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Free trader-journal. (Ottawa, Ill.) 1916-1920, November 09, 1917, Image 1

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OTTAWA FREE TRADER
EtUbllthtd t44
OTTAWA JOURNAL
Established 1880.
FREE TR AJDE'R-J OXJRN A.Ji
WEATHER.
onight and Situr-
,Smwhat warmer
VOLUME 1.--NO. IW'JL.
OTTAWA, ILLINOIS. Fit I DAY NOVEMHFH 9, 1917.
PRICE, TWO CENTS.
A
U -
nn .o. nnnnn n
PF
NORTHERN ARMIES JOIN REVOLT;
I IN OVERTHftOW OF KERENSKY
PREMIER REPORTED TO
HAVE BEEN CAUGHT
BY MAXMILISTS
E
RADICAL LEADER IS PROVEN TO
BE IN SYMPATHY WITH PRU8-'
SIAN CAUSE ARMY MARCHES
ON PETROCRAD,
London, Nov. !(. The Russian north
ern armies huve joined the Maximal
ists who overthrew J'rt-inh-r Kerensky,
accordlitK to a dispatch received here
today from Stockholm
The dispatch said the information
came from tierman sources.
The Russian northern army now in
said to be marching to Petrograd to
join the Maximalists.
Positive evidence that Nikoli I.on
Ine, the leader of the radical Maximal
lsts, is a German agent, wast received
here today In a dispatch from Am
sterdam. The dispatch qnoted the
Cologne Gazette an saying that "The
appeal of NiehoUl Lenine, the radical
socialist leader, will greatly Influence
the Russian people, but Germany must
not entertain too ureal hopes."
This dispatch, It wan pointed out
here, conclusively proves that tier
many knows just what Lenine'a appeal
will U,a4 lb4 it will id Germany.
The report that the northern Una
slan army had joined the Maximalists
was disheartening to officials here.
OtfieiAls made It plain that they would
wait more definite word that Rtich fic
tion had been taken before they pave
up hopes, however, The fact that the
dispatch from Stockholm ointed out
that the report came from German
sources would Indicate It wan assert
ed, that the Information was not re
garded as absolutely accurate.
Conflicting reports reached here to
day on Premier Kerensky. One re
port from German origin said the
young lender hud been captured by
forces in sympathy with the Maximal
ists and that he would be taken to
Petrograd. Another report stated that
Kerensky had reached Moscow.
As all dispatches from the capital
are censored by the Bolshevik I olll
rials' here are awaiting some definite
word from their own representatives
as to the situation before making any
titutenients.
Have Faith in Kerensky.
London, Nov. 9. Russia may yet '
be saved. Hope that the new repub
lic still will be a factor in the war on
the side of the allies was held out
here today when it was dellnltely es
tabllshed that Premier Kerens"ky had
made his escape from Petrograd.
Kerensky, in believed to bo on his
way to the front. Close students of
Russian affairs lure beleve that be
will be able to awing the majority of
the troops to his side. The cossaek
troops at the front the best fighters
In the Russian army the almost cer
tain to line up with the premier if
he will pledge that no attempts will
be made to conciliate the extremeists
but they will be dealt with In a vig
orous manner.' There Is some ground
lor belief, It was asserted here today
that Kerensky may effect a compro
mise with Oeneral Kornilofl, deposed
war minister, who Is awaiting trial
now because of his attempt to wrest
the control of the army from Keren-
HRy. 4l .u..i.e uu m-...- ""
r.hould Kornlloff join forces with Ker-
ensky the troops are much more likely'
,to sitte wnn me young premier.
PfiO-GERMAH FOR FIGHTING
If Kerensky suceeds at the front ll!u u,h ()f ,he laHt hpet when llbrury
is believed that he will take steps to; ,,, should ,,,, to , ,.d;0
estauiisu u.e .ioihiouhi Bove.nmeiH
in Moscow.
uispaicues u.uuy iioio i-cniKiau m -
dlcated that there was considerable
IOHS ot tne ueiore ine uoisiievim
gained complete control of the capi
tal. The women's battalion of deuth
fought heroically to save the winter
palace from capture. It was not un
til after they had been bombarded by
the cruiser .Aurora and tho guns of
the forttesB of St. Peter and St. Paul
that the women soldiers surrendered.
Armored motor cars also were lined
by the Bolshevik! troops who shelled
the women's reg'nietit relentlessly.
There were small clashes at several
places thruout the city but the Holsh
evir.l were In the big majority and it
OTTAWA LADIES OF
DIR. SEEK SWEETS
MEN
CAMPAIGN IS INAUGURATED FOR
TRENCH CANDLES BOX TO RE
CEIVE PAPERS PLACED IN FREE
TRADER-JOURNAL OFFICE.
The 1). A. 11. of this city are col
lecting a fund to send chocolate to
the soldiers in Pershing's army. En
velopes have been distributed around
the city for several weeks for the
collection of such a fund and these
envelopes ure to be turned into Miss
Georgia Kichelberger, chairman of the
committee of the chocolate fund.
Prom Ottawa the money will be sent
to Washington to the Adrienne d'La
fayette chapter at Washington, U. C
where it will be turned into a fund
that is being collected by the National
D. A. R. for the purchase of this choc
olate. Mrs. James Coates is chairman
of this national committee and has
signified her willingess to go to
France to personally distribute this
chocolate if she Is needed.
Anyone wishing to contribute to
this fund can leave their donation
with Miss Georgia Kichelberger.
Want Trench Candles.
Mrs. Charles Hook, is chairnari..of
the committee In "charge of the" mak
ing of trench candles In this City.
These candles hre made from old
newspapers, tallow and paraline and
when finished will ' burn for several
hours, ' keeping tile ' Soldiers in tht
trenches warm. '
When these candles are roller they
rati be turned In at the office of the
Free Trader-Journal where a bo has
been placed to receive them, and after
being collected t hey will be taken by
the committee In charge to the San
ders Bros.' factory, where they will
be cut. The officers of the Moat Club
have agreed to dip all candles in par
aline and after being dipped they will
be packed and sent by the comniittet
from the local 1). A. R to Washington
from where I bey will be sent to the
soldiers at the front.
Candles in the course of making
and candles that have been completed
will be on exhibition at. the Free
Trader-Journal otlice and anyone de
siring to see them, or not understand
ing jusl how they are made, Is in
vited to cull at any time and inspect
them.
The complete directions for making
trench candles as furnished by the
cro"Vbeu. .foliar:
'4 1 foU1 Gds8 care
ftfurtrtnerlld cut thru rentei
fold. """Take eight (X) sheets beint
careful to have all edges even, and on
the outside haw a sheet of pa pet
that has the columns well defined
beginning at the bottom, turn up one
halt inch, press down finitely; tlier
fold in the center making a fold
about a quarter of an inch; press
this down firmly with fingers, then
repeat; and begin rolling, keeping the
pajiers as tight as you can and the
edges as even as possible. When
about half rolled, turn back three (8)
sheets so that edges come to the roll
and continue to roll until within
"bout two Inches of the top of this
, tJ.(; ,h(,n . bn(,k (wo (Z) shpetH
"lh (,(1)ps pHmlng un(i(r flrst fol(1
j (,mitlnlle t0 ,.ol, nnt abollt an ,,.,,
from the seoctid fold, then fold two
, , , b k , . the
()f lb(,Ht (,oim( un(1(,r ,0 pdKP
jt Hm)nd fl,,d; ro , wllhlu
, .fiy folded over onto the
i )olli ,rfei.iy waling the edge
Tne (.umli(.H can be cut on the
collimn ,IU,H( niakK HeVeral candles
to each roll.
In order to make the taper, after
the candle is cut, take a small stick
und push up one end of the roll. Then
dip In boiling paraflne, letting them
remain for five minutes. Then take
out and drain. Knds of candles and
paraflne used on tops of Jelly can be
used for the dipping.
Better results are obtained If two
people roll the papers together.
Guard Your Tongue.
"Pe more you talk," siild Uncle Eben
"do more you 1ms to explain wfcr yon
Jdldn't keep still In de fus' place
ALAsecr
FINAL CHANCE FOR FEMININE
WAR WORKERS TO SIGN FOR
SERVICE COMES 'TOMORROW.
Tomorrow will be .the final day for
registration during the official "Reg
istration week" set aside by Govern
or Lowden, and will be the heaviest
registration of the whole week. The
number of registrars for the last day's
work has been doubled, and ladles in
charge expect the number of women
registering to be five times as heavy
as during any other day this week.
During the first three days of this
week the women of Streator register
ed 1,(1(10 women. This number great
ly exceeds tho Ottawa registration for
any like period. There are still many
women here that have pot signed up
yet, and when the week closes tomor
row night,, there will be a number of
women that wanted to register, but
have put It off one day too long. .
Every woman over the age of six
teen, living In this vicinity should reg
ister. It is not only a patriotic act,
it is her duty to her country. If a
woman registers for any sort of ser
vice or a position, and when the time
oiues, and she is called upon to fill
this position, anything makes it in
convenient for her to do this, she may
refuse to accept any such position.
There will be absolutely nothing com
pulsory about accepting positions
signed up for during this registration.
All women from all parts of this
Ity and the country surrounding Ot
tawa that have not registered, ure
urgently requested to come to tho Wo
man's Rest room on the first floor of
the court house, tomorrow between !t
and f o'clock and register.
Those that have registered and
have not signed the food conserva
tion cards can sign them at the same
place.
The registrars for 'omorrow will
be: Mesdaines Jennie Hinteii. Lor
ouzo Leland, Al. Richards, W. F.
Kaetz, Joseph Alscluiler, George V.
Farrar, Joseph Maker, Edward Me
Call, S. K, llertzner, J. Morton Me
gatlln, G. C. Rlckley, H. Stonehreuk
er, Moses Stiefel, Charles P. Irion,
J. J. Hornung, Win. Klnchloe and
Misses Mae McDougall and Ida Hagen
baugh, Janet Liked tha Plan.
Janet had a party on her fourth
birthday. The woman who sat by her
It the table shureil her glass of wuter
with the little girl. When the de
cert was served Janet promptly nte
hers and then snld sweetlv to he'
neighbor: "Shall we flfty-flfty on Un
Ice creuui too?"
EXPECT GRAND RUSH RETURN BOY TO OTTAVAH IN FRENCH
OF WOMEN ON LAST ST OWES SCHOOL CITY BOMBARDED BY
BAIN DAY'- "v BOCHL AMES
HIS CROSS
PERU BOY ON WAY TO STATE
INSTITUTION FOR SECOND
TIME REFUSED TO ATTEND
SCHOOL WAS UNMANAGb..LE
Peter Niedicki, of Peru, today Is
starting his second grind at St.
Charles. Peter, aged 12, this morn
ing was found to lie a delinquent, when
ho was tried on charges preferred
against him by Judge Dauber, of Peru,
and was ordered ttenl to the state
training school for boys.
According to testimony before the
court the lad would not go to school,
neither could he be managed by of
ficials or an older brother with whom
lie made his home. Iloth his parents
ure read and Peter was taken charge
of by his relatives, who, after trying
his best to raise his properly had to
give the task up as u futile one.
He is also charged with having com
mitted minor depredations with the
result he obtained a police record.
When he was taken away to the jail
Peter wept copious tears, but all to
no avail.
Two Dependents.
A petition was filed in the county
court today to have Donald and
Marian McKay, children of Mr. and
Mrs. Donald McKay, of Peru, declared
delinquent. The charge is made that
the parents failed to rear their chil
dren properly and did not furnish
them with suitable parental care. It
is further alleged they refused even
to send them to school.
This morning when the case came
up for hearing the parents were given
custody of the children until they
proved to tho satisfaction of the judge
that they were not competent to have
their children with them longer.
WIDOW OF GENERAL
MERRITT, ENDOWS
CAMP CLUB HOUSE
A copy of the Washington Post re
ceived by Mrs. Mary Hurlett, In
charge of the Mrs. Marshall Field,
summer home on the north bluff con
tains a two column story of Interest
to Ottawan's In general and to friends
of Mrs. Laura Williams Menitt, wid
ow of the late General Merrltt, In
particular.
Mrs. Merrltt has given a $10,(100 en
dowment for a club house ut Camp
Merrltt, neat Washington, In memory
of her deceased warrior-husband. The
jdub house will bo used by men and
' officers of the camp and will be mod
ernly equipped in every detail,
j The general's widow Is the daugh
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Williams,
former Ottnwans, and Is n grand
Iduughter of the late Judge John Dean
I1'8'011
She resides In Washington,
I where she Is a leader In the capttol
- i city's social net.
Valasek In Chicago Herald.
DR. ROSWELL PETTIT FINDS HU
MOR IN VISIT EVEN THO AEROS
ARE ABOVE HIM DROPPING
BOMBS ON INHABITANTS.
In his latest letter home "from
somewhere in France," Dr. Roswell
Pettit recounts an experience he had
in a French city while the town and
Its Inhabitants were uuder bombard
ment by German flyers. The doctor
who Is with a Britisu casualty clear-
ini station, had an opportunity to see
humor in the bombardment even in
the face of death itself.
He says:
October 18, 1917.
Dtar Hatiey:
Your letters of September ISth
and Ifth with the enclosed letter
from Uelle and the pictures of the
new hospital, Anna and Jane, were
received today und I was delighted
to get them all. 1 wish you would
write to me often and remember
that details about things at home,
even though they are commonplace
und of no particular Interest to you
are of the greatest interest to me,
way off here in desolated France.
It is almost as good us a trip- home
to hear about things at home.
While I am still attached to the
Held ambulance, I am assigned to a
casually clearing station for tem
porary duty during the big offensive
and suppose 1 will be here until the
winter closes down and operations
are stopped. Most of my work Is
doing blood transfusion and I am
getting some very good results. I
was glad to hear from Mr. Mc
Donald, of Chicago, and shall tell
Dr. Cushing, professor of surguery
at Harvard, how well Mr. McDon
aid is getting on. Dr. Cushing
opeiated on him in Host on. Dr.
Cushing at present is assigned to
another casualty clearing station
near here and I see him quite fre
quently. 1 went over und had din
ner with him just the other day.
Because of the mud and rain of
i the past week things have slack
ened up a hit, and yesterday I went
with our quurteimaster to the base
on a very Interest Ing trip, as we
went thru the French und Belgian
lines, and this was the flrst 1 hud
seen of any other than the British
army. We left about H;:o In the
morning. It was bright and fairly
warm, und we went through a num
ber of towns that you are undoubt
edly familiar with from their men
tion In the war dispatches. If 1
were writing this us u story, Instead
of a letter, I think 1 should call It
"Fioin the railhead to the sea," for
we ure located at the lull bead dl-
iCouttnued on page 5 )
CBENTS ALBUM .
Btrcsa hi w
Washington, D. C, Nov. 9 While the present
turmoil continues it is un likely that the United
States will advance any more money to Russia,
25.000 IS SOUGH
B UNITS W
OF Y NIC A FUND
CAMPAIGN 12 FORMALLY OPENED
IN OTTAWA PUBLIC MEETING
TO BE HELD MONDAY NIGHT
AT HIGH SCHOOL.
The Y. M. C.
A. campaign in
which it is
sought to raise
sufficient funds
in La Salle
county of ap
proximately
$25,000, of which every dollar Is to
be expended for the benefit and wel
fare of the brave boys fighting in for
eign lands, is taking on wide activity
and . nothing will be left undone in
the special endeavor of the promoters
to raise the necessary amountB.
The big public meeting scheduled
at the high 'school auditorium at 8
o'clock Monday night, at which time
ftU. Jidjdress will be made by Dr. David
H. Jones, of Evanston, a man who is
well versed in the work ot the Y. M.
C. A. and his address will be well
worth listening to. Musical features
will be added to the program, and
every man. woman and child in Ot
tawa is not only Invited but is urged
to be on hand.
Clarence Griggs, county chairman
of the Y. M. C. A. campaign, has ap
pointed an advisory committee of
well known business people of this
city who will aid him In the good
work. Those chosen were Geo. P.
Hills, W. K. Pilchard, K. W. Weiss,
W. V. Jacobs. Kd. R. Claus, Theodore
Tote!, J. J. Dougherty, W. J. Sinon
and Fred Scherer.
In a wire from F. H. Scott, a former
Ottawa boy who is chairman of the
Illinois campaign, says the work is
going on very satisfactorily and he Is
particularly anxious that the com
munity in which he formerly lived
makes a good showly as he feels most
confident that they will when the final
returns are sent to the Btate head
quarters.
Mr. Crossed, head of the big Cms-
sett Shoe Company, who Is devot
ing all of his time to the Red Cross
In raising funds and who has been
on the battlefields, brings back to
United States expressions of the
splendid impression made by General
Pershing upon the entire French peo
ple. "Pershing Is the idol of the men
and all who come In contact with him.
He deeply appreciates the service of
the Y M. C. A. and says they have
given the soldiers every opportunity
we have asked. He Inspected the as
soiiatlon headquarters In Paris and
was much pleased with what was go
ing on. He spoke of his knowledge
of association work at the Mexican
border as well us In the Philippines
and If I may be permitted to use the
expression, has so militarized it that
the Y. M. C. A. is now a recognized
and respected part of the army.'"
DISCOVER SPINAL
MENENGITIS IN
TWO MORE CAMPS
I.awton, Okla., Nov. 9. Twelve
men were found to have meningitis
ut Fort Sill today and an isolation
cmnp has been established two miles
from the cump In the foothills of the
Wichita mountains. According to the
division surgeon the epidemic is well
In hand.
Death at Leavenworth.
Fort Leavenworth, Kans., Nov. H.
According to unofficial but uuthoratlve
information, Corporul Alexander
Christie of the Tenth Telegraph Com
pany, died last night from the effects
of spinal meningitis.
Keep Troubles to Yourself.
The fellow who Is always telling n
hard luck story doesn't have many
friends, The world hasn't time tn
listen to your 'ruubU-s.
7
officials said today. Cred-
its previously extended,
and which have not been
exhauied by purcham made hare, al
to will be held up.
There is now standing to Russia's
credit under loans made by thta coun
try $114,110,000.
The money heretofore advanced waa
given to the Kerensky organization.
Now that it has been overthrown
there is no disposition on the part ot
the United States to furnish any addi
tional funds that might eventually
find their way Into the hands of Ger
many. It Is understood here that in any
action along this line the United
States will have the co-operation of
Japan. Most of Russia's supplies at
the present time are being- sent from!
Japan via Vladivostok and practically
unlimited credits have been tlven
the Russians by the Japanese. Na
turally this will be stopped for the
present.
CANADIAN SAND BUYER
HERETO PURCHASE 100
CARS FOR HIS FOUNDRY"
Mr. McLean 1b In the city from Lon
don, Ontario, to purchase 100 car
loads of moulding sand. He has an
order from the shipping board to the
railroad to furnish empty cars.
Mr, MeUan 'irtitertMt liltf foiiadTjr
has experimented with different silica
sand from dierent points and have
decided to use only Ottawa sand and
that hereafter no other sand will be
used In their plant.
The quality of Ottawa sand has be
come known In spite of the fact that
no newspaper or magazine advertis
ing has been attempted. It is finding
its way into the different markets
wholly on Its merits.
His order Is being distributed among
a number of operators.
ALLEGED AUTO THIEF
IS A PRISONER HERE
Albert Bluett, who was arrested on
Tuesday night In Mendota In a new
Ford car owned by John Young, su
perintendent of the Dehlgh Cement
Company, which had been stolen while
the owner was attending a perform
ance at a La Salle theater, is now a
prisoner in the county jail.
In court Bluett waived preliminary
examination and he was bound over
to the grand jury In bonds of $1,000.
He was unable to furnish bond and he
was brought to Ottawa.
With Bluett at the time of his ar
rest in Mendota, was bis six year old
son. The little fellow Is an interest
ing chap, and he made quite a hit
with court attaches.
Bluett appears to be a wanderer
and has no permanent residence, al
though he and his wife and six chil
dren now give La Salle as their home.
CALL DEPARTMENT
TO LIVERY BLAZE
The fire depurtmeut responded to
a call at 12:20 this afternoon to the
building owned by James E. Carew,
111 West Jefferson Btreet that was
formerly occupied by the Bailey liv
ery stable. Smoke coming from a de
fective chimney filled the building
and passers by saw this and sum
moned the department. There was
no damage from the smoke.
Health Preparedness.
rnclennllness means disease and dis
aster, and since disaster is not what
we are looking for, why not pay more
attention to the demands of good sani
tation? First to Smoke Tobacco.
Tradition ascribes tobacco and Its
origin to many things. Some say It
vrns Sir Walter Raleigh who Intro
duced It In the early seventeenth cen
tury, but the tiny village of Henstridge
Ash, Somersetshire, claims the distinc
tion which cannot be disputed and one
can And many champions of that
cause in the immediate vlclalty. The
entire vllluge consists of one house,
known ns the "Old Ash" or "Virginia
Inn," and here, it Is said, tobacco waa
smoked for the flrst time.
ICoatlUued ou 1'age Five.) ,
.' t:-':
Washington Star..

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