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The Rock Island Argus and daily union. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1920-1923, May 13, 1922, Image 14

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SATURDAY THE HOCK ISLAND ARGUS MAY 13,-1922.
T AD-
WOEUD Rfl EILEE
TO
FIVE ISLANDER.
PITCHERS USED
IN TEN SPASMS
Locals Flirht Way to Tie In Mnth
Only to Lose Out In Over.
Ume Round.
(Special to The Argus.)
Dubuque, Iowa, May 13. Five Is
lander pitchers were unable to stop
the onslaught ot the home club here
yesterday and Dubuque won the
fourth and deciding game of the
series from Rock Island by a score
of 13 to 11. The contest required
10 innings.
Fred Radloff, who started on the
mound for the Islanders, was hit
hard for three Innings. Dubuque
wasted little time on his offerings.
A double, single and base on balls
counted one run but three others
scored in the first were donated.
Elkins waa greeted In the fourth
inning, by a triple and three sin
gles, which counted three runs.
Sam Holden, who relieved him,
yielded three runs in the sixth
when Brownley, a recruit, cleaned j
Uie sacKS wun a inpie.
The Islanders were . forced to
fight an uphill battle all the way
on account of the weakness of the
pitching.
The Islanders scored one in the
first and two in the second when
Jelinek tripled and Fillingham and
Norton singled. The Islanders add
ed one in the fifth but Dubuque's
three in the sixth made the count
th made the count ;
stand 11 to 4
at that stage.
against the Tisitors ,
began to take picks on the offerings
of Lee Oster, who in spite of the
bombardment, remained in the box
to the finish.
Errors enabled the Islanders to
score three in the seventh. In. the ;
eighth the Islanders again filled
the bases, principally due to Du-1
tuque misplays. Then Gray, pitch-
hitting for Craig, drove the ball to;
far leftfield for three bases and
scoring all runners.
The Islanders tied the score in
the ninth cn a triple by Jelinek and
singled by Fillingham.
Dubuque won out in the 10th.
Young doubled, took third on an
error by Conzelman and registered
when Anderson drove the ball into
deep ceter for three bases.
SEMI-PRO NOTES
MANAGERS DIRECTORY.
Rock Island Boosters C. Igle
hart, "2 Twelfth street.. Phone
1L I. 4450.
M. W. A. Booster Camp Team
C E. Johnson, 1701 Thirty-third
dtreet. Phone R. L 3712Y or R. I.
11 SO.
Rock Island Mohawks M. S.
Colohanr, 419 Fortj-fourth street.
Phone R. L 1708.
Rock Island Advertisers H. X.
Ritze, 72 Forty-third street. Rock
Island. Phone Moline 126 until 3:30
o'clock.
Orion Forest Wayne.
1 1 dock. Phone Ernie Mnrdoc, Moor.
vWiead's pool hall, Illinois City,
Jf Sherrard Albert Davison. Phone
, Albert Chinlund, Sherrard.
IHInlos Valley (iaraes.
Came In the newly organized
Illinois Valley baseball association
for tomorrow are as follows:
Henry at Peru.
Tiskilwa at Galva.
Wyoming at Bradford.
Mohawks at Coal V alley.
The Mohawks of Rk Island will
meet Coal Valley at Coal Valley to
morrow afternoon.
The Mohawks are anxious to book
games with out-of-town teams. The
manager is Morris Colehour, 419
Forty-fourth street.
His phone is
ft l i'oii. .infin irih. iiiu in,i r i
1703 after 5 p. m.
Mansfield at Edcerton. !
The Mansfield A. C. baseball team i
will journey to Edgington tomor -
row afternoon to meet
tue Miuuft
nine of that town. The locals
have practiced hard all week and
are confident that they can defeat
their opponents. Lamp and Tonn
will do the mound work while
Swisher will work behind the bat
The following men will make the
trip:
Swisher and Hofter. catchers;
I jimp. Tonn and Shear, pitchers;
Kautz, first base; Herbert, second
base; Edwards, shortstop; Wood
ward, third base; Mejerle, Masters,
Johnston, Sersig, Kispin, Barta,
outfielders.
Jerry Mansfield, manager, is
anxious to book more games. He
can be reached by calling R. 1.
4663X or writing 2721 Wifth-and-a-half
avenue.
TICEIW RECALL MOHARDT.
Denver. Johnny Mohardt. cen-
tLr n
BeTroIt American' clnC ' JTV1 TT' d,8tanCe
- , ; boarded a tram at Waterloo station
'today for Southampton to sail on
CLARK'S CRUISES by C. P. R. STEAMERS
CUrk'a 3rd Cmise. Jum 23. 1923
ROUND THE WORLD
Superb SS "EMPRESS of FRANCE"
1S48I Grcn Tom. Spoci.Hr Chartered
4 MONTHS CRUISE. S1000 aw! ap
lac lading Hotele. Feee. Drim, GeMea, aea.
CUrk'a 19th Craiee. Fehewr 3
MEDITERRANEAN
lawnon SS "RMFRbSS o SCOTLAND
Graaa Too. Specialty Chartered
65 DAYS CRUISE, (400 wad
lachadinf Hetela. Feee. Drrrea. Gaidee. are.
1 daye EtVCPaleetrM.SaiB. luly.Graeee.eta.
Earope etop-yera allowed oa bath erateaa.
feratt mmd eaetee flay Pmrtim. H4 a
Freak C Clark. Tim Baildia. New York.
Box Score
Roek Island AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Jolirifk. HO a 1 2 2 1
.Swenson, 3b .... 2 2
weli. cf 12 U 0
MrFwan. 2b 4 1 2 1 2
jOtnipbell, e 6 1 1 Ijj
rilUinrham, 11 ... h
Conzelman, lb ... 4 2 0 - 1
Norton, rf 5 2 2 1 1
Radloff, p 2 0 0 0 2
Elkins, p 0 0 0 0
Holden, p 1 0 0 0 1
ra)r, p 0 0 0 9 0
Hoett, p 0 0 0 0 0
i Van Uoethem... 1110 0
tiiray 1110 0
0:
5; Holden, 4; Oster, 2. Umpire
x Batted for Holden In vUrhth.
t Batted for Crate in eighth.
JOne oat when winning run wag
scored.
Iubaqne
Biley. rf
Youne, of
Anderson, 2b
AB.R.11. I'll.
.A.E.
0
1
Wilson, If ..
(raves, Sb .
Brownley, 3b
Jundo. ss ...
Goodrich, ss
Hefner, lb .
Black, c
Tarpee, c ...
Oster, p
0. SpKuldin?
0 ,
xSpauIding
IfSuliivail
:
Totals
37 12 14 SO 17 7 j
Snore br inninirs:
Rook Island 120 010 831 0 II
Dnbnque 401 303 001 112
Three-base hits Brownley, Gray.
Young:. Jelinek, Swenson. Tjvo
he hits Ynnnir (2t. Sacrifice
hlis Swenson. II yde, Riley. Stolen ;
buses well. Campbell. JlcEwan, j
BroTVIlIr Hepner, Anderson (2), j
ne'k to McEwan to Conzelman.-
Struck ont By Radloff. 4: by S-:
itin. 3: bv Traiir. 2: bv Hoeft,
liases on balls F.I kins. 1: Radloff,
5; Holden. 4; Osteer, 2. empire
Schuler. Time of game 2:45.
Lawn tennis experts interviewed I
today without exception expressed !
doubt as to the assertion recently
made that the present lawn tennis
season will be the volleying game
brought to its highest pinnacle and
that the back court game will be of
secondary importance. If this;
proves true it will be a complete j
about face of trends which have
been observed on the American
court since Maurice McLoughlin,
the California meteor, burned out
through heat generated by his own
energy.
As a matter of fact, if play in the
course of American tennis season
will prove anything it will demon
strate. I think, a wise and judic
ious mixture of the volley and back
court game as exemplified by the
three greatest players we have, to
wit, Tilden, Johnston and Richards.
In fact, of the outstanding players
who will be in action this season it
is likely that Willis Davis, the Cali
fornian, will be found as exemplar
of the lightning attack based on
service of the close net volley im
mediately following.
British golfing critics think that
the present decline in the prowess
of British pros is due to the fact
that they are now a pampered
breed. In the old days, it is point-
ed out, a pro had to fight lik e grim
4 1 0 1 0
6 3 4 2 0
1 3 4 5 r
3 114 0
0 0 0 0 0
I 0 0
2 110 4
2 0 113
1 0 0 4 0
3 0 2 15 1
3 0 0 10
1 0 0 0 0
,,1114
0 10 0 0
1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0
j
j Y LAWRENCE PERRV
aeatb to win in order to make his
expenses. There was always the1 Totals 33 0 5 2
risk if he failed, that he would notIMoIine 130 001 0005
he in possession of the wherewithal ' Danville 000 000 0000
to return to his home. Nowadays i Two base hits McCue, IMrich.
adoring members of clubs to which Mack, Menamin. Brown, White,
they belong present them with i Bases on balls Ulrich, 3. Struck
checks covering all expenses. Were out Ulrich, 2; Brown, 3. Umpire
it not so think how Ray, for in- j Taylor.
stance, or Mitchell, or Duncan,!
would grit his teeth and perspire Tractors. 6: Tots, 5.
and work to avoid counting the raii-j Terre Haute, Ind.. May 13. Tak
road ties or riding the brakebeani. I ing advantage of Terre Haute er
Speaking of good old Yankee I rors- Peoria counted timely hits and
i names in Drofession.il snort a
j " "iuu
writes
with
to ask
what
s the
manor
Jesse
and
Virgil
Barnes. Cecil Causey, Ross Young
and Philip Douglas, all of the
Giants.
it in ni....ii.. ,
; says a crack amatfieu KOTfer who
I tnppthAP vith rt ki 1 -. j 1
developed a lucrative journalistic ! Rockford without a hit, and Deca
sideline, "what could be done hv ! tur won- 4 to 1- The Rocks' lone
second and third rate players
IO
lower tneir strokes without im
proving their skill?" The answer
is so simple as hardly to warrant
discussion. All that is needed is a
pencil and paper and a poor mem
ory. JACK DEMPSY
COMING HOME
London, May 13. (By the Associ
ated Press) Jack Dempsey, ac
companied by the two rather for
bidding looking dogs he acquired
rentrVwclfcaS SoT?
;tne Aquitania for New York. Heirni.nrt hn.,t
said that after his vaudeville tourj
in America he would begin train-1
ing in England for his fight with
v?'1":uu"' wu n 11 was annonnc-
ed bere has hMn srronvul to
place in London or Paris some
time "before next May."
DIVIDED 0 RESULT. '
Milwaukee. Newspaper critics
were divided as to the result of the
Ritchie Mitchell - Ever Hammer:
boxing match, two writers giving i
Hammer the victory, two giving it j
to Mitchell and one declaring it a!
draw. . ..
BOYLEMEN V'iN
CLOSE BATTLE
FROM DROHANS
Fried!, After Getting- Away to Poor
Start, Fitches Airtight
Baseball.
(Special to The Argus.)
Marshalltown. Iowa, May 13.
After spotting Ottumwa two runs
in the first, FTiedl yesterday oeia
the visitors to four scattered hits
and Marshalltown won, 3 to 2.
Friedl passed two and emitted two
wild heaves, scoring two runs. In
all he Dassed eight. Marshalltown
tied in sixth and pushed the win-1
ning run over in ninth when Clem-
ons doubled and Sullivan singled.
1 1 Score :
1 ! Ottumwa
AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Nolan, 2b 1
II
o ;
o;
0'
0:
0 !
1 '
i
0;
1 i Croake, lb 2
Kennedy, 3b .... 2
Palmanteer, If . . 4
Mann, cf 4
Corcoran, ss 4
Sindel, rf 3
Schuster, c 4
Keil, p 4
Totals 28 2 4x25 13 2 '
xOne out when winning run was I
Marshalltown AB. R. H. PO. A- E.
Forsythe, ss . 4
Dalev. lb 4
Ford, rf 3
Lenahan, If 4
Zart, cf 4
Anderson, 3b .... 4
1
10
1
o
1
1
o
9
0
Clemons, 2b 4
Sullivan, c 2
Friedl, p 3
Totals 32
3 8 27 11 0
I
Score by innings:
Ottumwa 200 000 000 2;
Marshalltown 000 002 0013
Two-base hits Corcoran, Clem
ons. Sacrifice hits Croake, Ken
nedy, Sullivan. Stolen bases No
lan (2), Ford, Zart. Double plays
Sullivan to Forsythe. Struck out
By Keil. 7; by Friedl. 8. Bases
on balls Off Keil. 1; off Friedl. 6.
Hit by pitched ball Ford. Wild
pitches Friedl. 2. Umpires Swalm
and Walton. Time of game 2:05.
MOLINE BLANKS
VETERANS, 5-0
Danville, III.. May 13. Moline de
feated the Veterans yesterday aft
ernoon, 5 to 0, the locals being un
able to hit Ulrich opportunely. The
feature was the fielding of Branni
pan and Mack for the Plowboys.
Score:
Moline AB. R. H
E.
0
0
0
0
0
McCue, 3b 4
Mack, lb 4
Thompson, cf 4
Lord, rf 4
Shollenberger, If 4
2 2
0 2
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
Brannigan, ss
0!
McMenamin, 2b
0
0
0
! Marmon, c
Ulrich, p
Totals 35
7 0
Danville
Schaefer. ss
AB. R. H. E.
. 3 0 0 0
Marck, cf 3
Pierce. 2b 4
I White, If 4
' Knisely, rf 4
j Duggan, lb 4
! Mitchell. 3b 4
j GUlenwater, c 4
Brown, p 3
t won- 0 lo o.
Peoria 020 001 0216 S .1
Terre Haute ...010 020 002 5 12 4
I Man
j Talum
Marquard, Ambrose and Yore
Edwards and Coleman.
. Decatur, 4: Rocks, 1. .
Decatur. 111.. Mav 13 Hnitv,o
! ser was in Brand form here yes-
teraay ana ior eieht inninirs riiri
jomic icgioirreu on Anaerson s sac-
1 ; r 1
1 iuc. pt.uit;.
Rockford 000 000 0011 2 1
Decatur 030 001 00 ( 6 0
Boesch, Primely and Rigsby;
Holtzhauser and Novak.
Evan, 2 : Bloomers. 0.
Evansville. Ind., May 13. Evans
ville won a pitchers' battle between
Young of Bloomington and Kroh of
the Evas, 2 to 0. Both hurlers
worked in great style and mowed
them down most of the way. The
locals got to Young in the first and
second for their two runs. Score:
Bloomington ..000 000 000 0 6 1
Evansville .... 110 000 000 2 4 1
Young and Harkins; Kroh and
Patterson.
BURMA BEATS RYAV
Louisville. Joe Burman. Chica
go bantamweight, was awarded the
newspaper decision over Tommy
Kyan or wiiKesport, Fa., In a 12-
J -
QKT.B KAYOS ROBERTS. !
Boston. Harry Greb knocked oat 1
Al Roberts in the sixth round
4
AUTO PAINTING .
First class work Prices right
M. E. HUGHES
(for 15 years foreman Velio
Paint Shop)
In Thiesen Auto Bids..
4431 Fifth Avenue, Rock Island
Padgett His Victim in Six Rounds
vsrf if v
5a
i 77 - V
3I0REIE SCHLAIFER.
AD0UND-c,RCUjrp
A JAMES L. HUGHES A
GAMES TOMORROW.
Rock Island at Waterloo.
Ottumwa at Dubuque.
Cedar Rapids at iiarshalltown.
Three out of four were lost to
Dubuque by one score. Trouble
seems to be in the pitching staff,
which at start looked promising.
The boys swat the ball and all that
but the hurlers seem unable to
maintain the advantage. "Lefty"
Hoeft is the only one holding up
under fire of the first road trip.
However, the Islanders are
still on top, even though shar
ing the honors with Marshall,
town. A change of scenery
should do the boys some good.
Pitchers Arnold Elkins and Paul
Wilson were released yesterday.
Wilson was immediately signed by
Dubuque, although the Mullen crew
hit him hard in the opening game
of the series.
Larry Mullen has also signed
Goodrich, a Kewanee boy, who was
with the Islanders during spring
training. Goodrich is an infielder.
Fillimrham. leftfielder. is play.
Inp a listless frame. Wouldn't
be a bit surprised to hear of
Manager Conzelman replacing
him in the near future, if re
ports from Dubuque are to be
credited.
Preston Gray, the slugging out
fielder and pitcher, delivered in
great style as a pinch hitter yes
terday. Taking Craig's place at
SAYS LEONARD
BRITTON BOUT
NOT ON LEVEL
New Jersey Promoter
Protests Against
Clash.
BY FAIR PLAY.
(Copyright, 1922, by The Argus.)
New York, May 13. These Jer
seymen certainly do know how to
kick up a fuss. Following the an
nouncement that Frank Flournoy
of the Madison Square Garden com
pany had signed up Benny Leonard
and Jack Britton for a battle eith
er at the New York Velodrome,
now in process of construction, or
in New Jersey, on June 1, J. Frank
Black, who controls fighting in the
Jersey City armory, comes to the
bat with a loud howl.
Black says he still holds Jack
Britton's contract for a match with
Leonard in August of last year at
Harrison field. He also holds a
telegram from Billy Gibson. Leon
ard's manager, sent three days
after the Leonard-Kansas match at
Harrison last year, to go ahead
with arrangements.
Everything was set for the fight,
says Black, when the Jersey box
ing authorities advised Black that
the flght was not on the level and
could not be pulled. So ask Black,
if the fight was not on the level
then, why Is it on the level now.
Black says that Velodrome stuff
is all a stall and that at the proper
time it will be announced that the
new structure cannot be finished
by June 1, and that, therefore, the
battle will go to Boyle's Thirty
Acres. Will it? Well, Black is
going to see about that Just now
he is at work Oil a. rirm lni ati.
which will advise sporting editors
as to -what certain men high up
said about the match three months
ago.
The holding that Lewis and Car
pentier did in their battle is the
very thing that is held by English
critics as seriously injuring the
sport of toxing in England. All
the heavyweight bouts held in Lon
don of late have been character
ized by hugging and hanging on. '
I M
; . .
W
i W
bat in the eighth with the bases
loaded, he drove out a triple.
Friedl. the youngster who
pitched Marshalltown to a 3 to
2 victory over Ottumwa yes
terday, is the southpaw who
lost a pitchers' battle to Hoeft
of the Islanders here last Son
day. Yesterday he held the
Cardinals to four hits.
A number of Rock Island fans
are planning on making the trip to
Waterloo tomorrow by automobile.
The Islanders haTe two series
of four games each to play be
fore returning home. After
Waterloo they will po to Mar
shalltown. They will be back
in Kock Island a week from
tomorrow.
I Bat Record of Islanders
1
AB. R. H. TB.
Campbell, c ..11 3 4 4
McEwan, 2b ..45 10 21 27
Elkins, p 2 0 1 0
V'n Goeth'm. p. 5 2 2 3
Gray, rf 41 11 18 32
Newell, cf 42 12 12 19
Radloff. p 17 2 4 8
Norton, ss 30 5 . 8 11
Fillingham, If .42 10 14 19
Jelinek. ss 11 2 3 7
Conzelman. lb. 33 6 7 9
Swenson, 3b ..43 9 8 9
Craig, p 5 0 1 1
Hoeft. p 5 0 0 0
Holden, p 3 0 0 0
.364
.467
.300
.400
.439
.285
.215
.267
.334
I212
.1S4
.200
.000
.000
WITT SETTING
BATTING PAGE
FOR AMERICAN
Chicago, May 13. Lawton Witt,
the former Philadelphia outfielder
who is holding down one of the
garden positions for the New York
Yankees, is at the top of the list
of batters in the American league,
according to figures released today,
which includes games of last Wed
nesday. The averages are of play
ers who have participated in 15 or
more games.
The pitching in the last week has
been to. Witt's liking and he boost
ed his average from .395 to .410.
Catcher Severeid for the Browns
brought his mark trom .319 to .404,
for the runner-up honors. George
Sisler, another member of the
Browns, who topped the hitters a
week ago, slumped a little and is
in third place with a mark of .402,
with Steve O'Neill, star catcher of
the Cleveland Indians, pressing
him with .400.
Other leading batters for 15 or
more games: Clark, Detroit. .393;
Jamieson, Cleveland, .379; Ed Mil
ler, Philadelphia, .373; Gardner,
Cleveland, .3bi; fratt; Boston, .353:
Williams, St. Louis. .348:
Scott,
New York, .348.
George Toporcer of the St. Louis
Cardinals has struck a batting '
stride which promises to make the'!
batters of the National league hus- j
ne iu Keep pace wun nim. He
cracked out nine hits in his last
five games, including last Wednes
day's contest and boosted his av
erage from .360 to .439. Rabbit
Maranville of the Pirates lost one
point, but with an average of .413
is the runner-up to Toporcer, while
George Kelly, the slugging Giant
first baseman, who topped the list
a week ago, lost 49 points and is
resting in the third place with an
even .400.
Other leading batters for 15 or
more games: O'Farrell. Chicago,
.395: T. Griffith, Brooklyn. .392;
Hornsby, St Louis, .390; Bigbee
Pittsburgh. .376: Powell, Boston,
.373: Walker, Philadelphia, .361;
Meusel, New York, J58.
fAUUtll fUl
AWAY IN 6TH
BY SCHLAIFER
Cowboy From Denver Takes Ter
riWe Beatinp From the
Omaha Maulers.
BY J. L. HUGHES.
"Cowboy" Padgett's hopes of ul
timately wresting the welterweight
title from the veteraa nome of Jack
Britton were somewhat blighted
last night.
Morrie Schlaifer, the Omaha
mauler, plastered the Colorado
ranchman all over the Coliseum
ring in the fifth and part of the
sixth rounds. With the cowboy
hanging helpless on the ropes, aft
er a minute of the sixth round had
passed. Referee Ed Smith stopped
the bout.
It was a technical knockout for
Schlaifer, to be sure, but about the
most decisive thing that could have
happened. Padgett was completely
beaten. He clung to the ropes for
support because his brain refused
to tell him the best thing to do was
to drop. The referee stopped the
proceedings just in time. Another
blow from Schlaifer might have
caused the cowboy serious injury
Padgett caused his own undoing.
He tried to make a vaudeville of
the serious business of fighting by
deliberately making Schlaifer ap
pear ludicrous. Frequently in the
first four rounds, Padgett indicated
his jaw with his glove and invited
Schlaifer to try for a target. The
easy going Morrie merely smiled
in return, and for a time the crowd
really felt that at last it was see
ing the superior of the Omaha youth
in action.
Padgett learned in the fifth that
he could carry his funny stuff just
a bit too far. He began to dance
and hop around the ring for the
purpose alone of making Schlaifer
miss blow after blow. The slower
moving Nebraskan for a minute
looked as if he was a mere novice.
But the good-natured smile had left
his face.
In the closing seconds "of the
round, Morrie cornered the swiftly
moving Padgett, and that was the
beginning of the end. Pandemo
nium broke loose with the sudden
change in favor of Schlaifer. The
bell rang but Morrie did not hear.
He continued to reign blow after
blow on the thoroughly chastized
cowboy before the referee could
pull him away.
Padgett came up for the sixth
cautious. But it was too late.
Morrie went after him viciously and
within a minute the excitement was
over.
Stop Semi-Windup.
Semi-windup bout between Jimmy
Dunn of Salt Lake and Tom Carney
cf Peoria was stopped in the fourth
round by Referee Mickey Pierce
for alleged stalling.
Johnny Showers defeated Young
O'Leary of Bridgeport, Conn., in
the second preliminary.
UNNfES TAKE
FINAL OF SET
BY 12-4 SCORE
(Special to The Argus.)
Waterloo, la.. May 13. Cedar
Rapids evened up the Waterloo
series by winning the final game,
12 to 4. Stimson was hit hard and
passed nine men. Lewis' base run
ning and Speas' hitting were fea
tures. Lewis scored four runs and
stole three bases. Speas hit safe
ly three times, one being a triple.
Score:
Cedar Rapids AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Lewis. If 4 4
Church, 2b 5 1
Speas, lb 5 2
Valentine, cf 5 1
Michaels, ss 5 3
Dempsey, rf 3 0
Rye. 3 b 5 0
Maloney, c 3 0
Johnson, p 5 1
2 0 0
3 2 6
3 13 2
1 1
0
2 1
0 0
I Totals 40 12 17
i Waterloo AB. R. H.
26 14 2
PO. A. E.
4 7 1
Simmons, ss 4 2 1
Mattern. If 3 0 1
McDowell, lb 4 0 1
Thomason. cf 4 0 2
Echtermeyer, 2b .4 0 0
Pezdirtz. 3b 4 0 1
Leach, rf 4 1 1
Lubbe. c 3 1 0
Stimson. p. . ..3 0 0
Fergeman, xx ...1 0 0
0 0
2 1
Totals 34 4 7 26 IS 4
x Stimson out, hit by batted ball.
x Michaels out, hit by batted ball.
xx Batted for Stimson in 9th.
Two-base hits Thomason,
Michaels. T'sree-base hits
Church, Speas. Stolen bases
Lewis, 3; Church; Speas, 2. Sac
rifice hits Mattern. Sacrifice
fly Speas. Bases on balls Off
Stimson. 9; off Johnson, 2. Struck
out By Johnson, 9; by Stimson, 1.
Double plays Lubbe to McDowell;
Simmons to Echtermeyer to Mc
Dowell; Speas to Church. Wild
pitches Stimson, 2. Passed ball
Maloney.
WILLIAMS GETS
ELEVENTH HOME
RUN OF SEASON
Philadelphia, Pa., May 13. Six
home runs featured the first game
of the St Louis series yesterdav,
in which the Browns defeated Phil
adelphia. 13 to 4. Kenneth Williams
hit his 11th homer of the season
while Sisler, McManus, Dykes, Mil
ler and Shorten also made circuit
clouts. St. Louis drove Harris and
Moore from the mound, while
Shocker held the locals safely.
League Standings
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY.
W.
L.
4
4
5
6
Pet
.636
.636
545
361
ROCK ISLAD 7
'Marshalltown 7
Cedar llapids 6
Waterloo
Ottnmwa 4
Dubuque 4
THREE-EYE.
W.
Terre Haute 7
Evansrille 6
Decatur 7
Peoria 5
L.
3
3
4
5
Pet.
.700
,667
.636
.500
.444
.400
.333
.300
j Danville
i Bloomington
.4 5
.4 6
'Rockford 3
'Moline 3
6
7-
JTATIOXAL LEAGUE.
t W. L. Pet
INew York .-...18 6 .750
ISt. Louis 14 10 .583
(Pittsburgh 14 10 .5S3
; Chicago 12 11 .522
'Philadelphia 10 11 -476
'Brooklyn ... .'....10 13 .435
Cincinnati 10 li .S7U
Boston . . .' 6 16 -273
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
W. L. Pet
New York 19 8 .704
St. Louis 18 9 .666
Cleveland 13 13 .500
Chicago 11 14 .440
Philadelphia 11 14 .440
Boston 10 13 .435
Detroit 11 15 -423
Washington 10 17 .333
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
Mississippi Yalley.
Cedar Rapids, 12; Waterloo, 4.
Ottumwa, 2; Marshalltown, 3.
Rock Island, 11; Dubuque, 12 (10
innings).
Three-Eye League.
Evansville, 2: Bloomington, 0.
Moline, 5; Danville, 0.
Peoria, 6; Terre -Haute, 4.
Decatur, 4; Rockford, L,
S'ational League.
Philadelphia, 7: Chicago, 4.
Pittsburgh, 5; Boston. 3.
Cincinnati, 7; Brooklyn, 6.
St. Louis, 7: New York, 6.
American League.
Boston, 5; Chicago, 0.
St Louis. 13; Philadelphia, 4.
New York, 10; Detroit. 8.
Washington, 5; Cleveland, 4.
American Association.
St Paul, 7; Toledo, 6.
Kansas City, 19; Louisville, S.
Minneapolis. 10; Columbus, 9.
No other games scheduled.
FRUSH EEISLER
MAY BE BARRED
FROM MICHIGAN
Detroit, Mich., May 13. Danny
Frosh of Cleveland, and Johnny
Reisler of New York, probably will
be suspended from Michigan rings
for a year, according to Charles P.
Campau, boxing commisisoner, as
a result of their alleged failure to
put forth their best efforts in a
bout here last night They were
scheduled to go 10 rounds. The
bout was stopped by Campau's or
der in the second.
Both fighters, It was said, be
came dissatisfied before the fight
with the purses they were signed
up to receive. Few attempts were
made by either man to land a
punch.
PREAKNESS DRAWS
CROWD OF 30,000
Baltimore. Md., May 13. A fast
track is promised for the running
of the Preakness this afternoon at
Pimlico. Local track officials pre
dicted that 30.000 persons would
' x' i n ihj c t Vi 11 riinninc rf tho annual
classic for the $50,000 purse.
Miss Joy, a western entry, ap
pears to be the favorite among the
many horsemen who have been here
several days for the big event.
Thirteen horses are scheduled to
face the barrier.
All the News AH the Tlmej
The Argus.
A year ago
almost unknown
' I "aTar4 ITT f
AVvaa7 a ivauw
m 1 ri
(If I t i CV Z
fx - M sr. ,.M V 1
A sweeping verdict for QUALITY
NO SHUTOUT IN
200 STARTS IS
GAME'S RECORD
Some Pitcher To Win Fame When
He Succeeds in Blanking
Minneapolis.
BY J0H' B. FOSTER.
(Copyright, 1922, by The Argus.)
New York, May 13. The Minne
apolis team, as a team, has played
more than two hundred games
without being shut out. It is a
wonderful performance in baseball
even if the team has not had the
eame players from the time that it
started its scoring run in 1920 un
til the present President Hickey
of the American association ha.s
claimed a world's record for Uie
performance and is pleased wver it
as he is over the fine fight that is
being made in his organization for
its championship.
A request was made of the "Lit
tle Red Book" editor to verify the
world's record claim by Minneap
olis. All sources of information
have been sought and to date noth
ing has been found that will sug
gest the possibility of a mistake
about the record belonging to Min
neapolis. The 200th game was play
ed on Sunday and sincj then Min
neapolis has scored steadily against
its rivals so that the consecutive
performance is still running. '
The odds against an achievement
of this kind are as great aa the
number of games combined with
number of innings and number of
batters who might not have been
able to make runs. Honor and
fame await the first pitcher who
shall be able to stop Minneapolis
from flaunting the flag of the
"Great Unwhitewashed."
Class AA baseball is only a little
removed from major league base
ball as most of the class A A brand
Is manufactured by old leaguers
who have served their apprentice
ship and then their time with class
A clubs.
For that reason the brillianry ot
the performance of the Minneapo
lis club should not be dimmed by
referring to it as a minor leaguo
success. A major leaguo club
would well thank its stars if it
could show something equally
creditable.
FAIR WEATHER
FOR DERBY RUi
Louisville, Ky.. May 13. The
more than 70,000 persons who will
witness the running here this after
noon of the Forty-eighth renewal
of the Kentucky Derby, awoke to
day to find thesky cloudless and
the early sunshine giving promise
of summer heat. A lightning fast
track is assured, barring a sudden
and unforseea change in weather
conditions. The exact minute of
the start of the classic can not be
determined, but the barrier will be
snapped between 5 and 5:15 o'clock,
it is generally agreed, the Jferby
being the fifth race on the card.
REGISTERED GUN
TOURNAMENT A
KEWANEE, MAY 25
' (Special to The Argus )
j Kewanee, 111., May 13. Midland
'Gun club. Galva-Kewanee organ
ization, announc es a regis! ed
j tournament May 25. Shooters from
'all parts of the state will aiteTi'i.
I American trapshooting rules will
govern.
DEPORT DETROIT RFD.
Washington. May 13. Nichoiai
Mansevich, officially qualified ji
delegate in the "soviet of Detroit,"
waa ordered deported.
cigarettes
I t
. i
i. mrr

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