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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, June 12, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Established 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1380.
FREE
RADER-JQTJRNA
THE WEATHER.
Probably showers and
tnundersiorms tonight
and Wednesday. Cooler
Wednesday.
VOLUME 1.--NO. 177.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 1917.
Pit ICE, TWO CENTS.
REG STRATIONS CLOSE; SHERIFF
TO SCOUR CQUHTV FOR SLACKERS
THREE MEN REPORTED
IN OTTAWA WHO
DEFIED DRAFT
NO MERCY WILL BE SHOWN VIO
LATORS OF LAW AFTER THEIR
8EIZU RE EXPECTED COUNTY
WILL NOT PRODUCE MORE
THAN THIRTY SHIRKERS.
Following upon the heels of advices
revived from Springfield to arrMl
all slackers who either refused oi
failed unintentionally to register cn
June 5, Sheriff Davis and his staff
of aids today will begin a clean sweep j
of the county in quest of several re
calcitrants who aro known to havcj
Ignored the draft and still persist in
their determination not to submit
themselves to the government for
prospective service In its armed
forces.
As soon as the sheriff organizes his
campaign it is expected that police or
fleers of various towns of the county
will he Instructed to make a thorn ;
canvas of their cities and towns for;
Bhirkers, It Is not Improbable that
every man appearing to an officer as
an eligible, will be accosted and his
registration certificate demanded. In
cases where no cards can be produced
arrests will follow. As the law pro
vides for ud other alternative but ar
rest for a term of ono year, then fol
lowed by registration, it is expected
that the local county jail will begin to
see the influx of slackers within the
next few days.
Word that arrests must be made,
is proof positive that the registration
stay has been closed. Yesterday two
men, one from the north end of the
county a Norwegian by binh and
' ono from Strontor an Assyrian ap
peared be'fcrt CoUhtJ Clerk Much and
signed their cards. They explained
they were ignorant of the law and
thought because they were aliens reg
istration did hot effect them. They
were permitted, as there was no in
dications they had failed to register
after careful deliberation, to fill out
',, their cards and proceed upon their
way rejoicing.
Several Known Here.
It la hinted in Ottawa that at least
three foreigners are marked tor ar
rest for failure to comply with the
registration laws. They will bi anion!;
the first to be placed under arrest and
made to explain their conduct. Oth
ers are charged with failure to regis
ter and when the sheriff's forces are
thoroly organized for their erusade
all rumors will1e traced down.
The three men under suspicion are
citizens of it neighboring country.
They are known to the authorities and
are also known to have failed In their
participation In registration duties.
It Is believed that defiance prompted
them to deport, themselves -is they
have and no clemency is to bo tdiown
them should all the stories told of
them prove out.
Suspects In Streator.
Stroator. it Is believed, has some
who.failod to obey the federal man
date and In his Investigation for slack
ers the sheriff wll make a careful suv
vcy of that city. It is not believed
I Salle, Mendota, Peru or other large
cities are harboring others of the
Blacker element. The registrations in
those cities, Judging by their numbers,
indicate the 21-30 years population nil
took part In the day and 'followed out
federal Instructions to the last letter.
Not More Than Thirty.
It Ib not expected that the sheriff's
fine-toothed "combing of the county
will produce more than thirty who are
unregistered, according to estimates
made by men well versed in census
. statistics. The county produced near
ly a thousand mote over government
estimate and for this reason it. Is be
lieved the number of slacker to bo
unearthed will bo the. lowest possible
minimum.
WOMAN SLAYS SNAKE
V IN PURSUIT OF BIRD;
NO FEAR OF REPTILE
The appearance of a largo snake.
three and one half feet long; endoav
pring to swallow a 'robbln, did not
frighten Mrs. B. h. Clark of North
Ottawa, .
, Yesterday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, at
the home of her brother, on Sycamore
and Fifth streets, she spied the snake
as ; It was crawling up on an enve
trough of the homo. Mrs. Clark
struck at the snake with a hoe, chop
ping the head of the reptile off. The
snak was Just about to swollow tho
robbln that rented in a nest In the
eaves. Her attention was attracted
by the peculiar sound made by Ui'e
ARRESTS FOLLOW
E
INCENSED AT DELAY
E
SUPERVISOR DAUBER ATTACKS
COMMITEE FOR FAILURE TO
HAVE WORK COMPLETED
MANY REPORTS ARE RECEIVED.
'Fhat augurt body, the Board of Su
pervisors, got down to business this
morning at It) o'clock In their session
in the court house and transacted
their work in real businesslike mau
ner.
It remained, however, for Super
visor Dauber, of l'eru. to toss a band
geranade into tho gathering and for
n time arguments waxed hot. Dauber,
voicing the sentiments of the Peru
Business Men's Association, attacked
the members of the committee for al
lowing the contractors to hold up the
liaOic so long over the slough bridge,
lie declared that some great "mis
take" must have been made and that
tho Peru business men and the citi
Kens in that community wanted to
know why Che bridge had not been
completed.
Supervisor Rfehey, who 13 chair
man of the committee, was not pres
ent at the meeting, but Supervisor
Yockcy, a member of the committe:-,
stated that a report on the work and
the cause for delay would be given the
board nt the next meeting. Ho denied
that any members of tly committee
had refused to listen to suggestions
from the township commissioners of
Peru.
Chairman Bronson urged ihat the
matter be given Immediate attention.
The commissioners of Allen town
ship Bre desirious of knowing when
the state aid road, on route No. , will
be completed and have asked the board
to take come action on the matter.
There petition was referred to the
road and bridge committee.
Over at Strew tor they ask for an ex
tension of the Bloomlngton road, n
portion of which has already been
paved, A communication wa.j re
ceived from the' Streator Commercial
Association asking' for an extension
of the road, to be paved with brick
and concrete, the Streator association
to pay for one-fourth of tho cost and
the county to pay tho remainder. The
road and bridge committee will cat
on tho matter.
The State Highway Commission has
appioved of the request of the In
dlana Oil Company to lay pipe lines
uiiu iui roiiuiy mm a portion or i
which will touch on slate aid roudj.
The State Highway Commission must
be given some notice prior to the
stalling of the work. The report was
adopted. j
A vice received from the State High
way Commission is to the effect that
(he county's allotment foV state aid
roads will not be know n until July 1.
Tim executive board of tho Anti-Tuberculosis,
hospital prosented a report
at the session this morning. Tho of
fleers elected were L. K. Lelanrl pres
ident, term of olllce two years; Mrs.
Virginia LeRoy, secretary, form of
office three years, and Itev. John P.
Quint), term of office one year. Jason
V, Kkhardi.on was retained as con
suiting aichitect. About $91,000 will
be received for which a building will
be constructed. The board asked
that a sum or $400 or $500 he ad
vanced them to make a survey of the
tubercular patients In the county.
Their request wag referred to the
county attorney and finance eomtnlt
tce. Coroner's Report.
Coroner Timothy Donoglme con
ducted i'i inquests during the pait
quaiter. Three of the inquests were
paid by heirs of the deceased, there
being duo the coroner $110. His re
port, was approved.
The committee' to let a contract for
a bridge between La Salle and DoKalb
county reported that the Continental
th-idge Co,, of Chicago, had been
awarded file work at. a cost of $2,7(12,
the county must pay for one half of
tho work. .
The contract for the bridge In Otter
Creek whs let to ,J. C. Lut at a cost
of $2.7!) I, , the , county .must, pay for
one-fourth 'of tho Improvement.
Adjournment was taken until to
morrow morning at 10 o'clock.
. r" '
NAME SPEAKERS FOR
LIBERTY BOND SALES
R. C. Jordan will speak at the Or
phcum theater this evening In behHlf
of tho sales of Liberty Bonds. Irllng
ton Hibbs will bo tho speaker at the
Crescent.
Each one wet what he carries In his
heart-tloctlio.
PERU CITIZENS AR
OE SLOUGH BK
T
EM
OTTAWA CHURCHES TO TOLL
OUT WARNING THAT SHORT
TIME IS LEFT IN WHICH TO BUY
GOVERNMENT BONDS.
At 9 o'clock tonight bells thruout
the United States will toll three times
as a reminder to red blooded Ameri
cans that but three more days remain
in which to subscribo for their share
of Liberty Bonds. Tomorrow night
bells will ring twice and on Thursday
at the same hour in the evening the
last tap will sound out its final warn
ing there remains but one more day
in which patriots can do their share
toward helping Uncle Sam thru the
present emergency.
Ottawa churches, Are station and
schools having bells will join in the
nation-wide movement. At 9 o'clock
people of the city will be thus remind
ed they, too, aro expected to do their
their duty by buying some portion of
the great liberty loan.
The action here Is in compliance
with a request made by the national
j liberty loan committee. In Ottawa
there is need of some such concerted
action. The city is not holding its
own. While it is doing as well as
hundreds of other municipalities, Ot
tawa certainly does not want to be
content with "slipping thru" like oth
ers have done, but will be content
only with a high mark that outshines
Its neighbors.
$700,000,000 Short.
Seven hundred million dollars short.
The foregoing is the astounding
shortage in subscriptions to the lib
erty loan bond in the United States,
according to preBs dispatches today
from Washington.
According to the Agues announced,
not a single American city has pur
chased the amount of bonds allotted
to It. New York has come more near
ly to Its mark than any other.
The Ottawa district is snort. At
the present time, the subscriptions in
this district, including those made by
the' banking Institutions is but about
half tho amount that should be raised
If the residents of this district show
Uncle Sam they are behind him.
Interest Starts June IS.
The bonds that have been sold thus
far, are to begin bearing interest at
three and one-half per cent. June 15.
This means that some hurried action
must be taken if this district Is to
prove that It Is behind the govern
ment in the present crisis, by sub
scribing to its allotted sum.
There are many people who do not
realize the seriousness of the situa
tion, should the two billion dollar bond
Issue which the government has asked
for, fail. It would be a big blow to
America and her allies.
CAPT. E. Z. STEEVER IS
ASSIGNED TO ARMY
DUTY AT DES MOINES
Captain Edgar 55. Steever, who thru
his activities in working In conjunc
tion with the Ottawa high school
board in its efforts to develop military
training In the local Institution of
learning, became well known In Ot
tawa, has been ordered back Into ac
tive servce and will report, probably
before thp,end of the week, at Des
Moines, la.,' where" he will assist in
the , training of colored reserve offi
cers. Captain James L. Frlnk, who has
been Associated with Capt. Steever
in promulgating Interest in military
lues thruout northern Illinois high
schools, has also been, transfored to
Des Moines. He is slated to leave
for his new post today.
Capt. Steever and Capt. Frink were
transfered to government service by
order of the war department.
SCHOOLCHILDREN
DRAWINGS ATTRACT
MUCH ATTENTION
Since school children decided to
make their own posters In advertls
lng school events, some exceptionally
fine work has been exhibited. Today
Ottawa people nre admiring the work
of John Lfnk, sixteen year old young
ster, of Washington . school,' whose
cartoons advertising . "The Contest
of Nations, have real newspaper
style, Ho has patterned an Idea us
lng his 'character "Mr. Empty Dome,'
nnd all events, prior to attending the
show are properly made In Ink draw
ings. -
Other drawings aro those of Misa
Rlva Carter, St raw n Trumbo, Mar
gerle Flick, Rluncho Richards, Mil
dred Wialle, Dorothy Carter and Ger
aldlne Carmlchael.
"The Contest of Nations" is a
school play to be given Friday even-
lng, June 22, ' at the Ottawa high
j "chool auditorium, , .
NUW
DAYS R
LIBERTY CAMPAIGN
SHATTERED ROMANCE
D VS FORH EXT WEEK
CIRCUIT COURT TO BE 8CENE OF
BUSY SESSIONS WHEN DIVORCE
CASES ARE TRIED MONDAY AND
TUESDAY. ,
Monday and Tuesday of next week
will be "shattered romance" days in
Judge Eldredge's court. During those
two days thirty-five divorce complain
ants accompanied by their list of mari
tal infalicities will appear in the Cir
cuit Court and give their reasons for
applying for release from bondage.
The June term of the county' prin
cipal tribunal is invariably set aside
for Chancery work. Unhappy mar
riages come under that classification
and yesterday, in anticipation of the
duties before him, Judge Eldredge
posted a list containing the appended
thirty-five cases as being ready for
trial. In case the complainants fall
to appear bills will be dismissed and
any divorce aspirations men and wo
men might have had, will be shattered
into a cocked hat with one swipe of
the Judge's pen.
The following Is the list of cases
Judge Eldredge will hear on the two
days set aside for this unpleasant
task:
June 18. ,
Sarwinskl vs. Sarwinskl.
Snedaker vs. Snedaker.
Rons vs. Roos.
Hanley vs. Hanley.
Brahender vs. Brabender.
Hoxle vs. Hoxie
Leyes" vs. Leyes.
Pelican vs. Pelican.
Fahler vs. Fahlcr.
Heerman vs. Heerman.
Tavierna vs. Tavlerna.
Allison vs. Allison. .
Schmidt vs. Schmidt.
Jackson vs. Jackson.
Lindenmeyer vs. Lindenmeyer.
Cavanaugh vs. Cavanaugh.
Miller vs. Miller.
Knutson vs. Knutson.
Roberts vs. Roberts,
Cheli vs Cheli.
June 19 at 1:30.
Mallady vs. Mallady.
Miller vs. Miller.
Daggett vs. Daggett.
Lundy vs. L'undy. '
Wicks vs. Wicks.
Eagle Eye vs. Eagle Eye.
DeGroot vs. DeOroot.
Curl vs. Curl.
Scholtka vs. Scholtka.
Eide vs. Eide.
Kent vs. Kent.
Malloy vs. Malloy.
O'Connell Vs. O'Connell.
McAlplne vs. McAlpine.
Delsbeck vs pelsbeck.
OTTAWA ARMORY GETS
$22,000 FROM STATE;
BILL PASSES HOUSE
Springfield, 111., June 12 Ottawa's
new armory today was given an ap
propriation of $22,000 to complete It,
The House passed the omnHjua bill
containing the $22,000 award for the
Ottawa building and it is not be
lieved that any trouble will be met
in getting the legislation safely thru
the Senate and passed Governor Low
den. The money will be used for laying
a concrete floor In the basement,
completing the fill In front of the arm
ory, laying a suitable concrete side
walk and the erection of a retaining
wall of concrete that will extend from
the Fox hiver bridge of the C, O. &
P. Ry to the south end of the build
ing. The money will also cover the
cost of making the fill between the
armory foundation and the retaining
wall.
All together the state has appro
priated $7,i 00 for the erection and
completion of its building In Ottawa.
LOCAL ROADS BOAST
FARES TO CHICAGO;
V NEW RATE IS $2.04
1 1
Because a St. Louis federal Judge
ruled that Illinois railways should
charge 2.4o per mile in the face of an
Injunction in this state that provides
against such action, Ottawa people
are-now paying $2.04 for a one-way
ticket to Chicago, only a slight de
creaBe under what the far was when
the old rate was at 3c per mile. The
regular fare was $1.70.
Both roads are charging that fee
for transportation to Chicago and all
other railroads thruout the Btate, not
withstanding that they have been or
de.red not to do so by Illinois courts.
The action is the result of an agl
tation started by St. Iouls merchants
who claim they wero being discrim
inated against by Illinois' 2c law. To
prevent St. Louis being discriminated
against fi.oooonn people residing In
Illinois have to be fairly treated by
paying a four-tonths of a cent addi
tional tax. for every mils they travel
under the ruling handed down by the
Missouri judge,
IN
SEARCH OF
finni"!) 10
MKMrK J
OTTAWA SOLDIERS, WARDEN
NOW ANNOUNCES, WILL BE
HELD ON DUTY UNTIL ALL OF
MEN HAVE BEEN RETURNED
TO THEIR WORK.
Joliet, June 12 Dynamite was dis
covered late yesterday in a tell at the
penitentiary. A search which was
made when the convicts were taken
from their cells and guarded by sold
iers, also revealed quantities of cloth
ing, knives and files and other con
traband.
Officials of the prison believe that
this provejs the theory that communi
cation with persons outside the walls
has existed and that inmates receiv
ed weapons which they had hidden
away, from friends outside. Altho the
clothing may have been stolen from
the prison, the presumption is that
it was smuggled to convicts from out
side the walls.
Practically all convicts in the pris
on have been searched and knives or
any other weapons found in their pos
session confiscated. A number of the
inmates were returned to work clear
ing wreckage caused during the riot
Tuesday morning.
Convicts Change Attitude.
When the convicts were taken
from their cells while the cells were
being searched, they are said to have
assumed a different attitude than that
which prevailed since the outbreak
last week. Companies C of Ottawa
and L of Kankakee will remain at the
Institution until the convicts have
been returned to work and order re
stored, "according to announcements
made today by Warden Murphy.
The discovery of the dynamite
came as a surprise to the officials.
That the convicts had planned to
use the dynamite In the riot, but were
prevented from reaching the cellhouse
is the theory of officials.
Investigations are being continued,
to learn the leaders of last week's
riot. In accordance with the verdict
of the coroner's Jury In the inquest
into the death of John Flaherty, of
ficials of the institution are making
efforts to bring about the arrest of
the head rioters. Three inmates are
under suspicion and should sufficient
evidence be obtained against them,
authorities Bay, they will be tried on
manslaughter and arson charges.
Keep Men on Prison Farm.
Miss Rosalyn Cooley of Meredith,
N. H., whose name was signed to a
letter found on Flaherty after he was
killed yesterday, admitted authorship
of the letter.
Altho Warden Murphy has not as
yet completed all plans for his con
duct of the prison, thehonor farm
will remain. That Is the message
the new warden sent the men on the
farm yesterday. Warden Murphy told
them that should their conduct war
rant, they will remain on the farm.
"My policy is one of fairness and
squareness," Warden Murphy told
them," and I expect yours to be the
same."
A. L. Bowen Is still at the prison.
He will remain there for a few days
to act In an advisory capacity. July
1 he assumes the superlntendency of
charitable institutions.
Two Convicts Leave Farm.
Two -convicts on the prison farm
Sunday walked away. They are
James Sammons and John Lynch,
serving life sentences on murder
charges. They have been on the farm
for a year, going there from the pris
on, where they were received In 1904
from Cook county. Altho officials of
the prison conducted a search in the
vicinity of the farm no trace of the
fugitives was found. They are believ
ed to have gone to Chicago. The au
thorities of that city were notified.
Shortly, after dinner hour yester
day Sammons and Lynch, with oth
er convicts, went Into tho yard.
When the check was. made for the
day the two convicts were missing.
PAINTER ARRESTED
FOR LEAVING WJFE
Curtis Thacker, an Ottawa paper
hanger and painter, whs arrested in
Joliet yesterday and this morning was
brought to Ottawa by Deputy Sheriff
Arthur Barrett, on complaint of his
wile, who alleges ho abandoned her
and left her without means of provid
lng for herself.
Thacker was taken to the county
jail where he Ib now being held a prl
soner.
The strictly well proportioned nose
should take up third of the prrflle
from the commencement of tho hair t
the tip of the clilu.
MOT
PRISON
RFSTURFfl
BOTH ROUSES FAVOR " DRY"
NATION DURING ll HIES
t
'CHAIN LETTER IS
SENT IN WAR APPEAL
Tfi ur n II
iu iilu i
ASK MONEY TO HELP SOLDIERS
WOUNDED IN FRANCE SAY
HOSPITAL WILL BE ESTAB
LISHED FOR THOSE WOUNDED
IN FACE AND JAW LOCAL
AUTHORITIES TO MAKE IN
VESTIGATION. Ottawa people have always contrib
uted their "bit" for any worthy cause,
but now they are beginning to won
der whether or not they have been
"duped" by an appeal to help France
in the European war.
'Tis a chain of letters, the manner
in which the fund is being raised and
the funds, to use the expression of the
originator of the letter, are "for the
purpose of founding a special Ameri
can hospital in Paris for the wounded
in the face and jaw."
In each case the receiver of the
letter is asked to" send twenty five
cents to Mr. L. Herritts, French con
sul, at Seattle Washington.
The following is the text of the let
ter addressed:
An honorable appeal to the rea
son of the American business
men.
France helped us tremendously
in the Revolution. Help Her
Now.
This chain is for the purpose
of founding a special American
hospital in Paris for the wounded
in the face and Jaw. Your help
is needed immediately in the
great work . of restoring horribly
mutilated faces and thereby per
mitting the unfortunate to con
tinue the remainder of their lives
with as little disfigurement as
possible.
For every $18,000,000 raised by
the American National Committee
the American Red Cross will give
$2,000,000 in cash, for which 100
beds will be established and main
tained. Please make four copies of this
letter and send them to your
friends, numbering each of the
four letters one higher than the
second number used at the top of
this page.
Send this letter, and Twenty
five Cent 8 (preferably stamps)
to Mr. ii. Herritts,' French consul,
P. O. Box 1871. Seattle, Washing
ton. This gentleman has agreed to
help centralle the fund. This
chain letter will end with No. 100.
Those receiving that number will
please make no copies of the let
ter, but will send the twenty five
cents.. Kindly do not break the
chain. To do so would work hard
ship on this humanitarian cause.
AUSTRIAN CHICKEN
THIEFlS KILLED AT
MORRIS LAST NIGHT
Morris, 111., June 12 (Special)
Believed to have been shot by William
Doss, who had been bothered by
chicken thieves, the dead body of
Andrew Kaska, Austrian, age 40
years, was found tills morning at 8
o'clock on Railway street, fifty feet
from the Doss home, by Mrs. Doss.
Last evening at 11 o'clock Mr. Doss
heard soineon prowling about his
chicken coop and presumed it was a
dog. He fired three shots In the direc
tion of the chicken coop and then
went back to bed.
Seeing a man lj lng in the road near
a load of wood, Mrs. Doss made tho
ghastly discovery. She presumed
that the man bad dropped dead and
the police were notified. Not until
examinciiion was uiaue uy v oruiiei i
Coroner
jnimnrn
IUUIIUlU
Sachse was Is found that a bullet hsJ'lzed armed merchantmen
pierced the right shoulder blade of
the dead man and traveled In a down
ward direction, lodging In tho region
of his heart.
To reporters this inorniiif Doss an
nounced that he fired three bhot at
some prowler. No outcry wa-t madei
and the owner of the chicken coop
thought that a dog had been fright
ened away. Wkiod found In the wagon
of 1io AuBtrlnn and several little
chickens were Identified by Mr. Doss
as his property.
The Inquest, was held thl after
noon. M. Hut, the traveler, said timf If he
were dropped from the cloud 4 blind
folded and fell Into any part of Cbltir.
be would Instantly know it by tit-smell.
ROLL OF CONGRESS PUTS
U. S. CLOSE TO
WATER WAGON
SENATE HAS RADICAL CHANGES
PROPOSED, ANYONE OF WHICH
WOULD ELIMINATE ALCOHOL .
FROM OUR NATIONAL LIFE.
BY ROBERT B. SMITH. -International
News Service Staff Cor
respondent '
Washington, June 12 The United ,
States surely is gofng on the water
wagon. - ',
Whether It will stay there longer
than the period of the war depends
on how the natioij likes the experi
ence. But a careful canvass, of the
entire membership of the hobses to
day demonstrated positively that the
"dry" element was in control. Their
flntjnn of "No food stuffs for intoxi
cants" Is winning converts every day.
Even the antls admit that only some
revolutionary plan which, like the
euro for the submarine menace is yet
to be devised, can prevent the abso
lute elimination of alcohol aa a factor
in America's national life by the pres
ent congress.
This ttiniom certain action will
make national prohibition the chief
issue In the next National campaign,
statesmen and politicians alike on
Capitol Hill agree.
There are now four distinct "dry"
plans before congress. Each of them
has the support of a committee or
some organized group of members.
There are nuraejejus other Isolated
prohibition programs backed by an in
dividual member or two; who probab
ly will merge with one the main
groups when the prohibition fight be
gins in earnest. The four big plans
are: '.''.,
1. The senate finance committees
recommendation, to be embodied, in
the war revenue bill, to tax distilled -liquor
at such an exorbitant rate as
to make its further manufacture un
profitable.
2. The senate agriculture commit
tee plan, to be presented in the form
of an amendment to the food legisla
tion, to forbid the further use of food
stuffs in the manufacture of alcholic
beverages.
3. The Gore rider to the prefen--tlal
routing bill, now pending in the
senate to prevent the shipment of dis
tilled Hqu&r in Interstate commerce.
, 4. The Sheppard resolution favor
ably reported by the senate Judiciary
committee and now on the senate
calendar, proposing a Constitutional
amendment for nation wide prohibi
tion. .
The first three of these will receive
a strong backing from a combina
tion of shncn pure prohibitionists
with the quasl-drys who believe that
the nation ought to quit drinking li
quor while the war rages. It is en
tirely possible that all three of them
may be passed, and the concerted op
eration of the three would have nearly
the effect of a bone dry measure.
Berlin Recognizes War Exists.
Washington, June 12 Announce
ment by Germany that the seventy
four American citizens who constitute
a part of the fruits of the raid of the
converted, 'raider Moewe are being
treated as prisoners of war is tho first
direct recognition by the Kaiser's gov
ernment that a state of war actually
exists.
Incidentally this announcement re
lieves a latent feeling of anxiety here
that officers or gun crows of Ameri
can merchant vessels would be shot
should they be captured by Germans.
The men taken from the merchant
vessels byjtho Moewe havs the status
of prisoners, according to the under
standing hero because Germany recog-
as auxll-
Mary cruisers
Germany's original announcement
that ihn wou'ul pot rw-nize the
Uniierl states us tin udclltlonul enemy
was made at. a time when it had been
believed that tho United States would
0,)n,ti,)t itself wMi supplying funds
and mumU,is, etc., to tho entente.
Since then, however, conditions ma
terially L.'vo changed. At present the
following belligerent i.ioyementa
among others are in pnu.i"-":
"American dostr yn w r operat
ing with the British and Trench na
vies in clearing the om of submar
ines. American warships have taken over
certain portions of tho Atlautlc. patrol.
(Continued on fyf 3.)
OFFER FOUR MS

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