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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, October 11, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
Established 184
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1S30. -
FREE TRADER-JOURNAE
Hi'
THE W RATHER.
Colder tonight. Friday
generally fair and colder.
VOLUME 1.--NO. -77.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS, TIIUUSDAY, OCTOUKIt 11, 1917.
PRICE, TWO CENTS.
KAUF KNOCKS TWO HOMERS IN GAME
TODAY: GIANTS Will FROM SOX 5-0
CHICAGO OUTCLASSED
IN ALL STAGES OF
CONFLICT
FABER IS REMOVED
WHITE t08E FOLLOW UP PITCH
ER IS DRIVEN OFF SLAB WHEN
KAUFF TORE OFF TWO FOUR
SACKERS 2IMMERMANN GETS
THREE BAGGER.
THE 80RE.
R. H. E.
Sox OOOOOOOO 00 7 0
Giants .0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 x 5 10 1
BATTERIES Faber, Danforth and
8chalk for sox; Schupp and Rariden
for the Giants.
New York, Oct. 11. It stands now
two and two.
The Giunts with Schupp at the holm
had little or no trouble putting the
Sox down to humble defeat f to 0,
this afternoon before a crowd of 33, (Hill
at the I'olo grounds.
Faber was sent to the box and hint
ed until the seventh. Danforth was
sent In to complete the nine innings
when Rowland's men were so far In
the. hole there was no chance of res
cue. Kauff got his first circuit drive in
the fourth and followed with another
in the eighth, splitting the drives
against Faber and his pitching pal.
Zimmerman tore off a three-bagger in
the eighth. At no time were the Sox
menacing, their monkey-shines on the
bases giving thorn the appearance of
bush leaguers when chance after
chance was Improperly handled.
First Inning.
80X Shano Collins fanned. Me
Mullen singled to right Eddie Collins
whined and Jackson flew out. No
runs; one hit; no errors.
GIANTS Burns, Hertog and Kauf
went down In order on infield drives.
No runs; hits nor errors.
. 8ECOND INNING.
'". 80 X Felch out short to first. , Gan
dil out Schupp to Holke. Weaver fan
ned. No runs, hits nor errors.
GIANTS Zimmermann out second
to first. Fletcher out third to first.
Robertson out pitcher to first. No
runs, no hits no errors.
THIRD INNING.
. 80X- Schalk singled to left, Faber
flew out to pitcher. Collins out on
third strike. McMullen out three
strikes. No runs, one hit, no errors.
NEW YORK Holke fanned. .Rari
den out on pop fly to third. Schupp
struck out. No runs, no hits no errors.
FOURTH INNING.
80X Ed. Collins doubled, along
third base line. Jackson out on pop
fly to second. Flech fanned. Collins
" was caught between second and third.
One hit, No runs, no errors, one hit.
GIANTS Burns fanned. Herzog
out on infield drive. Kauf drove a
home into deep center. Zimmermann
failed to hit. One run, one hit, no
errors.
FIFTH INNING. .
SOX Gandll hit it and was doubled
on Weaver's Infield phot. Schalk sin
gled and Faber out. No runs, two hits,
no errors.
GIANTS-Fletcher singled to right.
Robertson bunted along third base
line and made a hit of It. Holke bunt
ed to pitcher and beat it out for a
single. Rariden hit into a double
play catching Fletcher at the plate.
Schupp singled, scoring Robertson,
and Holke was caught tryink to make
home. One run, four hits, no errors.
SIXTH INNING.
- SOX J. Collins singled to left. Mc
Mullen fanned. Eddie Collins went to
second. Eddie out on fly to left.
Jackson out, second to first. No runs,
one hit, one error,
GIANTS Burns singled over sec
ond. Herzog bunted out, Burns going
to tecond. Kauff out oh fly to center,
Burns taking third. Zimmerman out,
second to first. No runs, one hit, no
errors.
i SEVENTH INNING.
SOX Felsch fanned. Gandll out,
pitcher to first. Weaver popped out
to second. No runs, no hit, no errors.
GIANTS Fletcher drove a long one
for a single. Robertson up. Fletcher
went to third on a wild pitch, Robert
ton out. Holke was hit by pitched
ball, Rariden out, second to first,
Fletcher scoring and Holke taking.
Schupp out, short to first. 'One run,
one hit, no errors.
EIGHTH INNING.
. SOX 8chalk out on fly to left,
Burnt making a great catch. Re Is-
bera wa n t k rsk u. i
--m r hot ' v i , i i .
out on a out fly to center. J. Collins
tingles to center. McMullen out on
(Continued on Pae 5.)
PREDICT DROP IN
PIES
WIN
LAW IS IN OPERATION
PRESIDENT WILSON ISSUES PROC
LAMATION SHOWING REGULA
TIONS AND RULES GOVERNING
STAPLES DURING PERIOD OF
WAR.
Ixwcr prices for tood products are
lu sight. Ilefore the first of next
mouth practically all staples used by
Aiueiicuns will be under government
ci-ntrol.
President Wilson today issued an
executive order requiring manufactur
ers and distributors of some 20 fun
damental foods, to operate under li
cense restrictions designed to prevent
unrensonni'lo profits and to stop spec
ulation act! hoarding.
Regulations are prescribed for meat
packers, cold storage houses, millers,
canners. elevators, grain dealers and
wholesale, dealers aud retailers doing
a business of more than Sluu.uoo an
ually in the commodities to be named.
"The prime purpose of the food ad
ministration," the announcement says,
"is to protect the patriot against the
Blacker In business."
Debt to Soldiers.
"It has generally been recognized
that enormous obligations imposed on
the American people to feed our sol
diers at the front and the allies create
a disturbing factor in trade which
allows opportunity to a few to impose
a burden upon many, and that It Is of
vital importance, that such control
should be exerted as will remedy, so
farts may be, eeoiiBtnie disturbances
Incident to the war."
The Proclamation.
After quoting the food control act,
under which the action Is taken, the
President's proclamation says:
"It is essential, in order to carry
into effect the purposes of said act, to
llceuse the importation, manufacture,
storage and distribution of necessaries.
to the extent hereinafter specified.
"All persons, firms, corporations and
associat'ons engaged in the business
either of (1) operating cold storage
warehouses (a cold storage ware
house for the purpose of this procla
mation, being defined as any place
artificially or mechanically cooled to
or below a temperature of 4.1 degrees
fahrenhelt, in which food products
are placed and held for thirty days or
more); (2) operating elevators, ware
houses or other places for storage of
corn,, cats, barley, beans, rice, cotton
seed, cottonseed cake, cottonseed
meal of peanut meal, or (3) Importing,
manufacturing (including milling,
olxins or packing) or distributing (In
cluding buying or selling) any of the
lollowing commodities:
Wheat, wheat Hour, rye or rye Hour.
Hurley or barley flour.
Oats, oatmeal or rolled oats.
("cm, com grits, corn meal, hom
iny, corn flour, starch from corn, corn
oil, corn sirup, corn glucose.
Rice, rice flour.
Dried beans.
Pea seed or dried peas.
Cotton seed, cottonseed nil, cotton
see;! meal.
Peanut oil or peanut meal.
Soy bean oil, soy bean meal, palm
o'l or copra oil.
Oleomargarine, lard, lard substi
tutes, oleo oils or cooking fats.
Milk, butter or cheese.
Condensed, powdered or evaporated
milk.
Fresh, canned or cured beef, pork
or mutton.
Poultry or eggs.
Fresh or frozen fish.
Fresh Truits or vegetables.
Canned pens, dried beans, tomatoes,
corn, salmon or sardines.
Dried prunes, apples, peaches or rai
sins. Sugar, sirups or molasses.
Exceptions to Rule.
"Excepting, however, the following:
"Operators of all elevators or ware
houses handling wheat or rye, and
manufacturers of the derivative pro
ducts of wheat or rye, who have al
ready been licensed.
"Importers, manufacturers and re -
flners of sugar, and manufacturers of
sugar, sirups and molasses, who have
already been licensed.
"Retailers whoso gross sales of food
commodities do not exceed $HIO,UOO
per annum.
"Common carriers.
"Farmers, gardeners, 'co-operative
arsoclatlons of farmers or gardeners,
'ncludlng live stock farmers and other
persons with respect to the products
of nny farm, garden or other land
owned, leased or cultivated by them.
"Hshemen whose business does not
extend beyond primary consignment.
"Those dealing In nny of the above
(Continued on Page Fire.)
MQourD'.
lieAve notmino
y Iom yomty ruATtt
fL iCwr our
A much as passion
POSTMA8TER DOUGHERTY IS
SUES INSTRUCTIONS 8HOWING
HOW PACKAGES SHOULD BE
WRAPPED AND ADDRE8SED.
Uncle Sam Is getting ready to play
Santa Clause for every one of his
boys at the front and to facilitate
wor.k of delivering the thousands up
on thousands of gifts that will pour In
to the army camps. He has Issued an
appeal to citizens of Ottawa, as well
as those of other cities, asking them
to co-operate with him by following
the appended set of rules announced
by Postmaster James J. Dougherty:
"To the Public: The-time is ap
proaching to give thought to bring
ing Christmas cheer ,to the Ameri
can soldiers and sailors abroad.
"Arrangements have been per
fected whereby the Christmas mail
to the American expeditionary
forces in Europe is to be delivered
by Christmas morning. Without the
fullest co-operation on the part of
the public it will be impossible to
accomplish this result.
"The three essential respects in
which the. public can aid In assur
ing a happy Christmas at the
front are: Mail early, address in
telligently, and pack securely. For
this reason It is urgently request
ed that all persons having Christ
mas mall for the soldiers and sailors
and the civilian units attached to the
army in Europe observe closely
the following directions:
"1. Mail to reach the soldiers in
France by Christmas morning
must be posted not later than No
vember 15th.
"2. Every package must bear
conspicuously the words "Christ
mas mail," the complete address of
.the person for whom it is Intended,
and, in the upper lefthand corner,
the name and address of the send
er. "3. Every package must be so
packed and wrapped as to admit of
easy Inspection by the postmaster.
No parcel will bo dispatched to
France which has not the postmas
ter's certificate that it contains no
prohibited articles."
JAMES J. DOUGHERTY,
Postmaster, Ottawa, 111.
! MAQOMQ VflTF I ARftP
i IVIHOUIsQ VUI u LHnUL
FUND FOR THE WAR
Delegates to the Illinois Grand
UNCLE SAM TO PLAY INTERURBAN IS REV. Ill DAY
SANTA EOR BOYS IN OCTOGENARIANS CAR NAMED MODERATOR
MANY ARMY CAMPS - OF CONG. CHURCHES
Lodge of Masons' In Chicago yester-1
day voted n war fund of M.-.&.ono. MIhs Gertrude Gunther of Depue
Governor Louden and Ralph H.jan, Juni08 i)wypr of a,)Plng Valley
Wheeler, retiring grand master, j W(.re nirrj(!d yesterday at the Baptist
spoke lust night. The Grand Lodge, parsonage In this city. Rev, O. W.
apportioned Its fund as follows: OnoJ Chessman, pastor of the First Baptist
hundred and sixty thousand dollars rliurch. performed the ceremony. The
tor am or meniDcrs in tiie country s
military service; iitiii.uou ror men now,
In France; $10,0(1(1 for soldiers' recre-
utlon purposes and u $2o,UU tiubscrip -
tlou to Liberty bonds,
GRATEFUL TO HOOVER
I NEVER .SX
C0VM BE-fVo 'A JfTi 1
SZTjH . Sw I An m e
WILLIAM WILLAVIZE VETERAN
AUTOMOBILIST IN ACCIDENT
THIS MORNING ESCAPES FROM
MISHAP UNINJURED.
Ottawa today recorded another "for
tunate escape'' iVom serious Tesutts In
an automobile accident when William
Willavize, 637 Madison street, was In
a machine that barely missed total
domolishment in front of a west bound
C, O. & P. car. Mr. Willavize, who
Is a prominent West Ottawa octogen
arian and noted for his skill in driv
ing a car, came out of the mishap un
injured, as did also his son, Grant
Willavize, who was with him ut the
time.
Hacking from his yard onto Madison
street just as niotorman Harry Funk
and Conductor Walter Reese, were
returning their car to the shops west
of town, Mr. Willavize, who was at
the wheel, arrived on the tracks in
time for the two cars to meet. The im
terurban car naturally played havoc
with the smaller motor leaving it
with a smashed wheel and a caved In
radiator, but the blow was not sharp
enough to throw the aged driver nor
ills son to the pavement.
The interurban car causing the ac
cident arrived at the Ottawa station
at 8 : TiO o'clock, and as this Is Its ter
minal It is sent back to ,the bams
to await the next trip. It was while
the niotorman and, conductor were
driving the car on reverse that the
collision occurred. Because of his po
sition at the rear end of the car it
,mssnie ior motorman rutin i
io see ai r. v niavize back out or his
yard onto the track.
URGE MEMBERS TO
. ATTEND RED CROSS
BUSINESS 'MEETING
The annual business meeting of the
Red Cross will be held in the parlors
of the Clifton hotel, Friday night, Oc
tober 12th, nt 7 o'clock.
Every member of the local chapter
Is urgrnl. to be present nt this time
as this is a very important session.
The annual election of officers will
be held and the annual reports will
be given. Every member of the Otta
wa chapter of t he American Red Cross
has a vote in the election As It Is
necessary to close the .meeting early,
it must open promptly so all those
planning to attend are requested to
come early.
COME HERE TO HAVE
NUPTIAL KNOT TIED
couple left at once for a short honey
moon In
Chicago, after which thyied from the county jail at Pensacola,
w
make their future home in Snrinu
1 Valley where the groom Is employed
i at the Mineral Point Zinc works.,
Berrymin in Washington Star.
FORMER OTTAWAN GIVEN HIGH
EST HONOR AT COMMAND OF
NATIONAL BODY iWILL HOLD
OFFICE TWO YEARS.
Rev. William Horace Day, former
Ottawan, and son of Rev. Horace Day,
who for years held the pastorate of
the First Congregational church in
Ottawa, has been honored by being
presented the highest office at the
command of the national Congrega
tional churches.
Yesterday at Columbus, Ohio, where
the seventh convention of the Ameri
can council or church of that creed
s being held, the erstwhile Ottawa
.boy, was chosen moderator, and will
continue in that office during the pe
riod of his two years' term. His elec
tion to this dignified post was made
within five minutes of the time the
conference was called to order and
was by acclaim.
The Congregationa lists have no
bishop nor other high dlgnatarles oth
er than their moderator. This means
that Rev. Day Is the recognized head
of all the Congregation edifices thru
out the United States. He previous
ly had held office as asslstunt modera
tor. Rev. Day stopped in Ottawa for a
week's visit during the past summer
while enroute from Los Angeles, Calif.,
where he was pastor of the city's
largest church for stpvprnl vnnru tn
Bridgeport, Conn., where he had ac
cepted a call to the United Congrega
tional church. During his stay here
he renewed old acquaintances and ad
dressed a few gatherings besides
speaking from his father's old pulpit.
Rev. Carl Stackman and Mrs. Stack
man are at Columbus attending the
sessions as delegates from the Fox
River Association of churches and mis
sionary societies.
At the meeting yesterday William
E. Burton, editor of the Advance was
elected first assistant moderator,
!Iarold McKIngsloy, Negro, superin
tendent of church work In Tennessee,
and Kentucky, was selected second
assistant moderator. Hubert C. Her
ring was elected to succeed himself as
secretary.
An appeal to President Wilson to
forbid during the period of the war
the use of all ' food values In the
manufacture of all alcoholic liquors,
Including beer and wines, and ,to for
bid the sale and importation of such
liquors, Is contained in the report of
the temperance committee which was
submitted by Dr. C. A. Vincent of Win
ter Park, Fla. The report, which In
dorses the work of the Anti-Saloon
league, has not yet been adopted.
Recapture Death Refugees.
Coffeyvllle, Ala., Oct. 11 Wilt and
Bob Blackwell, brothers, under sent
ence of death for murder, who escap-
, Fla., ten days ago, have been recap-
i tureil and are held here today for the
I Pensacola authorities,
REPORT MOVE ON TO OUST GERMAn
CHANCELLOR FOR PRINCE BUELOW
m
Y VOLUTEER TO
HELP IN CAMPAIGN
FOR SALE OF BIDS
ARTISTS OFFER SERVICES FOR
FRIDAY NIGHT'S MASS MEETING
JOE REARDON WILL RENDER
PATRIOTIC SONG OF OWN COM
POSITION. Intense Interest Is being shown by
the patriotic people of Ottawa in
their desire to get back of the Liberty
Loan movement and give it every sup
port possible. Chairman Griggs, of
the local committee, during the past
two days has had many artists along
different lines who have willingly ten
dered their services for the big pa
triotic meeting to be staged at the
high school auditorium tomorrow
night Columbus night.
Another star that has been added to
the program that will entertain the
crowd will be Joe Reardan. So that
with Miss Elliott, the popular soprano,
music by the high school orchestra
and a chorus of the students with the
splendid address to be delivered by
S. J. Duncan-Clark, will be a great
treat to the people of this community.
President Griggs will appoint an ex
ecutive committee of well known peo
ple who will volunteer their services
to assist In loaning money to the
government at 4 per cent interest.
Every bank In the city Is now ready
to take subscriptions for the loan and
all have agreed to adopt the partial
loan plan of payment to any person
who does not feel able or Is not pre
pared to pay rash for his bond. This
Is a splendid means of Saving money
and the different banks of the city
encourage and recommend this splen
did plan for becoming a bond owner.
Every head of families and every
young man and woman should make it
their business to attend the patriotic
meeting tomorrow night and bring
their friends and neighbors with them.
It will be the means of showing their
patriotism and their presence encour
age the citizens of this community
with the hope that our people
stand solidly behind the government.
To those that have relatives or friends
now In the service of Uncle Sam, a
special appeal is sent out to them to
attend the meeting.
When it comes to concerted action,
when civic and governmental matters
are concerned, the people of Ottawa
can always be relied on in heartily
supporting and co-operating in its good
and welfare. For this reason it is be
lieved that there will be a hearty re
sponse to the call for Ottawa to do
its "bit" by attending the big gath
ering Friday night.
DOUHERTY LANDS
JAIL HEATING JOB
Contracts for installing the new
heating system at the La Salle County
Jail and sheriff's residence have been
awarded to John M. Dougherty, whose
bid proved low In a field of three
entrants In the race for the job. The
system will be similar to the one now
in use in the court house and the
work will be done under the supervis
ion of Architect Jason Richardson.
Bids for the contract were as fol
lows: J. M. Dougherty $3,5H
Prafcke & Weiss 3,659
J. W. Clegg & Son 3,59
As there were only ninety-nine dol
lars difference between the high and
low bidders it can be readily seen that
the figures were compiled on very
close estimates.
EXEMPTION GRANTED
TO SHERIDAN BOY
The local exemption board received
today from the district exemption
board word that one more man, Ward
Smith Poore, of Sheridan, had been
allowed his claim for exemption by
them on account of Industrial grounds.
Mr. Poore had been denied exemption
by ,the local board but was granted ex
emption upon taking his appeal to the
district board,
Commission Drivers Strike.
Chicago, Oct. 11 Three hundred
men of the commission drivers' union
went on strike here today lu all com
mission houses that refused to agree
j to an advance ut $3 per week In
j.wagt'3.
DISSATISFACTION WITH
MICHAELIS IS SHOWN
IN REICHSTAG
REVOLT HAS EFFECT
GERMANS NOT PLEA8ED WITH
NAVY DISTURBANCE .FEARING
MOVE MAY HAVE BAD EFFECT
ON ALL OF POPULACE U. .
SEES IMPORTANCE OF OUT
BREAK.
BULLETIN.
Petrograd, Oct. 11 Ths now
Russian cabinet, headed by Pre
mier Kerensky today repledgsd
Russia to the allied causa.
Berne, Oct. 11 A severe obstacle
to early peace negotiations is seen la
the announcement of , the German
chancellor that Germany will not re
linquish Alsace Lorraine. Diplomats
who studied carefully the declaration
of Dr. Mlchaelis In the Reichstag on
Tuesday, said today .that, in their opln
Jon this Is the nearest Germany has
yet come to making public any ot her
peace terms. " '
With France committeed to the res
toration of Alsace Lorraine and the
German government on record (or the
retention of these provinces, a dead
)ock in the peace situation seema to
ettble for the time being.
A movement is reported under way
in the Reichstag, backed by a number
of deputies to compel Aha resignation
ot Chancellor Mlchaelis and reinstate
Prince von Buelow, who formerly
held that post.
During proceedings in the Reichstag
on Tuesday Oral attack were rnadV
against President Wlleon. ,
Copenhagen, Oct. 11. More than
three thousand sailors and several
members of the Reichstag were In
volved in the mutiny in the German
navy which broke out late in August,
according to information received here
today from a German naval port.
The leaders were plotting revolu
tion when the outbreak was checked
by loyal German soldiers and sailors.
Most of the warships affected were
lying at Wtihelmhaven when the up
rising took place.
Latest reports give the following
causes as the chief ones leading up to
the mutiny.
1. Influence exerted by the success
of the successful revolt in Russia,
which Inspired the men to a demand
or "Naval Commltttees," such as now
exist in the Russian fleet.
2. Bad aud insufficient food.
3. Low morale caused by long in
activity. Whether there was any connection
between the outbreak in the navy and
the mutinous uprising among the Ger
man soldiers on the western front Is
not known, but it is assumed here that
there was. . i
The ringleaders In both Instances
were severely dealt with. A number
were executed and severe trass of
Imprisonment were conferred upon oth
ers. The sentence imposed harsh as
they were fell short of the penalties
demanded possibly by the Kaiser.
Among the warships affected was
the Westfalen, which was reported
sunk at the time of the battle ot Jut
land. Others were the Lultpold, Prlnz Re?
gent, Kaiser and Kurnburg.
The government had the utmost dif
ficulty in suppressing the revolt. Some
ot the marines refused to Are upon
the mutineers, so Infantry was called
to the scene and the Iron disciplined
soldiers showd no hesitation In turn
ing machine guns and rifles upon the
mucinous sailors. It is not known how
many were killed.
Unrest In the German navy contin
ues despite the stern measures that
have been taken to stamp It out.
it was recalled here today that at
the time of the Kaiser's hurried trip
to Wllhelmhaven, at the time of the
mutiny, the Berlin Lokal Anzelger and
other papers stated that William was
going to review the fleet and the de
fense on Helgoland.
It is understood here that the Ger
man navy has commenced to conscript
sailors from the fleet for submarine
duty and this may have been one of
the underlying causes ot the growing
unrest.
Washington, Oct. 11 American na
Val circles today were anxiously seek
ing further information about the mu
tiny In the German navy. The admis
sion that one had taken place was
considered most .significant. Naval
revolts have been very few In history.
It was pointed out, naval men are et
tremely free from agitation that niakaa
for unrest. i

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