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The Rock Island Argus and daily union. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1920-1923, September 01, 1920, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92053933/1920-09-01/ed-1/seq-10/

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TnHAY-TIIE RDGS ISLAND, ARGPSSSPTEHBER 1 1S23.
c:iTts:Go:;?nD
. tLs2l at Mv w IMnl Fan
j v ' Ban tnr Heariag. ;
0 ' f: , - - t ,;.;.
, , ' Officials PC the Trl-City Railway,
company ara trMently becoming
'?' tapadeat at tho delay, of city otfi
dala of Rock Inland and Molina In
making a report of finding on pub
lic sentiment ralatira to. the "one
. ; mas" afreet earn.
, At any rate, the company la
aaxloaa to begin collecting a 10-
cent fare on the IUinoia aide of the
rlrer. r
; ' Early la July the eompany filed
two petition! for Increased fares
with the state public utilities com
mission, one petition asking lor an
immediate 8 -cent fare and the oth
i er asking for a permanent 10-cetit
fare. On July 8 the utilities com
mission granted a bearing on the
petitions, but only the accent fare
, proposition came np as City Attorney-James
M. Johnston of Moline
asked for a 30-day delay on the lu
cent fare bearing, to giro time to
both the officials ot Moline and
Rock Island to feel out public sen
timent on the "one man" cars. It
was thought that with tbe "one
man" ears in operation street car
service could be furnished at a con
t elderably lower fare than with the
present equipment.
5o Report Made. i '
On Jnly 20 the 8-cent fare went
Into , effect by order of the com
mission, but nothing was done
about the 10-cent fare petition, due
to the commlsalon watting on the
report oa sentiment' .
City Attorney 3. K. Scott of Rock
bland says that little has been done
In this city oa the "one man" car
proposition, ana says that be feels
that the public la against them.
Company Wait Conference.
The t, to-day time limit expired
several weeks ago, and B. J. Den-
man, president of tbe street car
company, announced uus morning
that company officials are seeking
a conference with tbe Moline and
Rock Island city officials relative
to the situation, after which the
eomnanT will ask the utilities com
mission for an immediate hearing
on the 10-cent fare petition.
General sentiment seems to be to
the effect that no final step will be
pressed on the faro proposition un
til after the primaries, sepu 10.
MILITARY BITES
HELD OVER BODY
OF HARRY
BHMKI
Tans was sounded and salnte
fired by the American Legion as
the body , of Harry Ehmke, who
died In the service of the United
States army on Oct 6, 1918, was
lowered this afternoon. Funeral
services were held at 2 o'clock at
the Moeller undertaking parlors,
and at ,2:30 at the Evangelical
Church of Peace, with Rev. Fred
J. Rolf In charge. Burial was made
in ChiDDiannock cemetery.
The Eagles lodge No. 956 was in
charge of the services. Ehmke was
a member or tbe Eagles. Pallbear
ers were Eagle brotheas of Ehmke,
several of whom had gone overseas
with him. They are John Lyons,
Daniel Staoleton, Harry uison,
Herman Larson, Fred Lorence and
Edward Meenan. Many attended
the services.
AMERICA RJ
X""jL PHONE 406 THEATRE , PHQXE 400 JL J
Tonight,
MrF ' t Sm
Hurled
over &
Cliff
'. Print TVr
1
nnnniALOPnAES
IIEA1702 ATTE3DI3J
BY IIANY FBIEID3
Fifty out-of-town , friends and
relatives and numerous tri-city
friends attended the services held
at 4 o'clock this afternoon over
the remains of Thomas C. "Bane
Meanor. The services were new
at the home, 1103 Eighteenth-and-
a-half avenue, with Rev. urea . .
Rolf in charge. Interment was
made in ChiDDiannock cemetery-
Many prominent boxing men of
the middle west, wno were per
sonal friends Of Babe Meanor, ar
rived In the city today to attend
the funeral. The flower offerings
were profuse. The pallbearers were
Bruce Copeland, John F. Miller,
Charles J. Smith, Thomas Ryan ot
Des Moines, Iowa, John Mickey
Pierce, Moline, and Charles Brin
die, Sr.
he is reliable aad vary snocassfal.
He baa new and special treatments
for rheumatism, goitre, lung, heart,
kidney aad skin diseases and high
blood pressure. .:. 1
that
Experts ' have
20,000,000 tone of paper palp can
be produced each year from ladlas'
bamboos aad
I BSOWS BIALTO
024 Iftatk Street
TOPAT 1 -
WILLIAM DUNCAN '
s " or
EE THE STLENT ATEHGEB
3 , . Final Chapter
)R. WALSH TREATS SICK FREE
Dr. Walsh of Davenport Invites
all people suffering with stomach,
nervousness! rheumatic diseases
to try the new and special treat
ments he uses one time free. " Dr.
Walsh's office Is- at 126 West Third
street, Davenport. He is one of the
leading specialists for stomach and
chronic ailments in this section and
THE W001T RISERS
Episode No. ft
WON BY A HOSE
A derer Comedy .
1
EE The
-v Than day - 1
BIRTH Of A SACS
Greatets Photoplay en
.earth
Coast
UNDERTAKING ESTABLISHMENTS GIVE UP
ENTIRE STOCK OF FORMALDEHYDE TO
PRESERVE MONSTER FISH NOW AT FOOT
OF 19TH STREET, ROCK ISLAND 19
BARRELS USED.
Uflderta
I'liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniu''
TO lb min of O din1
Calloaad hon mmi rUv.
A np im.fi wit ef
the air. Tlx ham pawed
Iraatleallr at tbm brtak
Ml hack u! tl rider
bat over tj cIKT. Don't
mis DandmU EDDIE
POLO. Cm HmcvIm ef th
ScrMn, im his aw Houmd
tb Clab Thriller. It's tbe
iaaaieet plctnr thie Klas
I ThrUla anr mad. tt
31
Dorothy DVore and Jimmie Harrison
T BIFF! BANG! BOMB!
' : A Christie Comedy
JOHN LOWELL .
THE HEARTOF BIG DAN
A Fine Northwood Story
niiiiiiii
Genuine Pipe Organ Perfect Ventilation v
I Spencer Square
T0XI6HT AXD TOMORROW TWO MORE DATS 03ILT TO SEE
J A SENSATIONAL O0CK0CT
J MARSHALL NEILAN'S
S Sensational Picture of the Dangers, Thrills and
Ejj Excitement of Newspaper Life.
j"Go And Get It"
r A Riot of Romance and Realism A First
EE National Attraction.
H .WITH
1 WESLEY "FRECKLES" BARRY ,
And a wonderful all star cast More thrills and laughs to each
inch "f film than other pictures have in a foot
H ALSO
PATHE XEWS PARAMOHfT MAGAZINE
5 ANDY AND MO GUMPS COMEDY
EjEJ We adTise to come early. One of th season's greatest pictures.
s You'll be sorry if you miss it -
Ul I Trf.i n n rKvn Wn rnu
l V .JtAlAUHllLAUyfUF
rnoes bav. 740-747
Davenport's Popular Play Honse
Datlr Hatlnse: V. Kronlnr: 8:16. Saturrtaj ;
atuniaT and Bandar
gTBpmg. iwo snows: 7 :au ana v:ld.
LAST CHANCB TONIGHT TO SEE
Danaev Edith CUeper mith Snow 4 Colombo.
S5.000 A Tear I Granreardmr I Rrrd a Tucker
, Fan Comedr I Fruitier I Full O Pep
THE VAUDEVILLE F1VR
IS JCkiale f Mirth and
Melody
OUVB RABDrSQ
Juntins
THEEE DATS STARTING TOMORBOW
A Npw 6 Act Show. Guaranteed to Please.
iv-
TIIE MfXODT GARDEN
Vauderllle1 Muraral Mnaation.
BeaoUlul Gir'.s Talented Musicians.
Spectacularly Stared AxtiaUcallj Acted Elaborately Co
tamed.
Three' Cham
A Pew Minute
At The Club
Cnraon Sister'
.Cook A Vernon
Oh Susie
Naeo Lutren
Swede Bil',7 Sunday
Oririnal Flyin- Butterflies and Other Act.
Special Holiday Bill Starting Next Sunday. Three
Seats Now on Sale.
COMING
Show Labor Day 3 6. 7:30 and 8:16.
mmi i.H-i rrr
I ILLINOIS
S THEATRE
S Phono B. L tii
Tke Bars run of Burlesque
1: i rrcncn rro cs
One Nifht
M WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 1.
S 20 Dancing Dolla 20
S3 EztiaBarleaiaea Snpraaa
J I s amutUn
5 I TCItPTATION
Itaa Can. f 1taw a.ii
1 Black Hawk Theatre
1103 Twelfth Avenaa
Tonight
EE: A Paramount Artcraft
Picture
1 MARGUERITE
E The Seven Swans
And a Christie Comedy
J Thursday
S FALSE C0DK
Ani a Harold Lloyd Cemedy
, . , CHOP S1EY ,
r PrMav - r'
LOBD A5D LADT AL6T !
C0MISG THE GREATEST D0CB1E ATTRACTION SH0WX
THIS SEASON -
i GEORGES CARPENTIER
In "THE WONDER MAN"
EE; Added Attraction
1 BABE RUTH, THE HOME RUN KING,
p SHOWING HIM KNOCKING HOME
g RUNS AGAINST CLEVELAND j
. ittso
CARL MAYS OF BOSTON
J DONTD MISS THIS GREAT BILL
l!iii:!!i!!!!!!!!lSI!l!!!I!i!li!l!iiiii!iil!i;E!illlll!IH
VAST
EXPERT REGOMtVIEUBED BY :
SniTHSOIIIAII IIISTITUIIOfl
RUSHED TO THE SCENE
CAPT. THOMPSON'S EFFORTS TO SAVE PRIZE
MORE HEROIC AND THRILLING THAN;
CAPTURE 45 FEET LONG, AND
WEIGHED 30,000 POUNDS.
It was an eventful day In Miami's jistory when Captain Charles
H. Thompson finally landed his strange and mysterious ' deep-sek
monster and had it hanled np on the ways on the Miami docks. It is
safe to say that no less than ten thousand people were eye-witnesses
to the scene, who remember it as though it happened yesterday.
As already explained in previous articles, the fish is tbe largest
known in history, and it is believed by pany, including the leading
theologians ot the country, that it was a fish of this species that
swallowed prophet Jonah, as no other fish known to naturalists could
have accomplished the feat. It is 45 feet long and weighed 30,000
pounds.
Thig mysterious monster of the deep sea Is still at the foot o
Nineteenth street. Rock Island. It is being ' exhibited by Captain
George H. Williams of the Yacht Tamiamt
The fish Is of wonderful Interest
not alone on account of its tremen
dous size, but from a scientific and
zoological standpoint as well, as it
is the only one of its species ever
captured.
Captain Thompson was quick tc
recognize the great value of his
stupendous prize, and with charac
teristic energy and foresight he at
once began the huge task of pre
serving it. To accomplish this
great task he displayed as much
courage and heroism as he did in
capturing the monster. As a mat
ter of fact it required as much
nerve and fortitude to preserve this
monster mass of flesh as it did tc
capture, it in the terrific battle
which lasted 39 hours.
Police Force Called Out
The crowd that swarmed around
tne monster after it was gotten on
the wharf at Miami was so great
that in pure self-defense Cap
tain Thompson was forced to call
out the police force to maintain
order while he rigged ap a canvas
screen around the creature. Two
men were kept busy for the entire
day passing the people in and out
so that all might have a chance tc
see the monster.
In the meantime Captain Thomp
son wired the authorities of the
Smithsonian Institution at Wash
ington, advising them of his re
markable capture and asking for
advice and assistance in preserving
it No response was forthcoming,
the authorities evidently suspecting
that they were called on to deal
with another one of the "big fish
stories" about which they were ac
customed to hear such exaggerated
statements at this season of the
TflROfieS FLOCK TO SEE 7
WEIRD DEEP SEA MYSTERY
CONSERVA' ELY ESTIMATED THAT EXH1E1
TION Al rOOT OF 19TH STREET WILL BE
SEEN BY AT LEAST FIVE THOUSAND
IN NEXT FEW DAYS.
i
TONIGHT 8:15
Last Time to See
HAYEMAVS WILD
ANIMALS
SPENCER AND
WILLIAMS
And Other Orpheum
Acts
Startinfr Tomorrow
Matinee ;
Double Feature
Program
SIX VEN ETTAS
GYPSIES
Frolicking, Music &
Sin ping '
Venetian Gypsy Airs
of the kind one loves
to hear '
A Landslide of Fun
BILLY BOUNCER'S
CIRCES
L-troducing the' fa
mous bounding con
test .Prizes to win
ners at every per
formance. Ai cloud
burst ot fun-i-A to- ,
nado of excitement.
GRANT GARDNER
The Funster
CLEVELAND AND
DO WERT
A satire on present
day conditions "Are
Yon Next"
GREEN & DEAN
Nifty sonirs sung- in
a nifty way
OLITE HARDING
' In "Jmprllng"
1
i Colonial
rr Genuine Pipe Organ
H TODAY LAST TEM
NORMA
TALMADGE
In
EEs A DAUGHTER Op TWO
WORLDS '
EE Who's WJo la Rack Ida
EE Otter Features
J TOMORROW
MAD ALINE
TRAVERSE
EE THE SPIRIT OP GOOD
EE Votary ot Broadway aad a
western mining camp featara
EE 2fcone Paraawoat
EE "frS aad Ford Weekly.
EE Friday and Saturday
TOM mx in -The Terror"
Order yonr seats
early.
Palace Management
Welcomes Yen
Special Labor Day
Program. Starting:
Sunday
Three Shows Saaday
and Monday Labor
Day
-7:S0-:lS
All . Seat Reserved
l.r ; . .,-,-- i . e i ,. i . l i i
' ?! w.. l. ,. -
j MAJESTIf
S. TONIGHT
g HARRY T. MOREY
EE THE
S GAUNTLET '
EE "The Gauntlet" la flUed wtth
z action and scenic beauty. As
the stranger. Mr. Moray finds
EE himself a unwelcome guest,
especlaUy whoa h falls in
EE l0Te tth thsx girl of tie
mountains.
U With It Ala a Comedy
THURSDAY AND PSIDAT
ALICE C3ADY
- la sxsirns -
, ...I, to taetr
year.
Captain Thompson was beginning
to feel apprehensive regarding the
situation, whereupon Dr. Gudger, a
gentleman whoee scientific attain
ments were not unknown in Wash
ington, wired a confirmation of the
captain's remarkable claim, and
strongly advised that in. the interest
of science the Smithsonian Institu
tion should lend all possible aid In
preserving such a rare specimen for
the benefit of posterity.
Noted Professor Responds.
The result was an immediate an
swer, with instructions as to he
proper course to be pursued, and
rornmmendinff that Professor
j s. Warmbeth, an eminent natural
ly nii omprt taxidermist, who had
! accompanied one of Peary's polar
expeditions, be engagea 10 prepare
and mount the big fish.
"But before Professor' warmbeth
could arrive," said Captain Thomp
son in relating the story of his
great undertaking. "I soon realized
that drastic steps had to be taken
if I would save my yrio.
"The monstrous piece of flesh, ly
ing theVe in the hot sun, was show
ing unmlBtaKaoie signs or uowmu
position. Of course, no kind of fish
amrfla exactly like attar of roses,
no matter how fresh it may be, so
when people began complaining of
tho odor and were edging away
from its vicinity, and when the
board of health took action and de
clared the carcass a menace to the
health of the community, I got
busy right away.
Wires Undertakers For Help.
"I had already wired to all the
undertaking establishments on the
east coast, from Jacksonville to
Key West, asking for assistance,
and also buying- every gallon of
formnlflehvde I could eet.
-"The great lubberly carcass was
gotten into the water and towed
arross Bisdyne bay, 40 miles out
to a desert sandpit, where, with the
assistance of a number ot bands, 1
set to work to save my prize.
You may imagine what an ardu
ous undertaking this was when I
tell you that the creature's hide was
all of three inches thick and so
tough we could hardly make an in
cision in its surface with our sharp
est knives. I tell you that we work
ed like Trojans night and day, for
the condition of the carcass waa
getting worse all the time. Al
though 4he monster waa literally
deluged with disinfections, IS bar
rels being required to complete the
Job, it was the most horrible ordeal
of the kind I ever went through,
and one that you may be sure re
quired an immense amount of nerve
and fortitude to put over. -Attacked
By Birds.
Walla we war working on the
carcase immense flocks of gulls,
carrion crows aad other sinister
birds of pray, drawn than by the
all-penetrating odor at the animal,
swirled around overhead fa clouds
that almost darkened the sky.
At first we paid mtla attention
bother us, bat as their numbers in
creased by new and more voracious
arrivals the birds became bolder,
swooping down by hundreds and.
alighting on the carcass proceeded
to aispute with us for its posses
sion. "Their avidity to get at the feast
was so great we actually had to
beat them off with sticks in order to
go bn with our work unimpeded by
their activity. They did not in the
least mind the strong disinfectants
we used, but tried to tear pieces of
flesh from the mass by beak anu
claw.
"Nobody conld keep at such an
unpleasant job for long at a time,
and we were obliged to work In re
lays. One wonld endure it as long
as possible, then you would see bim
drop his tools and run off as far to
windward as it was possible to go,
and there drop down on the sand to
rest and breathe a little fresh, in
vigorating air.
Huge Octopus In Stoma eh.
"We had to construct a big wood
en tank, capable of holding hun
dreds of gallons of chemicals, in
which the carcass was placed and
where it remained for several days.
Accurate measurements of the car
cass were made and a framework
of wood and steel constructed of
plaster, so as to make an exact re
plica of the inside of the huge mon
ster as it lay on the beach. Twelve
hundred feet of lumber, 1,700
pounds of steel bars, rods and bolts,
and barrel after barrel of plaster
was used to fill the enormous cavity
after the internal organs were re
moved. "The huge mass of flesh was now
dissected so that the internal organs
and the anatomy of the creature
might be studied. On cutting open 1
the stomach we were astonisned to !
find it containing the perfect body!
of a huge octopus that weighed;
1,500 pounds. Prom its condition it .
was evident that the octopus had j
been taken alive at one gulp and j
had remained alive for several dava 1
after It had been swallowed.
Figares Are Astounding.
"After the carcass had been
thoroughly impregnated with the
chemical preservatives it was taken
out of the immense vat and pre-'
parations were made to mount it in
its natural lifelike form and color.
The carcass was so heavy and cum
bersome that we found it extremely
difficult to manipulate and a large
force of men were required to
handle it.
When spread out on the eronnd
the carcass measured 45 feet long
and nearly 25 feet in circumference
and the hide was found to be three
inches thick. If its enormous hide
could have been tanned into quar
ter inch thicknesses it wonld have
furnished enough material to make
1,200 leather suitcases or 2,700 pairs i
of shoes. Cut into inch strips and
laid end to end it would have ex-
tended 24 miles, and these strips
conld have been made up into 43,-
200 men's leather belts, each 36
inches long. .
"If all the material in this im
mense hide had been cut up into
shoestrings of one-eighth inch dia
meter, they would have' reached,
end to end, a distance of 392 miles
from one end of Florida to the
other. These are tall figures, but
Just take your pencil and work it
out yoursjlf and see.
Six Months of Work.
"Well, to resume, after a good
deal of pulling and hauling, we n
nally got the monster in shape to
put on the finishing touches. The
holes made by tbe harpoons and
bullets were skillfully patched, ar
tificial eyes fixed in place and oth
er details carefully dressed up
Then the skin, which had been
somewhat bleached by the chem
icals In which it had lain, waa re
stored to its orlginnal color by a
secret process known only to the
taxidermist After six months of
uninterrupted painstaking work,
the Job was finally completed, and
at a total cost of more than $5,000
I waa sure proud of the achieve
ment, for I found myself in pos
seeaton of the greatest example of
tbe taxidermist's art in America,
ifnot la the world. The Deep Sea
Mystery bow appears exactly as it
did" when It was first taken oat of
the water.
Flak Has Beaatfful Iiaea,
"To say that I was delighted
with the results of my labor ex
preaaaa It i mildly, for one conld
not conceive ef a mora beaatlful
or perfect specimen of the true
fish species. One would imagine
on hearing of the eaormoae sise
of the creature that it waaM. a
enor lass ef a avmstroaltyand
Not in recent years perhaps has, great fish that swallowedth en.
anything aroused such widespread phot cannot properly be idntSI
interest and discussion among all with any ot them. Onlv th. .IT.?
classes of people in Rock Island as whale has a throat lartce ennn?
the monster Deep Sea Mystery at admit the body of a man, yetth.
1. . M Hu-,k . I I ... I J .1 1 '
luq im ua n lunontui bukl tu
doubtedly It has attracted more at
tention than anything of the kind
which has ever come here before.
Many visitors have crowded the
yacht every day since it has been
here, and many haa. been so pro
foundly impressed and have be
come so intensely interested with
what they have seen that' they have
gone away and havet urged their
friends not to mise the opportunity
to see the greatest zoological won
der of all times.
On account of the wonderful
amount of interest shown, it is now
conservatively estimated that the
exhibit will be seen by at least ten
. thousand people during the next
few days.
Among the thousands who have
already seen the exhibit were a num
ber from nearby towns, some from
fifty and sixty miles away. Already
the people of nearby cities are be
ginning to make inquiries and have
urgently requested Captain Thomp-
I son. and Captain George H. Will-
lama to include them in tho yacht's
itinerary.
Although the-e are several lec
turers aboard Captain Thorn peon's
yaht who explain the many facts
of mystery regarding the fish. Cap
tain Thompson's aid la called on to
tural food of the whale s peels con
sists ot email animals such u
medusae and crustacae snimili
that abound in all r.'-'
waters."
In addition to the Deep Sea Ilea,
ster on the Yacht Tamiami ther
a sea cow weighing 3,000 pound.
This creature swims about ink
large tank and has been trainwi I
eat out of the hands of ti man.-!
bers of the crew. It is one of UM W
rew remaining sea cows. The m i
cuw, or manaiEe, is so near extinct
that the government has forbiddei
the killing or capture of them. Cap;
Thompson had to obtain a spedil
permit to capture the one he it ex.
hibiting on the Yacht Tamiami.
On the yacht also will be font
500 marvelous wonders of the dec
sea. Included in the collection win
be found an octopus, one of the
most repulsive creatures imagls
oie; a aevu nsa; hammenuti
shark, angel fish, a giant sail fiiS,
with a sail two and one-half tM
long and one and one-halt tea
wide: a giant baracouta over sertt
feet long that weighs 140 poumli
and with mouth and teeth larp
enough to bite a man's arm oO;a
15-foot crocodile; a man-ea
shark, trigger fish, 600-pound S
answer a great many curious ques- turtle, a seahorse, to say notUi
tiona.
"It is surprising," said Captain
Williams, "how many people seem
to be interested in the story of Jo
nah and the possibility of there be
ing a fish big enough to have swal
lowed him. Everywhere I go peo
ple ask me about that the very first
thing.
"There are two or three species
of whale to be found in .the Medi
terranean," he continued, "but the
ot hundreds of other marvels ot tat
great deep, all of which are showi
on the Yacht Tamiami in their nat
ural forms and colors.
The Yacht Tamiamt Is open a
visitors from ft a. m. to 10 pa
daily. Streets leading to the tost
of Nineteenth street are brillUatlj
lighted at night Visitors will ant
be admitted to yacht at any otb
time Can between 9 a. m. and 11
p. m. .
Facts of Interest About
the Deep Sea Monster
, . ,
Measures 45 feet in length.
Weighs 15 tons; or nearly 30,000 pounds.
Its liver alone weighed 1,700 pounds, or more than ten full
grown men out tocether.
It is 23 feet around the body and its tail measures 10 feet from
up to tip.
It had swallowed an oe tonus weighing 406 pounds. A black-
fish weighing 1,500 pounds and 500 pounds of coral was found in
its stomach.
It could have swallowed 20 Jonahs without suffering the slight
est pangs of indigestion.
It smashed a boat into a thousand pieces and crushed the rod
der and propeller of a 31-ton yacht with a single swish of its mighty
tail.
Five harpoon thrusts and 150 large calibre rifle bullets only
served to increase its fury, and it took five to finally kill it.
1 The battle lasted 39 hours two days and a night in open wa
ter with the monster dragging a small boat at express train speed
for hundreds of miles.
Scientific authorities believe that the creature was an Inhabi
tant of depths more than 1,500 feet below the surface, and that It
was blown hp by some subterranean or volcanic upheaval, which is
Jnred tbe diving apparatus so it was unable to return to it natrff
depths.
Its hide is three inches thick and enabled it to withstand thl
most enormous water pressure, a pressure almost unconceivable to
man. Its eVes, which are very small, have no lids and were never
closed, indicating that it lived at a depth where eyes were of no avail
The creature is not classified in natural history, tbe genua or
species is unknown, and it is not only the most remarkable zoolof-
ical speciaien) but the largest specimen of the fish tribe known in
Although the largest fish ever captured, scientists claim it wi
only a baby of its tribe, and if it bad lived to attain full growtn n
would have been two and one-halt times as large.
Every undertaking establishment on the Florida East Coart,
from Jacksonville to Key West gave up their supply of formalde
hyde to preserve the monster, and over 19 barrels were used.
It was mounted by Prof. J. S. Warmbeth, the celebrated taxi
dermist who was recomnended by the Smithsonian institution, who
was also chosen to go with Admiral Peary on his famous trip to
the pole.
Now on exhibition in Rock Island on board the yacht Tamismi,
anchored at the City Wharf, Levee Front Foot ot Nineteenth street,
from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. i
HERE TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY.
aa ttay 6a boy vomit aav aa awxward.
lubberly appearance. Just the op
posite is true, however, as no fish
ever possessed finer or more grace
ful lines.
"Many doubting Thomases," con
tinued Captain Thompson, "ignor
ant of natural history, on seeing
the Deep Sea Mystery for the first
time, are ready to assert their be
lief that it is nothing bat a whale.
It has been entirely settled by sci
entific authority, however, that the
creature is not a whale, but a true
fish.
"Whales are lung-breathing,
warm-blooded mammals that suck
le their young, inhaling and 'exhal
ing air through a blow-hole in the
top of the head. The mouth is sit
uated under the head and the tail
is terminated by a horizontal fluke.
Only one species of fish has a dor
sal fin. - None ol these characteris
tics can be found In the Deep Sea
Mystery, except t&e dorsal fin. Its
tail la vertical like that of other
fiahea '
' Hundreds of Tears Old.
"Along each side of the monster
eaa be seen three lateral lines,
which are found In nearly all fish
es. These lines are believed to be
the sensory orgsns which enable
the flah to perceive and discrimin
ate between different kinds of vi
brations la the water. Just aa hu
man ears perceive different sounds
by the various kinds of air waves
or vibrations that strike the ear.
These Unas are thought to be the
traa eara of the fish by which they
an able to parcel va the presence
at aaeaalaa wa daagwr threaten.
where food is to be found, and
on. Some fishes are so
as to be able to distinguish
tween vibrations caused by a itMJ
or a piece of bread dropped in
water, even at a distance o 9
feet or more.
"The bones of some fishes
a cartillaginous nature and tea"
so all their lives. In others j
cartillage hardens, or ossifies,
the fish attains maturity. The "J
tebrae of the Deep Sea Mystery"
composed of cartillagtnoui PT
Uiu . v. - k.jnninr Of 09
fication. This fact is indoMtse I
proof that the creature w3
from adult age, was in fact JV
Such an animal would 11, 1
tremlw alms' prnwth. and H
take several hundred if not a
sand years to arrive to maturW"
"These and other details r
eu oj iae internal . a.
creature, leave no hoW,L.
rtnnhr that fh DeeD Sea
is a true fish, but of a
hitherto unheara oi or -j-j-i
nart nt th world slBCS rSW-;
history began. It is thsreWy
unique specimen
1... mn tnr a lone scm
Appearing Just as It did
first came out of the water ii
natural life-like form and iTf
this great loological wonder
on exhibition at the foofw
teenth street on the xaeMI-"S
from 9 a. m. to 10 p. ?-Jy
leading to yacht Tamiamt ""Tj
It Olumfnated at nigBv
I

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