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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, August 21, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Eitabllihtd 1840
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1880.
FREE TRADER-JOIJRNA:
Unsettled weather to
night and Wednetday,
probably showers. Not
much change in tempera
ture. VOLUME 1.--NO. 4J:s:.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. TUIISDAY, AlMifST til, 1917.
PRICE, TWO CENTS.
CLAIMING EXEMPTION BECAUSE HE HAS A WIFE TO SUPPORT.
CHAUTAUQUA GETS A SET-BACK
ON ACCOUNT OF BAD WEATHER
BATTLE RAGES FROM AlPS TO SEA;
GREAT ARMIES IN DEATH STRUGGLE
RALPH PARLETTE GIVES
A TALK ON BIG
BUSINESS
ALBERT MAKES HIT ; REDDI CK'SJ-1 B R A R Y
ROTARIANS PRESENT IN BODY
TO HEAR LEADER TWO GOOD
CONCERTS THIS AFTERNOON
AND EVENING.
Good weather for fanners, hut
hurt wpnther for Chautauqua put a
crimp in the program last evening
and today.
This afternoon the chief attraction
t uuih PiiiI.iip who will take for
his subject "Big Business" The
Hadley Concert Co. will give two -j
cert!', one this afternoon and anotli-'
,
er this evening.
The rain at Chautauqua did not
Btop the little children from being
on hand ut nine o'clock simp for
their kindergarten work this morning
It. Is very interesting sight to
watch the tiny tots working wilh
their bright colored papers and yarns.
A story period Is also conducted ev
ery morning by Mrs. Selby. About
thirty children are out every morning
for the work .
The older girls were forced to prac
tice under a large tent for their page
ant. Miss Hustis is giving them a very
pretty and benellelal course In folk
dancing.
Many Ottawa housewives were dis
appointed after making the trip to
the C'hautauuua grounds in the rain
to tind the demonstration had been ;
called off on account of the weather.
Mrs. Jones is a great favorite with
the women of Ottawa, and it is with
much regret they ure missing her ap
pearances here.
Mr. Charles K. Varney made, his
first war talk at 11 o'clock to n small crnl, who after paying a visit to the
audience. Ills subject for the morn 'camps and seeing life In the trench
ing was "The" Psychological Hack- es, decided that the poslottice should
ground of the war." 'help in forwarding reading material
Mr. Varney says he is ro interested ! to the men. Then the lied Cross and
In the war ho cannot help talking the Order of Saint John was asked to
about it. His only son, Charles K. ; affiliate the war library wilh their or
Varney, Jr., has recently been accept- ganizations.
ed as an aviator for I'ncle Sam. In i Win n the beds at (lallipoli were In
terest In these talks continues to grow ' ing rapidly filled wilh the sick and
from day to day. wounded, a cable came to Surrey
Chautauqua Notes. j House: "Send li-i.oim books at once,
Mrs. Nellie Kedzle Jones often light and good print." Perhaps Ihe
meets rain at Chautauqua-. At a re ; day before Malta had cabled for lti.
cent demonstration of Mrs. Jones, j .mil similar books. The demand seem
when she opened the kitchen cabinet, "d to grow by leaps and bounds. No
the flour had been rained on until it 'hospitai at home or abroad asks with
waa pasie, boys had made off with i ml receiving the full quota, today the
the raisins and nuts find a trail of ' organization Is supplying npproxlm-
sugar ran from the cabinet to the
side door of the auditorium. A kindly
grocer came to her resque with ma
terial and the demonst ration con
tinued. The Mondav evening session was
called off on account of the severe i
rain. The storm reached the ( ban-:
tauqua grounds at live o'clock.
when Mrs. Jones was giving her dem -
onstratlon. The people in Ihe nnmhi-jin
theater quickly scattered to thcin
tents, , The rain continued in lorren's
for several hours and quite a number
of Hie campers went to their homes
for the night.
The electric lights were turned off
for a few minutes early In the even
ing, leaving the grounds in total :
darkness. The slakes of a number j
of tents were washed on I by the rain.
The lunch counter tent fell compleie-i
ly down, and the Thompson lent i
down loo. Mr. Far re 1 1 was on the
Job with a sledge hammer thruoiit
the storm and kepi several other
tents from going down. The rain
blew in the amphitheater so badly
It was impossible to use it for the
evening session.
Rotary Session.
The Rotary Club attended the after
noon session In a body to hear Allen
P. Albert deliver a most excellent ad
dress on "The Clly of Ottawa."
"There loin nlwiivn been lilies
since the beglnlng," said Mr. Albert.!1"
a ...... i ,. .,.., .,., i . that
s in in t i if in (in u ? ii i in m- n 1 1 t n
God's children. Held together by the
unity of economic and Hlrllual con
ditions. All cities are alike and have
corresponding stages In their growth.
Ottawa, anil all ell les, began as places
of refuge."
He traced the early growth of tt city
thru the periods of trade, manufac
ture, iiml the beginning; of a richer
life. He spoke of the advantages or
building a largo city on a river, for
commercial purposes. Indianapolis Is
the. only huge, city in the wot hi that
Is not built on a river. It Is a com
mon Halt for all cities divided by a
liver, lo be jealous one side or the
other.
Mr. Albert gave tunny Interesting
statistics rif Ottawa. He said only
(Cooiinuea on Pag 3.)
BOOKS FOR SOUK
A ME IN AT
WAR LIBRARIES ARE BEING ES
TABLISHED AT ALL CANTON
MENT SOLDIER BOYS HUN
GRY FOR BOOKS.
Cunt riliut ions of books and maga
'ziue sfor the soldiers tire slowly hut
;"'y " "" "
The
hooks that have been received ho far
'are ill very good condition, most of
llicm as good as new.
Magazines of
: ,.(iiirst, predominate. There are still i
mlliv lnm, n Ottawa that could give j
;
i ms magazine donations. j
j Kram. buildings, 4uxl'D reel, one- (
'story high, with accommodations for j
eight
or ten thousand hooks, news
papers and magazines are being erect
id at the 32 cantonments and Nation
al Guard Camps.
Hoy very much reading material
; means to the' soldiers Is shown by
Ihe following address delivered al the
Louisville conference.
In England Mrs. II. M. (iaskell and j
Lady llatTersea undertook to supply ;
the soldiers with books. Not only!
parcels and boxes, but vanloads of
hooks were delivered at Surrey j
House. Assistants from the London i
Library aided m sorting and arrang
ing them. Hut as "the wide-flung bat
tle held extended the supply of
, hooks dw indled. We were in despair.
Hospitals in France doubled. Sick In
'Leninos, Malta, (lallipoli, Egypt, grew
'in nuinbers to tin alarming extent;
hooks were asked for, cabled for, de
manded, implored. Our hearts were
J indeed heavy laden." Relief came
thru the action of the postmaster gen-
ately I .S lo hospitals In Great l'.rilain. 1
2ii2 in France, 5S naval hospitals and j
V(t hospital ships, The transport hos- j
idlal ships are replenished every voy
age, j
Those whom typhoid and dysen- i
lery
hold
had weakened were, not aide to
books at. all, and needed pic- :
, lures instead. Mr. Kudyard Kipling i
Iliad foreseen this need and asked (hose
charge to supply strong brown pa-j
per scraphooks filled but. not crowded
with pictures. Fresh scraphooks
uippo'ed to, the hospital ships v
voyage. A young soldier, just
covering from typhoid, came to
are
ich
war library on his return from Egypt
and was asked to look about and tell
w 1 i t he would have liked best during
i, convalescence. "L was too tired
tn V(ad,
iven a
books "
said he, "but I would have
lot for one of those picture
This type of convalescent.
can use games to advantage and so
the war library has started a games
department. There Is a never ceasing
demand for playing cards, dominoes,
draughts and good' jigsaw puzzles -even
with n few pieces missing. Any
thing thai can be packed flat. Is ac
ceptable. All detective rtories-good detec
llve stories - are hailed with . joy.
Sherlock Holmes is a physician re
member that. Hut lest you feel that
ephemeral class ol hooks Is utl
Is asked for, I must say that
poetry Is in demand . Shakespeare,
greatest or patriots, visits the hospit
als he is ever young tho three hun
dred years old - but we prefer him in
single plays. There Is a demand
among the men for handbooks on
trade handicraft subjects.
Mrs. (iaskell says that the workers
are encouraged to renewed effort by
the countless letters they receive from
all over tne war area. i uon i nitow
l..io tt-n uti mii 111 U iv It hi nit vmir
books." wrlles one wounded soldier.
"I am Just wailing until my pal has
in ret hold his book." writ.-
another. "We have no books," Is the
appeal of an Isolated group of wound
ed In Egypt. "All wo have had to
read here was a scrap of the udver-
(Continued on Page 3.)
i m la ma w i f
OP FOR APPROVAL;
CONTAINS 64 BEDS
BUILDING WILL BE 111 FEET BY j
4-1.;, FEET, FACING ON CLINTON j
STREET WILL COST, WHEN ,
COMPLETED, $75,OCO.
j
The plans for the new King aU(1 1
city annex for ,1,. Kybmn Memorial 1
Hospital, which is to cord $7",immi, Is i
to he approved at a special meet lip?:
of the city council called for tumor-j
tow morning at !' o'clock.
The plans which have been pre
pared by Architect John Hainfen are
now on exhibition al the city council
chambers.
j
imposing slruo-1
14 feet wide, j
building paral-jof
The entrance;
be on Madison
The plans show an
(lire 1 1 1 feet long by
The long way of the
lela Madison street,
was first Intended to
street, but It
Clinton street
has In en (hanged loitering into his second marriage,
facing in the same ili-
rection at the It) burn Memorial, both
of which will he connected by short
corridors extending off the main cor-!
rido.'.
The
will be
lecture
tile and
HilldiiiK, when constructed,
an Imposing piece of arcbl
cunsl ructed of brick, stone,
concrete, ll will be practi
cally fireproof and equipped with all
modern safely devices.
There will be three floors and base
ment. The I'n si floor will contain the
administration olliec. service rooms,
one live-bed ward, kitchen and linen
room;
The second floor will have one
eight bed ward ami two two-bed
wards, privae rooms, children's room,
linen and store rooms. ,
The third floor will contain Ihe op
eration suite, contlnenient room, nurs
ery, utility room, nurses' staHon and
kitchen.
In the basement there will be the
x-ray room, dark room, laundry room;
isolation room and lockers, kitchen
and dining room for the help.
Tho rity council would have ap
proved the plans this forenoon but
prefei red to wait until similar action
had been taken by the trustees of
the King estate. ,
The new hospital annex will have
the following bed accommodations:
Two private rooms, bath, two beds.
Thirteen private mollis, thirteen
i beds.
Two senil-private rooms, bath, four
beds.
Three semi private rooms, six beds.
One emergency room, bath, six beds.
One conference room, one bed.
One live-bed ward.
Two two-bed wards.
Two elglil bed wards, HI beds.
One children's ward, fl cribs.
One nursery, six basseneltes,
Total number of beds, sixly-four.
I Ho0 Reach $20.
j 'll''R(. Aug. 21, - Hogs rea, bed the
' pi'ti I t t top price of $2o per hundred
pounds on the Chicago market today,
an advunce of from 2' lo 3D cents, re
ceipts were only ".ODD head,
Chinese peunuts are hand sorted by
woiueu after beliif sifted.
E
OTTAWA MAN MARRIED IN CALI
FORNIA IN 1908 AND AGAIN IN
OTTAWA IN 1913.
(.ynw j Sn()()k wa w)(h g
summons today in a divorce proceed-
lug brought against hint at Julesburg,
Calif., by Mrs. Cyrus J. Snook, who
( she was married to the Ottawa
'""!! at KvthM Calif. tVbruary 28,
1!M)S, and from whom she was never
() jV0,.,,Hj
The complainant claims that Mr.
Snook deserted her in August of the
same year.
The marriage records here show
that Cyrus J. Snook was married to
Miss Ada Clarmont of (his city No
vember 20, 1913. The couv of the
divorce bill was forwarded to State's
Attorney Wiley today.
Mr. Snook Is a respected citizen
Oitawa, residing on Locust street.
It probably will develop that Mr.
Snook secured a divorce before en-
EXEMPTION BOARD
AFFIDAVIT MAKERS
Many allldavils are being filed with
the local exemption board In 1hi'- citv
upholding the claims of certain y.iung
met; for exemption from sen ice 'ii e
new na'ioual draft army. TI: hoard
Is investigating Miany of tlies-i alii
da its and upon so doing tlicv bud
that many of ihein are false.
In one case a young man claimed
that he was the sole support of his
mother and his affidavit was signed
by a certain business man of this
community outside of his own family.
Upon investigation it was found that
the mother has married a plumber
and that seemed sufficient evidence
that the young man was not needed to
support the mother.
As a result of so many false a Hi -
i davits appearing there may be some
trouble caused and some men Indicted
for thus testifying to an untruth I he
board would not mention no speclllc
case or any person or persons who
had thus signed these false allldavlls.
It may be that some of the persons
signing these documents were not In
formed of all the particulars regard
ing the case, but they surely realize
that they should have made it their
business to make themselves ac
quainted wilh nil the particulars of
the case such as It may be.
The board are rushing their work
along as quickly as possible so as to
have everything ready when culled
upon to make their report.
CHAUTAUQUA
PATRONS
The FREE TRADER-JOURNAL
will be delivered on the Chautauqua
tjrounds every evening during the
1917 session. Subscribers desiring
their paper delivered at their tent
will pleate call this office.
PHONE 118.
Donahey in Cleveland Plain Dealer.
SMOKE AND GAS
E
BURLINGTON ENGINES WHICH
MAKE THE NIGHT HIDEOUS,
MAY HAVE TO PUT ON MUF
FLERS. " -
Ait Irion and others petitioned Ihe
city council for relief from the smoke
and gas from the Hurlington switch
engines which load their tenders at
the coiner of l.alayeite and Jackson
streets during all hours of the night.
The petition was referred to the coun
cil I as a whole.
The records of the board of local
Improvements were transferred to the
city and the records or the latter in
corporated as a part of the city rec
ords, was authorized by resolution
this forenoon.
The transfer of the license of Tlui
Creedon to J. O. Tazell was approved.
The cost of the maintenance of
Hrldge street will be divided equally
between town and city, according to
resolut Ions adopted.
Win. Thompson and other residents
of West Oitawa, petitioned to have
the width of intersecting; streets be
tween Armstrong and Hrldge streets
fixed- at Ilti feet Instead of 4X feet.
The petition was granted
Ottawa people who want brick will
be able to purchase them from the
dump pile at $2. ail or $3.a0 per thou
sand. The exact price has not yet
been decided upon. The new city
hospital will need about tlu.imo.
The pay roll for the mouth amount
ing to $l,sr7..riK was npproved.
CHERRY'S STEAMER
GETS A PUNCTURE
After completing the work of ex
cavating the block of paving on La
fayette street, between La Salle and
( olumbus streets. Contractor Cherry's
steam shovel chauffeurs concluded to
take u little ride around the loop.
lCvety thing worked like clock work
until they struck the bumps In front
of the Free Trader-Journal office. At
this point the steamer got a puncture
and the noise of escaping Bteam drove
everybody out of the block. The driv
ers of the "tank had to plug cotton
into their ears in order to get near
the machine to pull out the lire.
This morning repairs were made
and the machine continued Its trip to
Mill stieet, where It Is rooting up the
cobblestones today.
U. S. WHEAT PRICES
WILL BE FIXED SEPT. 1,
Washington, Aug. 21 .--Rumors that
a price already has been set for the
country's supply of wheat were set
at rest today when II was announced
the food administration will set a fig
ure on Sept. 1.
Reports that the price had been set
at $1 Ci and various other marks were
today characterized us lasl final ef
forts to nway Ihe markets for specu
lative purposes. '
N
IB
Kuvy selduui ruukles the suul of tbe liurlul was at Ottawa Avenue ceme
greut uiuii. tery,
1 PROPERTY
TO BE SOLD AGAIN
AT POBLIC AUCTION WEN DEAD MAN 'S HILL
MORTGAGE OF W. D. BOYCE NOT
RECOGNIZED BY MR. O'NEIL,
WHO OFFERS SUPREME COURT
DECISION IN SUPPORT OF HIS
CONTENTION.
Auction sale of the properties of
T. K. O'Netl Implement Co., which
were Bold by the master to VV. D.
Boyce August 13, will take place in
Marseilles, Sept. 12, 1917, according
to sale bills posted in the city. The
sale of the property to W. D. Boyce
will be contested, according to re
cent developments. Mr. O'Neil is
plaintiff in a $10,000 damage case
against Mr. Boyce. in the resale of
this property each tract of land will
be sold separately and also the build
ing thereon separately with privilege
to be dismantled.
It would appear from a decision
of the Supreme Court, as recited
In said sale bill, that the litigation now
started has footing upon concrete
foundations to carry along more than
one angle litigation upon practical
lines in harmony with court decision.
The history of the factory property
will be recalled by many during the
days of prosperous times, when oper
ated by the Marseilles Manufacturing
Company.
What appear to be disastrous per
iods took place after the lease of
I9u6, was consummated for additional
Horsepower. Alter this lease, was
made by Mr. Adams, the property soon
changed hands, being purchased by
Deere & Co., of Mollne, who shortly
after the purchase abandoned the fac
tory and found a purchaser. The clt
lena of Marseilles, aided In this pur
chase by the factory being sold to
the Svvanson Manufacturing Company,
and as a consideration for the factory
the Peeres received a large block of
the bonds. To provide working cap
ital the Marseilles people the other
portion.
The failure of the Swanson Manu
factoring Company resulted in the
properly being sold by the court at
a low price. Neither Peere & Com
pany, nor the Marseilles bond holders
took part in the repurchase, hence
(be small returns did not even pay
the Interest which virtually amounted
to their losing the property.
.Much has been paid as to the value
of water leases to the lease holders.
It Is the contention of O'Neil thai
it is impossible to maintain a Hume,
water and electric plant on a small
scale and develop power for several
times the price that the same amount
of power could be purchased for,
that the unreasonable claim of the
Marseilles Land Al- Water Power Com
pany, that they hold a mortgage by
virtue of their lease, takes from the
property a commercial value to sell
same, or as a basis of credit, and that
in a measure of net results, the opera
tions of the Water Power Company
Is no other than monopolistic and con
fiscatory. O'Neil purchased the property at
the bankrupt auction sale of the
Swanson Manufacturing Company and
paid cash the purchase price. When
he put his court deed on record, the
Marseilles Land & Water Power
Company said he assumed their lease
mortgage on which they have ob
tained a. decree from court on the
findings of the master. Af'.er closing
and selling they still claim to have
the same mortgage on the property,
on claim that buyers assumes the lia
bility, which strips the property of
value, leaving no room for to sell lo
an outsider, who has knowledge of
the water leases.
O'Neil purchased the property In
1912, or five years ago. He paid cash
for II, and there are no complaints
in Marseilles that he has not paid for
ever oilier commodity bought here
and during the period has paid for
wages in the town nearly $2uD,imi().
O'Neil thinks it is nothing short of
palaver und slander lor to tell the
story that he has twelve months in
which to redeem the properly under
the present court proceedings, he
says these water leases, according to
the contetil inn of the Marseilles Land
& Water Power Company, are like
unto the "He from which there is no
redemption," according to the teach
ings. A mortgage which does not end hy
foreclosure proceedings, surely leaves
no room for redemption or relief,
8cherer Funeral.
Tho funeral of Anton Scherer took
place at 2 o'clock this afternoon at
the home of hln son, Charles Scherer.
THREE MOST TERRIFIC
OFFENSES LODGED
AGAINST KAISER i
COMBINED ARMIES OF ALLIES
HOPE TO ADVANCE LINES AND
STOP GERMAN OFFENSIVE
AGAINST RUSSIA.
London, Aug. 21 Three terrific of
fensives, on as many fronts, are in
full swing against the 'German allies
today.
From the North Sea to the Swiss
Alps the combined armies of England,
France, Belgium and Portugal are
surging against the German lilies In
one of the mightiest battles of the
war.
On the Italian front, front the Tol
mino sector of the Julian Alps to the
Adriatic, the Italians, after months
of preparations have opened a new
drive smashing their way past the
mountain fortresses of the Auatro
Hungarians, creeping near and nearer
to their coveted goal Trieste.
Owing to the recent demoralization
of the Russians, the. counter drive
along the Gallcian and Rumanian
fronts has not gained them any ground
but they have succeeded In declslvvely
stopping the Austro German advavnee.
The hopes of the Germans to force
their way int othe rich Russian prov
ince of Bessarabaria and capture
Odessa seems doomed.
Savage fighting is in progress ov
er a combined frontage on all fronts
of about 1,000 miles. I
On the Italian front the gigantic
combined artillery and infantry action
continues with the tide of victory ev
ery swinging toward the Italian side.
Nearly 10,000 Austro-Hungarlan pris
oners havev been captured and Im
portant crossings of the Isonzo river
havev been forced.
Military exports look for a great
burst of fighting in Macedonia soon.
In the west the French have rolled
back Ihe Teutons over a wide front
hi the Verdun sector, capturing about
fi.OOO prisoners and dominating posi
tions on both sides of the Meuse riv
er that the Germans had been fortify
ing for months.
LeMort. Homme, (Dead Man's Hill)
that blood drenched eminence on the
western side of the Meuse about
which fighting has raged at intervals
for a year and a half, is again in
French hands, having been stormed in
one of the most brilliant charges ever
witnessed by mortal eye.
Avocort wood, Cumieres wood and
Corbeaux wood names that recall
the days when all the armed might
of The German empire was lunging
against the French defenses of Verdun-have
been recaptured by Gener
al Pelains men in a series of storm
ing assaults.
On the eastern side of the Meuse,
TaloiT ridge, hill No. 344, Champ Neu
vllle, Hill 240 and Mormont farm
positions captured by the Germans In
their Verdun drive at an enormous
sacrifice of human life He again un
der the protection of French arms to
day. Germans Assault Epehyi,
The German assault near Epehys
was preceded by a powerful bombard
ment and was followed by violent
fighting In which the Teutons used
great quantities of liquid fire. Despite
the fury of the attack, the British
lines held llrm.
Near the St, Queutln canal the Brit
ish made a successful raid rapturing
numerous prisoners.
Air Raids by British.
London, Aug. 21 The fourth raid
in as many nights was made by Brit
ish aviators against German military
works behind the lines in Belgium.
Tons of explosives were thrown down
upon ammunition depots at Middle
kerke and on military works at Bru
geaise and by naval airmen, the ad
miralty announced today. Much dam
age was done.
RUBBER TIRE PLANT
MAY COME HERE
Frank I!. Hamlon, of Pittsburgh,
will arrive In Ottawa tonight to meet
with the directors of the Chamber of
Commerce who will meet at the sec
retary's ollice at S o'clock this even
ing. Mr. Hamlon Is a well known man
In the business world, and his purpose
in coming lo Ottawa tonight Is to
give the directors of the Chamber of
Commerce an opportunity to procure
a rubber lire plant for this city, and
his visit will be one of .ousldetable
Interest to people of this city,

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