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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, June 15, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Established 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1880.
RNAJ
THE WEATHER.
Fair tonight and Satur
day. Warmer Saturday.
VOLUME 1.-NO. ISO.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. Fill DAY, JUrK 15, 1917.
PRICE, TWO CEMS.
BRINGING UP THE HEAVY ARTILLERY.
SENATE: iY BLOCK BILL
T&AJDERr
FREE
JOU
HEY ASSERTS PERU BUSINESS
KtEtJ UNJUST IN CHARGES TQBOARD
FOOD DICTATORSHIP SPLITS
EXPLAINS REASONS FOR
DELAY OF WORK ON
SLOUGH BRIDGE
is
T
SOLONS VOTE TO WITHDRAW
COMMUNICATION OF PERU
BUSINESS MEN LUND'S CHARG
ES ARE FOUND TO DE BASES
ON MEAGER CAUSES.
Declaring that the claims of the
Peru Business men, In the delay of the
plough bridge wore unjust, Supervisor
fllchey presented an able report this
morning to the. Hoard of Supervisors.
Mr. Richey denied the charges that
the bridge was "in no way near com
pletion" and recited to 'the hoard the
hard difficulties encountered in bring
lng about tho structure over the.
ttlough hack water of the Illinois riv
er. His report was responsible for
the withdrawal of the communication
of the Peru business men as a mat
ter of record from tho books of the
county clerk.
Presenting his report, which was
rather lengthy and which required an
hour and twenty minutes to read,
Mr. Uichey said:
"Bids for the slouch bridge were
opened April 27, 191ti, at which ttme
the Peru business men were present.
Acting in- their wishes tho contract
for the bridge wa sawarded to A.
Lund & Co., for $tl,78l for tho sub
construction, this did not include the
approaches or steel work. It was es
timated In the contract that the piling
would have to be Kunk twenty feet,
when the vyork was started it was ne
cessary to go thirty four feet before a
suitable foundation was found. Six
ty three more cubic feet of . Concrete
was required than estimated. A total
of $735.39 was allowed for work of
this nature on north abuttment and
the center pier.
"Rock was found in the head of the
stream and It was impossible to drive
the piling thru these obstacles.
Men Go on Strike.
"Owing to the hard work and the
tremendous difficulties encountered
the men went on a strike, and bdforo
they would return to work it was ne
cessary to pay them fifty cents per
hourv
C. M. Lund and his partner, W. T.
Gray, had some trouble and disolved
partnership, Lund said ho would con
tinue the work alone. After a few
weeks Lund wild out to the firm of
Roberson & Miller to complete the
work for $9,000, after continuing the
work for several weeks Robertson &
Miller said they could not do the wjork
and threw up tho Job.
Acting upon the advice of the state
highway commission, Mr. Farnsworth,
and Mr. Older of the state highway
commission undertook tho task of see
ing to have the work completed them
selves. An Inspector by the name of
Reed from the stato highway com
mission wan sent out and ho checked
and watched every bit of work dono
Ho made a report of the progress of
the work each week to Mr. Farns
worth, which report has been submit
ted to tho committee in charge of tho
county's Interest."
Lund's Report.
Mr, Rlchey then requested Mr. Lund
to make out a report of the amount of
work uecom pllshed. Hills calling for
railway expenses to first class accom
modations in Hotel Peru wore sent in
and it waH made to appear that the
county should assume those obliga
tions. "Assuming too, that Lund's
claims were just, the Peru business
men, submitted n letter to the board
and have, the audacity to make this
board believo that your committee
has tnado the county responsible for
all of Lund's charges," said Mr. Rich
ey. ' '
-It was shown in the report also that
C. L. Miller had been advanced sums
of $100, $25, po, etc., In fact, whenev
er he ran shprt of "kale," Lund is sup
posed ito have udvanced It and then as
sumed tho county would pay tho
charge,
It Is estimated that ubout. $18,0!)9.!t!)
worth of work wus dono by Lund and
his. sub-contractor, which ho claims Is
likely to be allowed and not $.10,000.
The men doing the steel work on
the bridge reported that they would
have the Job completed In ninety days'
time frpm May 6, or about August 6.
Their contract nllows thorn this much
time, hut they have already finished a
greater part of It and will he flnlsTied
before the time set In the contract,
, There are some necessary fills to
GIVEN FT
SAME CHARGES AR
E
E
E
I!
t
PERU AND OGLESBY IN LIME
LIGHT IN CIRCUIT COURT
ONE WOMAN FORCED TO MAN
AGE AND WORK FARM WHILE
SPOUSE WAS DRUNK.
Peru and Oglesby occupied the lime
light in the divorce courts today.
Three unhappy women, all from
these two cities, made the snuie
charges aga'ti'jt their husbands, each
alleging their spouses were habitual
drunkards and were cruel to lliem.
This Wife Married Young.
Alleging Dial her spouse drove her
from home and threatened to kill her
should sin; ever attempt to return to
li i mi, Mrs. Henrietta, Willner, of Peru,
i:i filing August VVillucss for marital
freedom. Mrs, illner claims in her
bill that sho is now only 20 years of
ape, her marriage to Willner occuring
'when i:ho was but. seventeen. The
ceremony was performed .three ycara
ai;o tomorrow.
Mrs. Willner. sl forth that Aur.UKt
is constantly going on sprees ana
when ho is under the influence of li
quor he is very quarrelsome and liarii
to net a'onc with. On June 10, she!
r.ays', ho drovo her from homo and
wdieii sho made overtures for peace
he threatened her life, and now, she
s,iys, the is too frightened of him to
l et urn to his domMle. le.it she be
killed.
Lights of Love Burn Lew.
Rose Lamps, wife of ft farmer near
Peru, has decided that being wife has
its advantages, but when iihe had to
lxi both wife and farm-hand her lot
was none too pleasant. At least she
intimates that in her bill for legal
separation tiled this morning. She
says that Tor the past four years she
was forced, because of her husband's
conduct, to work the soil, manage the
farm and do other labors about the
place, that tho family could garner
its sustenance from her efforts, all
because Fred Lamps was in the habit
of getting drunk and staying on his
jamborees for indefinite periods. Be
sides this failing he was wont toj
drive her from the house, she says,
and she would have to wait until lie!
fell asleep to regain entrance to the
home by stealth and to.insure against
her being assaulted by the defendant.
The Lamp.; were married June !,
!!U2, and separated yesterday. Mrs.
Lamps set forth that. Fred has a bank
account and personal property worth
$t;,tii!f) and that he ought, to be re
strained from disposing of niiv of his
eflecls until after the divorce case is
disposed of. The court granled an
injunction which prevents Fred from
molesting his helpmate or in any wise
selline; bin goods or drawing his cash
out of the bank.
Husband Left Her.
Besides being an habitual drunkard
and cruel to her, Joseph (lirrick, of
Oglesby, developed into a wanderer
and now Is away li'om nomo on some
unknown mission, according to Mrs.
Katy Oirriek, who hind a bill for di
vorce today. . I no LiirncKs were mar
ried in Chicago, January 10, 1911, and
lived together until May 20, 1917.
when tho wanderlust, aeeed .loo and
lie went away.
The defendant and his wife are the
Joint owners of a store building In
Oglesby, which the wile wants turned
over to her. The property, she avers,
would help to smpport her and their
two children,
OTTAWA IS TWICE
HONORED BY STATE
ENGINEERS' ASSN.
Ottawa was iwlce honored by the
State Association or Slat burn y -Km
gineers at the closing session of Itu
annual convention today at Moline.
John F. Alt, of Ottawa, a loader in IJIi
nois work, was chosen president ol
tho association,' and for tho next an
nual convention Ottawa whs choson
the next convention city.
Word corroborating tills report was
received by the Fien Trader-Journal
tills afternoon from Mr. Alt, who Is in
attendance at the Moline meeting.
both npproachs that must be mado and
are now helnir done.
Report Pleases Board.
Supervisor Ttlchey easily vindicated
himself In tho eyes of tho board and
everyone present, who heard the re
port commended him on the work of
the eonfmittco. :
MAD
mm m
AUTO VII DIES
1
CORONER'S INQUEST HELD OVER
LITTLE GEORGE PEPPLER WHO
FELL FROM MACHINE DRIVEN
BY WILLIAM MULHOLLAND,
SON OF CENTER OTTAWA GRO
CER. Little Oeorge Peppier, yesterday
afternoon's victim of an automobile
accident in which he was fatally in
J u red by being thrown from a truck
driven by William Mulbolland, died
at 7:15 o'clock last night, without re
gaining consciousness. The end
came at Ryburn Memorial hospital,
where he wan removed bhortly after
the mishap.
A coroner's jury this morning re
turned a verdict, after hearing all the
evidence in the ca:e, exonerating the
driver of the truck and assigning
death to the accident. The Inquisition
into the fatality was conducted in the
Gladfelter undertaking parlors at
10:30 o'clock, and was attended by
Mrs. Charles IVpp'er, -mol .her of the
deceased boy, William Mulholland
driver of the ill fated machine, and
Charles Peppier, Jr., a brother .of thoi
(Iccearcl.
Dr T. W. Harrows, who attended
the boy at. the hospital, testified In a
.deposition laifeii before, the coroner.
The statement, which was read before
the. coroner, blamed a concussion at
the base of tho brain as tho cause of
death. It also deveioned thru Dr.
Burrows' testimony that the little fel
low was run over by the automobile,
as was. first announced. There were
no other marks upon the Imdy except,
the concussion,, outside of minor
bruises that were insufficient to cunse
death. It was apparent, to Dr. Bur
rows that the boy hail fallen from
the rnnningboard to the pavement and
in this manner his skull was crushed.
Mr. Mulholland testified lie did not
know the boy bad fallen from the ma
c.hinn until others who- wr - with
George called to him that, tho injured
child "did not gel up.'' Looking back
ho. saw George lying prone upon the
street. Me rushed to wheiv lie lay
end removed Mm to the homo of Mr.
and Mrs. John A. Welsh, from whence
ho was taken to tho hospital.
It Is supposed that the jolting of Din
car shook George's bold loose and that
he fell backward from the running
board onto the rough' pavement. His
coat, it appears, became entangled In
the chain drive and was badly torn
It is possible that he was dragged a
Khoi t distance beforn his coat was re
leased from its entanglement.
Tho mother In her stiitemen' to tho
coroner's Jury absolved Mulholland
from all blame r nd fixed the response
bility for her sorrow upon boyish care
lessness during moments of peril,
which in this case made the accident
unavoidable.
Charles Peppier, the brother, said
he saw George, Harold Cassidy and
Clarence Woodward run and catch on
to the truck, but that he did not see
(ioorRo fall off. He was the llrst to
reach his brother and picked him up
to carry him to some nearby house,
Mr. Mulholland then rushed back and
took George Into his anus nd car
ried him Into tho Welsh home. Ho did
RUCK DRIVER NO
BLAMED FOR MISHAP
(Continued on Page 3.)
Iffl PARKS TELLS OF
LITE IN U.S, MLVALRY
URGES OTTAWA YOUNG MEN TO
ENLIST IN THE CAVALRY DIVI
SIONSAYS ROUTINE TASKS
ARE VERY ENJOYABLE NO
TIME FOR HOMESICKNESS.
Ray Parks, well knon young Ot
tawa boy, who has joined the U. 8.
Cavalry, writes an interesting letter
telling of the army life. -Mr, Parks
is stationed at Fort Bliss, Texas, near
E'. Paso. Mr. Parks enjoys the life
very much and any young men con
tempiating enlistments are urged to
join the cavalry. The following is his
lettur:
hi Paso, Texas.
Dear Friend:
Just a line to let you know that
this is some life here in Texas.
There is no time here at all for
homesickness. Something going
on nearly all the time.
There is one other Ottawa boy
here with me, Frank Haws, from
Main street, and also another
fellow from Aurora. The Y. M.
C. A. has a show every night and
three evenngit a week they have
boxing and wrestling, and believe
me, they have some time.
1 lie army is not wnat some
people believo it to be. We have
lota of time Tor ourselves. 1 will
give you our routine for ,a re
cruit for tho first, three months:
5:15 a. in. Revllle, first call.
5:30 a. m Second call and roll ,
call.
5:3r a. .in. Stable call, feed
herpes.
5:'.") a. m Mess.
ti:25 a. m. Assembly and tho
inarch to drill grounds.
(1:20 to X:im h. m Drill.
S:ii(t to X:25 a. m. Rest."
8:30 to 10:15 a. m. Mounted
drill.
10:;. to 11:00 a. m Croom
heriieL'.
Tliis completes our morning.
Afternoon
12:00 m. Mess call.
1 : 15 p. m. School.
25 p. in.-- March to - drill
grounds.
2:30 to 'Don p, m--. Drill with
rifles, pistol and sabers.
t:oo p, m. Retreat.
5:15 p. in. Mess call,
, f wish you, would compan? this
with a civilian jolt and s?o for
yourself which Is tho hardest.
We are getting $30 a month pay;
if we make a marksmanship it Is
$2 more a month. Kxpcrt rifleman
is $3, and If we make this, we get
foi shooting,' and we do not over
draw our cloihing allowance, wo
get a fairly good salary.
If you know of anybody who
wants to join t lit army, have Diem
write to any soldier in this ramp
for reference. The above routfne
applies only for the first four
days in the week. On Friday we
have assemble at parade grounds
at 7;oo a. mk 7:15 a. in. wo have
a hike of 15 to 20 miles and gen
erally get back by 11 o'clock nd
wo are thru for the day,
.Saturday at 8:30 a. m, mounted
Inspection of all equipment. No
retreat. on Saturday or Sunday.
Sunday
6:00 a. m. Hevellln, first call.
(Continued on Page 3.)
Pancoast in Philadelphia North American.
YOUTH AM ED OF
El
BFjNG SLACKER: HIS
El
8HERIFF DAVI8 INAUGURATES A
CAMPAIGN THAT WILL RESULT
IN WHOLESALE ARRESTS OF
LAW VIOLATORS.
Sheriff Davis this afternoon inaugur
ated his campaign for a general round
up of slackers with a trip to Troy
Grove, where two alleged cages of vio
lations of the registration law have
been reported. A man named Leland
Reed, aged 24, is under suspicion as
one of the violators for his failure to
tell connecting stories of his regisl ra
tion. He has been placed in the Troy
Grove lock-up pending the arrival of
the chief registrar and will be brought
to Ottawa to remain In jail until Uncle
Sam disposes of his case.
Reed, according to residents of the
village, disappeared a few weeks be
fore June 5 and showed back in town
last Sunday. He was asked by Beveral
whether or not he had registered and
in all instances replied in the affirm
ative, but conflicting stories were told
about the place of his registry. He
failed to produce his card and for
these reasons he became marked for
arrcrt.
To one prominent Troy Grove resi
dent Reed said he had registered at
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. To another
he said he had registered In Michi
gan. Others report that he gave them
a different, version of his registration
and It, finally resolved Itself Into a
case of who would bo first to report
Reed. As soon as the "tip" was given
In at. the sheriff's oflico a message was
sent, to the Troy Grove nonstable or
dering them to get the young man
and hold him pending the arrival of
Sheriff Davis.
This afternoon the sheriff left for
Troy Grove and by night. Reed will
I be in Ottawa with his headquarters
at the comer of Columbus and Jack
son streets, unless ho can convince
the authorities that he is really reg
istered. ,
Reed Is an American born and is a
native of the county,
Troy Grove's second case Is woven
about a youth of German decent. He
claims not to he twenty-one! while
neighbors allege he passed his ma
jority In February and Is eligible to
draft. This, caused by his father's
threats to stop the boy from register
lug, have cast a veil of suspicion to
hang over the son. Birth records are
now being Investigated and In case
the boy's and his father's stories ore
untrue both probably will b brought
to Ottawa and made to explain their j
conuuci to I'licio oani.
France "Loses Four Ships.
Pails, Juno 15. France lost elRht
vessels four of mom than 1600 tonn,
one smaller ship and three fishing
vessels by mines and submarines
during tho last week, according to of
ficial announcement today. Six vos
sets escaped after being attacked.
During the week 1,034 vessels entered
and 1.015 left, French ports.
Subtlety may deceive yon; Integrity
never will. Cromwell,
ARREST IS ORDERED
MURPHY W
L
MILITIAMEN WILL BE KEPT AT
PENITENTIARY PENDING RE
ADJUSTMENT OF AFFAIRS
WANT MCRE MEN EMPLOYED
BY STATE.
Jol; June 15. A loosening in his
policy (;f i "mparatlvely conservative
action In restoring order at the pris
on was announced this morning by
Warden Murphy in the return of 215
more convicts to work In the yards.
There are now more than 500 itiiiu.tes
engaged in clearing up dobris " left
from the riot and fire which swept
the prison June 5. The remainder,
1,250, are still in their cells."
According to the warden, only the
men who can be trusted are being
freed from cells now. The men known
to have been active in the riot will
be kept In confinement until such
time as repairs will allow their re
turn to work in the shops.
Continue Search.
A third search of the prison for
weapons and other contraband was
started this morning. The first and
second probes resulted in the collec
tion of hundreds of articles, including
knives and razors. Other searches
will be prosecuted if this reveals fur
ther articles.
While comparative quiet has been
restored at the prison, the national
guardsmen are still retained on duty,
Militiamen with loaded rifles walk
the walla with the prison guards, and
every entrance to the Institution Is
under constant guard. Warden Mur
phy is undecided on the disposition
of the guardsmen. It is known he is
reluctant to release them until fur
ther guards have been employed at
the prison or other safeguards pro
vided. Fear of further outbreak
when the convicts are released, re
belious after their long confinements,
is felt.
Attitude Changes.
The warden today declared the at
titude of the prisoners had changed
somewhat since the outbreak, that
most of them are cheerfully resuming
their work, he declared.
The ban of silence still hangs over
the disposition of men known to have
been ringleaders in the uprising. No
action is reported by prison or coun
ty authorities as the result of an in
vestigation which was expected to
bring county prosecution of the lead
ers, with a probable indictment of
several for arson and murder in the
death of Don Flaherty, a convict, the
only man who lost his life in the riot.
SALE OF LIBERTY
BONDS IN OTTAWA
AMOUNTS TO $230,000
The sale of liberty bonds In Ot
tawa will total fSW.nno. This was
the amount subscribed by Ottawa's
four banks, , ?f
. At 12 o'clock today the, following
amount of bonds bad been sold:
National City Hank $ R5.000
Flrrl National Bank 80,000
Ottawa i .iiklng ft Trust Co. . 32,450
The Iv. jiU V, Trust ft Havings
Bank , "7,000
Total lf'i04.4ro
The' National' City Bank and the
Ottawa Hanking ft Trust Co.. cvli
subscribed for $100,000, the Ottawa
Hanking ft Trust Co. bongl t 5O,00O
worth of bonds and The Peoples
Trust ft Savings Bank subscribed for
$10,000.
Announcement was made that the
sale would not close today with the
banks, but would proceed to sell the
amount ot bonds they have on hand.
OTTAWA HOUNDS
ON TRAIL OF DOVER
CHICKPN THIEVES
Carl Lockhart who lives west, of
Streator, near the town of Dover, was
visited by chicken thieves lad uiglil
and bad a hundrtd and twonty-flvn
birds taken from the chicken house.
DHn discovering his loss this niorn
lug Mr. 1ockluirt teluphonod to Otta
wa and got into communication with
W. J. Jackson the owner of the Ot
tawa blond-hounds, and at 10 o'clock
Rose's automobile and started for
Daver.
GUARD UNTIL I K
AT PRISflNRESOMES m HE I FIGHT
!
i
DEMOCRATIC CHIEFS TO
BALK PLANS OF
PRESIDENT
SENATOR GORE WANTE EADIBLES
CONTROL. LCD, BUT DOES NOT
WAi4TkTOO MUCH POWER PLAC
ED IN ONE MAN'S HANDS.
JiV UOBERT B. SMITH.
International News Scrv! ft t:;aff Cor
respondent. Washington, Jur.i ! Th! dinlnis-t,-ation
food control plan, branded as
"Food dictatorship" by democratic
! leaders who aiv mtain to balk or
at least delay its pasngu m the sen
ate probably will not become a law
until too late to have ar.y ftffect on
thin year's crop.
Unanimous consent to take VP the
lever food control bill in the house
on Monday has been obtained only af
ter much bickering. It Is expected a
week's hard fight will be necessary to
put it thru the house. Once passed
on to the senate It will face oppo
sition from Senator Reed ot Missouri,
Senator Smith of Ga., Senator Hard
wick of Ca., and Senator Kirby of
Ark., all Democrats. This revolt
with the administration will make It
necessary to win several Republlcnn
votes to pass the bill.
In addition to this outright opposi
tion, the lever will be before the sen
ate at the same time it Is considering .
the war revenue bill which the finance
committee will report, early next, week,
and the food bill probably will be ,
pushed aside during debate on -the
big measure. , .
After a week's consideration of the
preferential routing bill Senator, New
lands has consented to its amend
ment to satisfy opposition and It Is
hoped It will be passed and cleared
from senate boards today. Another
obstacle, to the prompt passage of the
food legislation is the fact that it is
going to be complicated with the pro
hibition measures. Many members of
the "dry for the war only" vintage
regard prohibition as lndispenaible to
food conservailon and are going to
give their aid the "dry" riders even
though they may cause considerable
further delay in the legislation. ,
Tho senate, however, Is going to try
to keep prohibition and food conserva
tion separate. Senator Cora is for
prohibition but not for foo.' dictator
ship and ns soon as the legislative
situation pet mils he i going to move
to take up the bill prohibiting use ot
foodstuffs in the manufacture of alco
holic beverages, recommended yester
day by the senate agricultural commit
tee. 1
Liberty Loan Subscribe.!
Washington, June 15. The Li ben j
Loan has been subscribed. ol'.i'"i"i
were supremely i-",fiu3t of tha fact
this morning. Figures will not be ob
tainable until the comn!ui-j reports
f.om tho various fedei'sl reserve cen
ters are telegraphed In tins afternoon.
tut from Prosidej: t Wil: :i down thru
the line" of lescer officialdom, there
v;s a feolisg of supreme confidence
that when the totals are complete the
nation will be well satisfied.
In a last minute effort to make the
total r :,m;0 as possible Secretary
c -Mv rw, i McAdoo was apiwalcd
to L) a ii' r:ii). r of bnnklnp leaders in
various sections to extend the closing
time until midnight tomorrow night.
Tho secretary reficcd l!m.;h to do so.
Hm is satisfied with h.- ii -t.-itloa as It
cxisls. and helleveH ''u-' t loan will
be subscribed. Fiu-na.Mg t!.o clos
ing tinio' votii i -i mply nermit Ger
many to chit ractei lie tho Van. is a fall-'
IVij,
Subscript Ions In tho Van till were
being taken by bunk., tc-imoiit the
country today. Tabulation of the re
turns n.-i a result will be- l.-it?, altho
tho treasury was hopeful that It
would be able to announce the totals
! not lat"r than tonight. The to'nls
jure about a day bohlnd and naturally
! in certain ' iie-s wlwe advnut.vge will
be (UM'ii of tho lust mcmerjf of time
il A ill be impossible Id speed up tllO
' tit.il;. .: But nflb ials are not much
! concern" .1 with this fact. They say
i that, tbt: simply a detail.
! Alieady the ipiostio-i ol when tho
! next, loan will he 'Vi'.i f"t- i-. t'Hns?
I discussed by oil!' t, s Wb n the in
itial loan was decided on the treas
ury department said that thrt loans
would be askod Tor at Intervals of
about three months each. Whether
tho next toial will bo for two billion
dollars will he decided by Secretary
McAdoo after the present loan is com
pleted, Olllclals say that with the
vt'outiuuoa cn Pago 3.)

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