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The Rock Island Argus and daily union. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1920-1923, September 11, 1920, Image 12

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SATURDAY THE ROCK ISLAND ARGUS SEPTEMBER 11, 1920.
mm
COMMUNITY
EMPHASIZED
I B. V. ChtfU te Power.
ftt AMnm to Gross of
fe.- stock blast Bes.
W':"' ' aamaam.inn
llteCBBmber of Conusoree, s live,
TODe force, around which retolvca
?fc community lif tending for the
iaftevmeot and upUft of the com
JjBMllj la all lias of endeavor -
ftach pictor la words did Col
SSe! a S. Chlperneld of Canton.
ID- draw for the men who gath-
ai ue ataaofUC lerapie lavai
determined to rive their time
effort towards the attainment
f an organization of this kind for
Hock Island. There were over one
kindred present, each and every
OBe t whom dealres to do that thing
Which will aaanre an unbroken path
of protreis for Rock Island. This
was Indicated when cards were
signed by practically everyone pres
ort pledging bimeeif to devote a
art of Monday, Tuesday, Wednes
day, Thursday and Friday of next
sk to going out and carrying the
meaaage of the Chamber of Com
sserce to every man in Hock Island
Who wants to see this city boom.
Colonel Chlperfield. big, power
fa) looking, presented bis convic
tions on "Business and Govern
Brsat" with the force of a legal
mind. He left no question In the
Binds of his hearers, being plainly
spoken. He made numerous start
ling assertions as to the probable
consequences of mis-government
aad the sacrificing of community
thought to the attainment of
wealth and of what rule by right
Of wealth may bring unless ten
dencies in that direction are
checked, and checked soon.
Community Personality.
Colonel Chlperfield sought to im
press upon the minds of bis hear
ers the sacred duty of a chamber
of- commerce to promote community
cooperation in not only business but
social lines as well. A commun
ity should acquire a distinct per
sonality as a community, he as
serted, and the people therein
should work on and on to an unat
tainable goal. It a letup occurs,
then business becomes a failure,
he declared.
Anytime a person or community
settles down to a state of self
satlsfactlon and feels there is no
longer any necessity for going on,
then it constitutes a step backward,
the speaker declared.
"In days to come communities are
going to be judged as communities,"
. ho spoke. "Communities must then
attain a high standard or be Judged
failures, Just as an individual is
oftlmes regarded as a failure by
his tellowmen.
"These are reasons why cham
bers of commerce are being formed.
Organisation gives all minds a
chance to work as one towards
progress for a community."
Government and Wealth.
The speaker delved into the sub
ject of wealth as related to govern
ment He declared that wealth he
hind any government makes that
government a failure. He expressed
the hope that sometime the poor
man will have as much chance to
attain political prominence as the
man of wealth, and chambers of
commerce, working not for wealth,
but for the masses, will be the med
ium through which this is brought
about
The present period of unrest
among certain classes came in for
a touch of the speaker's oratory.
He declared this rumbling beneath
the surface is caused by those who
believe they are not getting a fair
hare of the good things of the
world. He forecast that it depends
upon the patriotic men and women
to submerge their own selfish de
mands to save the country.
The time has gone by for pussy
footing. Colonel Chlperfield de
clared. He doesn't anticipate that
a dreadful calamity is going to
overtake this country but spoke
that it is to prevent any such possi
bility that chambers of commerce
work against He declared that the
chamber forms the bulwark of the
nation.
"The chamber of commerce
should be the eye that sees: the
mind that Initiates and the hand
that executes or restrains," he said.
The chamber sees all opportun
ities to aid the community and it
has the mind to initiate every good
move for the benefit of all citizens.
But it should not stop with talk. It
la up to the chamber to carry out
its Ideas to a successful conclu
sion."
Bound to Go Over.
What the meeting lacked in num
bers was made up in enthusiasm.
Thnne nreeent wp men of action.
thinkers all of them. Their heart
sura soui is wrapped up in me au- drawn U8 ci0Se to an economic
vancement of Rock Island and thebuginess precipice."
seriousness of their countenances iin.. n b,ium
.k .. k.. thi. uv- i UnUisea Own Policies.
USUSUVU UH7 invi WiOH. miio au 1
going to have one of the livest and
best chamber of commerce organi
sations in the country.
W. H. Scliillingor presided as
toes tm aster. He called upon E. C.
fisher, and the latter although
taken unexpectedly responded with
an extemporaneous talk that
reached home. Dr. Qustav Andreen
was next and he emphasized the
necessity of a chamber as the
means of making Rock Island sec
ond to no city in
the matter of '
community spirit.
Otto F. Hildebrandt, acting sec
retary of the Chamber of Commerce,
outlined the plan of activities in de
tail. Others who talked briefly
were T. J. Cavanaugh, chairman of
the campaign committee, and J. F.
Witter.
QUINN BACK WITH
GATELTS STORES
J. J. Qulnn, treasurer of the
John Gately company, who have
stores in Davenport and Rock Is
land, has again taken over the
management of the tri-clty stores,
and will make his headquarters in
Daren port
Be has a boat of friends among
the buying public who win be glad j
'Bear ox bis return.
fatvunn, arter years' con-1
wit hthe eowuevny. retired
CHURCHES
IttaHaf aanVaWaVMl (faaVwal fHI Mat PswWaT 1
a a. Morouw prayer aad eereeoa o(aar aarrtoae at 10:46.
Sunday at 10:45 a. at-) Morale prayer eraoe Kaxttah lAtheraa Corner Ser-
and litany. Friday. 19 a. m. Holy earn- mU arena aad Forty lourth etnet. Dr.
.i lath aaa.l It l a n i BnadaBe. naator. Sunday eehoal
IimHim at 10-4A a. as. I
IV S. W
(hair iul) .
i mini rrwsbrirrlaa Career of
taenia atraet and Tenia areaea.
erhool at 45 a o aerruM at iu .
and 7:30. Pastor's ajoroiag theme. Alive
Tet Dead." Erening theme. The Cap-
lanaaUwa P.
ty -third street Ml Beveelk
John Mruowa
Btoeeasoa. paetor. Bible
hMj a -.10 at. Mali
at 9 SO s. m. Women Bible dees at 9:30
a. m. Mra. Frank Mister, leader, inter
mediate and Senior ChrietUa aawkavot tt
8:30 p. m. .
Santa Park Fresoylerlsa Corner of
Thuueth etnet end ruteeath areooe.
ar. W. O. Oftene. paetor. Sunday
school at 9:90 a. m. Maa'a daee wlU
meet at 9:90 a. aa. In the booee adjoto
luf the church. The heataatere' cleee will
meet la the raoaw nrajerhr occupied by
the mea'e class. Serrieee at 10:46. Toanf
Monic a nutting at 6:46.
Cieland Presbyterian Aiken
Bonth Koek Island. Bar. Thllll
paetor. Sunder school as : a. an.
Endearor at 6:30. Serrieee at 10:46 and
7:30.
United Piwwjyterlan Third arcane aad
fourteenth etnet. Dr. J. H. Oibaoa. pan
tor. Sunday school at 9:30 a. m.
Morninr services 10:46. Evening serv
ice 7:30.
Oait Grove United Presbyterian Twen
ir fourth etnet and nineteenth arenue.
Bev. J. L. Vance, paetor. Sunday echool
at 9:30. serrieee at 10:46 and 7:90.
Gloria Dei Third Called 1 Tenby urn so
Twelllh etnet aad Potty aecond arenue.
Ber. Charles G. Mann, paetor. Sunday
rhool at 9:46 a. m.. Serrieee at 11 aad
7:30.
Ueulah Presbyterian Sural towaahlp
Ber. P. rrrguson Ogle, uaetor. Bible
at 10 a. m. lTeacamg aanaaai at
11
Coal Valley Preebytertan Coal Taney.
Ber. F. Ferguson Ogle, paetor. MMe
echool at 2 p. m. Sermon at S p. m
Chrietiaa Endearor at 7:30 v. m.
Milan Presbyterian Sunday ecnool at
9:15. Preaching aerrian at 10:46.
METHODIST
Kin l Metbodlit Comer or FIIIB
are-
noe and ioeU.'eiiia eueel.
ran Pelt, paetor. Soaday ecnool at :jo
a. m. Serrieee 10:45 a. m. Evening eerv
icee 7:30.
Spencer Memorial Metnodiet Comer
r r ly -third etreet and Scree th avenue.
Her A.M. Sluckiiie. paeior. eunoay
echool at 9:30 a. at. Serrieee at 10:46
and 7:30.
Free Mrlhodiet lbZO Sloth arenue.
Ber. George W. Mustard, paetor.
Waynian African Metnodiet
Comer, fifth and-a-hall
Ilurieriun eireel. aer. jl. a,, nn.
tor. Sunday echool at 10 a. at.
Milan Methodist Her. M
bcrger. pastor. Sunday echool at 0:45 a.
. Kpworth league at o: p. am. aer-
m. Serrieee at 10:45 a. m. and 7 :30 p. m.
Centenary Methodist Thirty-eighth
street. Eighteenth arenue. Ber. O. W. Carr.
pastor. Sunday school at 2:15. Preach
ing services at 3 o'clock.
CHRISTIAN
Memorial Chrietiaa Comer Third are
nue and Fifteenth street, lev. L. Hafia-
way, pastor. Bible ecnool at ":au a.
m.. A. D. Phillips superintendent. Morn
ing serrieee 10:45. Christian Endeavor at
6:30. Erenlng eervicee at 7:30. Morninr
theme, "Faith and Experience." Evening
theme. "Consider Jesus."
Second Christian Corner Sixth etreet
and Thirteenth avenue. Christian Ea
and Thirteenth avenue. Ber. W. B. Oliver,
pastor. (Serrieee every second and fourth
Sunday). Ber. H. B. Peters will be pres
ent at the Sunday school at 9:30. No
preaching emvieee. Evening service at
75.
Fifteenth Avenue CsriaUaa Corner
Filteenlh arenue and Thirty-sixth street
Bev. Guy B. Williamson, pastor. Bible
school at 9:30. Dr. J. H. Nichols, superin
tendent. Morning worship 10:45. Junior
Christian Endeavor 3 o'clock. Intermed
iate Christian Endearor 4 o'clock. Evening
service 7:30.
LCTHMtAS
Inunanuel'e Lutheran Twentieth etnet
and Fifth avenue. Bev. Ph. Wilhelat.
pastor. Sunday school at 9 a. m. Oer-
"U. S. DUPED ON
LEAGUE," SAYS
SEN. HARDING
(Continued from Page One.)
"weird economic and social theo
ries" by an administration which
"could not even ran its own bus
iness," would, If continued, mean
a "no hour day" (or American la
bor. "And when this bungling ad
ministration now seeks to perpetu
ate itself in perfect accord, let us
remember that its suspicion of bus
iness and the use of its extraordin
ary war power and its socialistic
tendencies hare been bullying and
tinkering with the pocketbooks of
all the American people," Harding
said. "When I hear the Tolces of
the present spokesmen of that
regime talking about being pro
gressive, I recall the activity made
in every direction, except forward,
and especially that which has
Outlining his policies toward
business, Harding declared the
government must repeal and wipe
out a mass, of executive orders and
laws wMfh leave business In anx.
iety and uncertainti; readjust the
tariff; readjust internal taxations,
and especially the excess profits
tax, and remove burdens in places
on business enterprise; stop ex
periments and enterprises which
government should not undertake;
establish closer understanding be
tween government ana Business;
protect business at home and help
build it op abroad; make govern
ment sufficient and make the will
of the people Instead of the "will
of the willful" supreme.
Throughout Harding emphasised
that Governor Cox proposed to
continue the Wilson policies and
quoted frequently the "perfect ac
cord' phrase contained la a state
ment issued after the famous
White house conference between
Wilson and Cox soon after the gov
ernor was nominated.
ITS COMING
a A.
at 0:16 a. m. Serrieee at 10:46 a. av
aad 7:46 p. aa. Lather leasue at7j p. aa.
Stan lolheraa church Forty arth
Bkhoua. paetor Sunday echool at 9:90
a. av Serriere at 10.:45 a. aa. and 7d0
0:16 a. m. Serrieee at 10:44 a. m. and
First Baptist, Career Third avaaaa
ana nnaana sireei. sure. . vtmn
Oranger. paetor. Sunday school at 0:30.
Men a Brotherhood elaee at 9:45. "Chris
tian Capitalists. What is Beal Wealth?"
Carlton G. Taylor in chaise. Moraine
services at 10:45. Subject. ''Secret of
Success." Evening theme. "Why So Many
Religions f"
IftMewnnil Baptist Comer Forty-fourth
street aad Fifth avenue. Sunday school
at 9:45 a. m. Morninr service at 11. B.
T. P. U. at 6:30. Evening service 7:45.
Second Baptist teoloreai Knth street
and Sixth avenue. Bev. 8. H. Gibson,
pastor. Preachinc at 11 a. m. Sunday
school at 9:46 a. m. A Harper, superin
tendent. B. T. P. U. at 6 p. m. Evening
services at 7:30.
CmiSTMN SCTENCal
First Church at Christ. SeamUst Cor-
enth arenas sad Tweniy-eecona
Sunday school at. 0:45 a. aa. Tsa-
ig every rreoneeuay ai e
p. m. Sunday aarvtea at 10:4a a. m.
The church snalmalna a free at iiBng
room la the People's
building, which is open
fmaa 11:30 a. as. to 5 n
Saturday from 11:30 to 5 and from 7:80
p. m. te 9. All authorised literature on
Christian Science may ha read or pur-
St. Joseph's Parish church Second
avenue and Fourteenth etnet. Daaa P.
H. Durkin. rector. Masses at 7. s, 0 and
10 o'clock. Sunday school at 10 v m.
Sacred Heart Parish church Fifth are
nue aad Twenty-eighth etnet. Father
t P. O'BeiU. rector. Buna ay
at 7. 8:80 and', 10:30 a. at. Sun-
at 0:16 a. as. wee -any
:30 a.m. Evening devotions
(whan said). 7:46.
St. Mary's Pariah church Fourth ave
nue and Twenty -second street. Father F.
J. TJehletn. rector. Sunday first mass at 8
o'clock. English sermon. High mass at
10:80 o'clock. English sermon. Sunday
echool at 2:80 p. m. Vespers aad bene
diction at 3 p. m. Week-day masses at S
o'clock.
St. Paul's church (Belgian) Twenty
fourth etreet and Etxhth-and-a-half ave
nue. Maes at 8:30 and 10:30. Father
P. Zwart. rector.
The lliaaisiil n il Church or Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints Eighteenth arenue
and Tenth etnet. H. I. Arrhambeult,
aider in charge. Residence hack of the
church. Tepnone B. I. 4080. Soaday
echool at 0:30 a. m. Preachinc at 11 a.
m. and 7:30 p. m. Religion at 6:15 p. m.
The public Is welcome. Prayer meeting
Wednesday evening at 8.
West Fad Settlement 429 Seventh ave
nue. Services at 10:45 a. m. and 7:30
p. m. Sunday school at 2:30 p. aa.: W. B.
Darker, superintendent. Cottage prayer
meeting Monday: mid-week service Wed
nesday ana tarrying meeting Friday.
110
James ' Daubney. auperinteaideat. Sratday
school at 3 p. m. Services every night
at 7:30
7:30 every week-day night.
Church of 'Spiritual Harmony Meetings
will be held at the A. Zlmmer home. 156
Fourth avenue, until further notice, with
E. B. Treatler as leader.
Church of God Fifth avenue and
Eleventh etnet. Mn. W. A. Hamilton,
pastor in charge. Sunday school at 6:45
Services at 7:30.
The Holy Bible Mission At 721 Third
avenue. Dedication at 3 o clock. A
rival will commence at 7:30
by J. C. Randall. Service every night the
following
PRAYER FOR
THIS WORLD
Oh, God, we thank Thee for this
universe, our great home; for its
vastness and its riches, awl tor
the manifoldness of the life which
teems upon it and of which we are
part We praise Thee for the arch
ing sky and the blessed winds, for
the driving clouds and the constel
lations on high. We praise Thee
tor the salt sea and the running
water, for the everlasting hills, for
the trees aad for the grace under
onr feet
We thank Thee for the sense by
which we can see the splendor of
the morning, aad hear the Jubilant
songs of love, and smell the
"breath of the springtime.
Grant us, we pray Thee, a heart
wide open to all this Joy and beau
ty, and save our souls from being
so steeped in care or so darkened
by passion that we pass heedless
and unseeing when even the thorn
bush by the wayside is aflame with
the glory of God.
Enlarge within us the sense of
fellowship with all the living
things, onr little brothers, to whom
Thou hast given this earth as their
home in common with us. We re
member with shame that in the
past we have exercised the high
dominion of man with ruthless
cruelty, so that the voice of the
earth, which should hare gone up
to Thee in song, has been a groan
of travail. May we realise that
they lire, not for Thee alone, but
for themselves and for Thee, and
that they lore the sweetness of
life, even as we, and serve Thee In
their place better than we in ours.
When our use of this world is
over and we make room for others.
may we not leave anything ravish
ed by onr greed or spoiled by our
Ignorance, bnt may we hand on
onr common heritage fairer and
sweeter through oar use of it, un
diminished in fertility and joy,
that oar bodies may return in
peace to the great mother who
nourished them, and our spirits
mar round the circle of a perfect
life in Thee.
ohxt tt can
For a Moonlight Ride on the Steam
er a W. Hill, Friday, Sept 17.
JEAXjAjCHE
hw it 23 m camoKumM,
day school
WRITER TO
'DOPE' OUT
FALL RACE
(Continued
Page One.)
day or two la any state eea
to go away cocksure of that state
bat In nine cases oat of ten a dis
interested reporter can draw deduc
tions from the optimistic or pessi
mistic tone of the rival leaders as
well as from the broad-minded men
in a community who are not guided
by partisanship.
WTO Get "Dope.
These men will hare been "K4nff
analyses of their own states for
many weeks before the traveling
reporter arrives. Sometimes, for
local reasons, the resident news
papermen do not print all that they
feel about their own states. The
political wayfarer usually agrees
not to disclose the source of his in
formation and thus picks np in
valuable information. This is the
season of the year when many re
porters will travel extensively to
find out how other sections of the
country are politically inclined
and if one has built up a string of
friends in every Important city
from coast to coast and knows the
personal equation of each man and
his ability in the past to Judge his
own state, the task of analysis is
bound to be reasonably accurate.
Minnesota Is Hardlntr'g.
Take Minnesota, tor instance.
Both Democratic and Republican
newspapermen will confide to yon
that aa things look now Senator
Harding will carry the state by a
good majority. The third party
movement failed to materialise
and the only question In dispute
among observers is whether the
state will go for Harding by 100,
000 or, as some conservatives put
it by 25,000. Anyway no Demo
crat of standing is claiming Min
nesota is as close aa it was in 1916
when Wilson almost won the elec
toral rote.
The reasons for Harding's
strength here are quite simple.
Much of the electorate is Scandin
avian and German. The Germans
are bitter against Wilson for his
war record. They voted for the
"he-kept-us-out-of-war" slogan in
1916 because they wanted to be
kept out of a war with their fath
erland. They cherish resentment
and will show it at the polls.
Scandinavians Against Leagae.
The Scandinavians are very
much impressed by pacifist doc
trine and many have been persuad
ed to believe the Republican cam
paign idea that the League of Na
tions means war Instead of peace.
Even though Norway and Sweden
have Joined the league, the Scan
dinavians here are against the
league. Their opposition has been
carefully cultivated by a Republi
can press. With only one or two
excentions. all the influential news
papers of Minnesota are Republi
can and nave been feeding the peo
ple Hiram Johnson doctrine. Even
those who lavor tne league uuce
their stand behind Senator Kel
logg, who voted for the Lodge res
ervations, and the number who
want the league as brought back
by President Wilson is negiigtniy
small.
Oppose G. 0. P. Management
This territory is so friendly to
Harding that it even draws a dis
tinction between the managers of
the Republican candidate and the
nominee himself. For instance, the
writer encountered considerable
dissatisfaction here among Repub
licans with the course of the Re
publican national committee In
handling the senatorial investiga
tion of campaign funds. It ia a
matter of common gossip that Gov
ernor Cox's figures of a $100,000
quota here were correct and that
the Republican leaders made a big
mistake when they failed to ex
plain it Hereabouts, they don't
think it is sinful to contribute
$100,000 to run a campaign, and
they would have preferred an ad
mission of the quotas coupled with
a demand that Cox prove that any
of the money was used or would
be used tor corrupt purposes.
They think, too, that It waa unwise
to fall into Cox's trap by permit
ting; the diversion of the nubile
interest tram the league issue to I
a discussion of imaginary quotas,
the sice of which ia not as impor
tant as the size of the funds actu
ally raised and the method of their
expenditure.
Minnesota likes Harding and will
give him its 12 electoral votes next
November.
Like jdwei?er? Phone R. L 32$.
it. l clean tow at Bwrvtoa. FhoM
B. L $.
Irl-OUy Towel nepply compaay.
Daves port 934.
Broadway Presbyterian Church
of all the people able ttv
CORKER OF SCYESTH AYESL'E ATD TWTXTY-THIRD STREET such aa fear Ood, ass ot
truth hating rnretrinsnsss
Sunday School at 10:30 A. M. ' 1
A cordial welcome is extended to those not regularly worshiping elsewhere
Church of Peace Gains
1,000 Membership During
25 Years of Existence
Although not a person respond
ed to the first meeting, called on
July 7, UK. for the organisation
of a new German church. Rev. C.
F. Off, then mission organiser of
the Iowa district did not give up.
Today, as the result of Rev. Mr.
OS's efforts, the Evangelical
Church of Peace stands at the cor
ner of Twelfth avenue and Twelfth
etreet with the prosperity of 25
years.
On July 14 of the same year Rev.
Mr. Off succeeded in gaining 10
persons to the first German serv
ice. And 25 years ago, last Wed
nesday, Sept 8,va church waa or
ganised with 30 charter members.
Sin oe then a new temple has been
erected, 6,034 people have partaken
of the Lord's supper, 544 have been
baptized, 345 Joined in holy wed
lock and 709 were borne to their
last resting place at the services.
Tomorrow morning 150 additional
new members will be received.
The first chnrch council was
composed of Martin Oswald, Henry
Fues, Herman Meese and John
Wendt Mr. Wendt is still in the
ranks of the active members to
day. The Sunday school was then
organised. Rev. Theodore Krue
ger of Cumberland, Ind.. was ap
pointed minister of the new
church. He assumed his duties in
April, 1896, but from January to
April of that year the pulpit was
filled by Rev. F. Rasche.
During the pastorate of Rev. Mr.
Krueger the church became affili
ated with the Evangelical Church
of America and purchased the
church of the English Methodist
congregation, located on Ninth
street between Fifth and Sixth
avenues. But in October, 1899,
Rev. Mr. Krueger resigned and
Rev. J. F. C. Trefzer entered his
duties on March of 1900. Mean
while Revs. Dexheimer and Janke
filled the pulpit. Rev. Trefser re
signed In 1903, and during his
term the present parsonage was
built
The church was renovated and
decorated and the basement built
under the church during the min
istry of Rev. E. Klimpke of Aurora,
who succeeded Rev. Trefzer. In
May, 1908, the pastor resigned to
accept a call to Des Plaines, 111.
From then until Rev. Frederick J.
The Day in
Heme Is Robbed Burglars' booty
obtained Thursday night at the
home of John F. Sass, R. R. No. 6,
Rockingham, will aggregate $100
In value, it was reported to the po
lice by Mr. Sass. A screen was re
moved from a window frame, and
entrance forced to the residence
while the family was asleep. The
cash obtained was $70, taken from
the pockets of a pair of trousers
In a bedroom. Other articles stolen
were a leather bill fold, a black
pocketbook, two clasp knives, a
silk shirt, and a woman's black
silk waist.
Urges Stock Buying. Present
ing an offer by which every em
ploye of the Tri-City Railway &
Light company can purchase stock
on the installment plan with the
utility company protecting the
transaction in case of sickness or
death of the employe. President
Frank T. Hulswitt addressed 300
men and women on the company's
pay roll in a banquet held at the
Hotel Blackhawk Thursday night
President Hulewltt stated the com
pany was following this modern
business practice in the effort to
have every employe interested fi
nancially in the concern for which
they are working.
MaraaalltowB Gas Higher. In
creased gas rates went into effect
yesterday at Marshalltown, accord
ing to information received by Dav
enport utility 'companies. A tem
porary rate of $1.90 per thousand
cubic feet la the new rate. There
is a provision that if bills are not
paid In 10 days an additional
charge of 10 cents per thousand
feet ia to be made. The former
rate was $1.40 per thousand. The
tariff asked by the company waa
$2.35 per thousand.
Kafuralise tuV Thirty-six candi
dates of Davenport are knocking
at the gates of the United States
to be admitted as citizens. The
naturalisation examination will be
held before Judge A. P. Barker on
Tuesday.
Conceals Ante. George P. Mil
ler, wanted on a state charge of
selling and attempting to conceal
an auto purchased under a condi
Rolf, present pastor of the church,
took the pulpit In July. 1908. Rev.
J. Jans of Muscatine came to Rock
laland every other Sunday after
noon and preached.
By this time the congregation of
the church had grown considerably
and the church quarters on Ninth
street was not meeting with the
growth of the church activities. So
on March 21, 1912. the building waa
sold to the B'nal Jacob synagogue
for $3,000. The building commit
tee to figure on a new church was
composed of George Waldmann,
Carl Krueger, Gustsv Krueger,
Henry Faust, C. H. Seidel. Robert
Mogler, E. F. Born. Albert Red
man and Walter Lena. Two lots
on Twelfth street and Twelfth ar
enue were purchased for $1,900.
The cornerstone of the new church
was laid on Sunday afternoon, July
18. 1912, with Rot. J. Jans of Mus
catine officiating. Until the time
of dedication of the church on
Sunday, March 30, services were
held in the old Y. M. C. A. build
ing. The total cost of the new
church was $22,000, but a debt of
$14,500 remained. From then on
the congregation grew continu
ously and steadily. The debt has
been diminished with every rear,
so that on the Jubilee year the
debt is $6,000.
The new organ was purchased
In June, 1915, for $2,500. and aa
1,800 pound bell was bought for
$1,000. Twelve years ago the
church numbered about thirty
three families and several individ
ual members. Today, 25 years
since its organisation, (he number
of individual members belonging to
the church is 676, the number of
adults and children being about
one thousand. One hundred fifteen
members belong to the young peo
ple's society.
In speaking of the former pas
tors of the new church. Rev. Mr.
Rolf says:
"In fond commemoration we re
call the pastors who served this
church. Of my predecessors, only
one remains behind; the others
have answered the call of death,
and have gone to their reward.
While they labored, they served
you as best they could. Their la
bors have not been in vain. Rev.
E. Klimpke has been invited to at
tend the services."
Davenport
tional sales contract, was arrested
yesterday at Linwood and lodged
in the Scott county Jail. He will
be arraigned today before Justice
of the Peace W. W. Scott
Obituary Record At Mercy hos
pital at 3:30 yesterday morning
the death At Mrs. Anna P. Fri
occurred after an illness of six
months. Her condition had been
serious for the last two weeks.
Bom in Germany 52 years ago, she
came to Davenport when 20 years
of age and resided here since that
timo.
Thursday evening the death of
Mrs. Lydia Lawson occurred at the
home, of the daughter, Mrs. A. J.
Fleming of No. 2 Lorenzen apart
ments. Death was due to a linger
ing illness, hire. Lawson was a
native of Indiana, where she was
born in 1840.
MEETS A GREAT HEED
HorsfonTs Add Phosphate
Is very beneficial tor exhausted
conditions due to heat over-work
or Insomnia.
CHEAPER THAN STAYING HOME
When you can spend the evening
on the Steamer G. W. Hill for only
25c. Friday, Sept. 17.
OH MY STOMACH
"I had stomach trouble aa badly that
nothing I ate would digest aa it should."
said Sadie B. Hamilton. Portland, ate., as
she bogan a remarkable story at the rebel
she has secured from Argo-Phosohate. the
new reconstructive, stomach tonic and sys
tem purifier.
"Everything that I ate would Ue In my
stomach like a lump." she explained. "Gas
would form and I would suffer distress an
the Ume. I got so I could hardly keep
anything down. Trying to get relief. I had
my stomach pumped eat, bat ercn this
did not help me aa I eon tinned Just aa bad.
"I kept hearing an much about Argo
Phosphate that I thought marhe It murht
help me and I decided to try it. I have
taken two bottles and to mr snrnria I aaa I
already feeling fine. I can cat anything
and I am not troubled at all.
"I am completely rid of my old stomach
trouble that I had for throe yean. I have
not felt so well for years aad I ma cer
tainly clad te endorse Argo-Phoaphala be
cause i waaa others to be
wonderful
of
Is what
giro these splendid public
of ArgPhoephate." said a local
inspenord by aeaiecei e Drug
STTIT) AT, SEPT. tt.
Preacher
John McGown
Sterenson
10:41 a. m.
'The SouTs Search'
Teat: Sir. we would see
JestjsWBO. 12:21,
1M P. X.
'The Right Nomine
Text! ThraH ah alt nrawMat aaa
helped by this
iptiit of wanting to help others
makes raftering man and women
WILL PREPARE
OR MINISTRY
t-
Adolpk K. Lerta.
Adolph H. Levin, popular window
trimmer for Young ft McComb and
one of Rock Island's most active
Christian workers, enters Eureka
college next week to prepare him
self for the ministry. Mr. Levin is
well known in "Y" work. Boy Scout
activities and other organizations
for religious work, especially
among young people.
His most definite and outstand
ing service has been with the Fif
teenth Avenue Christian church
where he is an elder and a recog
nized leader In several activities of
the church and Endeavor work.
Under his superintendency the
Sunday school has grown till some
of the classes have been compelled
to find rooms outside the church
building. For the last several
months he has been teacher of the
Comrades clan which has had a
phenomenal growth in numbers and
activities. This summer this class
with Mr. Levin arranged and
financed a two weeks' camp at
which time they entertained a group
of 10 boys (Chicago fresh-air chil
dren) besides putting over other big
undertakings.
His talented young wffe is indeed
a loyal companion in Christian
service, being president of the
Loyal Daughters class and church
pianist, besides being identified
with other lines of religious work.
The little church is proud of its
contribution of these consecrated
young people to the larger service
though their going will leave vacan
cies that will be exceedingly bard
to fill.
That Mr. and Mrs. Levin may
know of the appreciation of the
work they have done and that their
friends wish for them unlimited
success in their chosen work the
evening service Sunday will be
given over to a farewell with a spe
cial program of music followed by
short addresses by those who have
been associated with Mr. Levin in
religious work and a cordial invi
tation is extended to any and all
who would honor the couple. The
program will begin at 7:30 and the
pastor, Rev. Guy B. Williamson,
will have charge.
Do Yo u
Know Why?
Why is it that paint made for outside use
should be brushed out thin while flat paint
for interior walls may be brushed on fairly
thickly?
What is the result if flat wall paint is
brushed out thin?
Why is special woodwork varnish unsuited
to floor use while floor varnish does very
well for woodwork?
What kind of varnish should you use over
sanitas, and why?
How can you get a good job of white enam
eling with the least possible work?
When is it practicable to use varnish and
atain combined ; and when is it advisee to
use.the stain and varnish separately t
How can you avoid sags in the enamel whe
jdti refinish your car?
How can you make of simple materials a
varnish and paint remover that is fairly effi
cacious? ASK OUR PaAINT MAN. HE KNOWS
Mckinley hardware co.
227 Eighteenth Street
HAIL
KODAK
I
SB1I
rSeedaltv. tlkhest Grade of Work
i the Middle Wert.
Quick Service. SEND FOR
MANY MEMBERS
ADDED RESULT
OF BIG JUBILEE
Evangelical Church of iw
Take In 150 at Sarai
ocrricrs.
Closing exercises of the
tion of the 25th anniversary
founding of the Evam.ii.i ' "
of Peace, will be held tomcrr
feature of the day is the tajtrari !
or lov members intr.th.,.1, rv"
-"v vuurrn tasty-
hare been secured dnriMiw1
week's services. The dsv? J?
mm nrkona with P
With Rev. E. Klimnke r m-TV
ton as the speaker. There wuft
music by the double male iut?;'
and Mrs. Arthur Burrall willrtl, j
at this service. Following the fh?
day school hour at in-in m. "1
be an English service' with nrra!J
o -j nunuji nuecner of
Louis. A special song service m
be given by the choir and Mra.
vice is the admittance ot the a
members.
At the evening service the brains
honor plale is to be unveiled wttj
ri,ii,uac tcicuiuny ana the n-i
lish sermon will ho r.k.77
Rev. E. Irion of Moline while ltct
F. J. Rolf, nastor of th i..i S
gregation will deliver the unveUiBr
The special music will be frhva
by Mrs. Arthur Burrall and the
Misses Gladys Truesdell, FloreBct
Krueger and Irma Rahn.
The Jubilee concert last evsojftt
attracted a large crowd and wm
greatly enjoyed. Each number 3
splendidly given, both the solo aid
uio quartet.
PROPERTY HOLDERS' NOTICE,
Gen. No. 540.
Notice is hereby given to all po
sons Interested that the Board a
Local Improvements of the City g
Rock Island, Illinois, has filed a
the County Court of Rock Island
County, a certificate of the cost at
me improvement entitled in
Court. "In Re Petition nf tha
of Rock Island. Illinois, tn aa
the cost of the navinc of Twentr.
ninth street from Sixteenth to Sev
enteenth avenues." and sairt phhl
cate also shows the Court costs tha
amount of accrued interest, and tin
total amount of said assessment,
and said certificate also states that
the said imnrovement conform
substantially to the requirements of
tne original ordinance for the con
struction of the samp as rpnnirw! lw
law, and tha final hearing on s:4 j
certificate will be had on the 25th
day of September A. D. 1920, at tilt
hour of ninn o'clock. A. M nr si
soon thereafter as the business ol
the Court will permit. All person
desiring may file objections in said
Court before said day and may ap
pear on the hearing and nutto
their defense.
Dated at Rock Island, Illinois,
this Uth day of September, A D.
1920.
H. M. SCHRIVER.
M. T. RIJDGREN, "
FRANK WICH.
JOHN MURRIN.
WM. FITZSIMMONS,
Board of Local Improvements of
the City of Rock Island, Illinois.
ORDER
FINISHING
Moderate Prices aad
COMPLETE PRICE LIST
r n
K
V -II
S. tm
Bav. a

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