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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, May 25, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Established 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1630.
ADER-JOURNA
F
THE WEATHER.
Shower tonight and
Saturday. Warmer to
night. VOLUME 1.--NO. h;:
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. FIJI DAY, MAY 25, 1917,
PRICE, TWO CEVIS.
FREE
TR
JOHN CHERRY ILL BE AWARDED FRENCH CORPORAL
LOOP PAVING; IKES LOW FIGURE m m N
- , 5 visits in onm
MAN WHO PAVED OTTAWA I
PHMIMfi RAPtf HM
THE JOB
TWO FIRMS WERE IN FIELD FOR
WORK CHERRY'S OFFER HIGH
ER THAN ESTIMATE, BUT FAR
WITHIN LIMIT FIXED BY LAW.
Thti morning at th opening of bids
for tho 'Iim)i' pavement, John t'ln Try.
ML. . l ...... 1. .
j,n kmhh uie I'limi.n nil . mane anoiuei i
i LUIIIL'UIU UlllilU. ricHT or thc marne as
RPFN Bins TflHAY MAY END SOON wtLL
step toward taming th. sobriquet, ; meeting arraigned for between Frank
"The man who paved Ottawa." Hy sub-! Kennedy, organizer for tho Plumbers
mining a price that was f t.:r. til and Ktcam Fitters, it is generally bo
lower than Iho .limit fixed by law, j lieved that the plumbers' strike will
Cherry, at a meeting of the eornmis-) soon come to an mil.
sioner on Monday, will be awarded) Tin; fact that, this carpenters roach
con tracts for re-paving the dovvn-town vd a settlement, news of whirh was
district.
Two conti actors T. W. Key.-! and
Mr. Cherry--wore in the field for the
work and submit ted bids at tho spe
cial meeting of the board of local im
provements and council sit! lug joint
ly. The bids rollow:
T. W. Keyw, I.u Salle, $1 12.!IX5.7S.
Joint Cherry. Jacksonville, $ lux, "til..
40.
With a disparity of $ 1,224 32 in these
two bids and the fact that Public En
gineer Parnswortli placed his esti
mate at Jl02.S2'..t;i, leaving Mr.
Cherry's offer $5,!I30. S5 above tho e. ti
niflte and $4,351 11 less than the legal
limit of $113,112.5", at w'lich Hu
the commissioners would be pr'vi
ledged to award, it is almost a moral
rinch that Mr. Cherry will be Riven
the contract.
Cherry Not Pre;ent.
Mr, Cherry fas not present at the
meeting of the council today. He had
representatives on the scene, how
ever, and one of thein submit led h'?
bid. That Mr. Che try did not bid at
the previous attempt to pel contracts
was assigned by certain circles to a
precautionary move taken by him 'o
buy enough futures in bricks lo as
sure, him ample material should he be
successful in landing the big job in
Ottawa. It is hinted that. Mr. Cherry
Is sufficiently supplied with materials
to permJt his going rich! ahead with
the work as soon as he nets labor and
teams In the city.
It probably will be the hitler part
of June or the first of July before he
can get all set to tear up the streets
and start spreading concrete base and
laying brick, as well as gi ailing ami
building curbs as called for in the
specification.".
Supply Men on Hand.
Many supply men were on hand!
this morning, ami during l'ie readim: '
of Mr. Cherry's bid pencils flew like !
lightning. Some quarters showed dis-j
romforl, but all in all the loll in:: went
olT good natnredly. After adjourn
ment there was considerable buzin'-';
among the various representative I
and some predictions were made that !
Mr. Cherry could not do the work with- j
out losing money. Cherry, however,
has never been known to get many;
' "bumps" in the paving game, and he
has tackled some of the largest jobs
in Illinois and has been in the busi
ness a great number of years. He Is
recognized as one of the most daring
"independent" bidders in the state.
Ho has twice come to the rescue
of Ottawa when it appeared as tho i
the city was going to he precipitated
Into a pool and fail to let large con
tracts. On the west side letting the
satire procedure had to be followed
as that employed today, and in both
Instances Cherry was "Johnny on the
spot" to deliver.
Itesldes paving west Ottawa, Cherry
paved the entire south side. He is
now working on a large contract at
Pilnceton, which will 'not Interfere
In anyway with his contract here.
. Must Wait Ten Day3.
Tho law requires that alter the let
ting tho city must wait ten days be
fore signing contracts with Mr.
Cherry. This is to give a majority of
the property owners residing in the
district an opportunity lo take the
contract off Mr. Cherry's hands at in
per cent less than his hid, if they care
to. In view of the present high price
of labor and materials, It Is not be
lieved, however, that any attempt
will be made by owners of real estate
In tho "loop" lo relieve Mr. Cherry
of the work.
A Short Story.
"What seems to be the matter with
him?" asked the doctor, appmiiehtn
the bedside of the man who lay swath
ed In bandages.
"He found tho kh leak," briefly ex
plained the nurse.-London Tit 111U.
M
US II
1 M HFFT-
Ull liiLll InLLIj frank maccett. of sandwich.
CARPENTERS' SETTLEMENT MAY
BE INSTRUMENTAL IN BRING
ING ABOUT AGREEMENT BE
TWEEN PLUMBERS AND
PLOYERS.
EM-
With conferences being held be
tween the Union nu'ii, iintl another
published exclusively in the Free
Trader-Journal last evening, may be
instrumental in bringing about a set
tlement between the Plumbers and
their employers.
The carpcnlors asked for an
increase of len cents per hour in their
daily wages, thus an increase from
fitly cents an hour to sixty cents an
hour. They were given a seven and
one half cent, increase and a settle
ment was made on thin basis.
In sortie labor circles it was believ
ed that the plumbers' strike would
come to an end before the week
was out, while others were more
pessimistic, predicting that it would
be some time before an agreement
would be reached.
The plumbers are asking for an In- j
crease of six and one half cents a-
hour for-(he ftrt yeiw- mid bis ami
one-half cents for the second year.
MEMBERS OF SETH C.
EARL POST TO HOLD
PATRIOTIC OBSERVANCE
President Mrs. Susie S. Snow and
I Secretary Airs. Madge C Cooke and
' Trea. surer Mrs. Nellie Kilgore, of the
Seth C. Karl Relief Corp, are busily
I engaged in making the preparations
lor the usual customary patriotic ob
servance this year. On Sunday the
members will meet at Pi o'clock In
the Sunday school of the Congragtlon
al church to arrange to attend the ser
vices at the Congregational church
with comrades of the (!. A. U.
Memorial services for comrades anil
niemners oi uie . n. i:. wno tiavoji(1
died since a.lnuary, lit It!, will be held I i.i,,,
at tho armory Sunday afternoon at 3
o'clock. Rev. J. F. Vonckx, pastor of
the Presbyterian church, will have
charge of the services.
On Wednesday. May 30, a meeting
will he held at the court house at I
o'clock to arrange to attend the pa
triotic celebration Decoration day.
Exorcises will lie held at the armory
mid some of the members will go to
Ottawa Avenue cenie.tery to hold me
morial services. at soldiersViot.
FAMOUS TRAIN IS
SOON TO PASS INTO
HISTORY; LOSES NAME
After 12 o'clock next Sunday night
the Peru accommodation will be
known no lonm r by that name. As
ling us the oldest, employee of the
Rock Island can remember this pas
senger train has left Peru for Chi
cago every morning except Sunday and
returned at night to Peru, where t lie
train was put up for the night.
Beginning at. the above hour n"t
Sunday, I he Rock Island w ill make a.
change in Its time-card and one of
the changes will he the passing of the
name "Peru Accommodation." The
"Hureau Accommodation" will take Its
place.
The local train hereafter will go t
Hureau, 11 utile;! further west, In
stead of to Peru, and will leave that
station at C:30 in the morning, get
ting lo Ottawa at about 7:25. ll will
mean a litlle longer run for I ho crew
but (here will scarcely be any chiinge
In the lime of the train reaching this
city.
Another reason for the chance was
flint many mornings No. H passenger
froi.i the war west, generally side
tracks the accommodation, inaklntr P
considerably Into reaching here and
balling the fast Iraln into Chicago.
The Peoria train also Interferreil
wlt'i fhe accommodation at night get
tir.it by -at Peru.
The changes In the time sehedu'e
of other trains will not be important.
Corporal Frank Massett, of the 14th
regiment French grenadiers, last
night gave Ottawa its first touch of
Verdun atmosphere Massett, fresh
I from the defense of the French strong
J hold Is on a twenty-one day furlough
and Is putting in his brief stay with
his wife and children at their home
near Sandwich, before going gack to
the battle line.
Massett, in company with friends,
came to Ottawa last night and spent,
several hours upon the streets, where
his uniform attracted endless atten
tion. Masset was garbed in the uni
form of nil infantryman. His coat is
a dark shade of blue while his trous
ers are of greyish blue. Red stripes
running horizontally across his sleeve
give tho only touch of bright colors
to the outfit. On his sleeve is a black
band above his corporal's chevrons
to indicate his three months' service
at Verdun.
Masset is forty three years of age
and is the picture of health. He car
ries a rotund front that is comfort
able in its proportions and appears to
be well fed, besides admitting having
had plenty to eat. He arrived home
(on May 15 and will return to France
in time to get back Into service at
j the expiration of his twenty-one day
furlough.
Besides taking part in the defense
of Verdun Masset saw service on the
Marne under General J off re. He es
caped wounds, but had two very nar
row calls once when a dum duni
pierced the heel of his shoe and again
when a bullet tore his bayonet scab
bard off tho belt, but succeeded in
passing without touching his body.
He is a grenade, or bomb thrower,
considered among the most danger
ous of all the fighting. He takes his
lot with good grace and does not look
forward to his return to the trenches
wilh any misgivings. Like all others
of his kind, he is fighting? for France
and victory.
He wears the medal for distinguish
ed military service, but will leave that
with his children when sets sail for
Fra nee.
2 CATHOLIC CHURCHES
WILL RAISE FLAGS IN
ELABORATE CEREMONIES
On Sunday morning, immediately
after high ma's, at Si. Francis church,
flag, which' was 10 '1:,U! been
ed and raised two weeks ai'o but
was postponed on account of the fail
ure; of the railroad lo deliver the pole
iif time, will be solemnly blessed and
raised. i
Special ceremonies have been ar
ranged for this occasion. The Hag
will he given a place of honor in the
church during the high mass at 10
o'clock. Immediately after the mass
the blessing will lake place. Pro
cession will then he formed and will
proceed to the spacious lawn between
the new church and the school build
ing, where a fifty-fool pole has been
erected. The Knights of Columbus
and the niemehrs of Company (", 3rd
111. N. G., escorted by Hentrich's mil
itary hand, will also take part in the
ceremony. While 1 ho tlag is being
raised, Company O will lire a volly,
followed Immediately by the singing
of the Star Spangled Runner by the
assembled audience, accompanied by
the baud.
The Hag measures 7 x 12 and Is the
gift of the !. A. R. The pole is the
gilt of the Si. Francis Dramatic and
Athletic Club, while the celebration
Is being financed by the various so
cieties eoni'eried with St. Francis
parish.
On Sunday afternoon at 3:3u o'clock
a flag raising exercise will be held at
St. Patrick's school. 'A similar pro
gram has been arranged, which was
announced earlier In the week.
TO PUT FINISHING
TOUCHES ON PARADE
AT MEETING TONIGHT
Tonight at the circuit court room at
the court house, the olllcers, eoimnit
teemeii and everyone having red blood
In his veins who want lo seo Memor
ial Day fittingly observed will meet
to put on the finishing touches for
this day In Ottawa. Men uml wo
men, boys and girls and everyone
are not only invited, nut nro urged
lo attend this meeting, and it Is hoped
tho circuit, 'court room will be pack
ed to its capacity tonight.
Pl'STOiMloE
LIBERTY WAR BONDS
WILL PLACE ADS UPON LETTERS
AND PARCEL POST PACKAGES
OFFICIAL ORDERS RECEIVED
BY DOUGHERTY.
If within the next few duys you
see some extra lettering on 'he let
ter from your business house or
friend, don't tremble lest yo I are sus
pected of being a spy while the censor
opens your letter. Don't reach mto
jour Jeans for "postage d'.'.o." For
probably the printed ma't.r stamped
across the face of your letter is only
a postomVe advertisement ejr tiie l.b
eriy loan bonds.
Postmaster Dougherty is getting
ready to call the attention tf all bis
"customers" to the bonds, and as eooii
as his stamp arrives from Washing
ton he will start in decorating the
mail laekages of Ottawa folus.
Official Order Issuvl.
Here is the official order sent io Mr.
I'o'.sheity and other pos'masteis in
the Cnited Staler:
With reference to the notice of
the postmaster general, dated
May 17, PJ17, printed on the front
page of the Official Bulletin, is
sued at Washington on that date
by the committee on public infor
mation, requesting postmasters to
aid postal employes in subscrib
ing to the Liberty bonda, the at
tention of postmasters, ural car
riers and all other postal em
ployes Is invited to the further
opportunity of rendering valuable
assistance in Felling the Liberty
bunds by bringing the matter to
the attention of those of their
patrons likely to subscribe and
supply them with all necessary in
formation. It is hoped that every employe
In the postal service will sub
scribe for at least one of the
bonds, and thus be well armed In
the campaign for the sale of the
bonds to others.
"Liberty Loan" Rubber Stamps.
To assist you in your patriotic
efforts there will be forwarded
within a few days to the post
master at every second, third and
fourth class nostoffice, a rubber
impression staifip bearing the fol
lowing legend:
Do Your Bit.
Buy a Liberty Loan Bond.
Inquire at any Bank or Postofllro.
In the use of the stamp use your
red ink pad (or the black pad if
you do not have a red one) and
see that the Impression is put on
every letter received for delivery
from your post office, the impres
sion to be placed Just above and
slightly to the left of the ad
dressed name.
MISS ETHEL LA DUE
IS BRIDE OF JOHN
MILLER OF DAVENPORT
Simple ceremonies marked I he wed
ding of Miss Ethel La Due, daughter
of Dr. ami-Mrs. liurdette La Due, of
.'15 Kasi Main street, and John A.
Miller, son of Mrs. August Miller, of!
Davenport, Iowa, last evening at. 0
o'clock at the La Due home. Rev.
Chessman, pastor of the First, Baptist
church, officiated.
The bride was charmingly attired in
a georgette crepe dress with white
silk. Tiie couple were unattended.
Following the ceremony a four
course wedding supper was served at
the home of the bride to the imme
diate relatives of the young couple.
The bride had been a teacher In the)
public schools at Spring Valley, and ,
was one of Ottawa's popular young i
ladies. The groom is a resident of
Davenport. Mr. and Mrs. Miller will ;
nuake their future home in Davenport, j
IT IS 0. K. TO WEAR
STRAW LIDS NOW
Straw- hat season is at hand,
thus far there have been only a
but
few-
(Iviiineey Olcolts who have had
nerve to discard the little brown
the
Fe -
dora, put on the straw bonnet and
blossom out in creamy flannels. The
fact of the matter Is, a fellow reels
like Ringling's circus as he floats
down the avenue attired in a new
"skypiece" and one of Easy Mark's
two-piece Riiits of creamy shade and
filmy texture. Looks as If he were
trying to "outstrip" some other fellow.
The good housewife has put hubby
to work on quite some few dusty augs
while she is storing away, amongst
a brigade of moth balls, the winter
clothing--or maybe she is hidini'
them away in ihe cedar chest which
lias the same effect, on clothing lis
lutilh balls- except that there Is a
variation In the odor. If George is a
good, ha ril working, indulgent hus
band, and knocks a few scuttles of
dust out of the rugs, he gets a good,
substantial feed of "greens"-with
imiyhe an onion sandwich on the side. I
This is also the season of the year I
to drink snssfilrim lea and eat bur-j
dock rooi and a few other "yarns" December term of the county court.
for your blood. Some of the boysj .
think "Komi Crick" whiskey is almo.it I hllo U about twice as lurge as Call
us good in fact, better, fornla.
at
IN TO SERVE US
LIST OF HELPERS FOR OTTAWA:
MADE PUBLIC THIS MORNING'
ALL GIVE SERVICE TO HELP U
S. ON REGISTRATION DAY.
Volunteers who will assist in the
registration of Ottawa men on June
5 have been selected by Sheriff Davis,
and their names made known today.
The list is appended, together with
t
places where registration booths will
be opened. All services are given free
to the government, Including rents of
the election rooms. The lists follow:
First Precinct.
Axel Ileiberg, Chief Registrar.
David O. Cairns.
(leorge H. Woolbert.
Lothrop Perkins.
V. J. Duncan.
John D. Smith.
Second Precinct.
Arthur Colwell, Chief Registrar.
W. II. Barnard.
E. J. Kelly.
Harry Lee.
C. G. Deenls.
E. F. Bradford.
Third Precinct.
William O'Connell, Chief Registrar.
George V. B. Weeks.
Timothy Creedon.
Fourth Precinct.
M. W. Bach.
Joseph A. Peltier.
James Barrett.
C. A. Caton.
Fifth Precinct.
II. L. Richolson, Chief Registrar.
Al. F. Schoch.
Arthur E. Snow.
Col. Carl J. Metzger.
8ixth Precinct.
D. L. McKenny, ChJeK Registrar.
Clarence Griggs.
E. V. Yockey.
W. D. Duncan
t South Ottawa.
H. W. Farnsworih, Chlof Registrar.
W. D. Fullerton.
Hector C. Hitt.
F. M. DeLapp.
Henry Waldecker.
Polling Places.
First Precinct Ottawa Hotel.
Second Precinct -Roddick's Library
Third Precinct Weller's Store.
Fourth Preclnct-llllnich Building.
Fifth Precinct Schaefer's Hall.
Sixth Precinct Joust Barber Shop.
ILLINOIS ROADS
INCREASED RATES
The following official statement re
garding the proposed increase in pas
senger fares was issued yesterday by
the Illinois railroads:
"Duly constituted authorities hav
ing determined that certain passen
ger fares in Illinois are discrimina
tory, the same will be advanced to
the interstate .basis, commencing
May 31. 1!H7. The necessary tariffs
are on tile at all passenger nt.alions.
giving details of these advances."
It is expected that the increase in
passenger rate from 2 cents a mi'c
to 2 4-lo cents a mile, will be con
tested by Attorney General Brunilag",
of Illinois, In that case the suit wi'l
be carried to the United States Su
preme Court for final decision on the
alleged conflict of Jurisdiction of the
Illinois and interstate commissioners.
BILL ELIMINATING
TAX COLLECTORS
BECOMES LAW JULY 1
A bill introduced in the legislature
by Representative Boyd of the 3i!th
district, abolishing the office of tax
collector, was passed at. Springliehl
i last week and will become effective
1 on July I, tlMS, Tax collectors elect
i'd in April will be permitted to serve
out their two-year term.
The passage of the law, It is esti
mated, will save La Salle county
nearly $2u,iinti or $3u,iiuo a year in
fees which now go to collectors. Un
der the Boyd law any county treas
urer will collect tiie taxes, and any
additional help he may need, the hoard
of supervisors will have to supply it.
The bill provides for tho payment of
personal taxes in February, and the
real estate tax to be paid one-half in
September of each year.
County collectors shall have Ihe
same powers and may proceed in the
same manner for the collection of any
tax on real or personal property as
town or district collectors.
The new law will set back Ihe pub
lication of the delinquent tax list to
November and application for Judg
ment and order of sale for taxes and
special assessments on delinquent
lands and lots shall be made at the
OLD GLORY TAKEN TO AESN
FLOATS BESIDE
MCD
1
MM PMC HO
IVII10. UIIMJ. VVLmiL
II MM
DIED LAST NIGHTAWA1T MORE UNITS
DECEASED HAS BEEN AILING FOR
THREE WEEKS FUNERAL WILL
BE HELD ON SUNDAY AFTER
NOON.
The Werner home at 1001 Ottawa
evenue, was saddened by death last
evening at 7:30 o'clock when Mrs. Eva
Werner, wife of Charles G. Werner,
passed to her reward.
The deceased had been in ill health
for ' the last two years, but was not
confined to her bed unt;l three weeks
ago, when she suffered a stroke of
paralysis.
Mrs. Werner was born January 20,
1&X8. She was the daughter of the
late Mr. and Mrs. Eva I Pope. In
Ds81, she was united in nvtniage to
C. O. Werner, at the home of her step
father, the lite John Prolidase, of
Miller township.
Following her wedding, Mrs. Wer
ner came to Ottawa to reside and has
been a resident of this city ever since.
The deceased was very prominent in
the social and religious life of this
city and took a most active part in
anything that meant for the bethr
ment of Ottawa.
Two children were born to the mar
riage of Mr. and Mrs. Werner, both
are deceased. Clara L. Werner died
when at the age of ten years. The
late Mrs. Adaline L. Warner Lee was
one of Ottawa's talented musicians.
She was run down and killed by an
automobile a few years ago. Mrs.
Werner grieved greatly over the loss
of her daughter.
She is survived by her husband, C.
G. Werner, and one brother, Milton
Pope, of Ottawa, and a grandson,
Russell Werner Lee.
The funeral services will bo held
Sunday afternoon at 2:3i) o'clock, Ilev.
C. A. Briggs, pastor of the Methodist
church, having charge of the services,
at the home. Burial will he in the
Ottawa Avenue cemetery.
C. S. AYERS LANDS
SWEEPING CONTRACT
C. S. Ayers, of East Ottawa, was
low bidder for sweeping and cleaning
the streets, when bids were opened
this morning at the special meeting
of the council. Fred Scltcrer anil T.
J. Dinneeti were bidders for the work,
but both were considerably Jiigher in
their estimates I ban Mr, Ayers, and
contracts will be awarded Monday lo
the successful bidder.
Mr. Ayes offered to carry out. the
contract for 45c. per thousand square
yards during the nine months period
paved streets are swept, while Mr
Soberer asked 5Sc and Mr. Dinnecn
alio. There are a total of 30i,:50
squat e yards of pavement in Ottawa.
CATHOLIC CENSUS
IN PEORIA DIOCESE
The official Catholic directory, pub
lished by P. ,1. Kennedy & Sous, of
New York", has just been Issued, Tf"
figures of the Peoria diocese, of which
Ottawa is a part, will he interesting
reading to the citizens of this city
and vicinity. The statistics are g'ven
for the preceding year, and are as
follows:
Bishop. I; priest?;, 223; churches
with resident priest, l.'ii; missions
with churches, 77; lolal churches, 23:',;
colleges for boys, 4; academics for
girls, X; parishes will) schools, 74;
pupils 13,121; orphan asylums, J;
orphans, 123; Catholic population,
about. Il5,55i ; marriages, 1,212; bap
tisms, (i, 1)117; converts, .'lil; deaths,
2,073.
UTICA RESIDENT DIES
AT RYBURN HOSPITAL
John Lee, aged 4'.i years, of Plica,
died last evening at ii:2i oclock at
Ryburii hospital. The deceased was
taken III March IS. He was brought
to the hospital here Wednesday af
ternoon. His demise is attributed lo
a complication of diseases.
Mr. Lee resided In I'tica the great
part of his life, lie leaves surviving
two sisters, Miss Nellie Lee, of Ot
tawa; Mrs. N'etllc Allan, of Marseil
les, and two brothers, George, of
I'tica. and Gilbert, of llnrvely, Illinois.
The funeral services will be held Sat
urday afternoon at 2 o'clock at Utlca.
Interment .will be In the Utlca cemetery.
1
THE TRI COLORS
COLLEGE YOUTHS AID
j IN FIERCE FIGHTING BY
! WORK IN TRENCHES
STUDENTS FROM SEVERAL MID
WEST UNIVERSITIES WILL JOIN
COMRADES AND TAKE ACTUAL
PART IN FIGHTING.
London, May 25. The United Statta
tlag Is on the battlelleld at last. It
flies alongside of the tri-colors on tne
Aiane riv?r where furious fighting has
been lu progress ever siuce the spring
campaign opened.
The first detachment of the Ameri
can field service maCe up of college
men who came from California o
drive ambulances for the American
hospital, but who were organized Into
a service corps as soon as the United
States entered tho war, Is now active
ly participating in the operations wit a
the French.
The Americans at the front aie
members of section One of the Amer
ican munition transport service and
most of them are former students at
Cornell University. They are hurry
ing shells to the French fighters oa
the firing line and ammunition to men
in the trenches. Capt. E. I. Tinkhof
is in command and Lteut. Scully, of
Princeton, is second in command.
Section two of the transport service
will go on active duty next week and
a week later section three will do so.
The men of section three are mostly
from Dartmouth, Yale, Harvard, John
Hopkins, University of Chicago ana
Williams College.
The Americans have expressed the
utmost anxiety to get to the front,
saying they were willing to do any
kind of work so long as they can get
among the actual fighters.
Can't Join Pershing.
Washington, May 23. Americans
now fighting with the British and
French forces in France will not be
permitted to Join the United States
troops under Major General Jack
Pershing and continue their "bit" for
the allies under the starts and stripes.
This view was expressed today by
War Department officials who held
that Pershing's men would not bo sup
plemented by Americans now In the
French or British service, but thai
more American troops would be dis
patched to French soil as quickly as
the units could be given tho Intensive
training that is planned for them here.
It is variously estimated that be
tween 3o,0i!o and 40,tWiO Americans are
now lighting with the British and
French forces. Practically all of them
renounced their American citzenship
by taking the oath of allegiance pre
scribed by Great Britain and France,
altho in the case of the foreign legion
among the French troops and in that
of many of the flying corps wearing
French colors, American citizenship
is retained by reason of the fact that
the men took only an oath of obedi
ence." Proclaims Red Cross Week.
Washington, May 25 Recognizing
that fact that but a small proportions
of American people can have the op
portunity to serve on the battlefield,
but, that all men, women and children
can do effective service by aiding the
Red Cross President Wilson today
issued a proclamation designating
the week ending June 25 as Red Cross
week. The proclamation calls upon
the people to give generously to the
fun for the support of the national
relief needs. The proclamation fol
lows:
"liuisinueli as our thoughts as a na
tion are now turned in united pur
poses towards the performance to the
utmost of tho services and duties
which we have assumed in the cause
i of justice and liberty.
I "Inasmuch as hut a small propor
tion of our people can have the op
portunity to servo upon the actual
! field of battle, but all men, women
-and children alike may serve and
! serve effectively by making It pos
Isibl,' lo care properly for those who
do servo under urins at home and
! abroad.
i "And inasmuch as the American
Rod Cross Is the ollleial recognized
: agency for voluntary effort in behalf
Uif the armed forces of Ihe nation and
fur the iidiiiillisiration of relief.
"Now, therefore, by virtue of my
'authority as president of the UnlteJ
Stales and president, of the American
Rod Cross, I. Woodrow Wilson, do
hereby proclaim the week ending
June 25, 1!H7, us Rod Cross week, dur
ing which tiie people of the United
(Continued on Page Five.)

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