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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, March 02, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Ettablithed 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1880.
fre:
TRADER-JOU.RNA
THE WEATHER.
Rain or mow tonight
or Saturday. Not much
change in temperature.
E
VOLUME l.-KO. Dii. OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. FIJI DAY, MAKCJl 2, 1917. Pit ICE TWO cpt
HUMS 11 I
aBfc n as ' k mm. mm mmt n m
DAK3ER OF 1917 STRIKE IS
PRACTICALLY ELIMINATED
UMON MEN SAY
TO GET TBI RAISE
WAGE DEMANDS ACCEPTABLE TO
CONTRACTORS CARPENTERS
WILL DRAW UP SEPARATE
AGREEMENTS WITH BOSSEsT'
It was apparent that an amicable
settlement of the increase in pay de
manded by bricklayers, painters unJ
other member of the Ottawa Build-
ing Trades Council had bte.i reached j potatoes of the better variety are re
from the result of their meeting lust hailing locally at !tu cents a peck to
evening. Just what will be the out- (Iay' Kffis hav,) sl,ovv a fi'iKht de-
come of the carnenteiV rem.est f,,r
an increase 1ms not been determimd
as they have not held 1'ieir meet Ins
as yet. "We have practically reached
an agreement," said a prominent
union head when interviewed by a
reporter this morning. Ail build, n;j
operations will continue as in thr
past."
"The plumbers will take up wage
matters Friday evening," said one f
the members of the union today. "'We
do not look for any trouble in regard
to agreements with our employers,
but you cannot always tell what tho
outcome will be, The
opinion of all, however.
early settlement wi.l be reached a
neither contractor nor employes wish
to tie up building activities during
the coming spring months. j
Since the carpenters have with-
council a settlement reached by them j
Individually would not impede any i
action of the other unions.
The bricklayers are asking for 7
cents per nottr, in same scale
of,
wages paid thruout the state. The
bricklayers have been getting "0 cents
under their old terms. ,
The paints and plumbers are wily
asking for a small increase and (i)
not anticipate any (rouble.
A tie-up in labor trouble would ser
iously effect Ottawa. The building of
the annex to Ryburn hospital, the i
possibility of a Y. M. C. A., and a vast
amount of improvement to be made by
the nand companies are some of tiie
big Jobs ahead in this immediate vi
cinity. INCORPORATE DEER
PARK THRESHING CO.
Among the list of firms in the state
which have secured license to incor
porate from Secy, of State Kmmoraon
this week Is "Tho Deer Park Tresh
lng Company" of Deer Park township,
capitalized at $3,200. The purpose of
the company, according to one of the
stockholders, in to do the threshing for
the whole Deer Park farm communi
ty, thus saving each individual fanner
the worry and heavy expense entail
ed by this feature of agricultural life
each year.
The incorporators are Elmer J.
Strout, George Sargent, P. II. liar
beck, D. D. Frazer, James A. Mitchell
and D. E. Cooper,
CY DE VRY TO BE HERE MARCH
'9 AND NpT MARCH 3RD.
Cy Do Vry's lecture In Ottawa wis
erroneously advertised In Thursday's
Free Trader-Journal as to occur Feb
ruary 3, Instead of Friday, February 9,
'when the noted animal keeper will
be in Ottawa to tell a local audience
of his experiences at the Lincoln Park
Zoo. Mr. DeVry Is being brought here
under the auspices of the Washington
School Farents'-Teaehers' Association,
Tickets can be obtained at the Freo
Trader-Journal office. Children, 15c;
adults, 35c.
MRS. VAN SCHOICK FUNERAL
TO BE HELD SUNDAY P.?
M
Funeral services of the late Mrs.
M. Marion Van Scholek will be held
Sunday afternoon at 'A o'clock from
the residence of Mrs. Anna Ashley,
corner of Van Duron street anil First
avenue, Ilov. O, W. (hessnmn official-
Marriage Licenses.
Raymond Hltchins, Kurlvillo ...
Miss Merle Zorn, Triumph
Joe Martlnucl, Oglesby
Miss Barbara Perlno, 4)glesby,.
Wnt. Darner, Wheatland
Mist Rutu Harris, Streator ...
.21
.22
.20
.18
.18
.20
It Is eslliuntod thHt 2" per cent of
halibut aud from 20 to S per' cent of
salmon are Included Lu the entrails,
head, U,U, otc.
UFFERED Br EMPLOYERS'
ECS SLUMP
WITHIN THE WEEK
EXPECTED DROP IN HIGH PRICES
OF FOODS NOT REACHED IN
OTTAWA TODAY SUGAR NOW
HARD TO GET.
Sudden Jumps in the price of beans
land the failure to receive .shipments
of food Huffs from eastern point3 be
cause of the car shortage, pricked
IthcJnibblo of a hoped for decline in
foc.d products today. accordinK to
jloc:.l grocers. Belief that a boycott
on potatoos in Chicago would have
I an effect hero was also eitnlrfdei!.
! crease owing to warmer weather that
bus added to the supply.
Sugar Situation Serious.
Cuban difficulties and strikes at
five of the larger eastern sugar refin
eries, now in progress, have made
sugar alnicst Impossible to get, said
a grocer today, when he learned ol
the failure of a shipment ordered six
weeks ago, to arrive. The price on
this commodity hass gone to $S.I0 or
hundred pounds, retailing at 11 !bf.
for a dollar.
Navy and lima beans showed the
greatest Jump yesterday, the corn-
concensus moil bean retailing at $1.50 per hun
ts that an; died moro than a week ago. Els'i-
teen cents a pound is asked for navv
beans now. Lima beans have jumped
to $20 per hundred, an increase ol
$2.50 over that of last week. Lima
beans were quoted at f2c to ir.c a
pound by most grocers this morning.
Restaurant owners have appreciated
jthe advance in price, and unablo to
lay in a large stock owing to ihe
scarcity of tho nroiliiet "were7 "fo'reell
to make another cut in the side dish
served with meals.
Fresh shipments of eggs from the
west ami southwest have lowered the
price 10 cents in the last week. Kgs
are quoted at 3"c a dozen now. A
steady decrease in egg prices may be
expected with the corning of warm
weather to. stay. A month ago hen
fruit was sold over the counter at .rre
a dozen.
No Food Manipulation.
That the prevailing high prices
were not entirely due to food manip
ulation is tile claim made by grocers
Supply and demand and the failure
of staple crops for the last two years
all over the country are blamed. The
bean crop, all garden vegetables,
sugar arul potatoes have slumped in
production largely, they nay.
"Consumers themselves tire largely
to blame for increases in prices," said
a local grocer "Many housewives
fail to use sensible economy in trying
to practice economical tricks. As a
result they pay more for 'substitutes'
for potatoes and such things than
would for the product Itself. Thvn,
too, they often try to buy in too large
quantities. With a scarcity-1 pre
valent, if many do Hiis they will add
to the scarcity and make prices hit
it ill) another notch."
Recession Due Is Belief.
That everything about the markets
favtrs recession and not further ad
vance, however, is Intimated. A re
turn to food prices prevailing before
the present car shortage and difficul
ties relative to the war cannot be ex
pected until a good crop of every
commodity has been harvested.
Local grocers are paying as high
las $2,000 to get a carload of potatoes
here from the western coast, where
the only good crops were raised thij
year, they say.
JOHN HINKEY DIES AT ;.
RYBURN HOSPITAL
T....
John ITInkey, a well known old feV-
dent of thin vicinity, died lust ftening
at 8:30 o'clck at Ryburn hospital, fol
lowing a lingering I'llness. His demise
Is attributed to infirmities of old uge.
Mr. Hinkey was born In Westphalia,'
Prussia, and came to this country
with his parent:? at the' age of nine
years. Ho was raised on a farm near
Karlvllle for r, number of years. He
was married February 24, 1X70, to
Louise Flick and moved on u farm in
Wallace township, where he resided
for nearly forty-live years.
1 Two years ago he moved to Ottawa.
He leaves surviving a wife and seven
children Mrs. Jacob Parr, of Lnrnod,
Kansas, Mrs. Ren Dolder, of Harding,
Mrs. H. C. Wendcl, of Chicago, and
iMrs. Otis Bach, of Ottawa, and Jo-
seph Manville, William and John of
this Pity.
The funeral services will be held
Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at
St. Francis church. Interment will bV
111 St. Francis cemetery.
IOIHM P D fl P r 0
1 1 HUH!! UIIUULIIJ
CLEARED OF
y
JUDGE
SIDE
KOENIG FINDS NORTH
GROCERYMEN NOT GUIL-
TY OF
STOCK
APPLYING TORCH TO
All of "Little Italy" was gathered in
Justice Koenig's police court this
morning when Louis Augustine and
Pete Slyvester, North Ottawa grocers,
were arraigned before Justice Koenig
on a charge of attempting to defraud
insurance company, and found not
guilty by George Koenig. It was al
leged that Augustine and Sylvester
fired the Wolfe building, at the corner
or Marquette und La Salle streets
early Monday morning with the Hope
of collecting insurance on their stock
of groceries.
Deputy Fire Marshal Wagner was
present at the inquisition this morn
ing. The grocerymen were defended
by Attorney liarold L. Hicholson,
while State's Attorney (leorge S.
Wiley was the prosecutor. .More
than a dozen witnesses were in court,
most of them having been summoned
there by the state.
The Italian following of the two
grc rerymen practically filled the eourt
and all paid strict attention to the
trial.
Strubel cn Stand.
Oscar Strubel. who resides above
the grocery store, was the first to j
take the stand. Strubel stated that
he was awakened by the fire about 2
o'clock Monday morning and hurried
ly aroused all the members of his
family and then sounded the warring
to the Locander family, who had the
apartments across the hall from him.
When he arrived downstairs the fire
wa3 burning very freelv on the floor
of a rear room. The light from the
flames made objects discernable In the
room. He neither heard nor saw any
one leave, the store prior to the fire.
At 10:?o o'clock, however, he heard
some one down In the store, but did
not pay any uttentlon to the noise.
-a .i -George 8tevanon. . .
George Stevenson, foreman of the
fire department, . was the next to be
called. Stevenson testified that he
wa summoned to the fire by a tele
phene call at 2:10 o'clock - Monday
morning. When he arrived there he
found the blaze confined to the rear
portion of the store. The fire hud ap
parently started on the floor of ' the
building. The stove pipe of a small
Btove was laying on the floor. He did
not know whether the force from the
water knocked the pipe down, or
whether it fell out of place daring the
course of the fire.
There was no Indication of an ex
pkslon 6f anv kinw. On examination
Ste venson stated that he had talked
with Sylvester the next morning after
the fire and that he (Slyvester) stated
he was In the store at 8:3i o'clock
Sunday evening.
Boissenin on Stand.
Fire Chief Joseph Iloissenln was
called, ?but couM give very little evi
dence of material benefit in connec
tion with the origin of the bla.e.. Ho
stated the character, of the fire and
the condition the Bremen found in
tho store.
Officer Henry Monroe, who was
making his police "beat'' In that neigh
borhood, stated that he talked with
Sylvester In the doorway of his store
at. 8 : 3i o'clock Sunday evening.
I flter he was standing near the Wolfe
building from the hour of 12:30 to
1:W o'clock, and at that time he saw
no one enter or leave the building.
The attempt or the state to show
that the defendants had endeavored
to secure insurance from Fred Hathe
way liiBt July was thrown out and Mr.
Hatheway was not. permitted to tell
whv he did not. hold the Insurance on
the' building. We stated that the men
made application for a policy and that
one was granted, but it was only in
uso a few days when it was cancelled.
Sylvester and Augustine, when
called to the stand, denied trie charges
that they were guilty of applying the
torch to their stock.
f Richolson Makes Plea.
Attorney Harold L, Richolson made
an excellent plea for. his clients. He
stated that not, a particle of the testi
hibny .submitted , .would .warrant his
men lielng held to the grand jury. He
carefully reviewed the, case anil dealt
with every phase of it. "Without tes
timony to show that the defendants
are guilty of any crime, I ask that the
case be dismissed,", said Mr. Richol
son In his closing arguments. ', '
Attornqy Wiley attempted to show
that there was a suspicion of crime,
and that as this was only a prelimin
ary hearing, the men should be held
to the grand Jury. He showed where
the pair had Insured for more than
their stock was wxirth.
Jiirtlce Koenig ruled that the case
be dismissed ns there was not. proper
evidence that the men were guilty of
firing the building.
Onp of the most, common of errors
Is that of confusing happiness with
tho menus of happiness, sacrificing the
(list for the uttulumuut of the second,
Lucky . . . ..
a m mm
PiM. T. MOLONEY, EX-
ATTORNEY GENERAL,
SUFFERS PARALYSIS
General M. T. Moloney, ex attorn.'v
general of the stale of Illinois, suf
fered a slight stroke c.f paralysis lat
evening at 5:30 o'clock ut his home
on 3t;7 Benton street. The paralysis
is confined to his right side, tut lb
not of a very serious nature, accord
ing to reports given from his bedside
today. Ilia many friends hope for hr
speedy recovery.
GEORGE RUGG LANDS
TWO BIG CONTRACTS
George Riigg, Ottawa tile contrac
tor, landed two big contracts yester
day, one for $10,000 in the Corn Ex
change Bank building in Chicago, ar.1
another for $3,000 in Aurora. Mr.
Riigg expects to start the work im
mediately and will take a squad of
local workmen with him to do both
Jobs.
MOTHER'S PENSION IS
ASKED BYMRS. D00LAN
Mrs. Irene Doolan, widow of the
late Edward Doolan, whose death ;c
currefi a few' weeks pgn, today fil.il
a petition in Judge Mayo's court ask-
ng mat she he allowed a share of
the county's mother's pension funl
Mrs. Doolan sets forth in her plea
that she has two children, Irene aged
5 and Mary aged 8 months, dependant
upon her. Five of the older children
are confined as dependants in tho
Guardian Angel Home at Peoria.
The petition will be heard by Judge
Mayo at some future date.
TWO ESTATES ARE
FILED FOR PROBATE
Two Streator estates were filed for
probate in Ottawa today.
Ida Kuntz. who died In that city on
February 20. 1916, did not ieave a will
ind her $1,000 personal property vill
go thru administration and then be
divided equally among the four sur
viving children.
George Hall, whose death occurred
January 3!, left real estate worth
$3.0oo and personal property valued
it $300. . His will ivnji , all t: nla
widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Hall.
JOHN S. WATERMAN
TO BE BURRIED HERE
John S. Waterman, former Ottawa
resident, is dead in Chicago, accord
ing to word received today by Ottawa
.elatives. Mr. Waterman passed away
A'ednesday evening, February 28, and
his remains will be brought to this
dty arriving here Saturday morning,
or interment in Ottawa Avenue ceme
tery. Mr. Waterman was an uncle of
Mrs. G. C. Rickley and M. N. Water
nan, both of this city. Burial will be
irivate.
ARMING SHIPS MEANS
WAR BERLIN CLAIMS
Berlin, March 2. Officials here ex
pressed the hope today that the re
lease of four Yarrowdale prisoner
will at least offer proof that entente
charges that 'Germany is seeking de
liberately to provoke war with the
United States are unfounded.
There is little hope that the depart
ure of the Yarrowdale men will do
any more than slightly decrease the
tension between the two countries.
But officials said today their arrival
in Denmark will at least dispel the be
lief existing in some quarters in Amer
ica that a so-called "militarist" party
in Germany Is guiding the country's
destinies. Had Germany desired war
with the United States, It was point
ed out, she would have delayed the re
lease of the Yarrowdale men, by one
pretext or other, until public sent I-
ment in the United States became I
more Inflamed.
Now that the l.aconia sinking hasj230 o'clock at Ryburn hospital fol-
nasEed without a declaration of warji0WinR u two weeks' illness.
by the United States, official circles i Mr. Hall had been employed lor a
here are awaiting the action-of the i numl)t,,. 0r years at the St. Xavier's :
United States Congress on President Hf,,iPIv (inf W!W w,,n known in this
Wilson's request for authority to annr,y
ships (the result, of the House vole,
empowering the President to act, had
not reached Berlin when this dispatch
ws filed.)
The German Tress almost unani
mcusly agrees that the arming of
American merchantmen can maan
nothing but war,
YARROWDALE PRISONERS
. ' ARRIVE AT COPPENHAGEN
London, Mar. 2, Dr. H. B. Snyder,
of -Norfolk, Va.; Dr. John Davis, Co
lumbus, Miss.; Richard Zabrlsk'.e,
Englewood, N. J., and Orville McKim,
Watertown, N. Y the four Americans
from the steamer Yarrowdale, who'(,loHeJ lu a candy hox wns Klv(?n u
were released by the German govern-:a
mem, reacnen l openuagen . louuy.
They appealed to the United States I
Legation for assistance
in gemng ,
home.
An egg Lag )( crocheted cotton Is
useful t IhiII the eggs In, anves diffi
culty in getting tliein out ut t lu water
unJ also vaves brcukug;, ......
OTTAWA ENLISTED GERMANY NOT ANXIOUS TO
In FIGHT AGAINST
IS
DR. EAST ARRIVES IN CITY TO
DAY TO EDUCATE PEOPLE
AGAINST RE-OCCURENCE OF
LAST SUMMER'S EPIDEMIC.
To Parents:
It ii vital to you and yours
that all be done within your pow
er to stamp out infantile paral
ysis the worst and most violent
form of contagion Infesting this
Climate. It is nothing short of
Imperative that you hear Dr. East
at the high school tonight It is
your duty to be there.
The state today Is carrying Its mes
sage of infantile paralysis prevention
into the homes of Ottawa. A cam.
paign now in the waging is being con
ducted In every locality where this
dread malady made its presence
known during the summer and fall of
1916. Ottawa and other cities in La
aalle county were nartieul.-irlv hard
hit and records at Springfield show
this community had the greatest num
ber of cases of any in the state.
Dr. East, representative of the Illi
nois Board of Health, and recognized
as one of the greatest authorities in
tho mid-west upon infantile paralysis,
arrived here today and this afternoon
is conducting a clinic for doctors in
the supervisors' room of the court
house. After instructing the medics
In the sciences of combating the mal
ady he will go before the public and
carry his message right to the hearth
stones in a hope his visit will elimin
ate further fear of the contagion dur
ing the warm months to come.
Tonight he will address residents
of the city at the high school audi
torium. He should be heard by an
audience that will require every seat
in that spacious assembly place to
seat. Statistics show that none are
exempt from infantile paralysis' rav
ages. Homes visited by the conta-
flon last summer in Ottawa, were
among the best. " ' '
The gathering will be of an inter
esting nature anything that will tend
to minimize the baby plague cannot
be uninteresting to parents. There
will be slides to emphasize the talk
and there will be Instrumental music
by an orchestra.
Last year there were 1,200 cases of
the paralysis in Illinois outside -f
Chicago, and many of the patients
were left in a crippled state. By
clinics, which are held in the cities
in which the lectures are given, Dr
East is assisting the medical profes
sion in solving the after-effects, and
also is showing the doctors and par
ents how to treat the afflicted children
before the paralysis sets in. In New
York, Massachusetts and Vermont
where the paralysis has been highly
prevalent, there has been considerable
success In preventing the after
effects. '"We are particularly interested in
this phase,' said Dr. East. "A certain
percentage of victims who become
cripples eventually become public
charges, and we are seeking to treat
and save these. Simply speaking, it
is a sort of muscle re-education we
have adopted, by which we hope to
save for them means of unright loco-1"
m,, '
The medical profession of Ottawa 1
is co-operating with the State Board
in the work and urges the public in j
general and parents in particular - j
iu nut'iiu lumiu h leciure.
t
FRANK HALL IS DEAD;
FUNERAL SATURDAY
Frank Hall, well known Ottawa rer.-
iriont. naaHPll fiWHV thiri innnitnir Jl !
He leaves surviving one sister, Mrr
C. C. Duffy, of this city, and one
brother, Judge S. P. Hall, of La Salle,
The funeral services will be held '.t
1:30 o'clock Monday afternoon from '
,h ,.,..i,len,.e nf Mr. n.1 Mrs. C. C. .
Duffy. Inierment will be in Ottawa
Avenue cemetery. Funeral servlcs
will be private.
LUCKY WOMAN WINS
A VALUABLE SOUVENIR
At a party held in the home of Mrs.
Joseph Schultz in Seneca u large po
tutn wnnmed 111 tine nuner and en-
j,rze. i
A ,.omUctor on tho C O. & P. I
interurban tells of a man who went, j
mt0 a La Salle saloon and ordered a
S
glass of beer. He laid down a pola-' spent in these to cities. .
to. The bartender rung up the cash ! More men at honit- like Mr. Thoinp
register, usked the customer if he did 1 son would make the divorce courts
not have anything smaller and siig-1 the exception, rather than the rule mi l
gestod that he take the change in j life one heavenly bliss for house
trade. - ' wives.
FIGHT, BUT
FOIL ATTEMPT TO
YEGGS ARE FRIGHTENED AWAY
BY VILLAGERS WHEN BLASTS
ROCK TOWN ACROSS LA SALLE
COUNTY LINE.
Kinsman, Feb. 2 Four Yeggmen,
who early this morning blew the safe
of the Kinsman bank, were foiled in
their attempt to get away with any
cash 'deposited in the large Iron safe,
by villagers, who, awakened by the
explosions, drove the robbers out of
the town, but failed to capture them.
Two shots were applied to the vult,
the first blowing the large door away.
The second unfastened the inner
doors, just as the yeggs were tapping
door No. 3, behind which lay several
thousands in cash, an alarm was
sounded by the outpost and the four
men fled the scene. They dashed
from the building in a waiting auto
mobile and sped southward toward
Dwlght. Posses took up 'the chase,
but the bandit auto was too speedy
for the pursuers and the quartette
made their escape.
A report received here this morn
ing was that the four men were seen
driving thru Dwlght at a high rate of
speed about 5 o'clock. Another report
was that a machine, answering the
description of the oub had by the rob
bers, was abandoned near Coal Cltv.
It is believed in the village that .the
Coal City car is the one owned by tne
fugitives.-
City and County officials for a rad
ius of fifty miles were notified of the
attempted robbery. Sheriff Davis was
routed out of bed at 6 o'clock, twenty
minutes after the explosion rocked
the town, and told to be on the look
'out for thekyeggs. '-"
The sheriff believes the bandits who
are operating thru this section have
been working out or Peoria and make
that city their heaThrmrrters. Efforts
will be made to get the police of that
city to investigate the robbery.
The bank In Kinsman is owned by
State Representative Daniel O'Connell.
Kinsman is a small village, lying
across the La Salle county line in
Grundy county.
PATRIOTIC MOVIE
SATURDAY AT LIBRARY
There will be a good program of
movies and stories lor the children
at the library Saturday afternoon,
The following films will be shown:
"Declaration of Independence," a
fine
historical sketch leadinc un i0
July 4, 1770.
I "Poor Baby,
by mistake Mrs. Jones'
j baby is taken by a tramp and all con
! corned have amusing experiences in
securing baby's return,
j Miss Doroihy Nertney will enter
! tain the children who have to wa.t
I for the second and third shows. None
. 1 .. ,u"ulin
..1. Ll.l.w...
can afford lo miss
Miss .Nertney
s part of the program.
It will probably tie a good mixture
I of the sci ions and the comic.
fT' J p pQLKS WITH
A VERY STRANGE MAN
Illinois' most unusual man, particul
iarly so as inspector, visited Ottawa
yesterday, and instead of discovering
Pttmr hnnui. ho fnnnd virtue Klritny. !
er yet he went out of his way to add ;
praise to a dining institution that Is!
deserving of nil he said. ' !
Lou Harvey and his good wife, to-i
gether with their corps of faithful and 1
lena iem r in 'ivj cri, enji;.vetl un evt'lH-
(ul experience and the man speaking
1 in such ' laudatory tones was Slate
I Food inspector Thompson, who visited
I the New Clifton and inspected its cut-
r.. i...,... i .1.1
inni tup to uohoui. nesHies piac
,nK lh,! ''Oinnionwealth's seal of purl-
1' A .. I .... 1 I Il 1 I. .
jty upon the quality of the food, Mr.
j Thompson took advantage of un oppor
tunity to tell the Clifton proprietors of
the cleanliness and neatness of their
kitchens. Incidentally he Inquired of
! Mr, Harvey how such meals could be
! served at the Clifton rate of fifty cents
! each and received the reply "1 uppre
j elate my patronage and feel that I
can 'break even under these prices.
Some day I hope the high cost of liv
ing will go down ami then we'll do
better.
The Clil'ti ti has a pay roll of $1,000
a month, while In Streator the Co-
lumblo costs Mr. Harvey $800 a month
to ouerate. All of thin money Is beinir
ID KIIISMAII BANK
WILL IF FORCED
AUTHOR OF MEXICAN PLOT
ADDRESSES REICHSTAG
ON U. S. CRISIS
I
STANDS By SUBSEAS
2IMMEMANN. INTIMATES HE WAS
READY TO CONFER AFTER
FIRST SECURING CONSENT TO
ALL RULES PREVIOUSLY LAID
DOWN.
Berlin via Sayville, March 2 Ger
many will not back down. Mainten- v
unce of her new submarine policy
must be a condition of any understand
ing reached with the United States to 5
prevent a widening of the present
breach. ,
Foreign Secretary Zimmermann
made this assertion in the Reichstag '
in the course of his discussion of the '
efforts of the Swiss minister at Wash
ington to bring the two nations Into
agreement.
"Obviously our wish to come to an
understanding only can be accom
plished so far that we do not conflict
with our declaration of barred zones,
which we are firmly decided to main-
tain against our enemies under all
circumstances, the foreign secretary
declared.
Secretary Zimmermann first detail
ed to the Reichstag the negotiations
attempted by the Swiss minister at
Washington.
"In the affair of our negotiations
with the United States, the underly- .
ing facts are these," ha said. "Qtf
February 28, we received by the Good ; '
offices of the Swiss Federal Council
m telegram iroiu ma wiaa minuter ,
at Washington, who after the, break
Ing off of relations With the United".'"
States represents our Interests there. ,
The telegram had the following con- -tents:
"If the German government
would now show inclination to nego
tiate with the United States about
the blockade then he (The Swiss min
ister) would be gladly willing to take
further care of this affair."
"All the speakers yesterday declar
ed that the breaking off of relations
with the United States was regret
table. No doubt it would be still more
regrettable if there would be war with
the United States. Between - both
countries there exists the old friend
ly relations. There is no political
antagonism between both countries
ami in the economic domain they more
or less depend on each other. One
could even say that they ought to be
economic allies.
"Therefore, it is easy to understand
i '"at tne government took care to
avoid everything which might inten
sify the conflict and cause war with
America. From the standpoint of
these considerations we examined the
suggestion.
"From the very outset we were ab
solutely certain that our part in the
submarine war ought in no way be
.imited by concessions.
"We only hinted at our readiness to
enter into more detailed negotiations
with America about the admission of
passenger ships. The Swiss minister
at Washington transmitted our com
munications and thereupon received
from Mr. Lansing a note in very po
lite terms. Lansing says he is author
ized by President Wilson to say that
the government of 'the c nlted States
will negotiate with Germany very
gladly if Germany cancels her decision
of January 31. This being absolutely
impossible, the negotiations had to be
pnmriHurori uu n i.ji1itH kfni.A tUm,
really had begun.
Foreign Secretary Ziininermanu's
statement to the Reichstag is the first
official admission that Germany did
surritest to ihe fnited smtna fh
mission of passenger ships to the
barred zone as a basis for further ne
gotiations. Earlier dispatches from
Berlin asserted that the SwUs minis
ter was acting on his own responsibili
ty and not under instructions from
Berlin, when he made this proposal
to Secretary Lansing.
Congress Blocks President.
Washington, Mar. 2. - - I'renident
Wilson will deal wiih Germany in his
own way. This was made certain tz
day when nssuraiics of support
leached t : White House from Shi
ate and House lenders of both parties.
The icvelation of fie enormous ex
tent of J lie German plotting against
the I'nited States has proven u trump
card for the aduiinlsl niHon. it has
solidified the country behind the
President. Before the end of next
week, unless something entirely un
foiseen shall develop, the mail car
lyiny liners ot the American line will
be back on their accustomed routes
( n the Atlantic.'
The President, his advisers sy,
(Continued on pa go 6.)

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