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The Rock Island Argus and daily union. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1920-1923, April 15, 1920, Image 14

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1?J " ; TSIKAyJ-TIS KOCIS CLAND ARGU3APHIL 15, 1920. :
:.ilmli;;b
SOADDS
JO GODIS PRICE
I Meago, April liCon eontin
Ve47!M liow an apwwd tendency In
Sfto today with lack of selling
yrMrt an onUtandini; feature.
, Th ibMM erf mnreaaireneB on
the part of bear was ascribed
mainly to strength In wheat values
-ana u we aemoraiuea railway
uuc , aunauon. wening prices.
wbJea ranged from c decline to
. l.W.and July 1.60 to 1.61,
rere followed by material gains all
Arouna.
Delays to seeding gare independ
ent flnnness to oats. Aftewopenlng
Vac to Vtc higher, - including Jnly
at aeyic to 86 c, the market con
tinued to harden.
-Frqrisions were dull but firm.
Grain strength was the chief bul
lish factor.
HuhKMinentlr brisk eznort de-
, mand for rye counted as an addi
tional stimulus for the advance in
;: the corn market Except May de-
livery, prices touched the highest
point yet this season. The close
was nervous, lc to 3ttc let high
er with May 1.69',4 to 1.69fr and
JulyJ.63 to 1.63
Id provisions gossip was current
" that- provisions were the- lowest
prtced of all foodstuffs and that the
semimonthly stock report would
, show little if any accumulation dur
ing the last fortnight
...Chicago Cash Grain.
Chicago, April 15. Wheat not
quoted.
Corn: No.-3 mixed, 1.64 No.
mixed," 1.644; No. 3 yellow, 1.
1.70.
Oats: No. 1 white. 1.03: No.
white, 1.02 1.02; No. 3 white, 1.00
ei.QZr No. 4 white, 1.01.
Bye: No. 2, 1.9S2.00; barley)
i.bsi.7z; timothy seed. 9.00
12.00; clover seed, 40.00 53.00
Pork, nominal; lard. 19.50; ribs
17,7&18.50. -
Money and Exchange.
New York, April 15. Mercantile
paper 6 7; exchange irregular
sterling, demand 3.97. cables
3.98ii ; francs, demand 16.34, cables
16.32; Belgian francs, demand
15.32, cables 15.30; guilders, de
mand 37 6-16, cables - 37 7-16; lire,
demand 23.04, cables 23.02; marks,
'demand 1.71, cables 1.72.
.Government bonds, weak; rail
road bonds, heavy.
Time loans, strong, 60 days, 90
2ays and; 6 months, 8 per cent -
: Eansas City Livestock.
Kansas City, Mo., April 15.
Bogs, receipts 750; higher; top
price 15.00 15.35; bulk, light and
medium 15.00 15.35; bulk, heavy
14.3515.00.
'' Cattle, receipts 17,000; higher;
top steers 14.50; bulk steers 12.50
13.75; top yearlings 13.75; bulk
yearlings 12.25 13. 50; good veals
12.5013.50. .
8heep, receipts-6,500;-lambs, 75c
to 1.00 higher; best offered at
20.25; ' bulk 19.7520.25; about
steady with last market preceding
strike.
Potatoes.
Chicago, April 15. Potatoes,
Steadier; receipts, 11 ears; North-
em' Round Whjte, sacked 6.70 to
6.8S per hundred weight; ditto,
bulk 6.85 to 7.00 per hundred
Weight..
Silver.
New York, April 15. Bar silver,
1.18;. Mexican dollars, 89c.
Automobile Spray
Outfit
Complete
Regular Price
r
With Full
I Quart
1 Liquid
Veneer
Special
Cowering 350
89c
Just the Thing to Polish Your Car or Furniture.
"Everything for the Motorist"
? CUT PRICE SUPPLY HOUSE?
302-4-6-8 Cast Second St Corner Second and
Pershing Avenue.
115 E. Third St Between Brady and Perry Sts.
p5r DAVENPORT ?
CIIICAQO TUTUZZ3 J
Apru u, U2. d
uvea, mxn. nam. utoaa
JJ0 1.(4 4 1M Ltt
1.65ft IM UH 1.68
J 45
37JM tTM 87.40
...8S.20 37.50 38.15
liM 20.12 11.50 29.00
20.27 20.JO 20.27 20.82
..... 18.60 18.47 18.55
19.20 19.05 19.17
Weather Forecart
Illinois: Probably showers and
thunderstorms tonight and Friday;
warmer In south portion tonight
somewhat cooler 4n northeast por
tion Friday; fresm to strong shift
ing winds.
Missouri: Probably showers and
thunderstorms tonizht and Friday-.
worms innifht in nOBttt ana east
central nortions; fresh to strong
shifting winds.
Wisconsin: Unsettled weather to
night and Friday; probably rain In
east and south portions; not mucn
chanae in temperature; fresh to
fttronr Hhiftinc winds.
Iowa: Probably rain tonight and
Friday: nomewhat colder in west
and central portions tonight; freslf
to strong shifting winds.
Indiana: Showers probable to
night and Friday; warmer in south
and east portions tonight; colder
Friday.
Peoria livestock.
Peoria, 111., April 15. Hogs
nominal.
Cattle, nominal
Embargo on P. & P. U. blocking
nine roads held receipts to less
than 100 wagon and truck hogs and
a few cattle.
Kansas City Cash Grain
Kansas City, Mo., April 15. Cash
wheat: unchanged to 3c higher; No.
1 hard, 2.782.88; No. 2,2.75286;
No. 1 red, 2.782.80; No. 2, 2.75
2.77.
Corn: 2c to 4c lower; No. 2 mix
ed, 1.68; No. 2 white, 1.681.70;
No. 2 yellow, 1.73(91.75.
Oats: lc lower; No. 2 white, 1.07;
No. 2 mixed, 1.021.04.
Toledo Seed.
Toledo, Ohio, April 15. Clover
seed: Prime, cash and April, 28.00;
October, 23.75; December, 22.55.
Alsike: prime, cash, and April,
30.00.
Timothy: prime, cash (1917) and
cash (1918), 5.25; cash (1919) 5.35;
April, 5.3o; May, 5.25; September,
5.70; October, 5.65; December, 5.55
CHICAGO PRODrCE.
April 15, 1920.
Creamery extras 644 &
Standards ...63
Firsts 56
Seconds ...............46
EGGS .
Ordinaries .37
Firsts ...4041
CHEESE
Twins 29
Younc Americas 31
LIVE POULTRY
Fowls .............. .41
Ducks. ......... .38 .
Geese .......... .22
Springs 40
Turkeys ....35
POTATOES
Receipts 8 cars
Wisconsin-Minnesota ....6.757.25
New York 8ugar.
New York, April 15. Raw sugar
firm; centrifugal 18.93; fine gran
ulated 16.0017.00.
Cut Price
Outfits on Hand
at
Complete with'
Spray and Full Quart
Liquid Veneer
A
com
Mmt
July
Bent .
Ontaw
May
Jnly mm
Pork
Jnly
Lard
May
July .
- Ribs
May July .....
S1-75 Si
CTSTOBK
ISSUES ACTIVE
III EARLY SALE
New York, April 1 Leading !-
sues in today's stock market were
active, opening at an advance but
the rise was temporarily checked
before the end of the first half hour.
Selling accompanied Pittsburgh ad
vices that the railroad strike was
causing further suspension of in
dustrial operations. Oils, shippings
and food issues reacted l to a
points. Rallies soon ensued whn
minor steels, equipments, motor
specialties textiles, and chemicals
again moved forward. Leaders in
cluded Vanadium, Baldwin, Strom
berg, American Woolen, Consolidat
ed Textile and Industrial Alcohol at
gains of 2 to 7 points. Call money
opened at 8 per cent, the highest
Initial rate of the week and Lib
erty bonds continued to decline.
American Beet Sugar .103
American Can - - --r 47tt
American Car t Foundry J42i
American Locomotive ..107
American Smelting & Refin 67
American Sumatra Tobacco.. 99
American T. t T. , . , . ... 96
Anaconda Copper . . 62
Atchison 81
Baldwin Locomotive . .. 111 4
Baltimore & Orio . 33
Bethlehem Steel "B" 97
Central Leather 86
Chesapeake & Ohio . , r- 55
Chicago, Mil. & St Paul 36
Corn Products ... 103 Vi
Crucible Steel . ..-....262
General Motors ..356
Great Northern Ore Crtfa. ... 37
Goodrich Co . 69
Int Mer. Marine prfd. ....... 95
International Paper ....... 85
Kennecott Copper 31
Mexican Petroleum 201
New York Central 71
Norfolk & Western ,, t . , , L 94
Northern Pacific . 78
Ohio Cities Gas .u. ......... 43
Pennsylvania 41
Reading - 84
Republic Iron & Steel ..112
Sinclair Consol. Oil 40
Southern Pacific 98
Southern Railway . .. 22
Studebaker Corporation .....123
Texas Co. 206
Tobacco Products 72
Union Pacific 119
United States Rubber .......111
United States Steel . . 105
Utah Copper 75
Westmgbouse Electric 52
Willys Overland 24
Illinois Central 88
C, R. L & P 34
Standard Oil prfd. 107
Peoria Grain.
Peoria, 111., April 15. Corn
2c higher; No. 3 white 1.68; No. 3
yellow, 1.68 bid; No. 3 mixed. 1.66
bid; No. 4 mixed, 1.64 bid; sample,
1.35.
Oats, llc higher; No. 2 white,
1.031.04.
, Liberty Bonds.
New York, April 15. Final prices
of Liberty bonds today were: 3s,
94.50; first 4s, 90.40; second 4s,
88.88; first 4s, 90.30; second 4s,
86.76; third 44s, 91.10; fourth 4s,
86.76; Victory 3s, 96.08; Victory
4s, 96.08. v
ANNOUNCE ADDED
MEMBER OF REAL
ESTATE COMPANY
The B. F. Mltchem company, real
tors of Rock Island, announce the
accession of Walter Oberg as a
partner of the firm. The organiza
tion, to be known as Mitchem,
Oberg & Mitchem. will occupy new
quarters soon, but the vlocation has
not been announced.
Mr. Oberg, the new member, is
well known in this city, having liv
ed here all his life. He has been
employed at the court house and
more recently by the Rock Island
Plow company.
Bids will be received at the of
fice of F. K. Rhoads, Robinson
Bldg., Rock Island, 111., up to 2
o'clock p. m. Thursday, April 22,
1920, for the
'BILLY SU5DAT TABERNACLE'
as it stands at the corner of
Tjrepty-fourth street and Fifth
avenue. Rock -Island. A reason
able time will be allowed for
taking it down and removing
the material from the site.
Bids" will also be received for
the razing of the building; leav
ing the lumber and material on
the ground in good condition.
The right is reserved to reject
any or all bids.
TABERNACLE SALVAGE COM
MITTEB. April 14, 1920.
CAP" STUBBS.
'CFRSHUNCI ISAVtFVL
SCARCE. 'COUMTTA
NwnuDl Mrwinr
Or r!-
-v
Moline and
LI!!E PAVING
PROGRAM GIVEN
UP FOR SEASON
Board Declises to Let $300,000
Worth of Contracts Beeuse
Bids Are High.
Molme's paving program was
knocked oat thi morning, and indi
cations are that not a single street
win be paved this year. s
Not contract wan tot by the
board of local improvements. Ev
ery bid submitted was rejected.
Every bid, it was intimated, will
continue to. be rejected as long as
the contractor's figures are more
than 10 per cent higher than the
engineer's estimates. ,
Not one bid for the FUteentn
street repaying project was received.
The main north and south thor
oughfare of Moline is today 1 in
worse condition than ever before
and it probably will remain so.
Members of the board or local
improvements threw their hands in
the air and declared themselves
helpless, powerless and without a
present plan.
"We are not going to saddle the
people with supplemental assess
ments," said Mayor c r. Skinner.
"The people are burdened enough
now with high prices. This board
isn't going to make it any harder
for them. We know the people
wouldn't stand for it.
The board met to consider bids
for the Fifteenth street repaying
project, the Fifteenth street paving
district Twenty-second street dis
trict. Eleventh avenue B, Twentieth
avenue district and Fifteenth street
sewer and water-main.
One bid for the latter improve
ment was only 9.5 per cent above
the estimate but the board rejected
it because no contract for paving
was let for the same territory.
Contracts totalling more than
8200,000 would have been awarded
had bids within the estimates been
submitted. A large number of oth
er improvements are under way and
unless contractors change their fig
uring methods, they will receive the
same treatment
HUNT FOR DRIVER
OF PREDATORY CAR
Search for the Iowa car which
caused William Karstens, 1132 Fif
teenth street, Moline, to be pinned
underneath his automobile Tuesday
afternoon, has been fruitlss.
Mr. Karsten's car was damaged
and Karstens was injured. The
Iowa car hit the rear end of the!schol election Saturday is so
Moline auto, causing it to turn tur
tle, the Iowa driver did not stop.
MUCH PLUMBING IS
INSTALLED IN YEAR
Five hundred twenty water clos
ets and 312 bath tubs were installed
in Moline during the fiscal year
ended March 31, according to the
annual report of Roy J. Entrikin.
The plumbing inspector collected
$2,732.50 in fees. Number of plumb
ing permits issued was 2,182, water
permits, 395; permits for opening
streets and boulevards for gas and
water repairs, 195.
HOLD YOUNG AUTO
BANDIT FOR TRIAL
W. H. Jackson, 20 years old, one
of the two motor bandits who pass
ed through Moline in a stolen car
one night several weeks ago, was
held to the grand jury by Magis
trate Gustafson on a charge of
burglary.
Jackson waived examination. He
was committed to jail, having been
unable to furnish $2,000 bonds. A
week ago Jackson asked for a con
tinuance and intimated he would
fight the case. He had. earlier ad
mitted burglarizing the Miedtke
store at Fourth avenue and Elev
enth street
Jackson's companion is still at
liberty. The motor car which was
stolen in Milwaukee and found in
Silvis has been claimed by agents
of the owner.
EARLE TARBOX IS 1
ROTARIANS' HEAD
Board of directors of the Moline
Rotary club at their organization
meeting yesterday elected the fol
lowing officers:'
President Earle Tarbox.
Vice president James Hill.
Secretary Beder Wood.
Treasurer A. T. Foster.
VJHCN Vft STUDIES. IPrA
JEST STUD,, THATS .
fFSHUNCV.30T IF
Y SHftWEN TWO "PENCllA
AWrYf. AN' 1IAY WITH .
fER 30& AN' CAT A
APPLE WHEN VA STUDIES,
TMtN IT WN'T I
Ill
East Moline
GROVER L017E
IS SIONED
Was Gasoline Engine Expert at tie
Silvfe Shops for the Last
U Tears.
, Moline lost one of its prominent
residents last evening, when death
summoned Grorer S. Lowe, for the
last 16 years gasoline engine ex
pert at the SQvis shops, at 8:30, in
his home, 2011 Sixteenth street
Molina. Mr. Lowe had a paralytic
stroke two years ago and had been
confined to his home for the last
year.-
Funeral services probably will be
held Saturday, but no definite ar
rangements have been made.
For many years Mr. Lowe served
as chaplain of the local council of
Royal Arcanum, having recently
been appointed state chaplain of
the organization. He was a loco
motive expert, having been the in
ventor of a very successful stay
bolt breaker, as well as many oth
er mechanical appliances.
Grover S. Lowe was the son of
Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Lowe.
He was born Feb. 17, 1851, in New
Brunswick, N. J., and was a gradu
ate of the Somerset Classical insti
tute at that place.
He studied four years as a stu
dent in New York city and later
enrolled in the Lafayette college of
Easton, Pa., his ambition being to
become a minister. Three months
before he was to be graduated ill
health forced him to discontinue
his work and he was never ordain
ed to the ministry.
The following seven years he was
engaged as a teacher in schools of
Pennsylvania and Illinois, having
at one time served as county su
perintendent of schools. Again
failing in health, he was compelled
to resign his position and for the
next 10 years he was employed as
a commercial traveler, which work
he later gave up and became con
nected with the Silvis shops, where
he rendered valuable service up to
the time of his illness.
Mr. Lowe married Miss Cornelia
S. Whaley in 1881 at Earlville, 111.
To this happy union were born two
daughters and one son, the latter
having died in infancy. Surviving
Mr. Lowe are the widow and two
daughters, Mrs. De Ette Pombert
and Miss Ruth Lowe, both of Mo
line, a brother. Abram Lowe of
Somerville, N. J., and one grand
child. Miss Audrey Pombert of Mo
line. ONLY ONE PLACE
TO VOTE SATURDAY
Although interest in the Moline
-slight that school authorities de
bated this week whether to have
official ballots printed or mimeo
graphed, the event will be carried
off with all the formality pos-
sipie. , oi
Polls, or rather the poll there'll
be pnly one voting place at the
board of education office in the high
school building open at 9 in the
morning and close at 5 in the after
noon. There. are no contests.
President of the board to . serve
for one year and four members to
serve three years will be elected.
Wilson P. Hunt is candidate for re
election as president and Dr. H. G.
Bennett, L. E. Nutt and Gus Lind
vall, whose terms expire this year,
and Mrs. K. B. McKeever, are board
candidates. Mrs. Nellie Lynd will
retire at expiration of her tenn
this spring.
TRAFFIC OFFICER
FELLED BY. AUTO
PERFORMING DUTY
Barney Gamble, Moline traffic po
liceman, is confined to his home as
result of injuries incurred at Fif
teenth street crossing Tuesday aft
ernoon when he was hit by an auto
mobile driven by Frederick Ander
son, son of Alderman O. F. Ander
son. There are intimations being made
today that Anderson will be arrest
ed when Officer Gamble recovers,
on a charge of violating traffic reg
ulations. Disinterested eye-witnesses of the
accident declare that the alderman's
son disregarded the policeman's
signal to halt Gamble, according
to these witnesses, stood at the
crossing with arms extended, as
Anderson approached from the
north.
Instead of halting to permit the
Silvis shop train to pass the young
motorist is said to have driven
straight ahead, hitting first the po
liceman and then the train.
I I
DOGGONE EFFISHUNCY ANYHOW!
'CFF5HUNCr AWFUL
IMPORTANT! if yer,
HOUSE KETCHES FIRE T
NIGHT, AN VER SHIRT 14
ON TH CHAIR. AN vtK
SHOES ON Ttf BUREAU
AN' VER PANTS AN'
i anisrtwoinj
A
TODAY IN . ALEDO
CALF AND PIG
CLUB BROUGHT
BEFORE BOARD
P. 8. Bichey and Elsie Gildersleeve
' Address Supervisors en
Children's Work. "
County Farm AdVisor P. S. Rich
ey and Home Advisor Miss Elsie
Gildersleeve appeared before the
Mercer county board of supervisors
this morning and explained to the
members the proposition for chil
dren's club work-in this county.
The board members were advised
on the importance of the club work
and the Smith-Lever aid fund was
explained with a view to having
the board members appropriate a
sum of money to be used in con
nection with the fund provided by
the state to further children's club
work.
Mr. Richey explained the Idea
and working of the animal club and
cited instances of great benefit to
the children through the. club. He
stated that 46 children of the coun
ty have already signified their de
sire to belong to the animal club,
and the desire of the children is
upheld by their parents. On each
enrollment card received at the
farm bureau office the endorsement
of the child's parent has been noted,
thus proving that the residents of
Mercer county are taking an inter
est in the future farm managers.
Mr. Richey also explained how the
sum of $1,200 can be gotten from
the state for the support of an indi
vidual in Mercer county whose duty
it will be to supervise a children's
club. The only string tied to the
fund is that the county through its
supervisors shall furnish a like sum
for the support of the club.
Miss Gildersleeve, speaking for
the Mercer county home bureau,
described the various clubs which
were conducted under her manage
ment last year for the boys and
girls of the county. These includ
ed garden clubs, sewing clubs, can
ning clubs, etc. She has taken a
deep interest in the welfare of the
children of this countv and is rim.
stantly'working to better the con
ditions under which the children are
living. She corroborated Mr. Rich
ey s statement with reference to
benefit to be gained from organized
ciubs ror the children and reauest-
ed the supervisor to act favorably
tor tne children of the county.
i ne smim-LeTcr am fund is
practically assured for this county
as is seen by the attitude in which
the supervisors ieceived the state
ment It is expected that favorable
action will be taken.
POST NUPTIAL FOR.
ALEDO COUPLE WAS
UNEXPECTED PARTY
A happy surprise was given by
the members of the Young People's
society of the Swedish Lutheran
church to Mr. and Mrs. Andrew E.
Anderson in the church parlors yes
terday. The party was a post-nuptial
affair, the young couple being
married last week. A large num
ber of friends were present and
helped the newlyweds to enjoy the
evening. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson
will leave for their new home in
Holyoke, Calif., next Monday. Be
fore her marriage Mrs. Anderson
was Miss Florence M. Day. The
society members presented the de
parting couple with a set of silver
knives'and forks.
U. S. BUREAU
OF MARKETS
Chicago. April 15. Cattle: re
ceipts, 9,000; beef steers, steady to
25c lower; top yearlings, 16.00;
heavy cattle, 15.65; she-stock, fairly
active, steady; bulk. 9.00 11.00;
canners, dull, $5.005.50; bulls,
strong; bolognas, mostly 7.007.50;
calves, 25c to 50c higher; receipts,
4.000; bulk around 14.50; no trade
in stockers.
Hogs: receipts, 9,000; light,
steady to 10c higher; half load,
16.00; few above 15.io; modern and
heavy weight, steady to 15c lower;
tew sales other than packing and
extremely heavy butcher grades be
low 15.00; bulk of receipts sold,
14.9015.75.
' Sheep: receipts, 11,000; active,
steady; choice shorn lambs, 18.25;
bulk, 17.50 up; prime wooled yearl
ing wethers, 19.50; top, ewes, 15.25.
-'HAN&1N' TO TH" XECTR1C
LIGHT, rE8BE 'FORE VA
WUt ALL C LLECTEP, YOU O
ct evnncu ur: mm
AIN'T EFFlSHUNOf "
Al
v 1 1 i : i
AND MERCER COUNTY
THE ARGUS
HUNT SUIT FOR
AUTO MONET IS
STILL IN COURT
Attorneys for 'the principals In
the Hunt-Swartout controversy in
circuit court opened their argu
ments this morning shortly before
noon following the examination and
cross examination of a number of
witnesses for both sides. The case
has developed into a long and te
dious combat to decide how much
an old Moon automobile was worth
in 1118. Harold Hunt, the plaintiff
in the case, alleges that bis auto
mobile, which was left at the
S war toot garage in Aledo, was sold
after being rebuilt and the sum of
$0 which was offered him by Cor
nelius Swartout the defendant, was
insufficient Attorneys for both
sides endeavored to find out how
much the machine was worth by
questioning the number of automo
bile mechanics and salesmen on the
witness stand. Several of the num
ber examined were employed at the
Swartout garage and were firm tn
their assertion that the sum of $50
was the worth of the car. Attorney
Robert L. Watson for the plaintiff
endeavored by cross examination to
show that the witnesses who testi
fled to the worth of the car were
misjudging its value by asking the
prices on individual parts of the
machine. It is expected that the
jury will be given the case this aft
ernoon.
ALEDO BOYS SING
IN CHORUS WHICH
IS TO COME HERE
Glen Hartman, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas Hartman, and Carroll
Shult, son of Dr. and Mrs. F. E
Shult, both of Aledo, are members
of the Hedding college men's glee
club which will appear in the Aledo
Methodist church tomorrow night
Both young men are students at the
college.
The Day in
Start Drive on Profiteer. Estab
lishment of a grievance commit
tee to probe all complaints of price
profiteering in Davenport with a
view to general slashing of the
high cost of living, will be effec
tive when the new administration
lakes over the city government
next Wednesday night, if present
plans of Socialist leaders are car
ried out. This announcement came
from the office of Mayor-elect Bare
wald, as did also a definite policy
of economy in civic government,
which will result in the cutting
off of a number of, what Socialists
believe, unnecessary offices. The
grievance committee, according to
the plan outlined by the incoming
mayor, will hold night sessions at
the city hall, and any citizen who
believes he has been charged an
exorbitant price for necessities or
that he has been the victim of food
and clothing pirates, can complain
by letter or in person.
Find Stolen Auto. Word was re
ceived Tuesday by Karl P. Teske,
proprietor of the Teske Flour &
Feed company, 2023 East River
street, that his automobile, stolen
two months ago, has been found
at Bloomington, 111. The owner
left for Bloomington last night to
bring his stolen property home.
The auto was an Oldsmobile Six,
and was a comparatively new ma
chine at the time it mysteriously
disappeared.
Refused Right to Dig Paving.
Several Davenport families will be
without gas for lighting and heat
ing. The board of public works
through Building Commissioner
Harry Phillips yesterday refused
the Peoples Light company per
mission to tear up the paving in
12 different cases in order to make
new gas connections. The People's
Light company says this means that
the connections will not be made.
The 12 cases are in all parts of the
city. Officials of the light company
says the paving concerned is all old,
has been laid for many years, and
that this . is the first instance in
limn sncn
Us fcarth aike mm '
- Tl I" . Ott Mi . TS.
WUUam. Mcbola leprMMtattve
( CEEl ViHCRE'S I
I nt rest of my I
V conP'svTioN? J
SCHWARTZ liEl
CHAIRMAN K
COUNTY BOAD
Sort Henderson Mas fhei
m supervisors and "Sets t
I'p" to Fruit
J. P. Schwartz was chosen chair,
man of the Mercer county niu,
visors in their organization meg.
ing yesieraay. air. schwarti a
wring ms sixiu year as a ntemlxt
of the county board, and hit dM.
tion to tne chair was unanimou
The court house attaches, indud'
ing Circuit Judge W. T. Churck
and lawyers in the circuit tout,
were presented with trait a
cigars by the new official.
Three new members were initio
ted into the county organization
yesterday. They were Frank n
Church, Mercer township; Will ji
Minteer, Duncan township, uj
Omer Muhlenburg, Eliza townshia
The other four members of tta
board who were elected in the elec
tion on April 6 were old memben
of the board.
Little besides routine busiaen
has occupied the time of the in.
pervisors so far since the meettai
opened yesterday. t Following tki
naming of Mr. Sctiwartz as chair,
man the supervisors discaiiet
county business and several bills
were allowed.
HOME BUREAU HAS
LUNCHEON SERVED
FOR SUPERVIS0B
The ladies of the Mercer county
home bureau served a delicious two
coursed luncheon to the memben
of the county board of supervtMn
yesterday afternoon. The luncaeoa
was held in connection with the
regular meeting of the advisory
council. The full membership of
the county board was present, be
side a number of others and thi
men did full Justice to the meal.
Davenport
which permission to tear up paving
in order to make gas main connec
tions has been refused by the city.
This is the second state in a con
troversy which began a few days
ago when the People's Light com
pany served notice on the city that
it would be unable because of its
finances to lay mains ahead of the
big mileage of new paving ordered
in Davenport this year by the pres
ent council.
To Organize Battery. Steps to
reorganize the national guard in
Davenport will be taken at a meet
ing called yesterday for Monday
evening at 7:30 at the Time
auditorium. Following a series of
conferences yesterday and today be-
tween AdiutantGeneral Iiouis Lash-.'":
er of Iowa and business men and J.
former members of the guard, plana
have developed rapidly for the or
ganization of a battery of artillery
in Davenport. Assurance that full
equipment consisting of five sec
tions of 75s and one combat section
with 32, and possibly tit horses,
would be furnished the unit by the
war department speeded up the
work of reorganization and assured
the city a national guard unit.
Harry Ward, former caplain of D
battery and prior to the organiia
tion of that unit a lieutenant in oW
B battery, is slated for the captain
cy of the new unit, with Arthur
Ruhl, another former guard officer,
as one of the lieutenants.
Death Record. Frank J. Seaman,
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. ticaman,
430 West Sixteenth street, died yes
terday morning at a hospital at
Woodward, Iowa. He hail been an
invalid nearly al! his life due to
an attack of spinal meningitis when
he was two years old.
Mrs. Abbie" Oliver Wilson, widow
of the late Attorney V. H. Wilson,
died yesterday morning at 1 o'clock
at St. Luke's hospital. The cause
of death was pneumonia.
Alvena Marie, 2-year old daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse W. Ki?k, pass
ed away at 3:30 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon at the family home, 327
Filmore street.
BY EDWINA.
ONE
9
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