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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, October 19, 1917, Image 1

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FREE TR
5R- JOURNAL
THE WEATHER.
Fair tonight with frett
ing temperature. Satur
day warmer; probablj
rain.
VOLUME 1.--NO. lis-l.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS, FIJI DAY, OOTOHKK 19, 1917.
PBICE, TWO CENTS.
TEACHERS
CITY: 1. 1.
TAKE POSSESSION OE
L ill
"BREAKING HOME TIES"
IS
OTTAWA FREE TRAOER
Eatabllahed 1M
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Establishes- 1UO.
AJDI
0
TT
TO WORK OR
FIRST SESSION IS HELD
AT HIGH SCHOOL
AUDITORIUM
coiig. fess SPEAKS
OHIO STATESMAN DELIVERS
OPENING TALK SPECIAL
TRAINS FROM WEST BRING
MANY INSTRUCTORS THIS
MORNING.
The large auditorium at the high
school was filled last night fur the
first session of the Illinois Valley Di
vision of the State Teachers' Insti
tltute. This was the only meeting
during the entire institute, and the
people of Ottawa took advantage of
this, and turned out in goodly num
bers. The high school orchestra,
which is always a favorite attraction
with the music lovers of this city,
played numbers that were greatly en
Joyed, by every one that beard them.
This was followed by a very pictures
que folk dance given by the pupils of
the eighth grade. The little folks
danced gracefully and it was a beau
tiful sight to watch the figures of
the dance as the children passed buck
and forth with their red, white and
blue streamers.
Rev. John F. Vonckx, of this city,
made the invocation In a most Impres
sive manner.
The speaker of the evening, Con
gressman S. C. Fess, of Yellow
Springs, Ohio, was introduced by the
president, T. J. MtCormick, of La
Salle. Who In a few well chosen
.words explained how the people gen
erally In older times thought a school
master, was the last choice for all
public purposes. But how in modem
times' we chose all bur noted men,
public speakers, statesmen,, prime
ministers, congressmen, governors and
even the president of the United
States from the profession of a teach
er. Congressman Fess made one of the
'strongest patriotic addresses that was
ever delivered in this city. He has
been In Washington during all the
events leading to the present crisis
In this world's war, and speaks with
the courage and conviction of one
who knows his subject thoroughly. If
there had been a single person in the
house last night, who in his or her
secret heart, was a German sympa
thiser, the chances are they would
have left there after the meeting thor
oughly loyal to this country, so plain
and, strong was this patriotic talk
made.
He explained how he accepted the
Invitation to come to Ottawa to make
this address readily, when he learn
ed what the subject was to be, because
he did not think enough could be said
on the subject of why the entire world
was at war, and he was entirely will
ing to travel a great distance to ex
plain to the public why It seems to
the people of Washington that three
fourths of the world has taken up
arms and is fighting. Most people
thought in the beginning of the fight
the war would be of very short dura
tion, it did not seem possible with
all our modern warfare the war could
last as Kltchner predicted In the be
ginning of ,the struggle, three years,
but now after three years of fighting
people that have followed the situa
tion closely believed the war is Just
HUntu ts ha Inn or drawn nut AH it
no line. i UD w..B
Is to be of short duration.
The causes of the United States be
ing drawn into the war were discussed
at length, by Mr. Fess who declared
"we're In the war now and the only
way we can get out of It Is to go
straight through with it."
The president's action in asking the
tiollluerent nations to explain 'heir
proposed methods and usages of na
yal warfare In the beginning of the
war was next taken up and traced,
stage by stage until such a time as it
was necessary for our president to
ask the secretary of Btate to hold all
nations of the world to a strict alli
ance upon the usage and the rules of
the international warfare. The Unit
ed States could not hold any country
of the world to this alliance unless we
practiced it ourselves, and If, as Ger
many wished us ,to, we had refused
to sell England munitions we would
have been breaking this International
treaty by not allowing free trade. At
all times we were as willing and ready
to sell Germany munitions and food,
but Germany could not deliver this
'cargo on account of the British block
ade, conducted in strict observance of
the International alliance, saying "Ev-
(Continued ou page 5.)
MEAT
PIM 11 LOCATE
CO-OPERATIVE INDUSTRY SE
LECTS OTTAWA FOR ITS SITE
COMMERCE BODY RESPONSIBLE
FOR LANDING INDUSTRY FOR
CITY.
Ottawa Is to have a new Industry
a large meat-packing plant established
on co-operative lines, which will mean
much to the city and surrounding
country, and will undoubtedly be one
of t!ic leading Industries of this sec
tion. This plant has been brought to
Ottawa thru the enterprise and ef
forts of the Chamber of Commerce,
which has agreed to donate a satis
factory site of approximately ten
acres in or -near the city limits.
For years the germ of a co-operative
plant of this nature has been
lying quiescent and it was not until
Mr. Eli H. Doud. of the Doud Bros.,
of Chicago, well known In the meat
packing and live stock industry,
agreed to head the movement that it
was brought into full life.
Cooperative enterprises thruout
the country have received a great
stimulus from the present abnormal
conditions In addition to the rapid
growth that t'ley obtained before the
war. The great co-operative fruit
growers' association of California, and
other sections, are well known and
have succeeded in obtaining for their
members markets and prices that
would otherwise have been impossible.
Grain co-operative societies have
sprung up thruout the West and no
thei day of the farmer and live. stock
grower of this , sectUtn has arrived.
Practically since the earliest times,
the farmer has bjn, a victim of cir
cumstances which he could not con
trol, in regard to fixing of middlemen's
profits, transportation, etc. This con
dltion has . secured the great fortunes
of the packers and commission men.
while the farmer or producer has had
to create wealth for others.
Today he Is taking matters into his
own hands with a view to the estab
lishment of his own markets and the
elimination of the middleman.
Co-operative societies or companies
have been the method employed, and
he not only attains the end outlined
above, but likewise the profits on the
transaction. besides keeping his
.money at home and in circulation.
The plans for the co-operative plant
here call for a 'thoroughly modern
and up-to-date meat packing and eold
storage plant of a capacity sufficient
to iMindlo the output of live stock of
the surrounding country, and have
1 I I.L.. !....
uoen ai awn uy nruuuuiy nit?-, mum
prominent architects, and designers
of packing houses In the I'nited
States Messrs- Henschlen & , Mc
Laren, of Chicago,- who designed
twenty-three packing houses last year
many of great capacity.
As the Association is thoroly co
operative In Its nature and will not
be controlled by any Individual or in
terest, the amount of subscription to
each being strictly limited, its ad
ministration will be in the hands of
the local .members with Mr. Doud
who will also be a member of the
company, as expert business mana
U'er-
, . . ,.11i1..a
of the Association Chicago prices here
In Ottawa as the Middleman will all
be eliminated, including railroad
charges, yardage, shrinkage, etc. This
should mean Increase In prices of be
tween four and five per cent on live
stock over the present method.
To still further carry out the Ideas
of co-operation, the Association in
tends to grant a special discount of
ten per cent on all retail meat pur
chased by Its members. .
" As so much depends upon proper
management of business enterprises
a few words regarding Mr. Doud, the
manager of the plunt, may be of in
terest. Mr. Kll H. Doud was born at
Turin, Lewis county, New York, In
1803. His father Royal H. Doud was
for years connected with the meat
packing Industry and was In fact one
of the pioneer packers of Chicago.
His sons were connected with him at
a later period In the business. Mr,
Doud In addition to his business
training In the packing line has had
a legal education which has probably
been largely Instrumental In his sue
eerst!. 'He was one of the first to reullze
the Importance of the co-operative
1
u or r: victors
(Continued on Pas 6.)
DRAFT
El
IN OTTAWA TO FACE
PUNISHMENT- JAILED
I
SAM SWEENEY, SENECA FARM
HAND, SURRENDERS f ELF AF
TER BEING TRACED TO HIDING
PLACE IW WYOMING, '" '
Sam Sweeney, Ottawa district's
second man to avoid the draft by de
liberately dodging service iu the
army, today is a prisoner in the La
Salle county jail after surrendering
himself this morning to the exemp
tion board.
weeney was slaU " to so with the
second increment leaving Ottawa lor
Camp Dodge, but failed to put in an
appearance. When his continued ab
sence after notice having been served
upon him indicated plain slacking,
members of the board Instituted an In
vestigation with the result that he
was traced to Wyoming. Letters were
sent instructing him, or rather advis
ing him, that his whereabout were
known and lie had better report.
This morning, bedraggled and d's-
hevoled, and bearing all apearances
of having beaten his way back to Ot
tawa, he presented himself to the
ooard. He was ordered locked up by
members of the exemption body and
was removed to the county jail where
he will remain a prisoner pending dis
position of his case by federul author
ities. Sweeney now has the rating of
a deserter and probably will be re
moved to some federal penal institu
tion.
When asked what caused him to re
main away and not report for serv
ice on September 19, when the second
increment was dispatched to Des
Moines, Sweeney announced that ho
had not received any word of his se
lection for Immediate service. His
employer, a farmer residing near Sen
eca, however, reported that Sweeney
received his notice, drew his pay and
disappeared, saying he was going to
his home near Qulncy. An Investi
gation disclosed that Sweeney had not
gone to Qulncy, but he was traced to
Blootnington and from there to Wy
oming. Stanley Teckmansky, alias Stanley
Teekman, the only , other failing to
report on September 19, was arrested
In Chicago and turned over to the of
ficers at Ft. Sheridan, where he Is
now a prisoner.
NEAR ACCIDENT ON
ILL RIVER BRIDGE
Emll L. Walter, a farmer living in i
Fall River township, got the left wheel;
of his buggy caught in the street car
track yetserday afternoon while cross-
ing the Illinois river bridge and broke
the shaft on his buggy. Mr. Walter
was alone at the time of the acci
dent and was returning to his home
after a trip to town. The wheel was
pulled from the track before any ser
ious damage wan done.
Try the Free Trader Journal Want-Ads
for results.
IBAMMMEKlIDI
1
FOR SALE OF BONDS
DEFENSE COUNCIL TO KEEP REC
ORD ON ALL WORK DONE BY
ITS PATRIOTIC MEM BERS OT
TAWA Lady gets first hon
ors. Any woman 111 (his city w ho- buys
a Liberty Bond is asked to give the
Woman's Council of National Defense
the credit for making the sale. If
the application for this bond is not
made on the regular woman's appli
cation with a blue strip across the
coiner she is requested to write worn
man's application across the coiner of
her bond. In that way the La Salle
county women will get the credit for
all the bonds they buy
The first application lor a 'bond In
the Liberty Loan campaign of the dis
trict comprising Ottawa, South Otta
wa, Dayton and Wullace townships
was made by a woman thru an Ot
tawa bank. This Is Mrs. K. C. Gregg,
the mother of Mrs. W. V. Nash, of
the Red, White and Blue solicitors of
the Woman's committee. Mrs. Gregg
is the first subscriber in those town
ships now a member of the Woman's
Liberty Loan League, the format ion
of which was announced October in,
she having applied for her bond Oc
tober 4. Mrs. Gregg Is aged 7-1 years,
and has two sons in the service, one
a corporal at Houston, Texas, and the
other at San Antonio, being a mem
ber of Company C.
The first woman who applied for
a bond in Bruce township is Miss Anna
Ward, of Slreator. The first woman
in i.a naue county who gave Her sub
scription to the Red, White and 'Blue
solicitors is Mrs. Mary C. Trainer, of
Streato" Mrs. Trainer is 7G years'
of age.
The first man in the county who was
reported by Red, White and Blue so
licitors, cf the Woman's Liberty Loan
Commit to, as a subscriber, is W. W.
Nash, of Ottawa.
SUING HUSBAND IS
. . ARRESTED BY WIFE
BY HURTLING TIRE
i
'Accused by his wife, Cora Holm,
who he Is suing for divorce on
grounds of infidelity in the - circuit
court, James Holm, this morning was
brought before Judge George Koenig
and assessed a fine of $10 and costs
for disorderly conduct.
Mrs. Holm had her complainant hus
band arrested yesterday when he went
to .the (liome of her mother, Mrs.
Lauru McConnell to see their baby.
Mrs. McConnell, It seems Is keeping
the Infant during the pendency of the
divorce suit and Jenus reserved to
himself the right to visit the Infant,
in court he said he followed this
perrogatlve and while he was visiting
the baby, Mr. Holm chucked him un
der the chin and made other over
tures he thought were Intended to
bring about a reconcilliatlon, but he
resented. Finally, his patience all
used up, he chucked Mrs. Holm aside
with a push and then the police were
'railed. Mrs. Holm savs he was a lit-
I tie strenuous with the shove, -m'
Chapin In St. Loula Republic.
BANKS TO ISSUE
BOND PASS BOOKS
AS SALE BOOSTER
INDUSTRIAL CONCERNS JOIN IN
PLAN TO BRING LIBERTY LOAN
ISSUE WITHIN REACH OF ALL
cmiiHt." -'
The Ottawa banks and the various
manufacturing institutions of the city
gave a splendid demonstration of thelf
patriotism this forenoon when they
approved of a Liberty Loan contract,
which will permit of the employes of
the various industries of Ottawa to
secure Liberty Bonds upon the pay
ment of $2 down for a $50 bond and
$1 down for a $100 bond.
The plan was originated by the four
banks, which have been largely In
strumental In promoting the Liberty
Loan bond sales In the city and who
have been very generous In their ap
propriations for promotion expenses.
One bank went so far as to permit its
raving department depositors to claim
interest up to date providing they de
sired to withdraw any part of their
savings to apply on the purchase of
Liberty Bonds.
The meeting this afternoon was
called by Charles Reed, of the Chi
cago Retort & Firebrick Co., who pre
sented the form of contract for the
approval of all the representatives
l'lT-sent.
The contracts provide that the sign
er thereof shall pay $2 or $1 per week
out of his earnings and authorizes
the employer to pay to the bank such
sums at semi-monthly Intervals until
the bond I paid
The banks have decided to issue
Liberty Bond pass-books in making
; the firs' deposits, and in case a $50
bond is purchased $2 deposit Is re
quired semi-monthly and In case a
$100 bond Is purchased a $4 semi
monthly payment Is required. In the
event that the subscriber fails to con
tinue the payments the bank is author
ized to sell the bond In question In
the open market and charge up the
difference to the passbook account.
Those who subscribed to this agree
ment were:
National City Bank.
First National Bank.
Ottawa Banking & Trust Company
People's Trust & Ravings Bank.
Slnnott Bros,
Sanders Bros.
Federal Plate Glass Co,
Bellrose Sand Co.
Ottawa Silica Co.
Chicago, Retort & Fire Brick Co.
National Fire-proofing Co.
King & Hamilton Co.
Ghent Motor Co.
Peltier Glass Co.
J, K. Porter Co.
E. P. Johnson Pluno Co.
R. I. Kills Two.
Chicago, Oct. 19 -Garrett Wendall
22, and Miss Emma Schroeder, 26 of
i Blue Island, were Instantly killed
i when the automobile In which they
I were riding was struck by a Rock Is
'lum
train at itiue isiunu eariy touay.
Try tho Free Trader Journal Waut Ads
fur results,
UEUT. POOL WRITES
FROM FRANCE
IN
OTTAWA OFFICERS IN TRAINING
WITH THE BRITI H FORCES-
WRITES INTERESTINGLY OF
EXPERIENCES ENCOUNTERED
NO "SUBS" ON WAY "OVER."
A letter received by Mr. and Mrs.
Carlisle M. Pool, of South Ottawa,
from their son, Lieutenant Ernest
Pool, who now is "somewhere in
France," tells interestingly of the Ot
tawa boy's experience in a British
training camp, where he and thirty
five other American boys, including
Lieutenant Bushnell Fullerton, a for
mer Ottawa boy, are billeted.
The American officers in Lieut.
Pool's party are being trained In all
the modern arts of warfare and as
soon as they have been thoroly
schooled they will return to the
United States to do instructing work
in various cantonments of the coun
try. Lieut. Pool's letter follows:
Sept 30, 1917 (Sunday.)
"Somewhere."
Dear Folks:
1 have at last, after a month's
travel, arrived at a rather perman
ent stopping place. At least I will
be here for some time to come, and
therefore I will take a little time to
tell you what I expect to be doing.
I did not know until yesterday where
I was to be located, so there was
nothing to write to you except that
I was well, and I presume that you
knew that anyhow.
Thirty-five of us have been' sent
to what is known as the 3rd Brit
ish training camp, which opens here
tomorrow. I can't tell you where It
Is located. Many of the boys have
been sent to other such camps, both
of the English and the French, and
all expect to be taught the atest
forms of military tactics.
As I just told you, this school
opens tomorrow morning, and will
be composed of a number of Brit
ish officers, who have returned from
the front for a brief rest, and we
thirty-five Americans. The camp
will cover a period of five weeks,
and during th's time we expect to
learn a great deal, and also have a
good time. The English apparently
believe that sports should be played
a great extent, and that too much
work is bad for the system.
As you already know, our voyage
over the sea was rather uneventful.
We saw nothing of a submarine at
all, altho the last few days we ho;ed
that we might see one, Just for the
experience. I can tell you that we
did' not come directly across the
ocean, but dodged about to a great
extent, seeing many other ports
than New York and (censored) all
of which I must refrain from tell
ing. There were eight big steam
ers in our party, and after we en
tered the real danger zone, we were
protected on all sides by eight Brit
ish destroyers, it was a wonder
ful sight to see them maneuvering
thru the water, looking everywhere
for a sub.
It has taken me just about a
month to reach my destination, so
you see that 1 have been doing some
traveling, and as 1 sit here writing
this 1 can hardly realize that I am
so far away.
Peterson and Goldschmldt are still
with me, as well as Bush Fullerton.
We have gotten well acquainted,
which makes It especially nice.
Chapman was sent to another
chool.
This morning Pete and I took a
little walk out to the edge of the vil
lage, and up to the top of a hill,
and for the first time was able to
hear the big guns firing in the dis
tance, many miles away. They say
that you can easily hear the firing
here at any time of day or night.
Ag far as we are concerned, we will
not see the trenches for a long time
not even the last line. Perhaps
they may let us In to see them for
experience, before we are sent
back to train the men.
1 must tell you more about the
village I am In and the quarters I
have at. present. Each of us are
allowed a room all to our selves,
and also a Bervant, who nearly
drives me wild trying to do some
thing for me. He is an English sol
dier who has been sent back be
cause he was too young, and the
government uses them as orderlies
and servants for the officers, There
are no other hoys here in the house
(Continued on Page Five.)
Ml
ENGLISH
LOSE ens
PRESIDENT OF UNIONS
ISSUES MANDATORY ;
ORDER TODAY
HP MEN MICE HEART
FARRINGTON 8AYS WORKERS
ARE 8EEING FUTIMTY OF
THEIR RA8H ACTIONS AND ARE
RETURNING TO THE MINES. '
Springfield, 111., Oct. 19 Mine 1
cals in Illinois who refuse to return
to work by Monday wilt have their
local charters revoked from the Mb
nois United Mine Workers' Union of
America. Frank Farrlngton, presi-
aent or the Union who returned to
Springfield late last night, la aendln
out telegraphic Instructions to all
miners to this effect this morning.
in a statement Issued this moraine
he declares reports coming to the
neauquarters of the Union Indicate
the situation is enenurairinv u
Estates that the men who hava
die have decided that their interest!'
win De served by their return to wnrk-
and they are' gradually doing so. In
dustrial conscription by the govern
ment loonu up as a nosslbilitv. an.
less the men respond to the demands1
of the federal authorities, Mr. Far-
ring declares, indefinlng the "aeriona
feature of the whole affair."
Reports coming to my office are an
couraging and indicate that the men
vho have been Idle have decided that'
their best Interests will be served by
their return to work and thev are
gradually doing so. I have every rea
son to believe that Dr. Otrfleld Is
doing everything In his power to
make prospective wage Increases ef-
rective as early as possible, although
he has made It clear to me that he
does not propose to surrender to nrai."
sure brought to bear upon him by the
men discontinuing work, and I am
satisfied that he will not allow wage
increases to become effective until all
fit the men are back at work.
' I have hundreds of telegrams from
local unions over the state oledalna .
fidelity ,to the organization and to the
government and which Indicate that
the overwhelming majority of the
members of the Illinois Miners' Un-
(on are opposed to those who hare'
suspended work.
I am today Issuing telegraphic in
structions to the effect that where
men are not back to work by Monday
;their charters will be revoked.
P. S. CO. BUILDING
LARGEST GAS TANK
IN ILLINOIS HERE
The Public Service Company of
Northern Illinois is now engaged In
the construction of one of the largest
gas holders In the state of Illinois
outside of Chicago at their works
south of the hydraulic basin. Thls
gas tank has a capacity of 350,000 cu
bic feet, or twice the capacity of the
two holders now in use.
The first tank was built years ago
and had a capacity of 40,000 cubic feet.
The second one was built by A. D.
Cressler, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., and has
a capacity of lOO.oOO cubic feet.
The new holder la being erected
and the noise of the automatic rivet
ers makes life miserable in the neigh
borhood of the gas works. This new
holder will represent a cost of about
$50,000 and will supply gas for the
cities of Ottawa, Marseilles, Seneca
and Morris. Just as soon as the new
holder is completed new gas-making
machinery will be installed, which will
cost In the neighborhood of $5,000.
The reconstruction of pipe lines all
thru the city of Ottawa have been
completed, the heaviest portion of the
work being done last year, but new
leads and mains on the principal busi
ness streets were laid during the pres
ent year. This syBtem has cost the
company In the neighborhood of
$40,000.
A great saving In gas has been ac
complished by the renewal of pipes
and as a result of the good service
being furnished the business of the
company has increased nearly fifty
per cent.
CHICAGO MAN TAKES
0VERSMITH PITS
H. a. Vrooman, dealer In foundry
sands with offices in the Fisher build
ing In Chicago, has leased the sand
pit of Charles Smith, of East Ottawa,
and expects to engage In the sand
Industry In the vicinity of the Ruck
rlgel elevator, across the canal from
Buffalo Rock. .
vr-

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