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The Rock Island Argus and daily union. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1920-1923, May 01, 1920, Image 1

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THE
K. ISLAND ARGUS.
f - .a
.f
AND DAILY UNION.
.C2XTY-NINTH YEAR. NO. 166.
ASSOCIATED PS ESS LEAMD Witt.
SATURDAY MAY 1, 1920--FOURTEEX PAGES.
CTflTED PSBSS LEASED WIRE.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
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: tBVALISTS
l CROWD LOOP
llirhn nnnrinc
1 1 " run rHiiHUL
Downtown District Gay
;. With Flags as Patriots
Celebrate Day.
; GoTfrnor W. L. Harding of
Ions reached Ruck Island at
t:10 'clock this afternoon on '
Rock Inland train o. 7, from
the east. He was met at the
station by Mayor Harry M.
MirlTW and members, of the
reception committee.
Rock Island is out ea masse this
afternoon! All hough the streets of
the downtown district lire thronged
with spectators, and vivid wlUi be
red, white and blue, appearance in
dications are (bat the plurality of
tie city's papulation is assembled
(stake part in the parade, and that
lite, color and music will concen-
trate in the band of marchers. The i
' number of participants in the event I
in honor of America day promises !
to reach the most hopeful estimates.
Six tliouraii'l American Hags in
tbe hands of paraders, martial mu
, ilc from a dozen bands, a few floats
in patriotic colors, the uniforms of
various patriotic and fraternal
poops, and numerous pennants
adn banners emphasize the dom
inant tone of patriotism. Flags and
bunting form ( bright notes, flying
from bomes 'and business places
along the streets.
In. compliance with the request
of Mayor Harry M. Schriver,' gen-
ral chairman of the affairs of the
day, spontaneity is combined with
the well ordered ' schedule with
which the day's program is plan
ned. Good feeling and natural
outbursts of patriotic tievotion, in
spire the crowd. ''
Governor.. W. L. Harding of Iowa,
silpsMer at'tw, eeienration.-reaen-
M the city this afternoon and
m met by Mayor Schriver and
Members of the reception com
mittee. The automobile of the
Iowe eiecutive and his escorts will
head the parage.
Review Parade.
They will tie followed by Mayor
Schriver and the city commission
ers, on foot As the parade passes
along Second avenue going west,
tais contingent will turn at Market
Htuare, and advancing to the large
platform truck placed there for the
speakers, Mayor Schriver will
' mount and pass the parade in re
view. Labor's delegation in the parade,
asembled in formation at Third
avenue and Twetny-third street,
forms a noteworthy feature o,f the
Othering. It is estimated ' that
WOO represent the Rock Island
Arsenal federation, and that 1,000
represent the American Federa
tion of Labor.
Other larg-j divisions are the
children's band, in which 75 per
nt of the school children are con
regated, and the citizens' group,
oi several thousand.
MRS. TABOR FREED
UNDER BOND WHEN
JURY DISAGREES
' ' iBy United Pifss.)
.Paw Paw, Mich., May 1. Mrs.
fh I. Tabor, charged with caus
g the death of her daughter. Mrs.
Wd Tabor Virgo, was at liberty
lOdaV lindor hnmla r,t Oftft
, J J " 1 1 1 ' . ii utiuu LUC 7.1 ;
p ? against her disagreed after!
jg. 38 hours of debate. The jury was I
"pw.eci to have stood 8 to 4 for
Eviction.
The new trial probably will be
aeid in September.
126-YEAR-OLD MAN
DIES AT HOME JN
GRAND ISLAND, NEB.
Grand Island. Neb., May 1.
wnias Morris, aged 126 years.
this morning at the home .of
wles Mitten, ranchman, eight
""fa northeast of Ansley, Neb. He
born in Berren, North Wales,
3 8ed man never married
followed the profession of a
Wer for 100 years. He came to
ff? ,connlry in 1871. locating at
eoM ; Iu- ana moved t Custer
daughter of turk
: SULTAN NOW BRIDE
stai
ft , ,UUDI" Apru toy
t,;. oated Press). The sul
Sulti ughter- Prlncess Sabiha
pri'- was married today to
ftk i. mar Fauk Effendi, son
kuu f?T Pa'ent, Prince Abdul
!J1W Ettendi.
'iiWderM p&sha- th Krand
tM members of the cabinet
kM,..lho wedding which was
f Win the Yiidlz palace. .
flu fcrfJrincMs is 22 years old.
ikaat, eroom w" educated In
1
IQWA GOVERNOR
IS SPEAKER ON
"AMERICA DAY"
1 JF M 1
V
W. I- HARDING,
Governor of Iowa.
Who will deliver patriotic address
following parade ibis afternoon.
FETE ATLANTIC
FLEET, BACK IN
NATIVE WATERS
New York, May 1. The great
Atlantic fleet arrived in home wa
ters early today to give 25,000
American bluejackets relaxation
from their winter period of target
practice and drill oft Guantanamo,
Cuba. During their two weeks'
stay here they will be entertained
by various organizations and given
an opportunity to renew acquaint
ances . with relatives . and sweet
hearts..' :: . ,H
On board the flagship Pennsyl
vania with Admiral Henry B. Wil
son, commander of the fleet, were
Secretary of the Navy Daniels and
Admiral Robert E. Coontz, chief of
naval operations.
The fleet was met down the bay
by a squadron of navy seaplanes!
anH a ttmjt Iqfoi. ..i r. naafai
by a fleet of destroyers and tugs
from the navy yard which went
out to pilot tbe men of war up
through the Narrows.
Rear Admiral Jrfhn H. Glennon,
commanding the Third naval dis
trict, and Rear Admiral J. D. Mac
Donald, commandant of the New
York navy yard, extended formal
welcome to Secretary Daniels and,
the high naval officers on board.
SINN FEINERS AND
' OPPONENTS CLASH
m LONDON STREET
London, May 1. Sinn Fein sym
pathizers and opponents engaged
in a street right before Wormwood
Scrubbs prison last night, and
mounted police bad to charge on
the crowd before it would disperse.
Stones and clods of earth were
burled and several persons were
slightly injured.
Announcement was made last
night that three more hunger
strikers had been released," mak
ing a total of 13 since they began
refusing food 10 days ago. :
One feature of the night's dem
onstration was the appearance of
"tin" helmets, worn by a large par
ty of Irishmen engaged in keeping
order. A choir of lads "sang Irish
songs, and Mrs. Despard, sister of
Field Marshal French, lord lieuten
ant of Ireland, addressed a crowd.
STUDENTS GET OUT
CHAMPAIGN PAPERS
Champaign, 111., May 1. Stu
dents in Journalism at tbe Uni
versity of Illinois today -undertook
tbe task of publishing the Satur
day Evening and Sunday morning
editions of the Champaign News-
Gazette.
, The duties of reporting, editing,
head-writing and proof reading,
were all given over to the hands of
university Journalists.
Princess Gnstave Adolph of
jwrdei,who before her mar
riage was Princess Xaoraret
ConnanghC died here this aft
ernoon. 8he was the daugh
ter of Prince Arthur, duke of
C'onnaught.
Washington, May 1 Approx
imately $100,(XMI,0(W has been
saved for 1921. Chalrmaa Good
of the appropriations eomett
tee today told the house.
Washington.' May Sena
tor .Met ormfcVs bill to estab
lish a national budiret system
was passed today by the sea
ate sad mw gee to confer,
tnce.
j LATE BULLETINS j
RECOUNT IS
(ORDERED IN
N. J. VOTING
Supreme 'Court Judge
Calls for Check of Wood
Johnson Contest.
Newark, N. J., May 1. Chief
Justice William S. Cummere of the
supreme court, today signed an or
der for a recount of the vote cast
in last Tuesday's; presidential pref
erential primaries for Senator
Johnson and Major General Wood.
For Whole State.
The recount will be for the en
tire state and will begin May 10 in
Essex. Morris, Camden, Gloucester
and Cape May counties, where the
supporters of Senator Johnson al
lege that mistakes were made in
vote tabulations.
The sura of $50,000 must be de
posited with the secretary of state
ct w Jersey by Senator Johnson
before the recount will begin, to
defray expenses entailed by tbe va
lious county boards in the recount
To Save Expense.
The justice's reason for allow
ing the recount to start in the first
five counties, he said, was to give
Johnson, supporters an opportunity
to abandon tbe Contest should it be
shown by the recount in these
counties, tha,t the result was not
materially changed.
LARGEST FREIGHT
FLOTILLA ON RIVER
LEAVES ST. LOUIS
r
St. Louis, May 1. What was said
to be tbe largest river shipment of
freight from St. Louis since the re
vival of barge traffic on the Mis
sissippi in 1918, left today; six
barges, carrying approximately
5.000 tons of merchandise clearing
for Memphis and New Orleans.
It was said that 250 cars would
have been required to move the
freight had it been sent by -rail.
Five of the barges are going to
New Orleans with freight for trans
shipments to Europe and South
America.
The yardmen's strike, according
to shipping men, is responsible for
the activity characterising water
traffic:'
GIRL WRITES HER
SUICIDE MESSAGE
WITH A LIPSTICK
IDt United Press.)
Chicago, May 1. A red lip stick,
that helped hide a girl's secret, was
used by Marie Williams to write
her death message. She was tired
of singing and dancing for a living,
tired of rouge and the lip stick.
She left a garden in the middle of a
party and went home and opened a
gas jet. The janitor found her body
on the floor and a message writ
ten with a lip stick on a mirror.
"Have no pencil. Tell mother I
am at ease."
Her mother, Mrs. S. I. Williams,
Wilmington, Del., was notified of
the death today..
FORMER CURRENCY
CHIEF, NATIVE OF
ILLINOIS, IS DEAD
Baltimore, Md., May 1. William
Barrett Ridgley, comptroller of the
currency from 1901 to 1908, died at
a hospital here last night from a
sudden complication following an
operation. 1
His wife and other members of
the family were at his bedside.
The body will be taken to Spring
field, 111., where he was born, (or
burial.- He was 62 years old. .
FORMER KOLCHAK
MEN MEET REDS
Vladivostok. April 29. Severe
firhHnir i in nroeress at Chita.
trans-Baikalia, between the forces
of General Voitzekoffsky, and the
opposing bolshevik faction, accord
ing to reports from a Russian
source. The Japanese are declared
to be supporting uenerai vioc
zekoffsky. CAUCUS TO PLAN
SOLDIER RELIEF
FAILS IN HOUSE
Washington, May L With plans
for passing the bill next Monday
abandoned because the party cau
cus last night developed such oppo
sition to the proposal for raising
revenue by a sales tax that its elim
ination was held to be certain, Re
publican leaders today were seek
ing to effect a new compromise on
aoldier relief legislation.
After being in session four hours,
during which all efforts to obtain
the united support of the party lor
the bill as drawn by the ways ana
means committee failed, the caucus
adjourned. No date forthe next
conference was set but Represen
tative Mondell. floor leader, an
nounced it would be held next
week, -' -.; 1
HOUSE PLAYING
POLITICS OVER;
SOLDIER BONUS
Depending On Senate and
President to Mend
Flaws.
BT DAVID LAWRENCE. '
(Special to The Argus.)
Washington, D. C, May 1. Taxa
tion is going up not down. The
Republican party in congress has
virtually decided that more is to
be gained' by giving the soldiers of
the late war a bonus than by re
fusing to make further cuts fn
existing taxes or distributing the
burden through the years of the
next generation.
Tbe ways and means committee
of tfie house is in a tangle. A mi
nority of Republicans are opposed
to tbe new burdens of taxation, but
everf' with the help of the Demo
crats their strength is not sufficient
to prevent the passage of the bill in
the house. Only two barriers then
remain the senate and the presi
dent. If the bouse bill were pre
sented to the White house today it
would be vetoed. If it were put up
to the senate in tbe form in which
it has been drafted it would be
radically changed but on tbe other
hand there would still remain ad
ditional taxes wherewith to raise
money for the soldiers because sen
ate Republicans -must stand by
house Republicans in doing some
thing before the next election that
will not,alienate the soldier vote.
Perhaps'the Democrats would Jo
likewise if they were in control,
for the soldier vote has become like
the labor vote and tbe prohibition
vote something too formidable for
the average congressman to with
stand, especially when a demagogue
starts a campaign in opposition to
him in his district on that ground
alone.
The ways and means committee,
both. Republicans and Democrats,
had tbe new tax bill before them at
their Friday session. It had been
agreed upon by a majority of the
Republicans the night before and
the pla'n was to jam it through the
committee in time to report it to
the house during the day and thug
have It ready for the Republican
caucus Friday night.
Agree lee4tor Shoald Be Dew,
The significant thing is that
neither the proponents - nor op
ponents of the soldier bonus differ
in their sentimental feeling that
something should be done for the
soldiers of the late war, something
tangible. ' But getting down to the
bottom of the whole business, one
finds even the enthusiasts for a sol
dier bonus cognizant of the strain
which the plan would put on the
already overweighted credit sys
tern of the country. Those who
favor the bill say tbe nation can
stand the extra tax and they point
out that either a sales tax on re
tail sales above 1,000 a month, or
a retroactive tax on war profits
would hit only "the big fellows."
But experience with tbe vicious
circles in the high cost of living has
shown in the past year that the
larger concerns merely tack the
tax on their costs of production and
the ultimate consumer pays the
(Continued on Page Five.)
JUAREZ EX-MAYOR
HELD m ST. LOUIS
St. Louis, Mo;, May 1. One of
two Mexicans under arrest here
today, according to police, said he
was Manuel M. Prieto, mayor of
Juarez, Mexico, from 1914 to 1916,
and that be came to St. Louis re
cently to purchase arms for Gen
eral Alvara Obregon and tbe arm
ies revolting against the Carranza
government.
HIGH PRICED DUDS
AND SPUDS BANNED
Pittsburgh, May 1. Twelve
thousand members of tbe congress
of women's clubs of the Pittsburgh
district have pledged themselves to
wear only "staple" clothing until
prices of more modish garments
drop; and to place a two weeks'
ban on potatoes, in a campaign
against the high cost of living.
I Tht Waather
Increasing cloudiness and slight
ly warmer tonight Sunday un
settled, probably showers. .
. Highest yesterday, 58; lowest
last night, 44.
Wind velocity, at J a. m S miles
oer hour.
.precipitation in lasi 24 noors, .vz
inch.
12m. "p.m. 7 am.
y ester', yester. today
Dry Bulb temp.. 52 56 47
Wet bulb temp. . 7 49 41
Relative humid... 73 59 61
River stage, 8.7, a fall of .1 in the
last 24 hours. .
Washington, May 1. Weather
predictions for the week beginning
Monday are: - . T
- Region of Great 'Lakes: Rain
early in week followed by fair until
close; almost normal temperatures.
Upper Mississippi and Lower
Missouri Valleys: Showers by
Monday and probably again near
close of week, otherwise fair; mod
erate temperature. .
.. Hirer Forecast
Only slight changes 'in the Miss
issippi will occur from below Du
buque to Muscatine.
J.M.SHERIER. Meteorologist
CHIHUAHUA
CITY FALLS
TO REBELS
Border Folk. Bestirred by
Growing Menace of
Mexican Revolt.
El Paso, Texas, May L That
Colonel Angnstw Mora, com
mander of the Jnarex garrison,'
who hurriedly crossed the in
ternational line here shortly
after midnight, is fleeing Jnarex
because of anticipated revolt
in that dry, was the claim to
day la anU-Carraaxa circles
here.
El Paso. Tex., May 1. The seri
ous situation in Chihuahua as the
result of the Sonora revolt against
the Carranza government, was
brought home to border residents
today with announcement of the
fall of Chihuahua City, state capi
tal, and the staement that Colonel
Augusin Mora of the Juarez garri
son, had left that city and was on
his wal to Mexico City by wayof
Laredo for a conference with Pres
ident Carranza.
Colonel Mora was ordered to
Mexico City by General J. G. Esco
bar, commander at Juarez. He
passed through El Paso shortly
alter midnight
Defenders en Flight.
Almost simultaneously with an
nouncement from Juarez, admit
ting the state capital was in the
hands of the rebels it was stated
that Elia De La O, civilian com
mander of the iiyal troops at Chi
huahua City, was on his way to
Juarez with the remnant of his
command. He was expected here
today.
' Both General Escobar and Col
ouet-Sora last hieht declared their
1 loyalty to the Carranza govern
ment- and pledged their honor as
soldiers to the defense of justice.
- Rebels Approaching.
The approach of the rebel leader,
Juan 'Andrew Almazan toward Ma-
tamoro3. the Mexican port opposite
1-rowasville, Texas, came as no
surprise to persons here familiar
with the rebellious movement. It
was reported that the rebels had
cut the railroad line south of Mat
smoros, preparatory to the advance
of troofs toward 'the border.
4 Rebellion Spreads.
Agua Prieta, Sonora. May 1.
(By the A. P.) Mexico is honey
combed with revolution and in
stead of the "steel ring" of soldiers
President Carranza of Mexico, an
nounced wonld be put around So
nora, the first state to secede from
his administration; the rbels have
put a "steel ring of revolutionary
soldiers about Mexico City and in
every state except one." General A.
I. Villareal said here today, in mak
ing public the accomplishments of
the revolution in less than one
month since it began.
General Villareal came , here
from El Paso to discuss the revo
lutionary situation with General P.
Elias Calles, commander of the
revolutionary forces in the north
west -
Ex-Aide to Carranza.
General Villareal formerly was
constitutional governor of Neuvo
Leon and military goernor of the
state of Neuvo Leon, Tamaupilas
and Coaruila. He was president of
the Aguas Calientes convention
which selected Carranza to be pres
ident of Mexico.
General Villareal and General
Calles after summarising the revo
lution concluded:
"The revolution is gaining more
rapidly than any previous one in
the history of Mexico. It will suc
ceed and between 60 and 90 days
Cttrranza's administration will
have pased into history.
"The revolutionists have pledged
themselves for what they believe
just Foreigners alike, with citi
zens of Mexico, are offered full pro
tection and justice."
NINE BELLS NOW IN
CONFERENCE HELD
CONGRESS RECORD
Washington, May 1. Nine bills,
including five of the annual appro
priation measures, now are in con
ference between the senate and
house, setting which some officials
say is a record. A 10th measure,
that for water power development
has just been agreed upon and is
waiting final action by tbe senate
and house.
The money measures in confer
ence are the naval, rivers and nar
bors, fortifications, agricultural,
and diplomatic and consular. The
; ether bills are those relating to
army reorganization, army and
navy pay, railroad deficiency and
civil service retirement
The house today began consid
eration of the sundry civil bill, the
last of the 13 annual supply meas
urea. Wfth the hope of passing it
today, the house met an hour ear
tier than asual.
2 SHOT DEAD
AS PARISIANS
CAJOLE POLICE
Merrymakers Carry Baadinage Toe
far and Are Dispersed After
Clash with Guards.
BULLETIN.
Paris, May 1. (By Asso.
eiated Press.) Two persons .
were killed and about 5tt others
were wounded, most of them
lightly. In a series of small
riots this afternoon in eastern
part of the city.
Paris, May - 1. (By Associated
Press.) A clash between Republi
can guards, police and 2,000 May
day manifestants occurred at 3
o'clock this afternoon on the boul
evards of the St. Martin quarter.
Two shots were fired daring the
melee and several persons are re
ported wounded.
The disturbance was the first ac
tive disorder of the day. It was
brought out on the presence of
students from the Schools who act
ed as drivers of the auto busses,
replacing the striking drivers.
Crowds Annoy Police.
The police used flving squads of
from 5 to 100 along the boulevard
to break up congestion. The crowds
in most instances were good-natured,
but apparently annoyed the
police by blocking traffic at one
point after another. As soon as po
lice dispersed, a crowd would re-'
assemble 50 yards distant, hooting
and jeering the policemen as soon
as their backs were turned.
There were several fist fights
along tbe boulevards, but the po
lice did not interfere, in most in
stances letting the people settle
their own arguments.
POSSE HUNTING
FOR MAN WHO
ELUDED DRAFT
Withee, Wis., May 1. A large
posse, aided by blood hounds, to
day enveloped a swamp near here
in search of Louis Krueger. for 18
months a fugitive from justice on
a charge of military draft evasion.
Brought to Bay last night at the
home of bis mother,. Mrs. Louise
Krueger, the man escaped by leap
ing through a window amid a fusil
lade of bullets from possemen and
took refuge in the swamp nearby.
A cordon of deputies was
thrown about the swamp . immed
iately and it is believed he is still
within the circle of deputies.
Today's activity recalls the "bat
tle of Kruger farm" in September,
1918, when Harry Jensen, station
agent at Owen was killed and four
other persons wounded and which
brought life sentences for Frank
and Leslie Krueger, brothers of
Louis.
UNABLE TO FIND
'WHERE BLUEBEARD
BURIED TTTR WIFE
(By United Pna.l
Los Angeles, Cat, May 1. "Blue
beard" Harvey, who married 2
women and is alleged to have con
fessed to the murder of four of
them, today may be used as a guide
to direct detectives to the grave of
Nina Lee Delaney, one of the four
missing wives.
A party headed by District At
torney Thomas L. Woolwine, using
a map drawn for them by Harvey,
searched all night but railed to hnd
the grave. Searching operations
were suspended to get Harvey to
assist in locating the spot in Berego
Valley, where he is alleged to have
buried his victim.
Harvey is a convalescent in a
local hospital, recovering from two
attempts at suicide. Physicians
say it is doubtful whether bis co
dition will allow him to aid in the
search at present. ,
Harvey's alleged confession, it
was said, was made on condition
that the state waive demand for
capital punishment.
"I am not afraid of death," said
Harvey, "but 1 must have been
crazy. I can't explain it any other
way."
AURORA COVERED
WITH HAND BILLS
OF RED NOTICES
Aurora, 111.. May 1. Hand bills
carrying the banner line. "Hail to
the Soviets," fluttered on almost
every Aurora doorstep today. An
explanatory paragraph following
the heading said tbe dodger was
the "May Day proclamatioa of the
Central Executive committee of the
communist party of America."
The bills bore no signature. They
lauded bolshevist rule in Rnssia
and adjured "workers of America
to Join in the revolutionary strug
gle of the workers of tbe world if
you would save themselves from
capitalism you must break with
the. power of. the capitalistsyou
cannot compromise with them as do
tbe labor parties, the moderate so
cialists and tha -"cUonjlry trade
unionists."
STRICT SURVEILLANCE
OF FEDERAL AGENCIES
CHILLS ARDOR OF REDS
Precautionary Arrests of Alleged Agitators is Held
. Effective Against Threatened Outbreaks
Nothing Unusual Reported.
Washington, May 1. Forewarned by the department ef jus
tice, those responsible for the maintenance of order In every city
and industrial center were prepared today to act at the flrst sign
of any disorder instigated by radical elements.
While reports continued to arrive that communist atrltators
were still doing all in their power to aronse the workers, to a
"May day show of power," early today no Instance of viol en re had
come from any source.
Assistant Attorney General Garvan expressed the opinion
thst the precautions taken had materially dampened the ardor of
the radical leaders. Special care had been taken to safegnard e
members of congress, the three federal Judges and an attorney
known, according to the department of Justice, to have been se
lected by the agitators for assassination.
Mr. Garvan said an amazing amount ef money had been spent
by the communist labor party in the distribution of propaganda
and in preparations for demonstrations.
MID-WEST HELD
READY TO COPE
WITH VIOLENCE
Authorities Mobilised to Stamp
Out Slightest Attempt to
Break Peace.
Chicago, May 1. May day Fed
eral, state and city authorities in
central and western states today
were mobilized to stamp out threat
ened May day disturbances. Offi
cials generally predicted thatvno
violence would be attempted, hut
elaborate precautionary measures
were taken in several cities.
In Chicago, more than 1,500 radi
cals and undesirables had been tak
en early today in a police roundup.
Scores were formally escorted out
of Chicago when it was found they
had criminal records.
One thousand policemen in civil
ian clothes patroled the street and
guards were established about pub
lic buildings.
Police Attend Meets.
Three mass meetings were call
ed in Chicago by the Industrial
Workers of the World, Socialists
and the Russians of the city. Fed
eral officials planned to attend the
meetings.
Members of the Amalgamated
Clothing Workers of America re
mained away from work, but today
was said to be a holiday for these
workers, recognized in their union
contracts.
No permits for parades were
asked in Chicago.
Edward J. Brennan, chief of the
local bureau of investigation of
the department of justice, announc
ed that "no public officials in Chi
cago need have any fear of their
lives.",
Although there were no open
threats of radical demonstrations
on the Pacific coast, federal and
police officials had prepared care
fully to meet any emergency.
Federal officials in St Paul an
ticipated no trouble in tbe north
west.
Members of the American Le
gion in Indianapolis planned to pa
rade this afternoon in a protest
against "red flag demonstrations."
The entire police force of Cleve
land was ordered on duty and sup
plied with night sticks and extra
ammunition.
Southwest Quiet.
In the Bouthwest, reports indi
cated no organized demonstrations
were planned. At Kansas City.
Mo., tbe day was observed as
"Americanization day."
Communist literature made an
appearance in St Louis, but fed
eral officials said they bad no re
ports of organized demonstrations.
Police were called to a school
house in the thickly populated west
side ghetto .early this morning
when it was discovered that a red
flag bad been raised on tbe school
flagpole during the night
Lieutenant John Dixon, ex-soldier,
climbed the 80-foot pole and
cut down the banner, which bore
the legend, inscribed in yellow
chalk, "Hurrah for tbe Soviet,
Death for Capitalists."
Russian workers began gather
ing early in the day at Humboldt
park for an open air meeting.
There was no disorder.
Fear Race Riots.
- Chicago, May 1. Twenty-flve
members of the third reserve mi
litia were mobilized this morning
by Colonel Anson L. Bolte and de
tailed to guard rifles, ammunition
and other government property
stored in the armory, in the heart
of the south side "block belt"
Army intelligence officers warn
ed police several days ago that race
riots might break out today when
negro families began moving into
homes purchased in districts which
have heretofore been occupied by
whites.
ENTIRE POLICE
NEW YORK CITY
Whole East Heavily Policed and
Ready to Suppress Uprisings
Troops Beady to Spring.
New York, May 1. May day
found many cities in the east under
strong police ari military guard
in anticipation of possible acts of
violence by radicals.
,In New york .. City, the entire
police force of 11,000 was on duty; '
soldiers at Governor's Island were '
armed with 100 rounds, of ammuni
tion and held in readiness for in
stant duty; arrangements were
made to mobilize the New York
state guard and 100 posts of the
American Legion agreed to report
at police stations should the
emergency arise. Q
Guard Public Buildings.
All public buildings here were
closely protected and guards were
stationed at railway terminals,
bridges and tbe homes of promi
nent men. Department of justice
agents swarmed through certain
sections of the city where radical
agitators are known to have
baunts. One hundred meetings of
radicals were to be held during the
day under police protection and
scrutiny.
At Hartford, Conn, infantrymen
of the First Connecticut guard regi
ment patrolled, the state capitol.
Seven men were under arrest at
Scranton, Pa,, two of whom were
said by department of justice agents
to be organizers and leaders of the
communist party in America. The
government officers claimed they
nipped a May day plot in tbe bud
by the arrests last night
In several towns, patriotic. Ob
servances were held to offset pos- .
sible activities of extremists. The
day was made a holiday in Pater-
son, N. J., by proclamation of
Mayor Van Noort.
New Castle, Pa., fanned an
"American Day" panfle at which
only the Stars and Stripes were
to be permitted in the procession.
LAURETTE TAYLOR
IS UNDAUNTED BY
BRITISH ROWDIES
(By United Prraa.)
London, May 1. Laurette Tay
lor's play, "One Night in Rome,'
broken up by rowdies Thursday
night, will reopen at the Carrie k
theatre Monday nigbt,. it was said
today.
The actress, unstrung by her. ex
perience, was spending the week
end at the seaside with her hus
band. Hartley Manners, author of
the play.
The motive for the demonstra
tion had not yet been clearly estab
lished. Investigators said they
learned the disturbance was start
ed by an organized clique of about
20 or 30 rowdies and that some
others joined them.
C. B. Cochrane, manager of the,
theatre, said tbe identity of some
of the rowdies bad been learned and :
that measures would be taken to
prosecute them. Rumors that the
Sinn Fein was responsible wers dis-.'
credited.
EXPLORERS ROUT '
CANNIBAL DRIVE .
Newport, R. I, May 1. An at-.i
tack by ferocious cannibals of Urge
stature and scant attire, ' on the
party of Dr. A Hailton Rice, which
is exploring the Amazon region, is
described in a letter received here
today from Chester Ober, geograph-
er with the expedition. .1 j J,
Dr. Rice and Ober: killed two can-,
nibals and tbe rest fled. Mrs. Rice,
formerly Mrs. George D, Widcner
of Philadelphia, U with the party.
P
5.

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