tad
f ln - -1 -fl"ir'ifn " hi I inn i iiiiiiiii in i ii iEih ih hi
EXTRA
MEMPHIS MOB TRlCS TO
LYNCH NEGROES.
Memphis, Venn., Jan. 24 Depu
ty sheriffs and police early today
repelled a mob of 200 determined
men, who twice stormed the coun
ty jail in an effort to lynch two
negroes, who confessed the kill
ing of Walter Hooser, a white
butcher. One man, believed to be
the ringleader of the mob, was ar
rested. Word reached police
headquarters that another mob
would make nnMher attempt and
a :;trcri Torco cf deputies is
guarding them.
SENATE ADOPTS CONVEN
TION PLAN.
Springfield, III., Jan. ?4. Thia
morning the senate fnssed by a
vote of 45 to 1 the conctitution.il
convention resolution. Senator
Stephen n. Canaday, of Hillsboro,
catt the only vote, against it. Th?
resolution provides for the call
ing of a constitutional convention
in to revise the constitution
of Illinois.
CALLC ON SENATE FOR PEACE
LEAGUE DISCUSSION.
Washington, Jan. 24 SenJtor
Cummins, of Iowa, called upon his
resolution providing . free for all
debate of the President's peace
speech shortly after the Senate
convened today. "This touches
probably the most important mat
ter that has ever come before the
Senate of the United States," said
Senator Brandgee, of Connecti
cut. He immediately asked a
quorum call, insisting that all
senators should be In their seats
to hear or participate in the de
bate. ,
SUIT FOR LABOR
I IS HEARD TODAY
A tils put" arose over the amount that:
should be paid Mr. Sirolimeer nnd
the rpiestion was taken to tho courts I
for settlement.
There are n lot of dark Innes lending
from ewj Urcut White Wuy.
i n is
GOING GENEVA
EMMA ENGELDRECHT TO AVOID
JOLIET PRISON THRU KINDLY
INFLUENCE OF TRUANT OFFIC
ER MISS LAUNIA AUSSEM.
Einnia Kngelbrecht, 17 year old
Streiitor girl, now a prisoner at the
La Salle county jail, where she is
held for trial for robbing D. lleenan's
store of about. I loo in finery, Is to be
given one more chance to "hit" the
straight and narrow path. This morn
ing in the County Court action was
j taken at the instigation of Miss
! Lunula AusKer1 Ottawa truant of
j ficer, that .will nullify the Circuit
Court indictments if Judge Mayo rules
in favor of delinquency proceedings
j Instituted by Miss Aussein.
In an effort to save the girl, who
j admits it. will be hard for her to go
'"straight" unless she is put under
'some sort of restraint, MisH Aussem
! deemed it necessary to file infornia-
'lion against her and thereby keep
: her out of the penitentiary. As the
case now stands she probably will
, be sent to Geneva, w here the state
'operates a school for unruly young
1 maids who violate the laws.
This will be the second inquisition
ot this character Hie Kiigelbrecht girl
:h;is been in. On the former occasion
'she ucmiiltcd herself mid motit of the
! blame wan placed upon the mother.
When she vvns captured after robbing
the lleeiniii store, she admitted the
burglary and announced she, was hope
i lessly incorrigible.
The theft was one of the most dar
Pig porpci'Mtnd In Streatnr in many
'a day. lulling her thirty-six hour vi
gil the girl helped herself to canned
! foods In the grocery department and
; in this manner managed to prevent
hunger from driving her out of doors.
The father is August Kngclbreeht,
of Cherry nnd the mother Is Christina
' Kiigelbrecht, of Streiitor. They are
. said to be estranged. The girl was
arn sted by Chief Hopkins nt, Cherry,
when she Med after the burglary and
was visiting.
Proper Lighting Important.
In recent yours boards of health all
over the country have heroine so much
impressed with the Importance of prop-,
(.r lighting, even natural sunlight, that
laws lire enforced strlcily ns to the
placing nt window1 in nhlW schools,
l 1 (! . "
HISTORY
INTERESTING SURVEY JUST IS
SUED BY ILLINOIS GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY GIVES SOIL AND MIN
ERAL DATA ABOUT OTTAWA.
"The Geography of the Upper Illi
nois Valley and History of Develop
ment," is the title of a new work Just
issued by the Illinois State Geological
Survoy of which Frank De Wolfe Is
director.
The new publication contains a
series of educational bulletins rela
tive to the geological formation of the'
Illinois Valley and is full of geograph
ical material which will be interest
ing to student of nature.
The work contains slxty none illus
trations, among wnich are shown a
panomoramic view of the Illinois Val
ley from Starved Rock, a geological
map of tho upper Illinois valley and
cross sections of the Illinois valley at
Ottawa, Peru, Morris and La Salle,
also the location and the cross sec
tions of tho various coal measures ex
tending from the Klckapoo creek to
La Salle
The bulletin has been written for
the purpose of giving a non-technical
account of the geography and geology
of the upper Illinois valley and is in
tended primarily for those who make
their living from the great natural re
sources deposited therein.
Relative to the coal deposits the
bulletin says coal measures underly
the entire area west of Aux Sable
creek, the northern limit of which
does not extend beyond La Salle
county, but tho formation has a great
extent west and south. These meas
ures were deposited In an extensive
shallow basin,' extending southeast
ward from La Salle to the mouth of
the Wabash, the beds dip towards the
south except where they have been
deformed. At Morris, on the rim of
the basin, it is sixty-four feet deep.
In La Salle county, near the axis, the
maximum thickness or tne oasin is
570 feet, and in Bureau county, west
of tho nxis, the formation varies from
250 to 400 feet in thickness.
Coal is the least of the formations in
quantity, but its economical value is
more important than nil others com
bined. '
The bed averages about three feet
in thickness and furnishes coal of
good quality.
The bulletin contains articles on
the various mineral products, cement
rock, lime rock, gravel, sand and clay.
The bulletin also contains several
chapters on the waterpower develop
ment of the valley, including the gla
cial drainage, the Illinois and its trib
utaries and a history of the Illinois &
Michigan canal, and in conclusion is
x chapter upon the development of
the railroads, the decline of the canal,
and the introduction of rural mail and
electric railways in tho rural districts.
The work Is a very valuable one and
reflects great credit upon the director
nf the Geological Survey.
YOUTHFUL THIEF
SQUEALS TO PAL
The confession of the robbery o."
a creamery in Atnnoy, in., aim uio
burglarizing of the store of Anthony
Berry, former Ottawa inerchunt, was
brought about last Saturday in Am
boy thru information furnished the
authorities by Andrew Kraecem, for
mer Ottawa newsboy.
Kraecem, in company with a lad
named Stader, were cutlinir ice on
the Illinois river in La Salle. Stader
told Kraecem that they could make
some easy money and finally con
fessed how he had robbed business
places in Amboy in 1 it 14. Kraecem
Lipped Anthony Merry, former Ottawa
merchant, concerning the robbery and
the arrest of Stader followed. Two j
uther youths,, Jon l.enlhan and Joo
Kelleher were named in the confes
sion of Stader, but were not arrested
awing to a lack of evidence.
Stader has been held to the grand
jury with a. bond of $200 ami Is now
lodged in tho county Jail at Dixon.
FARMER LEAVES
$86,200 ESTATE
The will of Thomas Pottlnger, de-
reused Dlininick resident, was filed ! commission.
for probate todav, and bequeaths to Captain Schnltzo of the German (lo
tho widow during her lifo, all the tllla lost both le?s and died shortly
property valued at $S(1,200. At the j after reaching port. '
widi.w'H death the farms and nersonal Sixteen badly woundod Germans,
property go to tho seven surviving
children.
0
Mr. Pottlnger died January
BRITISH AND GERMANS EACH
SUFFER LOSSES "U 69"
6ADLY CRIPPLED
FOUR WERE RAIDERS
FLOTILLA SIGHTED AS IT LEFT
ZEEBRUGGE TO PREY UPON
COMMERCE PATROL OPENS
FIRE AND GREAT BATTLE 13
ON.
GERMANS DON'T ADMIT LOSS
OF VESSEL.
Berlin, Jan. 24. Sinking of a
British destroyer In a naval en
gagement off the Dutch coast yes
terday was reported in an official
statement issued today. Ons
German torpedo boat was forced
to take refuge in a Dutch harbor,
the statement added.
. The rest of the German vessels
returned to their bases with only
slight lostes,the statement said.
The text of the official state
ment follows:
"In the course of an sntsrprlss
undertaken by a portion of our
destroyer forces, an engagement -occurred
early In the morning of
January 23rd, with British naval
forces. The enemy destroyer was
sunk during the fight. After the
engagement a second was o
served by our aeroplanes to bs In
a sinking condition.
"One of the torpedo boats which
was In distress owing to damage
sustained, according to news re
ceived, has arrived at Ymuilen.
All the other boats returned with
slight dsmage." .
ADMIRALTY SAYS TWO
WERE DESTROYED.
London, Jan. 24 Unofficial re
ports were received here today
that eight torpedo boats (seven
German and ono British) were 1
sunk in the two engagements In
the North Sea on Monday night.
Fourteen German torpedo boats
that put out from Zeebrugge with
the evident intention of raiding
British traffic in tbe English chan
nel, encountered, a strong British
patrol and a sharp engagement
ensued in the darkness. At the
same time British and German
patrols of torpedo boats clashed
off Schouwen Bank.
The battle off Zeebrugge was
fought at close range. The Ger
man flagship "V-69" was badly,
damaged and was towed into
Yinuiden in sinking condition. 1
She lost 21 men in killed, includ
ing her captain and many wound
ed. According to an official an
nouncement by the British Ad
miralty only two torpedo boats,
one British and one German,
were known to have been sunk in
the two battles.
Second Cripple Puts to Port.
Amsterdam, Jan. 24 -A second Ger
man warship, damaged In the sea'
fighting off the Dutch coast on Mon
day night, has arrived at Ymudien, In
a battered condition, according to a
dispatch from there today.
This was the first naval activity on
a big scale in the North sea since last
October and many believe that it is
the prelude to even big"er sea battles
in these waters.
The number and weight of the ships
engaged la not. definitely known, but
all indications are that the Germans
were greatly outnumbered. It is pos
sible that part of the British high
seas fleet took part.
Two different groups of sea forces
were engpged and altogether it is bo-
, lieved that more than fifty war ships
took part.; ; , " I ,
Some of the wounded upon tho dam
aged torpedo boat "V-GU" at Ymudien
say they saw about, one hundred ships,
but this statement Is received with
little credence as tho fighting took
place at night and In a thick fog.
The "V-t;:i" Is a complete wreck
was In sinking condition when she
rca-hed Yinuiden. One funnel Is al
most horizontal with the deck. Her
steering gear was smashed and her
hull is packed with shell holes. The
"V-tl'J" had i chance to fire only one
torpedo before she was put out of
taken from the "V-6!)"
landed at Yinuiden by a
ler.
have been
Dutch tnw-

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