OCR Interpretation


Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, February 05, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92053240/1917-02-05/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE WEATHER.
Part! cloudy tonlot and
Tuesday; rising tempera
ture. OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Establish ed 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1S30.
FIR IV
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. MONDAY, FEIJltUAltV 3, 1917.
PRICE, TWO CENTS.
VOLUME 1.--NO. 70.
w
JVJ
trader-journa:
fo)oii?niv f
rE
OBJECTORS TO ERECTION Of j
$40,000 STANDARD OIL PLANT
MRS. n. G. REESE
goes to ran
BOARD OF FIRE EXAMINERS
HOLD MEETING THIS
AFTERNOON
FEAR DANGER OF FI
C. W. CAWIPBELLAS
MAYOR PRO TtWI
PROMINENT SOUTH OTTAWA WO
MAN DIED LAST EVENING
MRS. MATTHEW
SUCCUMBS AFTER
NESS.
DONCHUE
BRIEF ILL-
H. C. GRIFFIN, OF JOLIET, IS
PRESENT AT MEETING THJS AF
TERNOONCOUNCIL TAKE3 AC
TION AT FOUR O'CLOCK.
"INANCE CHIEF PRESIDES OVER
COUNCIL IN THE ABSENCE OF
MAYOR BRADFORD REPORTS
ARE READ.
His Honor, Commissioner of Finance
Charles W. Campbell, in the absence
froui the city of Mayor K. F. Bradford,
officiated as the city's chief executive
. .
Strenuous objection f ami the con: : at this morning s meeting el tne conn
templated construction of a f -10,000 j cil. The meeting was devoid of any
plant here by the Standard Oil Co.. ! stirring event:!., itepom irom various
at a meeting of the board of local lire
examiners this afternoon.
depaitments for I he enlightenment of
the commissioners in particular and
1 public in general were read. A3 a
Edward Claus, In the'interest of the i preBider of affairs municipal Commts
King & Hamilton factory, who have a
storehouse located near the proposed
site of the Standard 01 Co. plant ieadin role
was the principal objector. He voiced ;ner.
his sentiments against the coming of
the company because of the great ha
zard it would be to his company and,
too, he said, it would have a tendency
to Increase the fire rates. Mr. Claus
believed that the company should be
forced to erect their Bcrvleo station
outside of the city limits. Supporting
the arguments of Mr. Claus were:
Joseph Peltier, George Stage and Com
missioner August .litiJffrJcb. .., , , , .
Joseph Peltier sigh tod an instance
in Alton, Illinois, where an explosion
had occurred from a refinery, which is
not at all similar to tho proposed plant
tolje built here.
Commissioner Hclffrieh played a
prominent part in the argument ob
jecting to tho stench that would be
caused by the location of the plant
here. Ho recalled nn instance, eigh
teen years ago, when a supply shed
was located near him and which he
was instrumental in h iving removed.
JI. C Griffin, of Joliet, district
manager of this district was present
at the hearing. Ho represented that
the building would in every way com
ply with the requirements of the
State Board of Fire Kxmainers and
of all the Insurance companies. No
naphtha would be stored in the pi int.
V'The building will be positively lire-1
proof in every respect," said Mr. Grif- j
fin, and I cannot see any cause for
alarm.
"Gentlemen, as far as the law is
concerned on this proposition, you
cannot prohibit U3 from building.' Once
wo build you may oust providing you
prove thut we are a menace to the
community and tho burden of proof
rests with you."
"We came here .'and submitted
our plans because we want to be ab
solutely fair and because we want to
build in your city."
Commissioner Calmer stated that he
could not see any great dinger in con
nection with the plant if built afjer
the construction of the one in Elcin,
which he visited Friday.
sioner Campbell played up well with
the permanent mayor, and took the
in very acceptable nian-
Chicf Etirich's Report.
January's police record shows an av
erage of better thau one arrest a day.
In all thirty six offenders were taken
Into custody; nine of whom paid fine3
and five were dismissed by payment of
coots. A total of $59 was collected
and turned over to the treasurer.
Hoodoo in Fires.
Mr3. Emma Rees, wife of A. G.
Rees, of G20 East Van Burin street,
died at her homo last evening at
!Q:i: o'clcck following a lingering ill
new of several months. Her death
came rather suddenly.
The deceased was born February 2,
1S.13, in Grand Rapids township and
; was (he daughter of John nnd Mar
garet Powe.
On November 1, 1876, she was unit
ed iu marriage to A. G. Rees.
For twenty-six years Mrs. Rees was
a resident jf Ottawa and during that
time she took a most active interest
in tho civic and social welfare of
the city. She was a life long member
of the Methodist church and has al
ways been devoted with the kindest
care and affection to her home, hus
band and family.
She leaves surviving her husband
and mother. Mrs.-Margaret Powe, of
Phelps street, and two children Mrs.
W. I. Hibbs, of Ottawa, and Arthur,
of Grand Rapids township and three
brothers Charles Powe, of Quincy,
Kansas, Frank of Conway Springs, and
Edwin, of Phelps street and one step
daughter, Josephine Rees of Ottawa.
The funeral will be held Wednesday
at the late home. Interment will be
In Ottawa Avenue cemetery.
Mrs. Matthew Donohue.
PITV MINT PAY
wilson UN I IIIUUI i ni
MtlBPV MP niniiiM
y , I'll ii i in mini I
atiniiL ur rfluiHb
i
I
WAR BULLETINS
NEUTRALS DEBATE
OFFER.
London, Feb. 5. President Wil
son'a suggestions that all neutral
countries break off diplomatic re
lations with Germany is now un
der consideration by practically
all of the neutral governments,
according to dispatches received
here today.
The Government most likely to
take action upon the suggestion
la Spain, it was reliably reported
here.
Spain's reply to Germany's dec
laration of a ruthless submarine
war Is to be made public today,
says a Madrid dispatch. It is be
lieved to he a strong protest and
almost an ultimatum in fact.
JUDGE LARDIN FIXES AMOUNT
TO 3E TAXED FOR "PUBLIC
BENEFITS" AT $7.7C0 LESS UTIL
ITIES ASSESSMENT.
BOMB FOUND ON
COLLEC lORs
PORCH OF
HOME.
Washington, Ftb. 5. Dudley
Field Malone, collector of the port
of Ne York, telephoned Assist
ant Secretary of the Treausry
Peters this afternoon that he had
just found a bomb on the steps of
his home in New York. He said
the fuce wins burning and that he
had put it out with his fingers.
He gave no other details. This
bomb was said by officials not to
be the one that was found in the
custom house. '
PERSHING'S TROOPS BACK ON
U. S. SOIL. '
El Paso, Tex., Feb. 5. General
Pershing's expedition, which went
Into Mexico on March 15, 1916, "to
capture VUla dead ' or alive,''
marched back Into the Unittd
States today cheered by a crowd
of several thousand, according to
reports received here frcm points
near Columbus.'
Paving objectors who went into the
County Court to present their legal
complaints to't'ie assessment roll as
prepared for the "loop" improvement,
won an important step in their figfit
this morning when Judge Lardin ruled
that the city should pay $7,700 to
ward the cost of resurfacing tho down
town district.
Coming an it did, the decisicn served j
as a blow to the city and probably
means a delay on the work that may
'run late into tiie summer, unpre
pared to spend any more money fori
the improvement it is believed in nni-j
nicipal circles that abandonment of
the present plan for financing the
task will necessarily have to ' be
and that the city commissioners
will have to approach the improve
ment from an entirely different angle.
Commissioner Charles W. Camp
bell this afternoon when apprised of
the result of the hearing before Judge
Iardin, announced that he would pre
sent a resolution to the council wip
ing out the old roll and calling for tho
preparation of a new onf under spe
cial taxation, instead of by special
assessment 'is tho proposition now
stands.
In case this resolution carries thru
DUAL MONARCHY WILL
STAND BEHIND ALLY;
CUT DIPLOMATIC TIES?
Washington, Feb. 5 Austria supports the sub
marine position of Germany.
It was admitted today that in the note received
here from Ambassador Penfield, it is set forth that
the Austrian government has taken the same po
sition toward the submarine warfare without re
strictions a3 did Germany.
State Department offi-
L
111 ITS
Mrs. Matthew Donohue, prominent
rnctrtnnt nf Wallace townshii). died
. .TWrtostt fiwa etcurred in- Ottawa .i . . ..,(,rnluK at 3 : in o'clock, fol-
durinn January, according to Fire
; Chief Boissenin's report. A total dam
age of 11,805.51 resulted from these
conflagrations. The heuviest loss was
suffered by Edward Bailey, when his
home near tho Federal Plate was en
tirely destroyed. The cause was as
signed by the fire chief as "boys with
matches." Three Fires were responded
to that occasioned 110 losses.
Made Many Inspections.
.Plumbing Inspector William Wilson
reported a busy month. Sixty seven
inspections were made. One master
plumber's license was renewed and a
brand new "pirate chief" was granted
lowing a brief illness of peritonitis.
Mrs. Donohue was born in Rutland
township in 1853. She was united in
marriage Jan. SO, 18S1, to Matthew
Donohue and has resided in
Wallace township for the past thirty
four years. During her residence in
that community she made a large "cir
cle of friends and her passing will be
mourned by a host of friends.
Surviving Hie 'ites her hitsbund
and three daughters Margaret and
Marie, at home, and Mrs. B. F. Car
roll, of Seneca, and four sons Mat
thew, Jr., James, Joseph and Arthur,
at home and two sisters Miss Ellen
COM Ml
0. S: NEXT MOVE
BRITISH SPECULATE UPON FU
TURE RELATIONS BETWEEN U.
S. A. AND GERMANY CITE
HOUSATONIC SINKING.
London, Feb. B The wave of jubila
tion over the break in diplomatic rela
tions between Germany and the Unit
ed States was followed today by keen
tho council, it will mean a delay of j speculation as to the next , step that
nothing short of sixty days and there
President Wilson would take. That
(u a nimatlrn In unmn avnprt mlrwlu
whether or not it would be profitable Germany is going to great lengths to
BE HELD AT FOOT
i rfvnn of Grand Ratiids townshin and
permission to boss the under pirates j Mr8 Martjn Har,,,mint of Fowier, Ind.,
by passing an examination and depos- j mil one i)rothcr, James Kilelea, of Ot
liting with the city the grand sum of j ,
in fees wore collected
i Two More Report.
Street Superintendent Owen Fox, re
ported spending $08.20 in his depart
ment. The bulkiest expenditure occur
red when his men wrere forced to chop
the icicles off tho aqueduct.
City Sealer. Johnson, reported that
the gas ns furnished by the Public,
Service Company was above the sland
ar 1 fixed by the state.
Receipts Heavy.
The month wim 'a profitable one hi
the finance department. Tho treas
ure's and clerk's report showed that
tho receipts from all sources were
$10,576.76 and the expenditures H
425.92 leaving a balance of $6,150,805
on hand.
The pay roll amounting to $1,124.18
was ordered paid.
I
The funeral services will be held
Tuesday morning at 9:30 o'clock at
St. Columba church. Interment will
be made in St. Columba cemetery.
YOUNG MAN IS
PARALYSIS VICTIM
ROTARY'S SEMI
ANNUAL MEETING
Ottawa Rolarlans tomorrow w! 1
celobrato their semi-annual "round
up" with a spread at the Clifton. The
banquet will bo served at 6:30 o'clock
followod by an address by Dr. Rob
well Pettit upon "Service In Modi
cine." Caution has been Issued to all mem
bers to be "among those present" or
he properly excused from attendance,
or suffer tho consequences of being
suipended from the club. . '
INFANT PLAGUE
COST CITY $546
., Bills aggregating $516 for servlceo
rcndcied by doctor:! to school children
during tho infantile paralysis scare of
last August and September, wore or
dered paid at this mornings meeting
of the city council, The fee3 were di
vidod ortonfj all the ph'slelans in. var
ious amounts, ranging from E0c to
$125.
The city paid only half the cost of
examinations for high school pupils
and the school board paid the remain
der. The city srthool children vveie
examined at the expense of the city.
HOBOES RIDE TO
JAIL IN TAXICAB
Traveling to jail in n taxi used to
be a luxury for millionaires, but three
Gaudy Dancers, Friday evening, cast
a'ide all rornis of hobo tradition
when they sought admission to the
city lockup lifter alighting from a
taxicab. Frank Morton, "Jack" Kil
Patrick and Mavis ;Mr'Clerq were the
trio who were pleased with the mol
erri conveniences furnished by John
Cisco.
Friday evening, they were hiinging
out in the depot. The men were told
they must leave. They 'phone for
a taxicab anil the driver brought tho
men to the local police station. Af
ter registering on John Cisco's slat-j
they joined the rest of the party' of
slumber-seekers.
The men informed tho odicers that
their camp east of town was cob'..
They had slept in the city lockup be
fore and decided that they would
again seek tho warmth of the b!g
Btove. The trio, however, did not
leave the station in a taxicab, but
"hoofed'; it to their work Saturday
nornlng.
Adolph J. Nill. prominent young
North Ottawa resident, died suddenly
Sunday morning at 0 o'clock at bis
home, 70fi Norris street, after a brief
illness. Saturday evening at 10:CO
o'clock he was stricken with heart
trouble, winch was followed by a
t troke of paralysis, d'jath resulting on
Sunday morning.
Deceased was born in Palmyra, Mo.,
March 17, 18W, and came to Ottawa
when he was eighteen years of age.
He had been employed as a piano
worker for the past seven years. He
leaves surviving his wife and father,
Conrad Nill, Sr., of Palmyra, Mo., one
sister, Jennie, and three brothers
Emll, Conrad and George, all of Pal
myra, Mo.
The remains were taken to Palmy
ra, Mo., today. The funeral service
will be held there Tuesday.
;
MRS. CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
BURIED IN OTTAWA AVE.
KENTUCKY REGIMENT GETS OR
DER TO , REMAIN INTACT EX
PECT DUPLICATE WORD AT K i .
SHERIDAN.
Orders issued out of, Washington to
day ordering tho Second Kentucky
Guard to discontinue its preparations
for mustering. out and to remain in
tact at its present quarters, are ex
pected to be duplicated and sent to
the Third Illinois Guard in Chicago
some time today. Company C, of Ot
tawa, is a member of the Third regi
ment, and like the Kentucky troops,
were released from border duty nine
days ago.
Letters received from Captain Cha.
Gapen and otlu.r members of the reg
iment indicate that the muster ou;.
will lie delayed as f result of the new
switch in affairs and the crucial situ
ation between Germany and the I nit-
ed States have left.
Company C members are momentar
ily expecting word from tho national
eapltol commanding them to remain
at Ft. Sheridan for an indefinite per
iod. It is a moral cinch that their
arrival home will be delayed for a few
weeks at the least.
Orders Guard Ready.
Springfield, February 5. Governor
I owden last night notified Adjutant
General Piekson in Chicago to take
steps to have the National Guard
protect the German consulate th'Te.
The Governor acted In response to or
ders from the State Department. The
adjutant general will return to Spring
field today and take steps to have the
Illinois Guard ready for instant call.
for the city to begin the work at such
a late time In the season.
The ruling of Judge Lardin con
forms with all the laws governing spe"
'cial assessment propositions and is
in accord with that handed down in
the Clinton street and east side paving
jebs, where the city was made to pay
its proportionate share for "public
benefits," Judge Lardin In his ruling
credited (lie city with some $1,400 to
be paid by the C. O. & P. and N. I.
prevent actual war is shown by the
action of the submarine commander,
which sank the American ship Housi-
tonIc.' Not only was the ship warned,
but special precautions were taken to
see that the crew was landed safely.
However, in view of the recent dec
laration of ruthless sea warfare by Ger
many it is felt here "that the German
IT boat fleet, despite care and precau
tions, cannot prevent some incident
which would give the American gov-
L. &. T. companies. The tax imposed -erninent a caucus belli.
upon the municipality Is intended to
cover the cost of paving the street
intersections
That the Campbell resolution, if it
is presented as stated by the commis
sioner of finance this afternoon, will
pass, is generally conceded.
MENDOTA WOMAN
CHARGES CRUELTY
Mrs. Ruth Tice, of Mendota, has
filed a bill for divorce against James
Tice in the circuit court, alleging cru
elty. In her list of allegations setting
forth her reasons for securing a de
cree Mrs. Tice names two occasions
Comment in the press and in official
circles dwells upuon the reinforce
ment of the economic and financial
strength of the allies by the possible
entry aid that America could give 1
the entente powers.
It is felt here, and this belief
Is shared in all the allied capitols,
that, if the American government
should declare war on Germany the
financial and economic problems of
the allies would be solved forthwith.
Newspapers print tables of statistics
to show the gigantic wealth and
boundless resources of America.
Dispatches from Amsterdam say
that the news of President Wilson's
action in breaking off relations with
when she was attacked and beaten by 1
the defendant. Germany and in recalling Ambassador
She savs that on June 15. 1913. Fhe Gerard from Berlin was a shock to
Funeral services over the Into. Mrs.
Caroline Zimmerman, aged Ottawa
resident, whoso death occurred Thurs
day, were held Saturday morning at
St. Francis church. Interment was
made In Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.
The pall bearers were Henry 'Becker,
Charles Matthias, Fred Worth, Lee
Hamalle, Carl Mattes and George Mai-tea.
was struck in the face and both her
eyes blackened and that on July 10,
1916, Tice struck her in the abdomen,
painfully injuring her. The couple
separated October 17th, 1916, and the
wffe says that Tice remained in Men
dota until Peeenilier 1st of that year,
when he disappeared, since which
time alio has been unable to secure
any trace of him.
The couple were married December
11, 1912, at Olney, 111,
TWELVE HOBOES ARE
GIVEN SHELTER HERE
Twelve hoboes, claiming residences
Germany. Apparently it had been felt
that relations with the I'nited States,
precluded any such action.
Order Release of Prisoners.
Amsterdam, Feb. 5 Preparations
have been made for the departure of
the seventy-two Americans brought in
to pert on tho German Prize ship
Yarrowdale, says dispatch from Ber
lin today.
The release of the American prison
ers was ordered by the German gov
ernment 011 Sunday in response to a
demand made by the American Slate
Department.
Tho exact number of Ameri-
SENECA WOMAN
DIES AT HOSPITAL
Mrs. John Baker, of Seneca, who on
Thursday afternoon jumped from. the
window in her room at Ryburn Hospi
tal while delirious, died Saturday ev
ening at 10 o'clock of 'appendicitis.
Mrs. Baker was taken to the hospital
January 26th, but her condition wus
such that doctors considered it unad-
vlsable to operate upon her.
Tho deceased was born In Ottawa
November 2!, INS", and resided in Ot
tawa until six years ago. On Febru
ary 9. 1915. she was united In mar-
in all th large metropolises of tliejeun captives 011 the Yarrowdale is un
united States, were given shelter last certain. Cable grams place the nuin-
eveniTig in the city lock-up. The milli
ter was the largest that has ever been
given lodging in this city during the
last month. All departed this morn
ing for St. Petersburg and Palm
Beach. Florida, where they will spend
tl.o remaining winter months.
ATTEMPTED ROBBERY
AT DINNEEN SALOON
her at 72, but Washington dispatches
indicate that are fewer than this num
ber. $25 DAMAGE TO
C. S. AYERS' HOUSE
cials believe that this
means a diplomatic
break with Austria
shortly. A copy of the
Austrian note now is in
Pres. Wilson's hands.
Belief was expressed
here today that the ac
tion of the United States could not
cause the German government to
change its original submarine regula
tions. The text of the Penfield communi
cation has not yet been given out. It
was stated, however, that it probably
would be made public within a short
time. Until the President has decid
ed on the subject, however, no official
statement of intention by the United .
States will be forthcoming from the
State Departnumt.
' Meanwhile the question of receiv
ing Count Tarnowski, the new Aus
trian Ambassador, is held in abeyance.
He was informed on L Saturday when
he called at the State Department to
seek an appointment wtttr President
Wilson to present his credentials,
that he would be communicated with
if an appointment was made. There
the matter stands and will until the
president determines upon a course of
action to pursue.
Washington, Feb. 5. The United
States is waiting. The crisis precipi
tated by the diplomatic rupture with
Germany was unchanged today.
There are two acute angles which
may chaugo the situation at a Bee
end's notice:
Firs t, is action by Germany which
would fcrce the hand of the President.
Second, is action to restore the for
mer status of submarine warfare,
'which would stay any additional
move. Another possible angle is tie
action that the other neutral natioi.a
will take to follow America's lead.
Tho President has asked all to place"
Germany beyond the pale of diplo
macy. But until action is definitely
announced in the several capitals or
complete replies can be made public
here, the United States must mark
time.
Meanwhile, preparedness prepara
tions were in progress on a gigantic
! rcale. Congressional leaders have a
I siired the President that he can have
all of the money ho needs for any
purpose. Leading bankers in the fl-
nanelal centers or the nation have let
' It. be known that a bond Issue of not
less than half a billion dollars would
bo absorbed in almost no time. hi
addition congress was in readiness to
j pass a score of measures which will
1 aid in the defense such as more strlu
! gent neutrality laws, empowering the
1 taking over of private plants for chip
' building construction and the like,
land all such legislation which in the
opinion of the President and his ad
visers is necessary to place the na
Ion in readiness for any emergency
which may arise.
Reports' that the American line;
Philadelphia bad been sunk had no ba
sis in fact so far as any Ii. formation
available here was concerned. It had
been accepted that for the live days
' Subscribe for FjcuTrader-Jounwl.
KNEUSSL FUNERAL
TUESDAY AFTERNOON
The nmeral services for the late
Mrs. Frank Kneussl will be held to
morrow afternjen nt 1 o'clock from
the Into home. Interment will be in
the Ottawa Avenue cemetery.
The tire department was called to
1 the homo of Curtis, Ayers, at (02 (.Urn- .,nnir m mi.lnltht tonight all mcr-
Robbers endeavored to enter the sa-gress street, last evening at 10: in o'-! hant vessels In transit would be pro
loon of Daniel Dinneen on Columbus 1 clock, when an overheated chimney re- tected and if attacked a all, subjected
street Sunday evening, but were un-1 suited in damage to the adjoining to cruiser warfare. Officials made it
successful. The discovery of the at-j woodwork in the house. The damage plain that they expected many ru
tpinnteil rohherv was made this morn-; ,nii nnt v,.,...,i tor. ,,,i h i,i.,-,u i mr r. would 'be current of vessel sink-
riage to John linker aad to this union. )llR fr()In ,,, nmrklngs on a rear door. extinguished by the aid of chemical- I inc and abridgement of American
one son was born. 1 No arrests have been made. j 'rights. Put I hoy also declared there
Surviving she leaves her husband. . I wctild he no jumping at conclusions
her son Wesley, her parents, Mr. and rnllN1TV ward DIES I Z .7 VL Sm.i no additional action by the Pres-
M Linn... Kr i.n l' K a nn, a Ihriw . i rvnm ur uurunumtui
iilf. iii;iii,t 1 iiv., v. ..v., , ......
ulsters, Mrs. E. E. Barr of Cornell,
AT NOON TODAY!
The Japanese make en imitation of
silk from Kemp. x
Mrs. R. R. Barr and Miss Ella Price,
of Ottawa, and four brothers dlarry,
John and William, of Ottawa, and
Ralph, a member of Co. ('. , ;
The funeral services were held at
2:3) o'clock this afternoon at the
Flrrt M. fc. church, Rev. C. A. Brlggs,
Jr., ofnelatlug. Interment was made
In Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.
Tint ,ttv nf PiirlvMhi tnnv
Sherman Wright, age years, men : ... uh..uHh .,i,u,rm,.nt(. r,irm f pv
at noon today at the County Home fob prntmiut if a limjorty 0f the voters
lowing a lingering illness of tuberrn- j deHd(, ln favor ot the commission
tosls. He leaves surviving his moth-i form A 1,Ptltll, requesting Judge
rr, Mrs. Martha Wright, and one sis-i Mayo to Hx ft (,,Uo for tl0 pUi.lim ls
ter. MIph Nellie Wright. 0 'flle , the counly court. The judge
Funeral arrangements nave not uee.t , ,,-lhnu.rv lr.th the ,i,te for
blent until official word lias neen re.-
1... fnreml I eeived of any new facts In the crisis.
' Tne Situation so utr nn ii. nun ic
official-
Austria still was a puzzle to
ilcni. If Austria Is to act in concert
with her ally, Germany, and under
take unrestricted submarine warfare,
then the new Austrian ambassador
made.
the election.
(Continued on Page 3.)

xml | txt